3 New Fujifilm Cameras Coming Soon!

Fujifilm X100F Blog

There’s some exciting news that I want to pass along to you. I don’t want Fuji X Weekly to be completely centered on gear, but I also want to keep you in the know, and so I try to keep things balanced. Anyway, according to Fujirumors.com, there are three new Fujifilm cameras coming this spring. One is the X100V, which will replace the excellent X100F. Another, which might be called X-T3s or X-T5 (in Japan, the number four is bad luck), will replace the not-very-old X-T3. The third is a mystery, but I’m betting that it’s a medium-format GFX camera. Let’s briefly talk about each.

The X100V has been whispered and rumored across the internet for many months. There’s no surprise that it’s coming soon. What we don’t know is how much different it will be from the X100F. It will certainly have the 26-megapixel X-Trans IV sensor and processor, and probably all of the new JPEG tools of the X-Pro3, but beyond that nobody knows. There’s been speculation for some time that Fujifilm redesigned the lens, but I don’t know if that’s true or not. It could be a mild update to the X100F, which makes sense, because if it ain’t broke don’t fix it. Or it could be a moderate overhaul, similar to what Fujifilm did with the X-Pro3. We will know soon enough.

It’s very surprising to me that Fujifilm will be announcing a replacement to the X-T3 so soon. Why? Because the X-T3 will only be one-and-a-half years old when its successor is released. Digital technology advances quickly, but I’m not sure there’s enough to justify a whole new camera in that short amount of time. Is there a new sensor coming? New processor? If not, a simple firmware update would breathe a second wind into what’s already a successful camera model. If there’s nothing big to separate the upcoming model from the current one, I don’t think it will be a huge success because there’s no incentive to buy the new camera. Why pay more for something that’s essentially exactly the same? It will be interesting to see what Fujifilm has up its sleeve on this one.

The third camera is an unknown model, but fuzzy pictures have leaked out of Japan of a new GFX body. It could be a non-IBIS 100-megapixel camera. It could be a 50-megapixel body with IBIS. It could be the first GFX with an X-Trans sensor. Fujifilm has done well in the medium-format market, quickly setting themselves up as the leader, so it would be unsurprising if they added another camera to the GFX lineup.

What other cameras should Fujifilm release in 2020? I’d like to see an X70 but with an X-Trans IV sensor. How about an X-H2? While it was well-received by users, I don’t believe the X-H1 was especially commercially successful, but Fujifilm should have at least one APS-C camera with IBIS for those who want it, so an X-H2 makes sense. That is, unless the X-T3 successor has IBIS. The X-E line is due for an update. Keep the body the same, but put the X-Trans IV sensor inside, and you have an X-E5. Simple enough, right? It will be exciting to see whatever is forthcoming from Fujifilm, and I will do my best on the Fuji X Weekly blog to keep you updated, but hopefully without overwhelming you with gear posts.

5 Tips For Photographing Grand Teton National Park (Without Going Inside The Park)

John Moulton Barn Grand Teton National Park

Barn by the Tetons – Grand Teton NP, WY – Fujifilm X-E1

The Grand Teton National Park in western Wyoming is incredibly beautiful! It’s one of my favorite places. Once you’ve been, you’ll want to return again and again. There’s a magical quality to it, similar to that first view of the Grand Canyon or a misty morning in Yosemite Valley. If you’ve never visited the range, it should be high on your bucket list of places to see! The Grand Tetons are a landscape photographer’s playground, and you definitely need to visit with a camera in hand.

Many people who see the Grand Tetons do so from their car. U.S. Highway 191 runs north and south just east of the mountain, offering spectacular sights the whole length. There are so many amazing views of the range that don’t require an entrance into the park. Yellowstone National Park, which is a little north of the Grand Tetons, is the more popular park of the two, and Jackson Hole has itself become a destination, so a lot of people only see the Teton Range as they travel between the two places. While taking time to go inside the Grand Teton National Park is certainly a worthwhile endeavor, it’s definitely possible to experience exquisite views from outside the gate. Going inside the national park isn’t required for a memorable Teton visit. Below are five tips for photographing the Grand Tetons from outside the park entrance.

