Fujifilm Full Spectrum (Or, Dreaming In Infrared Colors)

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This is a fake infrared picture that I captured in Yosemite National Park several years ago.

I would love a full-spectrum Fujifilm camera for infrared photography. I’ve had an interest in infrared photography for some time, but I have yet to actually try it. Yes, I shot a roll of infrared film many, many years ago, but I didn’t understand what I was doing and the results were disappointing. I’ve also used software to make faux infrared, but I don’t particularly like the results from that, either. No, what I need is a Fujifilm camera that has been modified for full-spectrum, and then a bunch of filters to achieve various affects. You can find these cameras sometimes on eBay, like this X-E3 for $900, this X-T1 for $850, or this X-T100 for $590. [Edit: This X100F is the one I want, but at $1,300 it is outside of my budget.] I would especially love to buy the X-E3, but honestly I’d be happy with the X-T100. You also need filters, which can be cheap (like this one) and can be expensive (like this one), depending on the brand, filter thread size, and the exact effect you are after. Additionally, you need to know what lenses are good for infrared, but thankfully there’s a good database, so it’s not too difficult to know which lenses will work well and which ones won’t.

It would be great if Fujifilm made a full-spectrum version of one of their cameras (the X100F, perhaps). I doubt that will ever happen, unless there’s a sudden interest in infrared photography. Sigma cameras have a removable IR filter over the sensor, which when removed turns the camera into full-spectrum. The filter just pops in and out. An option like that would be pretty cool on Fujifilm cameras, but it’s unlikely. The best bet is to buy a camera that’s had the conversion done to it. Someday, when I have some extra money burning a hole in my pocket, I will do that. Until then, I will dream in the unusual colors of infrared.

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My Fujifilm X-T30 Kodak Elite Chrome 200 Color Fade Film Simulation Recipe

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JTPX 1204 – North Salt Lake, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 “Elite Chrome 200 Color Fade”

I recently ran across some old slides that I had forgotten about, and one of those color transparencies was a frame of Kodak Elite Chrome 200 that was beginning to fade and change color. The picture wasn’t especially good, but it looked interesting because of how the image was transforming. Elite Chrome was a version of Ektachrome, which has been dubbed Fade-a-chrome, as it’s very prone to fading and discoloration, especially if not stored correctly, which this particular picture wasn’t. You can see the fading Elite Chrome 200 photograph below.

I wondered if I could create a film simulation recipe that mimics the look of fading Elite Chrome 200. I experimented with the settings a bunch, but couldn’t get it to look right. After showing my wife, Amanda, she suggested that the digital picture looked too crisp, too detailed. I made some more modifications, and found myself much closer. Not perfect, but very close. I made more changes and adjustments, but unfortunately I couldn’t get it to look better, so I went back to those settings that were very close to being right, which is the recipe here.

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DGNO Locomotive – Dallas, TX – Canon AE-1 & Kodak Elite Chrome 200 35mm film

One addition to this film simulation recipe that you’ve never seen in any of my other recipes is Image Quality. I have always used Fine, because it’s the highest quality setting, but in this case Fine was, well, too fine. I set it to Normal instead so as to better mimic the transparency. While I’m sure this particular recipe is not for everyone, those looking for something that resembles film from decades ago might appreciate it, as it has an analog aesthetic, and a look that’s a bit unusual, perhaps a bit lomographic (did I just make up a word?).

Classic Chrome
Dynamic Range: DR200
Highlight: 0
Shadow: +2
Color: -2
Noise Reduction: +2
Sharpening: -4
Grain Effect: Strong
Color Chrome Effect: Strong
Image Quality: Normal
White Balance: 8300K, +4 Red & +8 Blue
ISO: Auto, up to ISO 6400
Exposure Compensation: 0 to -2/3 (typically)

Example photographs, all camera-made JPEGs using this Kodak Elite Chrome 200 Color Fade recipe on my Fujifilm X-T30:

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Green Locomotive – North Salt Lake, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Tank Rider – North Salt Lake, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Tracks By The Refinery – North Salt Lake, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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American Joe – Layton, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Neighborhood Patriotism – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Sidewalk Tricycle – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Red Flag – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Peek – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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One Eye Open – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Evening Bike – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Fence & Path – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Out Flowing – North Salt Lake, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Mountain Sky – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Wet Red Rose – Layton, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Rose Blossom Fence – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

X-Pro3 To Have New Film Simulation: Classic Negative

The upcoming Fujifilm X-Pro3, which will feature an unusual rear screen, will have a new film simulation called Classic Negative, which is supposed to resemble Superia film, according to Fujifilm. I get a lot of requests for Superia, so I’m very happy to see this as a new film simulation. Yea!

