Fujifilm X100V Film Simulation Recipe: Ilford Pan F Plus 50

Santa’s Bed – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X100V – “Ilford Pan F Plus 50”

Anders Lindborg (Instagram) sent me a black-and-white film simulation recipe to try, which he modeled after Ilford Pan F Plus 50 film. Anders, you might recall, created the Kodak Tri-X 400 recipe, teamed with Thomas Schwab to create the Kodak T-Max 400 recipe, made seven Fujicolor Pro 160NS recipes, created seven Fujicolor Pro 400H recipes, and made an important D-Range Priority discovery. His contributions to the Fujifilm community are significant! The Kodak Tri-X 400 recipe is a favorite of mine that I use frequently, so I’m personally very grateful to Anders for his hard work on this recipe and all the others.

And hard work it was! Anders sent me a lengthy note on his process to create this recipe, and I want to share with you a short snippet just so you get an idea of the effort put into this. “I checked the spectrum sensitivity chart and looked for any significant bumps in the wavelengths,” he wrote. “For the largest bump, I checked what color it represents to try to match it as close as possible with the white balance shift. This recreated the bump in the recipe to make the simulation a bit extra sensitive to that specific color.” This was point four of seven in his process, and shows the kind of effort that can go into creating film simulation recipes.

Ilford Pan F 50 Plus is a low-ISO, contrasty, sharp, detailed, fine-grain, black-and-white negative film. It has the punchiness of a mid-ISO film, but is very clean, and can be printed large and still appear crisp and fine-detailed. Of course, how a film is exposed, developed, scanned and/or printed will affect the exact aesthetic. Ilford Pan F 50 Plus is one of the best black-and-white films you can buy today, and this recipe is a pretty darn good facsimile of it.

Sugar House Traffic District – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X100V – “Ilford Pan F Plus 50”

“This one needs some care,” Anders wrote of this recipe, “and really soft light is recommended for portraits, but the reward is wonderful! If you’re looking for drama, this is it. Great in studio where lighting can be controlled, but can sometimes also work nicely for certain kinds of street photography. High contrast with a really classic black and white look, emphasis on the black.”

I modified Anders recipe a little. His version calls for Shadows to be +2 and Clarity set to 0, but he says that +2 Shadow can sometimes be too strong, and that +1 is not always strong enough, but +1.5 (for those cameras that are capable) is probably just right. I wanted to use this recipe on my Fujifilm X100V, which isn’t capable of .5 Shadow adjustments, so I set Shadow to +1 and Clarity to +2 (to increase the contrast, similar to what +1.5 Shadow might be)… alternatively, Shadow +2 and Clarity -2 is an option, too, but I didn’t like it quite as much. Because of Clarity, I decreased Sharpening to 0 from +1 (what the original recipe calls for). Instead of -3, I set Noise Reduction to -4, which is my preference. If you want to use Anders full recipe, set Shadow to +2 (or +1.5 if your camera is capable), Clarity to 0, Sharpness to +1, and Noise Reduction to -3. Otherwise, you’ll find my slightly modified version below. This recipe is compatible with the Fujifilm X-Pro3, X100V, X-T4, X-S10, X-E4 and X-T30 II cameras.

Monochrome
Dynamic Range: DR100
Highlight: 0
Shadow: +1
Noise Reduction: -4
Sharpening: 0
Clarity: +2
Grain Effect: Weak, Large 
Color Chrome Effect: Off
Color Chrome Effect Blue: Off
White Balance: Daylight, +1 Red & -6 Blue
ISO: Auto, up to ISO 6400 (for best results, try to limit the ISO to 1600 and lower when able)
Exposure Compensation: -1/3 to +1/3 (typically)

Example photographs, all camera-made JPEGs using this “Ilford Pan F Plus 50” film simulation recipe on my Fujifilm X100V:

Item Number – Bountiful, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Snow on Seat – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Wheelchair Shopping – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Face Masks For Everyone – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Can, Baskets & Baby Seats – Bountiful, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Watching Her Brothers Catch Carp – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Boots – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Salty Pavement – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Street Puddle – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X100V
To Cross – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Open – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Central Book Exchange – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Parley’s Creek in Winter – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X100V

Find this film simulation recipes and over 200 more on the Fuji X Weekly — Film Recipes App!

7 comments

  1. Thomas Schwab · January 2

    Anders! This is one of my Black and White favorite recipes, now!
    Beautiful and useful for many purposes. Thank you very much for sharing! 🙏🏽🙏🏽🙏🏽
    BR Thomas

    Liked by 2 people

  2. milt · January 3

    really wow.. ritchie,,, i don’t know why i’m asking since much of this i dont know what it means. maybe it’s the aquarian in me that needs to know,,,,what is the prurpose of adjusting chrome effect, chrome effect blue, and wb (settings i associate with color),,,FOR A B/W SHOT?

    Liked by 1 person

    • Ritchie Roesch · January 3

      CCEB doesn’t affect B&W. Some people will tell you that CCE doesn’t affect B&W, but I think it makes greens and reds a hair darker grey (Strong vs Off), but it’s barely noticeable when closely studying side-by-side (maybe it’s just my brain playing tricks on me, who knows–if it does it’s barely perceivable, and I do believe I can perceive it). But White Balance can have a big affect. I explored it a little here:
      https://fujixweekly.com/2018/11/12/using-white-balance-shift-for-black-white/
      You can also see it in this recipe:
      https://fujixweekly.com/2020/08/11/fujifilm-x100v-film-simulation-recipe-black-white-infrared/

      Like

      • milt · January 3

        a pretty popular photographer friend of mine used to print his b/w’s “in color” (i hope i’m getting this right). that is, instead of printing on regular b/w paper with a b/w process he actually printed the b/w negatives on color paper using a color process. he said, and i’m paraphrasing, he felt the grey scale had more depth.

        i think i got that right…is that kinda what you mean? and so you believe tinkering with cceb helps in digital imagery

        Liked by 1 person

      • Ritchie Roesch · January 3

        Not really. Color Chrome FX Blue doesn’t affect Acros or Monochrome whatsoever. Color Chrome Effect is debatable if it extremely subtly deepens the grey of red and green. White Balance can significantly change how different colors are rendered in grey, kind of like (but not exactly the same as) using color filters in b&w film photography.

        Like

  3. Matt · April 5

    Curious if you are using monochrome with one of the built-in filters? Monochrome standard, Yellow, Red, or Green? Thanks.

    Liked by 1 person

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