The Off Season Is The Best Season

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Tetons From Mormon Row – Grand Teton NP, WY – Fujifilm X-E1

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Avalanche Canyon – Grand Teton NP, WY – Fujifilm X-E1

The Grand Teton National Park can get very crowded. Even though it plays second fiddle to nearby Yellowstone, it still sees a ton of visitors from across the world, especially in the summer months. The winter months are harsh yet could provide some amazing photographic opportunities for those willing to brave the elements, but that’s not when I’d recommend visiting. There are a couple of small windows that are better suited for travel to the Grand Tetons.

The month of May is an excellent time, as the crowds are low since school is still in for many people, and the weather is usually decent enough. The earlier in the month you go, the smaller the crowds will be, but the temperatures will be colder and it still might feel like winter. Mid-May is the sweet spot. Mid-September to mid-October is another excellent time, as most children have returned to school, and the weather is still decent enough. The earlier you go the better the weather, but the larger the crowds will be. Late September is another sweet spot for visiting Grand Teton National Park. If the forecast is for clouds and cold temperatures, it could provide a dramatic environment for your pictures, so it might be preferable over endless sunshine, but be prepared for the conditions.

Early Morning Is Magical

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Mountain & Clouds – Grand Teton NP, WY – Fujifilm X-E1

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Sliver of Illumination – Grand Teton NP, WY – Fujifilm X-E1

While sunset can be a spectacular time to photograph the Grand Tetons, nothing beats sunrise. Since the highway runs on the east side of the range, the sunrise light is often better for photographing the mountains. The early morning “golden hour” is a time that you don’t want to miss. Be sure to arrive well before the official sunrise because the peaks will illuminate before the valley. If you can only be there for either sunrise or sunset (and not both), make sure that it’s sunrise. It’s worth getting up while it’s still dark outside to catch the early morning light on the Teton Range.

Because the sunrise will light the tips of the peaks first, it’s a good plan to begin the day with a telephoto lens. Once more of the landscape has daylight, you can switch to a wide-angle lens if you’d like. The Grand Tetons are a place where you’ll want the option for both telephoto and wide-angle focal lengths, and you’ll probably switch between both frequently.

Mormon Row Is Historic

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Mountain & Mormon How – Grand Teton NP, WY – Fujifilm X-E1

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Barn In The Mountains – Grand Teton NP, WY – Fujifilm X-E1

If you are starting off your photographic journey in the early morning, make the Mormon Row Historic District your first stop. It’s located just north of the Grand Teton National Park entrance on the east side of the highway. The old houses and barns are found about a mile down Antelope Flats Road. The John Moulton Barn is probably the most famous of the historic structures, and surely you’ve seen pictures of it, but there are other buildings that are equally picturesque. Mormon Row is one of the most famous spots at the Grand Tetons for photography, so even during the off season you’re likely to find a crowd with cameras at this place.

Besides the historic buildings, this is a location where you might spot bison, as buffalo commonly graze in the area. You might also see deer or even moose. Always be vigilant around wildlife and keep a safe distance. While the animals are fairly used to crowds of people, they can still be quite dangerous, so don’t get too close.

Schwabacher Landing Is Unbelievable

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Tetons From Schwabacher Landing – Grand Teton NP, WY – Fujifilm X-E1

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Schwabacher Landing Beaver Dam – Grand Teton NP, WY – Fujifilm X-E1

After you are done photographing the barns at Mormon Row, head further north up the highway to Schwabacher Landing. There’s a little road on the west side of the highway that takes you down close to the river, which is calm and reflective thanks to a bunch of beaver dams. Honestly, this place is magical! It can feel unreal. It’s my favorite place at the Grand Tetons, so be sure to stop here.

If there’s a place that you’ll want to use a tripod and really take your time, this is it. Walk around the trails a little. Soak in the scene. Enjoy the incredible nature that’s around you. Don’t be in a hurry to head down the road. Be in the moment, because the moment is amazing. If you are visiting during the off season, there’s a good chance you’ll have the place to yourself. Don’t miss Schwabacher Landing because it’s unbelievably beautiful!