Fujirumors stated that the X-Pro3 will have some additional adjustments for in-camera RAW processing, such as Clarity. I welcome this because the more tools that Fujifilm provides, the more easily I can achieve a desired look in-camera. Fujifilm is one of only a few companies that take camera-made JPEGs seriously, and is one of the big reasons why I appreciate their products. Shooting JPEGs saves me so much time, allowing my photography to be more productive while simultaneously allowing me to spend more time elsewhere, such as with my family.

I hope that Fujifilm makes these things–the Classic Negative film simulation and the additional tools–available to other cameras, such as the X-T3 and X-T30, which share the same sensor and processor as the upcoming X-Pro3. There is, according to Fujirumors, some big firmware updates on the horizon, and I hope that these are a part of that. Sometimes, when a new feature is included in a new camera, Fujifilm will update older cameras to include it as well, and sometimes they don’t. So it’s really hard to know. I will keep my fingers crossed.

The 5 C’s of Photographic Vision

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Photographic vision is essential to successful photography. Many people will tell you that you need it, but very few will explain what it is. You can search the web endlessly, but you won’t find a whole lot that lays out photographic vision simply and coherently. It took me a long time to learn it, mostly from experience, and mostly from failures. And, really, I’m still learning it. In this post I will briefly explain this important concept.

“In order to be a successful photographer, you must possess both vision and focus, neither of which have anything to do with your eyes.” –Kevin Russo

“There is nothing worse than a sharp image of a fuzzy concept.” –Ansel Adams

My definition of photographic vision is “a vivid and imaginative conception.” There are five essential elements of photographic vision, all beginning with the letter C, and three of those essential elements are found within that definition: Clarity, Creativity and Conception. Capturing and Composing are the fourth and fifth elements. Let’s take a look at each.

1. Clarity

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Passerby – Great Sand Dunes NP, CO – Fujifilm X-Pro2

In order to have photographic vision, you must have vivid clarity. You must see in your mind’s eye what it is that you want to create before opening the shutter, which means that you must pre-visualize the finished photograph. This might be a brief moment before the shutter opens or this might be something that you’ve thought about for days, weeks or even years in advance. It doesn’t necessarily matter how long that you pre-visualized, it just matters that you saw the finished picture prior to capturing it.

Great photographs are very rarely happy accidents. Almost all worthwhile pictures took some thought and planning to create, even if just for a moment before the shutter clicked open. The more clearly you can see in your mind what it is that you want to capture, the more likely you are to accomplish it. Clarity means vividly seeing the end while still at the beginning, which is the first key to capturing great pictures.

2. Creativity

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Ethos – Riverdale, UT – Fujifilm X100F

In addition to having clarity, you must be creative. Some people seem to be naturally creative. If that’s not you, don’t fret! I believe that creativity is something that can be learned and fostered. The more you allow yourself to think outside the box and look at things from different angles, the more creative you’ll become. Creativity takes practice.

You have to relax. You have to keep an open mind. You have to use your imagination. Try to channel your inner child. This all might sound cliché, but the only barrier to creativity is yourself–your rigid self–the self that says words like “no” and “can’t” and “shouldn’t” and other negative things. Think positive and throw all the so-called rules out the window. Take a deep breath; let yourself go.

3. Conception

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Barn By The Tetons – Grand Teton NP, WY – Fujifilm X-E1

Your photograph begins as a concept. You have an idea. You begin to see that idea vividly in your mind’s eye. As the thought forms, you begin to consider other ways to look at it. Your creativeness takes the concept to new places. This is a vivid and imaginative conception.

Speak some message through your picture. Show your unique perspective. You have something important to say, so say it! Photographs are a form of nonverbal communication, and they all say something. The stronger the communication, the stronger the image. Use your strongest communication in your photos. Make your concept as clear as practical so the viewer isn’t left wondering what the point of the picture is.

