Watch: SOOC Season 2 Episode 1 — Kodak Gold 200 & Kodak Tri-X 400!

Season 2 of SOOC kicked off this morning! You can watch it (above) if you missed it. It was a really good show full of fun and surprises, so you’ll want to hit play. In our usual fashion, the broadcast went a little long, but I hope you find it well worth your time.

For those who don’t know, SOOC is a monthly live video series, with each episode focused on a different Film Simulation Recipe. It is a collaboration between Tame Your Fujifilm (Fujifilm X-Photographer Nathalie Boucry) and Fuji X Weekly (Ritchie Roesch). SOOC is a fun and educational experience where we not only talk about Fujifilm camera settings, but also answer your questions and give tips and tricks. Basically, we’re trying to help you master your Fujifilm camera, with a focus on simplifying your photographic workflow.

In Episode 01 of Season 02, among other things, we conclude our discussion (from Season 01) of the Kodak Gold 200 Film Simulation Recipe, and introduce the next recipe-of-the-month: Kodak Tri-X 400. We had a special guest, Anders Lindborg—it was fun talking shop with him, and seeing his wonderful photographs. Thanks, Anders, for joining us live! To submit pictures captured with the Kodak Tri-X 400 Film Simulation Recipe for Episode 02, click here.

Something else to note: we had our first Pre-Show, that was a more informal experience. You can watch it (above) if you missed it. The Pre-Show will be a regular feature, so if you have a few minutes before a broadcast, be sure to join in!

Thank you to everyone who watched, to everyone who participated, and for all who submitted pictures. You all are the best! Episode 02, where we’ll conclude Kodak Tri-X 400 and introduce the next recipe-of-the-month (Kodak Vision3 250D), will be April 14th, so mark your calendars now! See you then!

Click here to see previous episodes!

Fujifilm X-Trans IV Film Simulation Recipe: Ilford HP5 Plus 400

Haystack Driftwood – Cannon Beach, OR – Fujifilm X100V – “Ilford HP5 Plus 400”

This new film simulation recipe comes from Anders Lindborg (Instagram). Anders is the one who created the Kodak Tri-X 400 recipeIlford Pan F Plus 50 recipe, Kodak Gold v2seven Fujicolor Pro 160NS recipesseven Fujicolor Pro 400H recipes, and made an important D-Range Priority discovery. So I know that you’ll love this one, too! He was kind enough to share it with me and allow me to share it with all of you—thank you, Anders!

Anders sent me a lengthy note on his process to create this recipe, and I want to share with you a short snippet just so you get an idea of the effort put into this. “I checked the spectrum sensitivity chart and looked for any significant bumps in the wavelengths,” he wrote. “For the largest bump, I checked what color it represents to try to match it as close as possible with the white balance shift. This recreated the bump in the recipe to make the simulation a bit extra sensitive to that specific color.” This was point four of seven in his process, and shows the kind of effort that can go into creating Film Simulation Recipes.

Specifically about this recipe, Anders noted, “Middle gray is the game here. Soft highlights and things disappearing into deep dark shadows, but never as black as Tri-X. Great for all day shooting in just about any weather. Looks totally awesome on winter shots!” I can add that it looks great on both sunny days and rainy days, too. I think it does especially well in moderate and high contrast situations.

Footbridge & Falls – Multnomah Falls, OR – Fujifilm X100V – “Ilford HP5 Plus 400”

Ilford began the Hypersensitive Panchromatic (HP) series in 1931. HP5 Plus 400 is the latest version, released in 1989, and still available today. This is a classic black-and-white film stock that has stood the test of time, and Anders did a great job mimicking it on Fujifilm cameras. This recipe is intended for use on the X-Pro3, X100V, X-T4, X-S10, X-E4, and X-T30 II cameras; however, for the X-T3 and X-T30, as well as X-Trans III cameras, simply ignore Grain size, and this recipe is compatible with those cameras, so anyone with an X-Trans III or IV camera can use this.

A side note: this recipe is different than my old Ilford HP5 Plus and Ilford HP5 Push Process recipes, which I still quite like, and are both excellent in low and mid contrast situations. Try those or Anders’ version—or all three if you are feeling adventurous!

Monochrome
Dynamic Range: DR400
Highlight: -1
Shadow: +1
Noise Reduction: -4
Sharpness: -2
Clarity: 0
Grain Effect: Strong, Large 
Color Chrome Effect: Off
Color Chrome Effect Blue: Off
White Balance: Daylight, +1 Red & -8 Blue
ISO: Auto, up to ISO 6400
Exposure Compensation: -2/3 to +2/3 (typically)

Example photographs, all camera-made JPEGs using this “Ilford HP5 Plus 400” Film Simulation Recipe on my Fujifilm X100V:

Horsetail Falls From Bridge – Columbia River Gorge, OR – Fujifilm X100V
Horsetail Falls – Columbia River Gorge, OR – Fujifilm X100V
Upper Falls – Multnomah Falls, OR – Fujifilm X100V
36 CFR 261.53(e) – Multnomah Falls, OR – Fujifilm X100V
Use Caution For Slipping Bandits – Multnomah Falls, OR – Fujifilm X100V
No Cars – Astoria, OR – Fujifilm X100V
Two Elk in a Yard – Warrenton, OR – Fujifilm X100V
Spiral Stairs – Fort Stevens SP, OR – Fujifilm X100V
Old Fireplace – Fort Stevens SP, OR – Fujifilm X100V
Stairs in the Forest – Fort Stevens SP, OR – Fujifilm X100V
Astoria & Columbia River – Astoria, OR – Fujifilm X100V
Two Ships in the Columbia River – Astoria, OR – Fujifilm X100V
Tetons, As Seen By Oneskies – Grand Teton NP, WY – Fujifilm X100V
South Jetty – Fort Stevens SP, OR – Fujifilm X100V
Pointing To The Pacific – Cannon Beach, OR – Fujifilm X100V
Haystack Sticks – Cannon Beach, OR – Fujifilm X100V

Find this film simulation recipes and over 200 more on the Fuji X Weekly — Film Recipes App!

Fujifilm X-Trans IV Film Simulation Recipe: Kodak Gold v2

Grass and Frozen Pond – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V – “Kodak Gold v2”

This new film simulation recipe comes from Anders Lindborg (Instagram). Anders is the one who created the Kodak Tri-X 400 recipe, Ilford Pan F Plus 50 recipeseven Fujicolor Pro 160NS recipes, seven Fujicolor Pro 400H recipes, and made an important D-Range Priority discovery. So I know that you’ll love this one, too! He was kind enough to share it with me and allow me to share it with all of you—thank you, Anders!

Anders began by looking at some old prints he has, which were captured on Kodak Gold 200 film. He noticed that these prints looked a little different than my Kodak Gold 200 recipe, but one film can have many different looks depending on how it was shot, developed, printed and/or scanned, or even which generation of the emulsion you’re viewing. This recipe mimics the aesthetic of his prints, but he noticed that it also matches many examples of Gold 200 that he found online.

Kids in a Tree – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V – “Kodak Gold v2”

This recipe is compatible with the Fujifilm X-Pro3, X100V, X-T4, X-S10, X-E4, and X-T30 II cameras. To make this recipe work on the X-T3 and X-T30, Anders suggests using Grain Strong, White Balance 5900K (with the same shift), and ignoring Clarity—I suggest that you consider using a weak diffusion filter, such as 1/8 Black Pro Mist or 5% CineBloom, in leu of Clarity. In addition, for X-Trans III, ignore Color Chrome Effect. The results will be slightly different, but nearly the same. Anders suggests trying this recipe with a 3200K white balance for night photography.

Classic Chrome
Dynamic Range: DR200
Highlight: 0
Shadow: -1
Color: -1
Noise Reduction: -4
Sharpness: -1
Clarity: -2
Grain Effect: Strong, Large
Color Chrome Effect: Weak
Color Chrome Effect Blue: Off
White Balance: 5800K, +2 Red & +4 Blue
ISO: Auto, up to ISO 6400
Exposure Compensation: 0 to +2/3 (typically)

Example photographs, all camera-made JPEGs using this new Kodak Gold v2 film simulation recipe on my Fujifilm X100V:

Moon Behind Pine – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Moon Behind Cattails – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Safe Zone – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Makeshift Gate – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Wood Post – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Trail to Visitors Center – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Green Leaves in January – Farmington UT – Fujifilm X100V
Hanging Red Berries in Winter – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Berries and Barren Branches – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Brown Reeds – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Jo in a Tree – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Jo Under The Tennis Net – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Back Alley – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

Find this film simulation recipes and over 200 more on the Fuji X Weekly — Film Recipes App!