Snake River Overlook Is Iconic

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Snake River Fog – Grand Teton NP, WY – Fujifilm X-E1

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The Tetons and the Snake River, 2017 – Grand Teton NP, WY – Fujifilm X-E1

About 21 miles north of Jackson Hole, Wyoming, is the Snake River Overlook, which is a pullout on the west side of Highway 191. There are a bunch of scenic pullouts along the highway that offer stunning views of the Grand Tetons, but this one is special because Ansel Adams captured one of his most iconic pictures at this spot. What makes it especially great is that you can capture the Snake River winding in front of the incredible mountain range. This is a good place to finish the morning, and, if you can, return for sunset.

As a photographer who has studied Ansel Adams’ work, who has been inspired and influenced by his pictures, there’s something prodigious about being in the exact spot where he captured one of his famous pictures. It’s walking in the footsteps of greatness. It seems particularly appropriate, when you visit the Teton Range, to pay homage to Adams by making your own photographs at the Snake River Overlook.

See also: 5 Tips To Become A Better Photographer

Photoessay: Autumn 2019

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Mountain Autumn – Big Mountain Pass, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 & Fujinon 90mm

Fall might be my favorite season, but it’s always too short. Summer often overstays its welcome. Winter usually comes too quickly. Autumn gets squeezed in the middle. You have to be quick, because it’s fleeting. It comes and goes so quickly! If you don’t take time to see and experience it, you’ll flat out miss it, and you’ll have to wait another year for fall to return.

Autumn is the season of change. The weather changes. The colors of the leaves change. The food we eat and coffee we drink change (if you want them to). There’s beauty in change, and uncertainty. It ends cold and gloomy as winter budges in, but before it does autumn puts on a spectacular show. Autumn can be breathtakingly beautiful!

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Apple Harvest – Logan, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 & Fujinon 90mm

The photographs in this post were captured during the 2019 fall season. Many of them I’ve yet to share on the Fuji X Weekly blog, but you’ve probably seen a few of them in other articles. Some of the pictures are from early autumn when the weather was still warm and the leaves only beginning to change colors. Others are from late fall when the temperatures dipped cold and the scene turned drab. Still others were captured during the height of vibrant colors, which unfortunately didn’t last very long, yet long enough for me to get a few exposures made.

I used a Fujifilm X-T30, which is a great all-around camera, for all of these pictures. A number of different lenses were attached to it, depending on the image. I used a Fujinon 35mm, a Fujinon 90mm, a Fujinon 50-230mm, a Rokinon 12mm, an Industar 69, and an Asahi Super-Takumar 135mm. There’s a number of different film simulation recipes that I used, including Velvia, Kodacolor, Eterna, “Classic Negative” and possibly another one, I’m not certain. I hope that you enjoy!

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Leaves of Autumn – Riverdale, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 & Fujinon 35mm f/2

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Bent Trunk – Bountiful, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 & Fujinon 35mm f/2

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Icy Leaf – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 & Industar 69

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Changing Nature – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 & Fujinon 35mm f/2

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Tree Star – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 & Rokinon 12mm

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Autumn Sun At Ogden Station – Ogden, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 & Rokinon 12mm

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Drab Autumn Drive – Bountiful, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 & Fujinon 35mm f/2

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Flowing Creek – Bountiful, Utah – Fujifilm X-T30 & Fujinon 35mm f/2

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Flowing Fall – Bountiful, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 & Asahi Super-Takumar 135mm

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Gradations of Color – Big Mountain Pass, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 & Fujinon 90mm

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Change Begins – Big Mountain Pass, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 & Fujinon 90mm

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Winter Kissed Autumn – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 & Fujinon 50-230mm

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Mountainside Autumn – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 & Fujinon 50-230mm

See also:
5 Tips For Fall Foliage Photography
Zion In Autumn

New Project: Farmington Bay

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Crane Reflection – Farmington Bay, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

The Farmington Bay Waterfowl Management Area is a landscape and wildlife photographic treasure trove in Farmington, Utah. I’ve lived in the Salt Lake City area for almost four years now, and only learned of this place last week. I’ve passed by it thousands of times. I’ve seen it on many occasions without knowing what it was that I was looking at. I had no idea that it was accessible, and I’m so glad that I finally found it!