4. Capturing

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Jacob’s Ladder – Taos, NM – Fujifilm X-Pro2

The next step in photographic vision is to capture the image on film or digital sensor. You’ve come up with a creative concept that you can clearly see in your mind. You’ve made a vivid and imaginative conception, so now is the time to make it a photographic reality. This is when you take what you saw in your head and make it happen photographically.

There is a lot to this, of course. You must consider gear and settings and lighting and composition and everything else. You have to know how to put what’s in your mind into something tangible. If you don’t know how, then perhaps you should learn. There are so many resources available on the internet and at the library–it’s all at your fingertips if you put in a little effort to learn. And oftentimes learning-by-doing is a good approach because, after all, practice makes perfect. The more you do, the better you’ll be. Because this step might be the most difficult, I cannot overemphasize the importance of understanding how your camera works at a deep level, and knowing fundamental photographic concepts. Capturing what’s in your mind is much easier said than done, but it can be done.

5. Composing

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Brush Strokes Over The Great Salt Lake – Antelope Island SP, UT – Fujifilm X-T20

Composing probably reminds you of composition, but that’s not what I mean, as composition can be found in the previous principals. Instead, think of a symphony composer, putting everything together, placing consideration on even the smallest details. In the case of photographic vision, composing means taking account of all the little details, including editing. Especially editing.

Editing might mean post-processing your files if they require manipulation to fulfill your vision, knowing how much manipulation is enough, and knowing when no manipulation is better. Editing also means editing out the lesser exposures, deleting the bad ones and not including the mediocre ones with a body of work. Consider composing to be a synonym for curating. Additionally, it’s knowing when the vision or execution of the vision wasn’t good enough. Composing means knowing when to take it from the top and try again. It means being responsible for the finished image.

Conclusion

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Twisted Tree – Keystone, SD – Fujifilm X-Pro2

It takes a lot of work, mostly mental work but also physical work, to create worthwhile pictures. You are creating pictures, not merely taking them. Your art requires your best craft. Understanding what photographic vision is goes a long ways towards this, but more important than understanding it is practicing it. Grab your camera and head out with a vivid and imaginative concept in your mind so that you will more successfully create great photographs.

10 Old Color Slides

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I opened up a box in the garage. I was looking for something, and I hoped that I would find it in there. The box had been packed for many years. It was loaded and closed up when I moved from Arizona to California in 2011. I guess whatever was in there wasn’t important, because it remained closed for many years. I commented about this box to my wife once, “Let’s just toss it, since we obviously don’t need whatever is in there.” I’m glad that I never followed through with that, because when I dug through the contents of the box I discovered some old slides that I had forgotten about.

It was fun to look at the old slides, most of which I had captured in 1999, but a few were from 1998, and some as recently as 2005. It was great to reminisce as I viewed the different pictures. Most of the exposures weren’t particularly good. Something that I have discovered over the years is that I was never as good of a photographer as I thought I was. Time has a way of humbling you, I think. While there are a few decent shots, some pictures that I really thought were worthwhile are actually cringe-worthy. Still, I separated the “best” slides from the rest and had them scanned. I never scan my old slides because it’s expensive to do so, but I thought it would be fun to do it in this case.

The Kodachromes appear to have a cool color cast, but in reality they don’t. That’s the difference between scanning them and viewing them through a projector or light table. I could have corrected that in software, but I chose not to. The Elite Chrome 200 shot is clearly fading, showing discoloration from age and inappropriate storage. Elite Chrome was a version of Ektachrome, and Ektachrome has been referred to as Fade-a-chrome for not having an especially long shelf life. It looks kind of neat, though, so I had it scanned. The actual slide seems a tad more red/purple than the digital version, but it’s close. In the early days, a lot of my photography had transportation themes, such as trains, trucks and airplanes, so you see that represented here (mostly trains). Even though these are old pictures, and despite the only Fujifilm connection being the singular Provia frame, I thought it might be worthwhile to share. I hope that you appreciate the ten slides below.