Fujifilm X100V Film Simulation Recipe: Ilford Pan F Plus 50

Santa’s Bed – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X100V – “Ilford Pan F Plus 50”

Anders Lindborg (Instagram) sent me a black-and-white film simulation recipe to try, which he modeled after Ilford Pan F Plus 50 film. Anders, you might recall, created the Kodak Tri-X 400 recipe, teamed with Thomas Schwab to create the Kodak T-Max 400 recipe, made seven Fujicolor Pro 160NS recipes, created seven Fujicolor Pro 400H recipes, and made an important D-Range Priority discovery. His contributions to the Fujifilm community are significant! The Kodak Tri-X 400 recipe is a favorite of mine that I use frequently, so I’m personally very grateful to Anders for his hard work on this recipe and all the others.

And hard work it was! Anders sent me a lengthy note on his process to create this recipe, and I want to share with you a short snippet just so you get an idea of the effort put into this. “I checked the spectrum sensitivity chart and looked for any significant bumps in the wavelengths,” he wrote. “For the largest bump, I checked what color it represents to try to match it as close as possible with the white balance shift. This recreated the bump in the recipe to make the simulation a bit extra sensitive to that specific color.” This was point four of seven in his process, and shows the kind of effort that can go into creating film simulation recipes.

Ilford Pan F 50 Plus is a low-ISO, contrasty, sharp, detailed, fine-grain, black-and-white negative film. It has the punchiness of a mid-ISO film, but is very clean, and can be printed large and still appear crisp and fine-detailed. Of course, how a film is exposed, developed, scanned and/or printed will affect the exact aesthetic. Ilford Pan F 50 Plus is one of the best black-and-white films you can buy today, and this recipe is a pretty darn good facsimile of it.

Sugar House Traffic District – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X100V – “Ilford Pan F Plus 50”

“This one needs some care,” Anders wrote of this recipe, “and really soft light is recommended for portraits, but the reward is wonderful! If you’re looking for drama, this is it. Great in studio where lighting can be controlled, but can sometimes also work nicely for certain kinds of street photography. High contrast with a really classic black and white look, emphasis on the black.”

I modified Anders recipe a little. His version calls for Shadows to be +2 and Clarity set to 0, but he says that +2 Shadow can sometimes be too strong, and that +1 is not always strong enough, but +1.5 (for those cameras that are capable) is probably just right. I wanted to use this recipe on my Fujifilm X100V, which isn’t capable of .5 Shadow adjustments, so I set Shadow to +1 and Clarity to +2 (to increase the contrast, similar to what +1.5 Shadow might be)… alternatively, Shadow +2 and Clarity -2 is an option, too, but I didn’t like it quite as much. Because of Clarity, I decreased Sharpening to 0 from +1 (what the original recipe calls for). Instead of -3, I set Noise Reduction to -4, which is my preference. If you want to use Anders full recipe, set Shadow to +2 (or +1.5 if your camera is capable), Clarity to 0, Sharpness to +1, and Noise Reduction to -3. Otherwise, you’ll find my slightly modified version below. This recipe is compatible with the Fujifilm X-Pro3, X100V, X-T4, X-S10, X-E4 and X-T30 II cameras.

Monochrome
Dynamic Range: DR100
Highlight: 0
Shadow: +1
Noise Reduction: -4
Sharpening: 0
Clarity: +2
Grain Effect: Weak, Large 
Color Chrome Effect: Off
Color Chrome Effect Blue: Off
White Balance: Daylight, +1 Red & -6 Blue
ISO: Auto, up to ISO 6400 (for best results, try to limit the ISO to 1600 and lower when able)
Exposure Compensation: -1/3 to +1/3 (typically)

Example photographs, all camera-made JPEGs using this “Ilford Pan F Plus 50” film simulation recipe on my Fujifilm X100V:

Item Number – Bountiful, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Snow on Seat – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Wheelchair Shopping – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Face Masks For Everyone – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Can, Baskets & Baby Seats – Bountiful, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Watching Her Brothers Catch Carp – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Boots – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Salty Pavement – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Street Puddle – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X100V
To Cross – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Open – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Central Book Exchange – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Parley’s Creek in Winter – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X100V

Find this film simulation recipes and over 200 more on the Fuji X Weekly — Film Recipes App!

The Fuji X Weekly Story

Hair & Lips – Ogden, UT – Fujifilm X100F – “Classic Chrome” recipe – 2017

“What exactly is Fuji X Weekly?”
“What is your website about?”
“What is it that you do?”

I get these questions often. People I meet ask them. Photographers just trying to understand what this thing they keep hearing about ask them. Family and friends ask them. While these are common and seemingly straightforward inquiries, giving a good answer has not been easy. I’ve struggled with this, and I’ve concluded that I haven’t considered enough what the Fuji X Weekly story is. Why did I create this website? What has it evolved into? Why do you come here? This article is my attempt at articulating answers to these questions.

In the very first post on the Fuji X Weekly blog I stated, “I love to photograph and I love to write. Those are two things that I truly enjoy. So I decided to do just that, without profit or self-promotion as a driving force. If nobody ever reads this, I’m OK with that. I’m not looking for money or attention. I’m publishing this because that’s what I want to do.” I then added, “I’ve called this blog Fuji X Weekly because I plan to publish one article per week. Sometimes I might write more than that, sometimes less. The topic of choice is Fujifilm X cameras, specifically my Fujifilm X100F that I purchased four weeks ago. I’ll be talking about one camera. I’ll be writing about my personal experiences with this one camera. And that’s it! However, I purposely left the name of this site, Fuji X Weekly, a little more ambiguous in case that I decide in the future to expand to include other cameras. I didn’t want to make something that might become too limiting or obsolete in a few years.” I did eventually change the website to be all-things-Fujifilm instead of just about the X100F.

That’s a good origin story description, even if it is a little lengthy. I would summarize it like this: “I started Fuji X Weekly because I love to photograph and write, and I desired to share my journey with whoever wanted to come along for the ride, even if that was no one. Originally it was exclusively about the Fujifilm X100F camera, but I was open to someday expand it to Fujifilm in general, which eventually did happen. I committed to publishing at least one article per week.”

That’s how it began, but what is Fuji X Weekly today? How did it get there? Where is it going?

Onaqui Horses – Dugway, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 – “Vintage Kodachrome” recipe – 2019

I started Fuji X Weekly more than four years ago, and a lot has happened in the meantime. Early on I began to publish film simulation recipes—the first two were Acros and Classic Chrome. I didn’t realize the significance of this—in fact, I don’t even remember why I called them “recipes” (Did I coin it? Did I see someone else use it first? Honestly, I have no idea. However it came to be, the term has unquestionably become a part of the Fujifilm lexicon!)—by far these were the articles that people came to the website for. People wanted JPEG settings for their Fujifilm cameras. My fifth film simulation recipe, which I published nearly four years ago, was Vintage Kodachrome. To this day it is a fan-favorite—so far it is the fourth most viewed recipe in 2021, and stands as the number one most viewed recipe of all-time. It was a breakthrough for me because I realized that I could mimic specific films and aesthetics by being more bold and creative with the settings. This recipe required some settings adjustments that most people would not have dared to try on their own because they were pretty extreme, but the results were interesting, similar to the first era of Kodachrome film.

I began more-and-more to model new recipes after specific films and development processes. I’ve now published over 175 film simulation recipes, many of them modeled after film stocks. How was I able to do this?

The Fuji X Weekly story actually goes all the way back to the summer of 1998—the summer between high school and college—when I travelled to Vermont with some friends. I borrowed my dad’s 35mm Sears SLR and shot a whole bunch of rolls of film. When I returned home, I excitedly dropped off the film at a one-hour lab, and, when they were developed, the pictures were… absolutely awful! Many were blurry, most were significantly overexposed or underexposed (a difficult feat considering the exposure latitude of many films), and poorly composed. I was so disappointed. That fall, when I enrolled in college, I chose Photography 101 as an elective, because I wanted to be able to capture a decent picture. It wasn’t for a love of the camera that I enrolled, but out of determination born from failure; however, I discovered very quickly that I loved photography.

For the next year-and-a-half you’d often find me in the darkroom, with the strong scent of photographic chemicals in the air, developing and printing my pictures. I remember one day heading into the lab before sunrise and not finishing until after sunset—I had missed the entire daylight portion of the day! If I wasn’t in the darkroom, or in class, or at one of my two jobs, or doing homework, I was out with my camera, a Canon AE-1. That was my favorite part of photography: out on some adventure in search of something interesting to photograph. When I didn’t have access to a darkroom, I most often shot slides, which I could send off to a lab and get consistent results back.