What is the Farmington Bay Waterfowl Management Area? To be honest, I’m not entirely certain. There’s a small museum and signs along the road that explain it, but I have yet to actually stop and learn anything. Educating myself is pretty high on my to-do list. What I do know is that Farmington Bay is a bay in the Great Salt Lake, and it is where Farmington Creek empties into the lake. The area where the creek approaches the lake is a marshy wetland with several ponds and small lakes. The Great Salt Lake is a massive salt water lake, but access to it is surprisingly limited. My favorite place to see it is Antelope Island State Park, which is a fascinating spot but not particularly convenient for me. There are a handful of other locations that provide access to the Great Salt Lake, but not many. Farmington Bay is very convenient for me, so that’s a huge plus, as I’ll be able to stop by often. There are several miles of roads (mostly dirt, but well maintained) that take you into the marshy bay, and several miles of trails (again, well maintained) that go even further. I’ve only been to the end of the road and back. The purpose of the Farmington Bay Waterfowl Management Area is, as far as I can tell, to provide a refuge for migrating birds, to protect the marshland, and to provide access for outdoor enthusiasts.

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Farmington Bay in January – Farmington Bay, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

My new project that I begun 2020 with is to photograph Farmington Bay for a year. I want to capture this location under different light, different weather, and different seasons. I want to intimately immerse myself into the environment, so that I can document it as only I can. My goal is to photograph Farmington Bay no less than once every four weeks for the entirety of 2020. I will likely drop by more frequently–if I can make it once per week that would be great–but at a minimum it will be once every four weeks. If I over-commit then I’ll end up abandoning the project before it’s complete. Perhaps if everything goes well this project could turn into an exhibit or book, but for now it’s for my own enjoyment and skill enhancement. While I’ve done plenty of landscape photography over the decades, I’ve done very little wildlife photography. This project will allow me to stretch my skills and hopefully improve my photography.

I invite you to follow along as I embark on this journey. I will be posting periodic updates on the Fuji X Weekly blog. I’ll be using Fujifilm cameras and lenses throughout this project, such as my Fujifilm X-T30. The lenses that I used for these pictures are a Fujinon 90mm, Fujinon 50-230mm and Rokinon 12mm. This post contains pictures from my first outing. I hope that you enjoy these photographs of Farmington Bay!

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Winter Trees Over Farmington Creek – Farmington Bay, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Tree Canopy Over Farmington Creek – Farmington Bay, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Winter Creek – Farmington Bay, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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On Thin Ice – Farmington Bay, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Hidden Wasatch Reflection – Farmington Bay, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Frary Peak From Farmington – Farmington Bay, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Salt Lake Shorebird Sign – Farmington Bay, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Water Under The Bridge – Famington Bay, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Turbulent Water – Farmington Bay, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Hiding – Farmington Bay, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Designated Parking – Farmington Bay, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Ice Water Reeds – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Cold Cranes – Farmington Bay, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Birds of a Feather Huddle Together – Farmington Bay, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

Part 2

10 Most Popular Film Simulation Recipes of 2019


Arizona Highways Magazine

Shot on a Fujifilm X-T30 using my Vintage Kodachrome film simulation recipe.

It’s the new year, and that means reviewing last year, and making “top lists” of everything under the sun from the previous 12 months on this blog. Most popular posts. Top favorite pictures. You get the idea. That’s what I’ve done in the past, and besides, everyone else is doing it. Actually, this article will be the only one on Fuji X Weekly this January. Well, I’m not promising, as I reserve the right to change my mind, but for now, my only top list will be this post, where I will share the most popular film simulation recipes for Fujifilm cameras from 2019.

I determined which film simulation recipes were the most popular by the number of page views each one received last year. Which article was seen the most during 2019 is what determines the popularity for the purpose of this post. That doesn’t mean more people are using it or more images were captured with it, just that more people viewed the recipe. Also, not every film simulation recipe was around the whole year. Some were made not very long ago and are at a strong disadvantage to make this list.

I was surprised by how many views a few of these film simulation recipes had. The top five were expected, but some of the others were not. Let me know in the comments which one is your favorite! Also, let me know which recipe that didn’t make this list is your favorite. I hope that your holidays were wonderful. May 2020 be a fantastic year for you!

#10. Cinestill 800T
#9. X100F “Eterna”
#8. Ektar 100
#7. Eterna
#6. Fujicolor Superia 800
#5. Kodachrome 64
#4. Kodak Portra 400
#3. Classic Chrome
#2. Vintage Kodachrome
#1. Kodachrome II

Fujifilm X100F Review Blog

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