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Night Train – Plano, TX – Canon AE-1 & Kodachrome 64 – 1999

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Sunrise Tracks – Floyd, TX – Canon AE-1 & Elite Chrome 100 –  1999

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DGNO Locomotive – Dallas, TX – Canon AE-1 & Elite Chrome 200 – 1999

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Moving Tracks – Palestine, TX – Canon AE-1 & Ektachrome E100VS – 1999

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Colorful Circles – Greenville, TX – Canon AE-1 & Ektachrome E100VS – 1999

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Camaro & Caboose – Farmersville, TX – Canon AE-1 & Kodachrome 64 – 1999

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Kansas City Southern – Plano, TX – Canon AE-1 & Kodachrome 64 – 1999

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Lake Michigan From Sears Tower – Chicago, IL – Promaster 2500PK & Provia 100F – 2005

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Flat Ball – Surprise, AZ – Promaster 2500PK & Elite Chrome 100 – 2004

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Grand Canyon Summer – Grand Canyon NP, AZ – Canon AE-1 & Ektachrome E100SW – 2000

15 Film Simulation Recipes So Far This Year

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As I was reviewing my different film simulation recipes, I realized that I have posted 15 different ones so far in 2019. That’s quite a few! I bet I made close to 25 more that were “failures” and were never shared on this blog. I have several in the works right now, and I hope at least a couple of them will be successful, and will be published in the coming weeks or months. I also have some crazy ideas that I want to try out, and maybe a recipe or two will come out of that, we’ll see.

More of these recipes are based on Classic Chrome than any other film simulation, which is probably because it’s my favorite for color. Eterna and Acros, which are also great film simulations, are tied for second most. PRO Neg. Std has two. Provia, Velvia and Astia have one each, while PRO Neg. Hi doesn’t have any. I would like to do more with those, so maybe I will come up with something soon. I also think Acros is overdue for a new recipe.

Which of these film simulation recipes that I posted in 2019 are your favorite? Which one would you like to try but have yet to do so? Let me know in the comments!

Provia:

Agfa Optima

Velvia:

Velvia

Astia:

Redscale

Classic Chrome:

Kodachrome 64
Kodacolor
Vintage Urban
Faded Color

PRO Neg. Std:

Warm Contrast
Fujicolor Industrial

Eterna:

Eterna
Expired Eterna
Low Contrast Eterna

Acros:

Agfa APX 400
Ilford HP5 Plus Push-Process
Faded Monochrome

Budget Fujifilm Kit Recommendation

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Back in June I wrote a post explaining how one could buy an elaborate kit, complete with multiple bodies and lenses, for $3,000 or less, the exact price depending on the body and lens combinations. The deals that made it possible have since expired, so I thought I would suggest a budget kit based on what’s on sale now. This one won’t be as grand as the previous, but if you are trying to assemble an “ultimate kit” on a low-budget, this might help you achieve that.

The first thing that I’d start with is a Fujifilm X-T20 bundled with the excellent 18-55mm f/2.8-4 lens, which will set you back $1,000. This is a great mid-level body to build the rest of the kit around, and bundling the lens saves some cash. For a second camera body, I would buy an X-E3, which right now is $600. This would give you two quality camera bodies and a good zoom, and you would have spent only $1,600. Assuming that we’re staying within the same $3,000 budget, you now have $1,400 to spend on lenses.

If you visit my Fujifilm Gear page, you can see the different lens options and what they’re currently going for on Amazon. There’s a lot of potential combinations that would fit within the budget, and what would work best for you will depend on your photography needs. That being said, I will lay out a few ideas for how to spend that $1,400. You could buy the 10-24mm f/4 or the 16mm f/1.4 or the 56mm f/1.2 for $1,000, and the 35mm f/2 or the 50mm-230mm f/4.5-6.7 for $400. You could buy the 14mm f/2.8 or the 23mm f/1.4 or the 18-135mm f/3.5-5.6 for $900, and the 23mm f/2 or the 27mm f/2.8 or the 50mm f/2 for $450. Or, if you want the most lenses, maybe choose your favorite three from the $400-$450 options listed above. I really like the 90mm f/2, which costs $950, and the 35mm f/2, which are two lenses that I use regularly, but you could choose any one of the $400-$450 lenses to pair with the 90mm. There are a lot of potential combinations!