Night Train – Plano, TX – Canon AE-1 & Kodachrome 64 – 1999

As is common in life, I was thrown a couple of curve balls, and I didn’t pursue photography as a career. I had an opportunity to work for JCPenney as a catalog photographer, which I turned down because I lacked the confidence in my own abilities and didn’t have the courage to take the risk. I went a whole different direction with my career, and photography was “just a hobby” for a long time. I continued to shoot film, resisting the move to digital because I didn’t like how digital photographs looked. I remember very proudly being able to tell if a picture was captured on film or digitally just by looking at it. Slowly it became harder and harder to tell, but I could still tell. It wasn’t until 2009 that I got my first digital camera, and I felt like I had to learn photography all over again because it was so much different.

I shot both film and digital for awhile. I preferred how film looked, but digital was more consistent, convenient, and cheaper (at least once the initial investment was made). I jumped from brand-to-brand, trying to find one that I liked, but was never completely happy with any. First I tried Pentax (because by this time I was shooting with a Pentax film camera, and those lenses were compatible with the digital camera), then Samsung (remember when they made interchangeable-lens mirrorless cameras?), then Sigma (oh, the much loved and hated Foveon sensor!), then Nikon, then Sony (with a Panasonic briefly thrown in for good measure), and finally Fujifilm. My first Fujifilm camera was an X-E1, which I loved, although a year later it was replaced by an X100F, which I loved even more!

When I setup my Fujifilm X-E1, I chose RAW+JPEG, but mostly used the RAW files. Occasionally I preferred the camera-made JPEGs. My JPEG settings were the factory defaults (I didn’t bother to adjust them), yet the results were sometimes quite nice. In those cases I’d use the JPEG over the RAW, and not bother with post-processing, or (perhaps more commonly) I would lightly edit the JPEGs. I began to realize during this time that Fujifilm’s JPEGs were higher quality than the other brands that I’d used, although I wasn’t completely convinced yet that I could rely on out-of-camera JPEGs. When I setup my X100F, I also chose RAW+JPEG, and I quickly discovered that the JPEGs were even better than those from the X-E1. The epiphany that I could rely on JPEGs (and not fiddle with RAW anymore) came after I edited some RAW files, and when I compared them to the straight-out-of-camera JPEGs they were very similar. My first thought was, “Why am I spending all this time editing RAW files only to get the same look as the JPEGs?” My second thought was, “If I adjust the JPEG settings, can I get even closer to my edited RAW files?” The first two recipes, Acros and Classic Chrome, came from this. They were my attempts to get my out-of-camera JPEGs to more closely match my edited RAW files.

Snake River Fog – Grand Teton NP, WY – Fujifilm X-E1 – Silver Efex – 2017

The advantages of shooting JPEGs are time, simplicity, and enjoyment. Because I was no longer editing RAW pictures, I suddenly had a lot more time. My rule-of-thumb was that every hour of photographing would require two-to-three hours of post-processing. With JPEGs I could “post-process” hours of photography in minutes. My workflow suddenly evolved into uploading the pictures from the camera to my iPhone, cropping and/or making very minor adjustments if needed (not usually needed) using the Photos App, and uploading the pictures to the Cloud for storage. That’s it. My production noticeably increased while simultaneously I had more time to spend with family and friends. It’s amazing how many hours and hours I had been spending for years in front of a computer monitor fiddling with pictures, and now I didn’t need to. This had a profound impact on my life, and that’s not hyperbole. The simplicity of this approach was freeing! I no longer needed RAW editing software, or any photo editing software, or even a computer if I didn’t want to have one. The process was more analog-like—more reminiscent of my film days—and I found it to be more enjoyable. Photography became even more fun for me! I began to realize that these JPEG settings were helping a lot of other people in the same ways that they were helping me. My recipes allowed them to save time, simplify their process, and make photography more enjoyable for them.

I would summarize this (very long) portion of the Fuji X Weekly story like this: “I used my experience as a film photographer to create JPEG settings, called film simulation recipes, that often mimic film stocks. These settings save time, simplify the photographic process, and make capturing pictures even more enjoyable.”

Photographers who were using these recipes began to spread the word—the popularity of Fuji X Weekly grew very organically. Experts would probably tell you that, from the very beginning, I did everything wrong to grow the audience. I did almost nothing—barely anything at all—for the first three years to promote the website. It was others, on their own accord, spreading the word to the photography community, because these recipes made a difference to their photography. There were just over one million page-views over the first two years combined, which I thought was a lot. Then Fujirumors picked up on the website, followed by Andrew & Denae, Vuhlandes, Omar Gonzalez, and many others, and traffic significantly jumped. The Fuji X Weekly audience continues to grow and grow, and much of that is still organic—just photographers telling other photographers about film simulation recipes, and how they’ve made a difference to their photography.

Rays Over Canyon Ferry – Townsend, MT – Fujifilm X100V – “Kodak Tri-X 400” recipe – 2020

About one year ago Sahand Nayebaziz, an app developer and photographer who shoots Fujifilm cameras and uses Fuji X Weekly recipes, reached out to me with a proposal: let’s make an app together. My wife, Amanda, had been telling me for awhile that these recipes needed to be in an app, but I didn’t have the knowledge, experience, or resources to do it. Sahand did, and he wanted to partner with me to make it happen. We worked very hard for a couple of months, and on December 1, 2020, the Fuji X Weekly App launched on iOS, and we continued to work hard, and on March 1, 2021 the app launched on Android. These were major accomplishments that just wouldn’t have happened without Sahand—frankly, there would be no Fuji X Weekly App without him.

There have been, of course, many other people who have helped Fuji X Weekly along the way: Thomas Schwab, Anders Lindborg, Daniele Petrarolo, Nathalie Boucry, Immanuel Sander, Luis Costa, Ryan, Piotr Skrzypek, K. Adam Christensen, George Coady, Manuel Sechi, Julien Jarry, and many, many others. My apologies for not including your name if you contributed something—I know that I’m forgetting several, as there have been so many over the years. This really has become a community, where we’re all helping each other, because we’re all journeying down this same path together. It’s a team effort, and you, the Fuji X Weekly reader, are a part of that team!

I would summarize this portion of the Fuji X Weekly story like this: “Fuji X Weekly grew in popularity very organically, largely spreading by word of mouth. A lot of people have helped in various ways, and, because of that, this has become much more than a website—it is a community of photographers journeying down the same path.”

Over the summer I secretly worked on another project: recipes for Ricoh cameras. I made JPEG recipes for the Ricoh GR, GR II, GR III, and GR IIIx cameras, and just last month I lunched a new website, Ritchie’s Ricoh Recipes, and published a new App for Ricoh GR. My wife told me that I needed an overarching website to link Fuji X Weekly and Ritchie’s Ricoh Recipes together, so I created RitchieRoesch.com. The very first words on this website are: “Custom JPEG settings for cameras. Get the look you want straight-out-of-camera without the need to edit. Easy to use. Free.” That’s what I do. That’s what my websites are about. That’s my contribution to the photography continuum. Right now this is for Fujifilm X and Ricoh GR cameras, but perhaps someday it will expand beyond those brands—it’s hard to know what the future holds. Fujifilm is my preferred choice—no doubt about it—and I will continue to create recipes for X-series cameras for as long as I can. I immensely enjoy what I do, and I know for certain that I will continue to do it.

I would summarize this portion of the Fuji X Weekly story like this: “I immensely enjoy creating recipes, and I will continue to do so as long as I can.”

Sentinel & Merced – Yosemite NP, CA – Fujifilm X100V – “Vintage Color” recipe – 2021

That’s a pretty long story (which, by the way, could have been much longer, but I didn’t want to bore you too much), and I’m glad that you found it entertaining enough to get this far. Really, I’m honored and humbled that you would be this interested in what I do, and that you’re journeying with me on this adventure. If you did find it to be a little too wordy, here’s the Cliffs Notes version:

I started Fuji X Weekly because I love to photograph and write, and I desired to share my journey with whoever wanted to come along for the ride, even if that was no one. Originally it was exclusively about the Fujifilm X100F camera, but I was open to someday expand it to Fujifilm in general, which eventually did happen. I committed to publishing at least one article per week. I used my experience as a film photographer to create JPEG settings, called film simulation recipes, that often mimic film stocks. These settings save time, simplify the photographic process, and make capturing pictures even more enjoyable. Fuji X Weekly grew in popularity very organically, largely spreading by word of mouth. A lot of people have helped in various ways, and, because of that, this has become much more than a website—it is a community of photographers journeying down the same path. I immensely enjoy creating recipes, and I will continue to do so as long as I can.

Or, even more simply:

I create free and easy-to-use custom JPEG settings to achieve looks straight-out-of-camera without the need to edit.

Whether it’s the long version, short version, or super short version, this is the Fuji X Weekly story; however, this isn’t the end, it’s really just the beginning. I hope this is Chapter 1 of a much longer tale, and that you join me on this journey, wherever it leads.

Fujifilm X100V (X-Trans IV) Film Simulation Recipe: Pulled Fujicolor Superia

Salt Lake Shorelands – Layton, UT – Fujifilm X100V – “Pulled Fujicolor Superia”

After creating the Scanned Superia and Portra-Style film simulation recipes, which use D-Range Priority Auto, I wanted to create a recipe that utilized D-Range Priority Strong. You might recall that Anders Lindborg made an interesting discovery that D-Range Priority (DR-P) is essentially the same thing as Hypertone on Fujifilm Frontier scanners. In my own experiments, I’ve come to the conclusion that D-Range Priority Weak is more practical for everyday photography than D-Range Priority Strong, because, unless there is a bright light in the frame, DR-P Strong tends to be too flat, since it maximizes dynamic range. Undeterred, I set out to create a nice recipe that utilizes DR-P Strong.

I call this recipe “Pulled Fujicolor Superia” because it is similar to Fujicolor Superia Xtra 400 film that’s been pulled one stop. Of course, how any emulsion is shot, developed, printed and/or scanned has an impact on its aesthetic, and one film can have many different looks. I didn’t set out to recreate the look of pulled Superia film, but, in fact, it does look surprisingly close to some examples I found. It’s better to be lucky than good, right? I wouldn’t say that this is 100% spot-on for pulled Superia 400 film, but it’s not far off at all.

Break – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X100V – “Pulled Fujicolor Superia”

Because this recipe uses the Classic Negative film simulation, Clarity, and Color Chrome Effect Blue, it is compatible with the Fujifilm X-Pro3, X100V, X-T4, X-S10, X-E4, and X-T30 II cameras. I think it works best on sunny days, but I did use it with some success in overcast and indoor situations.

Classic Negative
Dynamic Range: D-Range Priority Strong
Color: +3
Noise Reduction: -4
Sharpening: -2
Clarity: +2
Grain Effect: Weak, Small
Color Chrome Effect: Strong
Color Chrome Effect Blue: Strong
White Balance: Daylight, -4 Red & -2 Blue
ISO: Auto, up to ISO 6400
Exposure Compensation: 0 to +2/3 (typically)

Example photographs, all camera-made JPEGs using this “Pulled Fujicolor Superia” film simulation recipe on my Fujifilm X100V:

Packed Parking Garage – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Dee’s – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Salt Lake Shoreland Preserve Boardwalk – Layton, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Wetland Grass & Mountains – Layton, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Grass – Layton, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Fence & Hidden Building – Layton, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Playing Pokemon – Layton, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Looking Through Binoculars – Layton, UT – Fujifilm X100V
My Four Kids – Layton, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Jonathan at f/3.6 – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Yellow & Green Grass – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Pops of Fall – Fruit Heights, UT – Fujifilm X100V
A Little Splash of Autumn – Fruit Heights, UT – Fujifilm X100V

Find this film simulation recipe and many more on the Fuji X Weekly — Film Recipes App!

Help Fuji X Weekly

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Fujifilm X-E4 (X-Trans IV) Film Simulation Recipe: Portra-Style

Peach Tree – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4 – “Portra-Style”

After Anders Lindborg shared with me his interesting discovery that D-Range Priority (DR-P) is essentially the same thing as Hypertone on Fujifilm Frontier scanners, I immediately went to work creating a couple film simulation recipes that use D-Range Priority, since I didn’t have any. Like many of you, I thought that DR-P was a feature reserved only for extreme situations, and not for everyday use, but (as it turns out) it doesn’t have to be—DR-P can be utilized all of the time if you want.

What is DR-P? It’s basically a tone curve intended to maximize dynamic range. There are four options: Off, Auto, Weak, and Strong. When DR-P is Off, the camera uses DR (DR100, DR200, DR400) instead, and when DR-P is On (Auto, Weak, or Strong), DR is disabled. When DR-P is On, Highlight and Shadow are “greyed out” so those can’t be adjusted—the curve is built into DR-P. You get what you get. DR-P Weak is similar to using DR400 with both Highlight and Shadow -2, but with a very subtle mid-tone boost. This recipe calls for DR-P Auto, and the camera will usually select DR-P Weak unless there is a bright light source (such as the sun) in the frame, such as the picture Sunlight Through a Tree further down below.

Tall Grass – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4 – “Portra-Style”

This “Portra-Style” recipe isn’t intended to faithfully mimic Portra film, but was inspired more by Kyle McDougall’s “Portra-Style” presets, which are, of course, modeled after Kodak Portra film. The Kodak Portra 400 Warm recipe was also inspired by these presets, and there are some similarities between this recipe and that one. I don’t know which is better, as they’re both good options for achieving a warm Portra-like aesthetic. For a more-accurate recipe, try Kodak Portra 400 v2. This recipe, which is closer to Portra 400 than 160, works best in natural light, especially daylight, although you can still get interesting results sometimes in other lighting situations. My “Portra-Style” recipe is compatible with the Fujifilm X-Pro3, X100V, X-T4, X-S10, X-E4, and X-T30 II cameras.

Classic Chrome
Dynamic Range: D-Range Priority Auto
Color: +1
Noise Reduction: -4
Sharpening: -2
Clarity: +3
Grain Effect: Strong, Small
Color Chrome Effect: Strong
Color Chrome Effect Blue: Weak
White Balance: 5000K, +2 Red & -6 Blue
ISO: Auto, up to ISO 6400
Exposure Compensation: 0 to +2/3 (typically)

Example photographs, all camera-made JPEGs using this “Portra-Style” film simulation recipe on my Fujifilm X-E4:

Jonathan – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Arrow & Cones – Sandy, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Northstar – Orem, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Summer Tree – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Sunlight Through a Tree – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Fence & Tree – Layton, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Cautious Nature – Fruit Heights, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Bridge in the Forest – Fruit Heights, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Yellow Leaves in Green Forest – Fruit Heights, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Log in the Forest – Fruit Heights, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Last Light on Dead Tree – Fruit Heights, UT – Fujifilm X-E4

Find this film simulation recipe and many more on the Fuji X Weekly — Film Recipes App!

Help Fuji X Weekly

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Fujifilm X-E4 (X-Trans IV) Film Simulation Recipe: Scanned Superia

Brownie on a Shelf – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4 – “Scanned Superia”

After Anders Lindborg shared with me his interesting discovery that D-Range Priority (DR-P) is essentially the same thing as Hypertone on Fujifilm Frontier scanners, I immediately went to work creating a couple film simulation recipes that use D-Range Priority, since I didn’t have any. Like many of you, I thought that DR-P was a feature reserved only for extreme situations, and not for everyday use, but (as it turns out) it doesn’t have to be—DR-P can be utilized all of the time if you want.

What is DR-P? It’s basically a tone curve intended to maximize dynamic range. There are four options: Off, Auto, Weak, and Strong. When DR-P is Off, the camera uses DR (DR100, DR200, DR400) instead, and when DR-P is On (Auto, Weak, or Strong), DR is disabled. When DR-P is On, Highlight and Shadow are “greyed out” so those can’t be adjusted—the curve is built into DR-P. You get what you get. DR-P Weak is similar to using DR400 with both Highlight and Shadow -2, but with a very subtle mid-tone boost. This recipe calls for DR-P Auto, and the camera will usually select DR-P Weak unless there is a bright light source (such as the sun) in the frame, such as the picture below.

Big Grass Leaves – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4 – “Scanned Superia”

This recipe was inspired by pictures I found that were captured with Fujicolor Superia 100 film scanned with a Frontier SP-3000. Of course, how the film was shot, or even the scanner settings selected, can effect the exact aesthetic of an image. Even the same emulsion captured the same way and scanned on the same scanner can look a little different if the settings on the scanner are different (more on this in an upcoming article). I didn’t spend a lot of time trying to precisely match this recipe to those scans—it was more of a quick attempt, but I liked the results so I didn’t fine-tune it any further. It has a pretty good feel, I think, that produces pleasing results in many circumstances, although it isn’t the best for artificial light, and you might consider using Auto White Balance when not in natural light situations. This recipe is compatible with the Fujifilm X-Pro3, X100V, X-T4, X-S10, X-E4, and X-T30 II cameras.