For $3,000 or less, you could have two solid camera bodies, and three or possibly four quality lenses. That’s really quite amazing! While these current deals aren’t nearly as blockbuster as the ones in June were, there’s still a lot of value available for your money. You could still assemble an very solid Fujifilm kit for a reasonable price.

New: Fujifilm X-A7

Fujifilm just announced the upcoming X-A7 mirrorless camera. The X-A line is a low-budget series that uses a Bayer sensor instead of X-Trans, and is comparable to the X-T100. Honestly, I’m not sure why Fujifilm has both camera series, as they are a lot alike, aside from body design. The X-A7 has some advantages over the X-T100, but I’m sure whenever the X-T110 is announced, it will include these same upgrades.

I used to have a Fujifilm X-A3, which is two model-years removed from the X-A7 (there’s no X-A4 or X-A6). It was a surprisingly good camera. The user experience and image quality reminded me a lot of X-Trans I or maybe X-Trans II sensor cameras. The big improvements that have come since then are in regards to speed (including auto-focus, which is supposed to be pretty fantastic on the X-A7), video quality, and the new “vari-angle” rear LCD screen. I doubt there is much difference in image quality between the X-A3 and X-A7, but it seems like the rest of the camera has come pretty far. It might be like X-Trans II+ (if such a thing existed), but not quite equivalent to X-Trans III, yet with an LCD that is unlike anything found on any X-Trans camera, and better auto-focus, too.

I know that a lot of people are less than thrilled by this camera, not because it’s bad, but because it’s not X-Trans and it’s mostly made of plastic. The X-A line is not particularly popular in America, but in some parts of the world it’s extremely popular. I’ve heard that in a couple southeastern Asia countries, the X-A line sells better than Nikon, Canon and Sony combined. I have no idea if that’s true, but I do know that the camera will sell well internationally, and will get only minor-league attention in the American market, which is too bad because it’s a good camera.

For those looking for an inexpensive second (or third, perhaps) camera body, the X-A7 (or even the X-A5 or X-A3) is a good choice. This could also be a great option for those buying their first interchangeable-lens camera. I can see the X-A7 as a stepping stone into the Fujifilm system for someone with limited funds. If you are trying to decide between the X-A7 and X-T100, if video or super fast auto-focus are important, I would recommend the X-A7, but if not, the X-T100 is basically the same thing, and $100 cheaper right now (while the X-A5 is $200 cheaper and the X-A3 $285 cheaper). My personal recommendation is to get the X-T20 combined with the 16-50mm lens, which is only $100 more right now, and is a better overall camera. The X-A7, with an MSRP of $700 combined with the kit 15-45mm lens, is available today for pre-order (click here to pre-order from Amazon), and will be shipped on October 24th. Be sure to check out the “mint green” version, which you will either love or hate (probably hate). While I’m sure most of you are yawning at this announcement, a few of you are likely going to buy this camera and will enjoy it over the next few years.

Below are some photographs that I captured with a Fujifilm X-A3:

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Endless Canyons – Dead Horse Point SP, UT – Fujifilm X-A3

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La Sal Through Mesa Arch – Canyonlands NP, UT – Fujifilm X-A3

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Hoodoos – Canyonlands NP, UT – Fujifilm X-A3

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Feeling Blue – Canyonlands NP, UT – Fujifilm X-A3

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Kids At The Salt Flats – Wendover, UT – Fujifilm X-A3

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Salty Tree Stumps – Wendover, UT – Fujifilm X-A3

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Salt Water Reflection – Wendover, UT – Fujifilm X-A3

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Stark Salt – Wendover, UT – Fujifilm X-A3

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Canyon River – Grand Canyon NP, AZ – Fujifilm X-A3

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Maricopa Point – Grand Canyon NP, AZ – Fujifilm X-A3

Photoessay: Suburban B&W

You might think that you live in a boring neighborhood. You might think that there’s nothing of interest to photograph where you live. You might think that you have to go somewhere to capture good photographs. This photoessay is intended to debunk that. I live in a boring suburban neighborhood, but I have still made an effort to walk the sidewalks with my camera in hand. This particular collection features some recent black-and-white images that I’ve captured in the neighborhood where I live. In the past I’ve shared many pictures captured in my neighborhood, so these are far from the only ones or even the best ones–they are simply ones that I have not posted on here before. I hope that this article inspires you to get out into your local area with your camera, even if “getting out” is just a short trip around the block.