Classic Negative
Dynamic Range: D-Range Priority Auto
Color: +3
Noise Reduction: -4
Sharpening: -3
Clarity: +3
Grain Effect: Weak, Small
Color Chrome Effect: Weak
Color Chrome Effect Blue: Weak
White Balance: Daylight, -2 Red & +3 Blue
ISO: Auto, up to ISO 6400
Exposure Compensation: -1/3 to +1/3 (typically)

Example photographs, all camera-made JPEGs using this “Scanned Superia” film simulation recipe on my Fujifilm X-E4:

RADAR Peak – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Colorful Blooms of Summer – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Last Red Rose – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
White Rose of Summer – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Yellow Country Flowers – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Little Yellow Flowers in the Wetlands – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Suburban Reeds – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
No Parking Any Time – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Morning Flag – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Succulent Shelf – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4

Find this film simulation recipe and many more on the Fuji X Weekly — Film Recipes App!

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Fujifilm Frontier Scanners & Dynamic Range Priority

I received an email earlier this week from Anders Lindborg with an interesting discovery he made. You might remember that Anders is the creator of the Kodak Tri-X 400 film simulation recipe, as well as the Fujicolor Pro 160NS and Fujicolor Pro 400H recipes, which are actually much more than just recipes—they’re a new way to approach using recipes on your Fujifilm camera. Needless to say, I was intrigued!

“After reading the information on Fujifilm’s subsites about how they develop their film simulations for the 999th time,” Anders wrote, “I had a small revelation. The base for the simulations are professional photos scanned with their Frontier scanner with corrections applied, so apparently that scanner plays a major role in the final look. I googled around for a bit and found a PDF version of the software manual for the Frontier SP-3000. Here are the really interesting parts:
1) The image settings in Fuji’s cameras are more or less exactly the same as those found in the image correction settings in their Frontier scanner software;
2) There is a correction called Hypertone that turns out to be exactly the same thing as the dreaded D-Range Priority (DR-P) modes;
3) A bit of further research revealed that almost all Fujifilm associated photo labs used the Frontier scanner since the early 90’s and the recommended method was fully automatic mode which included both white balancing as well as Hypertone—both on auto.”

After reading this, I dug around the internet for articles on Fujifilm’s Frontier SP-3000 scanner. I immediately recognized Fujifilm’s “color science” in the photographs I found. There was a distinct similarity between the images that I was seeing, which were scanned negatives, and the pictures from my Fujifilm X cameras. Another tidbit I found was a remark that negatives scanned using the Frontier scanner have a similar aesthetic to negatives printed on Fujicolor paper, which makes sense, because you’d want the digital images to closely match the prints. All of this is to say that, based on these discoveries, I believe Fujifilm’s JPEG programming is heavily influenced by their scanner technology, which was heavily influenced by their photographic paper. This was a surprise to me, although it shouldn’t have been because it is very logical.

The similarities between Hypertone and D-Range Priority are interesting. I’ve written a couple articles that discuss D-Range Priority (here and here), but I’ve always thought of it as a “use only in extreme circumstances” kind of feature, and not a particularly useful tool for everyday photography. But if it was commonly used by photo labs around the world (as Hypertone), maybe it should be more commonly used now (as DR-P)?

It’s one thing to theorize about these things, and a whole other thing to put it into practice, so I created two different “recipes” that utilize D-Range Priority (which I will share in future articles). I wanted to see if this feature could be left on for extended shooting and produce good results, or would the results be flat and uninteresting? Here are a few pictures captured with each recipe:

Recipe 1

Tall Grass – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Peach Tree – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Summer Tree – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Northstar – Orem, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Arrow & Cones – Sandy, UT – Fujifilm X-E4

Recipe 2

Brownie on a Shelf – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
White Rose of Summer – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Last Red Rose – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Big Grass Leaves – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Suburban Reeds – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4

D-Range Priority Weak is very similar to using DR400 with Highlight and Shadow both set to -2. When you compare the highlights and shadows of pictures captured with D-Range Priority Weak and those captured with DR400 with Highlight and Shadow both set to -2, you’ll notice that they’re nearly identical. What is a little different—subtly different—are the mid-tones. Anders observed, “I noticed that DR-P, just like its predecessor Hypertone, also applies a slight mid-contrast boost.” There is an advantage to using D-Range Priority Weak over DR400 with Highlight and Shadow reduced to their lowest option, but it is subtle. Another note is that D-Range Priority Weak requires a minimum ISO of 320 while DR400 requires a minimum ISO of 640.

If you use D-Range Priority Auto, the camera will almost always select DR-P Weak, and only DR-P Strong if there is a bright light source, such as the sun, in the frame (like Big Grass Leaves above). D-Range Priority Strong produces a very flat image, and it only looks good if there is a lot of contrast in the scene. Anders noted that both Hypertone and DR-P can produce “weird” results if applied too strongly, but the camera seems to do a good job of knowing when to use which DR-P option. D-Range Priority Strong requires a minimum ISO of 640.

“You have to be really careful with the exposure compensation when using it,” Anders advised. “A bit too much or too little can quickly kill the whole photo. I tried to keep it at 0 most of the time and only use Fujis recommendations for correct exposure.” I found this to be true, too, and rarely needed to go beyond +1/3 or -1/3 exposure compensation.

D-Range Priority is only found in Fujifilm X-Trans IV cameras. Using D-Range Priority Weak or Auto seems to be an effective strategy; DR-P Strong is more useful in extreme circumstances. Those who created this feature (and the other JPEG options) were influenced by Frontier scanners, and the programmers likely intended D-Range Priority and White Balance to be set to Auto. Of course, there’s no “right” or “wrong” way to do anything, and I’m certainly not afraid of doing things outside-the-box (as you know). D-Range Priority is something that I shouldn’t have ignored so much, because it is more useful than I originally thought. I’ve created two film simulation recipes to take advantage of DR-P (and I’ll probably create more down the road), which I’ll publish very soon.

Thank you, Anders Lindborg, for making this discovery and sharing it with us!

Let me know in the comments which recipe—1 or 2—above you are most excited for.

Help Fuji X Weekly

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7 New Fujicolor Pro 400H Film Simulation Recipes!

Pink Roses – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 – “Fujicolor Pro 400H Box Speed”

In my last post, entitled A Different Approach, I shared Anders Lindborg‘s new take on film simulation recipes, which included seven different Fujicolor Pro 160NS recipes that he invented. This is Part 2 of that article. Below you’ll find another seven recipes, this time for Fujicolor Pro 400H! If you haven’t read the first post, you’ll want to do that now, because this will make a lot more sense if you have that prerequisite understanding.

If you don’t want to take the time to read it (or if you’ve already forgotten), here’s a quick summery. Anders’ approach is to have a good base recipe that works well in most circumstances, but also have subtle variations of that recipe, that mimic pushed and pulled film, for when the conditions require either less contrast (pulled) or more contrast (pushed). You can use all seven Custom Presets in the Q Menu to save each of these recipes if you want, or just save the base recipe (called “Box Speed”) and adjust to the various variations on-the-fly, or save the base setting and have the variations programmed into X RAW Studio. Also, by design these recipes will work with any film simulation, even though they call for PRO Neg. Hi.

Like the 160NS recipe, I’m only including the “Box Speed” version in the Fuji X Weekly app, and I encourage you to use the Notes section under the recipe to store the pushed and pulled variations. These seven Fujicolor Pro 400H recipes are compatible with the Fujifilm X-T3 and X-T30 cameras. If you have a newer X-Trans IV camera (X-Pro3, X100V, X-T4, X-S10 and X-E4), Anders recommends setting Clarity to -3 and Grain to Weak & Large. If you have an X-Trans III camera, ignore Color Chrome Effect; the results will be slightly different, but it will still produce good results. For Pushed +3 and Pushed +4, feel free to try Grain Strong.

This recipe wasn’t intended to mimic Fujicolor Pro 400H film, but it does resemble it fairly well. A lot of people like to overexpose real 400H film to get a pastel look; unfortunately, this recipe won’t achieve that particular aesthetic (but look here and here). Anders created this recipe by modifying his Pro 160NS settings; I made a couple of small modifications to it, but mostly these settings are created by him. Thank you, Anders, for creating these recipes and allowing me to share them!

Fujicolor Pro 400H Box Speed

Pops of Red – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

PRO Neg. Hi
Dynamic Range: DR400
Highlight: 0
Shadow: 0
Color: +1
Color Chrome Effect: Strong
Grain: Weak
Noise Reduction: -4
Sharpness: -3
White Balance: Daylight, +1 Red & -3 Blue
ISO: Auto up to ISO 6400
Exposure Compensation: 0 to +2/3 (typically)

Free Pie – South Ogden, UT – Fujifilm X-T30
Birthday Girl Coloring – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30
Shelf Plant – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

Fujicolor Pro 400H Pulled -1

Snail – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

PRO Neg. Hi
Dynamic Range: DR400
Highlight: -1
Shadow: -1
Color: +1
Color Chrome Effect: Strong
Grain: Weak
Noise Reduction: -4
Sharpness: -3
White Balance: Daylight, +1 Red & -3 Blue
ISO: Auto up to ISO 6400
Exposure Compensation: 0 to +2/3 (typically)

If you are adding this recipe to the Notes in the app, consider using this abbreviation: Pulled -1: HL & SH -1.

Green Aspen Leaves – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30
Tank Cars – Uintah, UT – Fujifilm X-T30
Yellow Cat – Layton, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

Fujicolor Pro 400H Pulled -2

Hazy Mountain – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

PRO Neg. Hi
Dynamic Range: DR400
Highlight: -2
Shadow: -1
Color: 0
Color Chrome Effect: Strong
Grain: Weak
Noise Reduction: -4
Sharpness: -3
White Balance: Daylight, +1 Red & -3 Blue
ISO: Auto up to ISO 6400
Exposure Compensation: 0 to +1 (typically)

If you are adding this recipe to the Notes in the app, consider using this abbreviation: Pulled -2: HL -2, SH -1, CLR 0.

Box Cars – Uintah, UT – Fujifilm X-T30
Suburban Sunset – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30
Hazy Tree – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

Fujicolor Pro 400H Pushed +1

Yucca Leaves – Uintah, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

PRO Neg. Hi
Dynamic Range: DR400
Highlight: +1
Shadow: 0
Color: +1
Color Chrome Effect: Strong
Grain: Weak
Noise Reduction: -4
Sharpness: -3
White Balance: Daylight, +1 Red & -3 Blue
ISO: Auto up to ISO 6400
Exposure Compensation: 0 to +2/3 (typically)

If you are adding this recipe to the Notes in the app, consider using this abbreviation: Pushed +1: HL +1.

Red Tree – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30
Tree & Dark Clouds – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30
David Baldwin – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

Fujicolor Pro 400H Pushed +2

Wood Stripes – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

PRO Neg. Hi
Dynamic Range: DR400
Highlight: +2
Shadow: 0
Color: +2
Color Chrome Effect: Strong
Grain: Weak
Noise Reduction: -4
Sharpness: -3
White Balance: Daylight, +1 Red & -3 Blue
ISO: Auto up to ISO 6400
Exposure Compensation: -1/3 to +2/3 (typically)

If you are adding this recipe to the Notes in the app, consider using this abbreviation: Pushed +2: HL +2, CLR +2.

Mountain Biking – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30
Radar Mountain – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30
Bloomin’ Onion – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

Fujicolor Pro 400H Pushed +3

Three Artificial Plants – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

PRO Neg. Hi
Dynamic Range: DR400
Highlight: +2
Shadow: +1
Color: +3
Color Chrome Effect: Strong
Grain: Weak
Noise Reduction: -4
Sharpness: -3
White Balance: Daylight, +1 Red & -3 Blue
ISO: Auto up to ISO 6400
Exposure Compensation: -1/3 to +2/3 (typically)

If you are adding this recipe to the Notes in the app, consider using this abbreviation: Pushed +3: HL +2, SH +1, CLR +3.

Berry Bush Leaves #1 – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30
Berry Bush Leaves #2 – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30
Sky Leaves – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

Fujicolor Pro 400H Pushed +4

Old Phone – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

PRO Neg. Hi
Dynamic Range: DR400
Highlight: +3
Shadow: +2
Color: +4
Color Chrome Effect: Strong
Grain: Weak
Noise Reduction: -4
Sharpness: -4
White Balance: Daylight, +1 Red & -3 Blue
ISO: Auto up to ISO 6400
Exposure Compensation: -1/3 to +2/3 (typically)

If you are adding this recipe to the Notes in the app, consider using this abbreviation: Pushed +4: HL +3, SH +2, CLR +4, SHARP -4.

Berry Bush Leaves #3 – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30
Green – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30
Landscape Leaves – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

Below are examples of using the Fujicolor Pro 160NS Box Speed recipe using other film simulations. You can do this with all of the pull and push variants, too, although I didn’t supply any examples of those because this article is already very long.

PRO Neg. Hi “Box Speed”
Provia “Box Speed”
Velvia “Box Speed”
Astia “Box Speed”
Classic Chrome “Box Speed”
PRO Neg. Std “Box Speed”
Eterna “Box Speed”
Acros “Box Speed”
Monochrome “Box Speed”

Find this film simulation recipe on the Fuji X Weekly — Film Recipes App!

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A Different Approach + 7 New Fujicolor Pro 160NS Film Simulation Recipes! (Yes, 7!)

Pink Paper Blossom – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 – “Fujicolor Pro 160NS Pulled +2”

I received an email the other day from Anders Lindborg with this subject title: A Different Approach. Anders created the Kodak Tri-X 400 film simulation recipe, which is my personal favorite for black-and-white photography. I was immediately intrigued, and I was not disappointed as I read his message. I’ll let Anders explain this new approach below as he described it to me.

“Doing professional work is tough. Since getting a Fujifilm X-T3 (and later an X-Pro3), I’ve come to rely totally on the straight-out-of-camera JPEGs. They look great and I get more jobs just because I can deliver good results fast. After diving deep into the Fujifilm film simulations, I’ve come to realize that you cannot create a single recipe that will always look great. Sometimes the sunlight is so strong that everything gets blown out and the next day the same recipe will make everything look murky and dull.”

“Coming from a film background, I’m reasonably used to pushing and pulling film as needed. With cheap consumer film stocks, you could sometimes get absolutely horrific (or ”creative” as some call them) results, but the professional films were often quite predictable. Some film stocks have become legendary because they really could take a good beating, no matter how you treated them. Also, the exposure latitude of film is insane compared to digital, which is something I really have missed since switching. Awhile back I started experimenting with recreating this, but I slowly realized that it would require several different variations of my settings. When I was finished, I had used up all seven slots! A lot of research and assumptions went into the process. For example, I totally assume that Fujifilm knows what they’re doing and that their stock simulations are good. I can honestly say after all this, that—yes—they do know their game!”

“The settings emulate a flexible film look. They serve as a base that can be modified as needed on the spot via the Q Menu (for example: changing film simulation, white balance, tint, dynamic range, etc.). The objective was to always have working settings for any scenario that emulates how professional film behaves when being pushed or pulled. They’re intended for professional use and come out of both a need and want for realistic film-like simulations that are guaranteed to work, no matter what task I’m currently challenged with. Of course it’s up to the end user to tune it to their specific preferences, but I strongly recommend you leave the highlight/shadow settings as-is. They are heavily tested with all standard film simulations and you will get a nice looking result with them. These settings took me a couple of years to develop, but this is what I actually use every day now.”

“Just step outside and try to come to a conclusion about what the current weather and light conditions are like. If the sun is harsh, you need to pull. If the sun is blindingly bright, pull two steps. The same goes for pushing. If you’re missing just a bit of light, push one step. If it’s dull, push two steps. The third and fourth push settings are perhaps a bit special as the contrast starts to increase. On a regular day, of course you use the box speed setting. Once you’ve selected your setting for the day, stick with it! This is the key to consistent results.”

“I recommend shooting RAW+JPEG and having the settings stored in X Raw Studio. RAWs are great to have if you aren’t happy with the results of your selected setting. The settings were created for the Fujifilm X-T3, but can be easily adapted to taste on any X-series camera. On my X-Pro3, I set Clarity to -3 and Grain to Weak & Large on all slots.”

Thank you, Anders Lindborg, for creating and sharing this new approach!

Pink Rose – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 – “fujicolor Pro 160NS Pulled -1”

For those without a film background, let me briefly explain what pushing and pulling means in film photography. Film is rated at a certain ISO, for example ISO 100, ISO 200, ISO 400, etc., which is a measurement of the film’s sensitivity to light (it’s pretty much just like on your digital camera). You can underexpose a roll of film and increase the development time to get correctly exposed pictures, and this is called push-processing or pushing the film. Also, you can overexpose a roll of film and decrease the development time to get correctly exposed pictures, and this is called pull-processing or pulling the film. Pushing the film increases the contrast, vibrancy (for color film), and grain, while pulling the film decreases the contrast, vibrancy (for color film), and grain. With film, you have to push or pull the entire roll and not just one or a few frames.