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Home Peek – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 & Fujinon 35mm f/2

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Shadow Maker – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 & 35mm

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Suburban Pathway – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 & 35mm

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Monochrome American Flag – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 & Asahi Pentax Auto-Takumar 55mm f/2.2

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Geo – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 & Asahi Pentax Auto-Takumar 55mm f/2.2

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House Work – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 & 35mm

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Alaskan Engineer – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 & 35mm

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Ray Above The Roof – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 & Fujinon 90mm

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Hill Behind The Homes – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 & 35mm

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Curious Cow – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 & 35mm

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Grey Fence – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 & 35mm

Fujifilm X-Pro3 Thoughts

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The upcoming X-Pro3 hasn’t been officially announced by Fujifilm, but aspects about the camera have been leaked, and it’s creating quite a stir. Word on the street is that sometime next month Fujifilm will make the official announcement and we’ll know all about the X-Pro3, but in the meantime we have only little glimpses of it, yet a picture of what this new iteration will be is becoming more clear, and more controversial.

Firstly, as has been widely reported across the web, the X-Pro3 will have an unusual rear screen. The X-Pro2 has a flat, non-flipping and non-touch LCD. The new version will have a flip screen, but mounted backwards. When up, you will see the black backside of the screen. To view the LCD, you will have to flip it down. When up, there will be some sort of mini screen that will display the film simulation and perhaps other information. The idea, I believe, is to literally hide the LCD from the user when in use, so that the photographer uses the viewfinder. You can flip the screen down 90° to shoot from the waist, or 180° to review your pictures. It’s highly unusual, and I imagine that most people won’t like it, but if you are looking for a film-camera-like experience, this could help replicate that a little more closely.

Another thing that will be different on the X-Pro3, according to FujiRumors, is it will not have a D-Pad. I’m a little surprised, as I think having both a focus-joystick and D-Pad is a premium feature, something that should absolutely be included on premium cameras. On the less-than-premium models, the D-Pad is removed in favor of touch-screen controls, which works well enough. My concern on the X-Pro3, when you make the touch screen less convenient by mounting it backwards, you should not make the use of it integral to the operating of the camera. The D-Pad solves that, so I’m curious how this is going to work on the new camera since Fujifilm removed it.

What I believe Fujifilm is attempting to do with the X-Pro3 is further separate it from the X-T3. The X-Pro2 and X-T2 are a lot alike, with the main difference being the body shape (SLR vs. rangefinder). Yes, the X-Pro2 has some things, such as the hybrid viewfinder, that the X-T2 doesn’t, and the X-T2 has some things, such as the rear tilt-screen, that the X-Pro2 doesn’t. But in reality they are 95% the same camera. The X-T2 is perhaps very slightly superior technically, while the X-Pro2 is, in my opinion, superior aesthetically, although some might disagree with both of those points. I think Fujifilm’s research shows that many of those who purchased an X-Pro1 or X-Pro2 did so because the camera reminds them of classic 35mm rangefinders, so Fujifilm is using that information to slightly alter the design to enhance that impression. While internally the X-Pro3 and X-T3 will be nearly identical, the shooting experience of the two cameras will be significantly different, and that’s what will separate the two models from each other. What camera you choose will depend on the experience that you desire. My guess is that most will choose the X-T3.

I can see a few possible scenarios regarding the X-Pro3. People might love the changes, find the backwards screen to be revolutionary, and the camera sells even better than previous models. Alternatively, it might be a total flop, as the design choices leave people confused and frustrated, and this might be the last of the X-Pro line, or perhaps an X-Pro3s is released next year with a normal flip screen. Most likely, a dedicated group loves the design while others don’t “get it” and buy a different camera instead, and the camera does about as well as previous versions have done. I suspect that the X-Pro3 will get plenty of attention, unfortunately much of it will be at least somewhat negative, and it won’t receive the high praise of the X-T3. But I also suspect that it will quietly have a cult following and do surprisingly well for itself. I know that I would gladly give it a chance, although budget constraints will likely prevent that from happening anytime soon. It will be interesting to see the final product and observe how well it does in the marketplace, and that time will come pretty quickly.