The genius of Anders’ method is that you can apply this film approach to your digital pictures, and you can do it with as few or as many frames as you wish. You can push one frame, pull the next, and shoot the third at “box speed” (nether pushed nor pulled) if you want. This type of flexibility was unimaginable in the film era!

In case you didn’t understand this approach, let me rephrase it. You have one recipe, but that recipe has push and pull variants. You can use any film simulation with the recipe, and Anders’ film simulation of choice is PRO Neg. Hi, but try any of them! The rest of the settings stay the same. His push and pull variants don’t necessarily represent stops of pushing or pulling, but more like half-stop increments (although Fujifilm lenses have 1/3 stop increments, but don’t worry about that). You can dedicate slots in your Custom Settings Menu for the recipe and variants, or you can have one Custom Settings slot set to the standard “box speed” recipe and adjust on-the-fly if you have the required changes memorized, or you can do it in X RAW Studio.

Anders actually sent me two recipes. The first, which you’ll find below, is called Fujicolor Pro 160NS. It wasn’t purposely intended to resemble that film, but it nonetheless does, more-or-less. The second, which you can find here), is called Fujicolor Pro 400H. The Pro 160NS recipe is the “standard” one, while the Pro 400H recipe is just a little more bold for when you need a bit more pizzaz.

There are seven versions of the Fujicolor Pro 160NS recipe: Pulled -2, Pulled -1, Box Speed, Pushed +1, Pushed +2, Pushed +3, and Pushed +4. You’ll find each of these below, although the Box Speed version is the only one included on the Fuji X Weekly app. My recommendation is to manually add the other versions into the notes section under the recipe in the app. These seven recipes are compatible with X-Trans III cameras plus the X-T3 and X-T30; for newer cameras Anders recommends setting Clarity to -3 and Grain to Weak & Large. As a reminder, these recipes are intended to look good no matter the film simulation used, despite it calling for PRO Neg. Hi. For Pushed +3 and Pushed +4, feel free to use Grain Strong if you’d like.

Fujicolor Pro 160NS Box Speed

Two Broken Cars – Uintah, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

PRO Neg. Hi
Dynamic Range: DR400
Highlight: 0
Shadow: 0
Color: 0
Color Chrome Effect: Off
Grain: Weak
Noise Reduction: -4
Sharpness: -3
White Balance: Daylight, 0 Red & 0 Blue
ISO: Auto up to ISO 6400
Exposure Compensation: 0 to +2/3 (typically)

Old Railroad Sign – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30
Rainy Day Railroad – Uintah, UT – Fujifilm X-T30
Hazy Mountain & Red Helicopter – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

Fujicolor Pro 160NS Pulled -1

Clouds Over Green Mountain – Uintah, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

PRO Neg. Hi
Dynamic Range: DR400
Highlight: -1
Shadow: -1
Color: 0
Color Chrome Effect: Off
Grain: Weak
Noise Reduction: -4
Sharpness: -3
White Balance: Daylight, 0 Red & 0 Blue
ISO: Auto up to ISO 6400
Exposure Compensation: 0 to +2/3 (typically)

If you are adding this recipe to the Notes in the app, consider using this abbreviation: Pulled -1: HL & SH -1.

Cryo-Trans – Uintah, UT – Fujifilm X-T30
Jonathan – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30
Orange Flower – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

Fujicolor Pro 160NS Pulled -2

Trailer Interior – Uintah, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

PRO Neg. Hi
Dynamic Range: DR400
Highlight: -2
Shadow: -1
Color: -1
Color Chrome Effect: Off
Grain: Weak
Noise Reduction: -4
Sharpness: -3
White Balance: Daylight, 0 Red & 0 Blue
ISO: Auto up to ISO 6400
Exposure Compensation: 0 to +1 (typically)

If you are adding this recipe to the Notes in the app, consider using this abbreviation: Pulled -2: HL -2, SH -1, CLR -1.

Not Driven – Uintah, UT – Fujifilm X-T30
Americana Country – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30
Uncertain Walking Path – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

Fujicolor Pro 160NS Pushed +1

Green Tree & Storm Clouds – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

PRO Neg. Hi
Dynamic Range: DR400
Highlight: +1
Shadow: 0
Color: 0
Color Chrome Effect: Off
Grain: Weak
Noise Reduction: -4
Sharpness: -3
White Balance: Daylight, 0 Red & 0 Blue
ISO: Auto up to ISO 6400
Exposure Compensation: 0 to +2/3 (typically)

If you are adding this recipe to the Notes in the app, consider using this abbreviation: Pushed +1: HL +1.

Garden Blooms – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30
F’n’R – Uintah, UT – Fujifilm X-T30
Boy Smile – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

Fujicolor Pro 160NS Pushed +2

Worn Seat Abstract – Uintah, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

PRO Neg. Hi
Dynamic Range: DR400
Highlight: +2
Shadow: 0
Color: +1
Color Chrome Effect: Off
Grain: Weak
Noise Reduction: -4
Sharpness: -3
White Balance: Daylight, 0 Red & 0 Blue
ISO: Auto up to ISO 6400
Exposure Compensation: -1/3 to +2/3 (typically)

If you are adding this recipe to the Notes in the app, consider using this abbreviation: Pushed +2: HL +2, CLR +1.

Shasta Trailers – Uintah, UT – Fujifilm X-T30
Onions in Bloom – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30
Flowering Bush – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

Fujicolor Pro 160NS Pushed +3

Branches Over Creek – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

PRO Neg. Hi
Dynamic Range: DR400
Highlight: +2
Shadow: +1
Color: +2
Color Chrome Effect: Off
Grain: Weak
Noise Reduction: -4
Sharpness: -3
White Balance: Daylight, 0 Red & 0 Blue
ISO: Auto up to ISO 6400
Exposure Compensation: -1/3 to +2/3 (typically)

If you are adding this recipe to the Notes in the app, consider using this abbreviation: Pushed +3: HL +2, SH +1, CLR +2.

Two Cows – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30
Green Leaves – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

Fujicolor Pro 160NS Pushed +4

Wet Leaves – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

PRO Neg. Hi
Dynamic Range: DR400
Highlight: +3
Shadow: +2
Color: +3
Color Chrome Effect: Off
Grain: Weak
Noise Reduction: -4
Sharpness: -4
White Balance: Daylight, 0 Red & 0 Blue
ISO: Auto up to ISO 6400
Exposure Compensation: -1/3 to +2/3 (typically)

If you are adding this recipe to the Notes in the app, consider using this abbreviation: Pushed +4: HL +3, SH +2, CLR +3, SHARP -4.

Forest – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30
Wall Shelf – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30
Yellow Bike – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

Below are examples of using the Fujicolor Pro 160NS Box Speed recipe using other film simulations. You can do this with all of the pull and push variants, too, although I didn’t supply any examples of those because this article is already very long.

PRO Neg. Hi “Box Speed”
Provia “Box Speed”
Velvia “Box Speed”
Astia “Box Speed”
Classic Chrome “Box Speed”
PRO Neg. Std “Box Speed”
Eterna “Box Speed”
Acros “Box Speed”
Monochrome “Box Speed”

Find this film simulation recipe on the Fuji X Weekly — Film Recipes App!

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Fujifilm X100V Film Simulation Recipe: Kodak Tri-X 400

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Leaves in the Forest – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V – ISO 3200 – “Kodak Tri-X 400”

The number one black-and-white film simulation recipe that I’ve been asked to create is Kodak Tri-X 400, but I’ve never been satisfied with my own attempts. Thankfully for you, Fuji X Weekly reader Anders Lindborg (Instagram) was able to do it! This is brilliant, and I’m sure you’ll love it. It’s the only B&W recipe I’m using on my Fujifilm X100V right now.

Kodak introduced Tri-X in the early 1940’s, and in the 1950’s they began selling it in 35mm format. Ever since, it has been the “standard” high-ISO black-and-white film for photographers. It’s been made in ISO 160, 200, 320 and 400 versions; this recipe is based on Tri-X 400. Kodak re-engineered Tri-X 400 in 2007 with finer grain and lower contrast, but it’s still nearly identical to the old stock.

Anders actually made three recipes in one: low-contrast, mid-contrast, and high-contrast. Tri-X, like most films, can be made more contrasty or less contrasty based on how it’s developed (chemicals used and/or development times) or printed (contrast filters). The recipe further down this article is the mid-contrast version. For low contrast, set Highlight to -1 and Shadow to +2. For high contrast, set Highlight to +1 and Shadow to +4. This film simulation recipe was designed for the X-T3 and X-T30, but I changed a couple of things for the X100V: I set Clarity to +4 (which isn’t available on the X-T3 and X-T30) and Grain to Strong & Large (on the X-T3 and X-T30, Grain is set to Strong). Because it adds contrast, setting Clarity to +4 actually makes this look more like the high-contrast version. If you are using this on the X100V, X-Pro3 or X-T4, feel free to try all three contrast versions, with or without Clarity, to see which you like better. For X-Trans III cameras, which don’t have Color Chrome Effect, you can still use this recipe; while it won’t look exactly the same, it will still look very similar. In other words, even though the title says “Fujifilm X100V Film Simulation Recipe” you can actually use it on any camera with the Acros film simulation—I’ve tried it on an X-T30 and X-T20, and it looks great!

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Forest Edge – Fruit Heights, UT – Fujifilm X100V – ISO 1600 – “Kodak Tri-X 400”

I found that this recipe looks best when set to ISO 1600 or higher. From ISO 1600 to 3200, the results more resemble newer Tri-X 400 film. From ISO 6400 to ISO 12800, the results more resemble older Tri-X 400 film. I want to give a big thank-you to Anders Lindborg for creating this recipe, sharing it, and allowing me to publish it here—you are appreciated! Thank you!

Acros (+Y, +R, +G)
Dynamic Range: DR200
Highlight: 0
Shadow: +3
Noise Reduction: -4
Sharpening: +1
Clarity: +4
Grain Effect: Strong, Large
Color Chrome Effect: Strong
Color Chrome Effect Blue: Off
White Balance: Daylight,+9 Red & -9 Blue
ISO: ISO 1600 – 12800
Exposure Compensation: +1/3 to +1 (typically)

Example photographs, all camera-made JPEGs using this Kodak Tri-X 400 film simulation recipe on my Fujifilm X100V:

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Fallen Trunk – Fruit Heights, UT – Fujifilm X100V – ISO 1600

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The Forest – Fruit Heights, UT – Fujifilm X100V – ISO 1600

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Light in a Dark Canopy – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V – ISO 1600

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Sunlight & Leaves – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V – ISO 12800

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Monochrome Backlit Leaves – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V – ISO 1600

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Drops on a Window – Fruit Heights, UT – Fujifilm X100V – ISO 1600

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Half Leaf In The Road – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V – ISO 1600

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Footstep – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V – ISO 1600

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Barrier – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V – ISO 1600

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Corner Benches – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V – ISO 6400

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Drinking Fountains – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V – ISO 1600

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Feel Like A Kid Again – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V – ISO 1600

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Walking at an Amusement Park – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V – ISO 1600

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Waiting at the Exit – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V – ISO 3200

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Diagonal Light Boy – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V – ISO 12800

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FED 5c Film Camera – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V – ISO 3200

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Coffee Grounds in a Filter – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V – ISO 3200

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Rainbow Feet on the Floor – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V – ISO 3200

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Girl in Zebra Shirt – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V – ISO 12800

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Rainy Day Siblings – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V – ISO 3200

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Level Up – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V – ISO 12800

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Wet Leaf in the Grass – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V – ISO 5000

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Wet Tree Leaves – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V – ISO 3200

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Leaf of a Different Color – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V – ISO 3200

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Emptiness – Roy, UT – Fujifilm X100V – ISO 3200

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Empty Boxes in an Abandoned Home – Roy, UT – Fujifilm X100V – ISO 12800

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Nobody’s Home – Roy, UT – Fujifilm X100V – ISO 3200

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White Truck – Roy, UT – Fujifilm X100V – ISO 3200

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Dead End Night – Roy, UT – Fujifilm X100V – ISO 12800

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Trolley Bus – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V – ISO 12800

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Wrong Way – Centerville, UT – Fujifilm X100V – ISO 12800

See also:
Film Simulation Recipes
Tri-X Push-Process Film Simulation Recipe

This post contains affiliate links, and if you make a purchase using my links I’ll be compensated a small amount for it.

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Fujifilm X100V Silver   Amazon   B&H

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Fujifilm X100V Film Simulation Recipe: Kodak T-Max 400

Tree Behind Bars – North Salt Lake, UT – Fujifilm X100V – “Kodak T-Max 400”

Kodak introduced T-Max black-and-white negative film back in 1986, and they dubbed it “the finest-grained black-and-white film in the world.” While it certainly has fine-grain, particularly the low-ISO version, I don’t know how accurate Kodak’s proclamation was. It’s available in ISO 100, 400 and 3200 variants. This film simulation recipe is intended to resemble the ISO 400 version.

T-Max 400 is a popular B&W film. I’ve used it, although it has been many, many years. Kodak updated the film in 2007 to be sharper and have finer grain; it’s the old version that I have personal experience with. With any film, but perhaps especially with black-and-white negative film, so much can be altered in the darkroom to customize the aesthetic, and one film can produce many different looks, so creating a recipe can be controversial because it might not look exactly like what someone thinks it should. Still, I hope that you will recognize this as T-Max-esque.

You might find that this recipe looks familiar. Actually, it began as Kodak Tri-X 400. Fuji X Weekly readers Thomas Schwab (who has helped with several recipes) and Anders Linborg (who invented the Tri-X recipe) worked together to modify that recipe into this one. I added a couple of small revisions, and now we have Kodak T-Max 400! It really was a group effort, but mostly Thomas and Anders. Thanks, guys!

Night Clouds – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V – “Kodak T-Max 400”

This Kodak T-Max 400 film simulation recipe is intended for the Fujifilm X100V, X-Pro3 and X-T4 cameras; however, with a couple small modifications, it can be used on any X-Trans III or IV camera. First, if your camera doesn’t have Clarity, consider using +1 Highlight and +4 Shadow instead, although you can certainly keep those settings as they are in the recipe below. If your camera doesn’t have the option for Grain size (only strength), set it to Strong. I used Toning on this recipe, which is completely optional, but on the X-T3 and X-T30, which has a different Toning menu, consider using +1 (warm). Back when I shot film I would often give my prints a quick Sepia bath, both for warmth and archival reasons, and the Toning option on your X-Trans IV camera does a good job of mimicking that.

One difference that you might notice between this recipe and Tri-X is ISO. On that recipe I suggest using ISO 1600 to 12800. I think for this recipe the best results are found between ISO 1600 and 3200, but anything from ISO 320 to 6400 looks good. I feel like ISO 12800 is a bit too much, but feel free to try it and see what you think.

Monochrome (+Y, +R, +G)
Dynamic Range: DR200
Highlight: 0
Shadow: +3
Noise Reduction: -4
Sharpening: +2
Clarity: +3
Toning: WC +2, MG 0

Grain Effect: Strong, Small
Color Chrome Effect: Strong
Color Chrome Effect Blue: Off
White Balance: Daylight,+9 Red & -9 Blue
ISO: Auto, up to ISO 6400
Exposure Compensation: +1/3 to +1 (typically)

Example photographs, all camera-made JPEGs using this Kodak T-Max 400 film simulation recipe on my Fujifilm X100V:

Hanging Leaves Silhouette – North Salt Lake, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Light Through The Dark Forest – North Salt Lake, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Ghosts – North Salt Lake, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Tree Trunks & Ground Cover – North Salt Lake, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Tree at Forest Edge – North Salt Lake, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Paved Forest Path – North Salt Lake, UT – Fujifilm X100V
People Shadows – North Salt Lake, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Happy Jon – North Salt Lake, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Fish in the Net – Hyrum Reservoir, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Tired Old Dock – Hyrum Reservoir, UT – Fujifilm X100V
A Boy & His Fishing Pole – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Lake Water – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Flower Photo – North Salt Lake, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Monochrome Wildflower – North Salt Lake, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Photo by Thomas Schwab – Husum, Germany – Fujifilm X100V

See also: Film Simulation Recipes

This post contains affiliate links, and if you make a purchase using my links I’ll be compensated a small amount for it.

Fujifilm X100V Black    Amazon   B&H
Fujifilm X100V Silver   Amazon   B&H

Help Fuji X Weekly

Nobody pays me to write the content found on fujixweekly.com. There's a real cost to operating and maintaining this site, not to mention all the time that I pour into it. If you appreciated this article, please consider making a one-time gift contribution. Thank you!

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