Digital Holga – Turning My Fujifilm X-T30 Into A Toy Camera

48912047966_979306331a_c

24165836488_fa9221bf4b_c

The Holga is a line of cheap Chinese “toy” cameras that (mostly) use medium-format film. Introduced in 1982, this inexpensive camera was designed to be the everyday tool to capture family moments, although poor quality made it only somewhat successful commercially. It’s known for heavy vignetting, soft focus, blur, and light leaks. While the Holga is not generally considered a good option for serious photographers, it has been used as such, and some famous pictures have been captured with this humble camera. The flaws are what make the Holga special.

I own a Holga 120N, which is perhaps the most common Holga model. I don’t use it often, but I do dust it off every once in awhile, load it with 120 film, and capture 12 square frames. Holga cameras can capture square or rectangular frames, or, if you are feeling really frisky, you can load it with 35mm film. Here are a few photographs that I’ve captured with my Holga camera:

301593_173973112686190_1011456409_n_173973112686190

315641_173982752685226_930013407_n_173982752685226

296753_173982842685217_640288172_n_173982842685217

226184_112198412196994_7845451_n_112198412196994

Like most of you, I’m staying home as much as possible right now due to the worldwide pandemic. For the most part, going places is out of the question, and I wouldn’t really want to even if I could. To foster my creative mind and prevent boredom, I decided to “convert” my Fujifilm X-T30 into a digital Holga camera. I set out to capture Holga-like images out-of-camera. Yes, I could do this by shooting RAW and using software, such as Exposure X5, but I didn’t want to. For me, that would be much less fun.

In “Advanced Filters” Fujifilm has included a “Toy Camera” effect. It’s designed to produce something similar to what you might get out of a Holga camera. Advanced Filters is misnamed, as it’s not well-designed for advanced users. It’s gimmicky. You can’t really change much with it, so what you see is what you get, for better or worse. I set my X-T30 to the Toy Camera effect, set the aspect ratio to 1:1 (square), and Dynamic Range (the only thing you can control) to DR400. To further the Holga effect, I attached my “worst” lens to the camera, an Industar 69, which has flaws not too dissimilar to the lens on my Holga camera. For some pictures, I used page markers to simulate light leaks.

Here are some straight-out-of-camera “Holga” pictures from my X-T30:

49737022097_3849dcbceb_c

49736025473_d84953fb0c_c

49736053228_f07212ae87_c

49739083768_e47656b514_c

49739633746_2169cc5fe8_c

Next, I opened up a rarely-used app on my phone called RNI Films to apply a film preset to the pictures. I used an Agfa Scala option for black-and-white and a Kodak Portra 160 for color. Below you’ll find some pictures where I used the RNI Films app.

B&W

49736025063_44578772d2_c

49736921742_c12ff4c467_c

49736601436_30a4a822f8_c

49739097293_432f9d4d23_c

49739939662_331709b04f_c

Color

49736152523_bf4f3e2a7f_c

49737021722_de8c292078_c

49739578201_4967212877_c

49739905242_eb69b2fb4c_c

49737160697_2abd12bd6f_c

Of course, a Holga experience wouldn’t be complete without double exposures. With a Holga camera, if you don’t advance the film (or you forget to), you can capture multiple exposures by simply opening the shutter again. Unfortunately, you cannot make double exposures on the X-T30 using the Toy Camera effect, so I used the Snapseed app on my phone to combine two exposures. Here are a few examples of using Snapseed to combine two Toy Camera images into one double exposure picture:

49737096922_e913e2338b_c

49737096902_d66b9da65a_c

49736215528_d1e78cb38b_c

While this was a fun experiment, and I’m glad that I did this, the Fujifilm X-T30 isn’t an especially good or practical way of achieving an out-of-camera Holga look. Can you? Sure, to an extent. The use of a couple of apps improves the results. Even so, there are only a few of these pictures that I really like. I think next time I’ll just load a roll of film into my Holga 120N.

My Fujifilm X-T30 Kodak Portra 160 Film Simulation Recipe

49718475416_c243bdc992_c

Summer Waves Hello – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 “Kodak Portra 160”

This is the film simulation recipe that you’ve been waiting for! One of the top films that I’ve been asked to create a film simulation recipe for is Portra 160. I’ve tried many times, and I felt that I got close a couple of times, but I was never able to get it quite right. Fuji X Weekly reader Piotr Skrzypek recently created a Portra 160 film simulation recipe for his Fujifilm X-E2, which he gave me permission to share. I modified his settings very slightly, and published that Portra 160 recipe for X-Trans II cameras last week. Using those settings as a starting point, and understanding how X-Trans II is different than the newer sensors, I was able to make a Portra 160 film simulation recipe that is compatible with X-Trans III & IV cameras.

Portra is a line of films that Kodak introduced in 1998. As the name implies, it was designed for portrait photography, although it has been used for many different genres, as it’s good for more than just portraits. Kodak made Portra in three different ISOs: 160, 400 and 800. The ISO 160 and 400 versions originally had two options: Neutral Color (NC) and Vivid Color (VC). In 2011 Kodak redesigned Portra, and they did away with the Neutral and Vivid versions, making instead only one option in each ISO. Portra has been a popular film since its introduction.

49718431646_9fdf6ee393_c

Horizontal Ladder – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 “Kodak Portra 160”

This recipe looks great when you turn the exposure compensation dial up. You don’t want to clip highlights, but if you keep the highlights just below clipping you can get excellent results. This recipe is especially good for high-contrast scenes. Really, this is a good all-around recipe that you’ll want to keep programmed in your camera’s Q Menu. I imagine that for some of you, this will be the top film simulation recipe that you use most of the time. Don’t be afraid to use Auto-White-Balance instead of Daylight, or to adjust Color up to +2 or down to 0, depending on your tastes.

Classic Chrome
Dynamic Range: DR-Auto
Highlight: -2
Shadow: -2
Color: +1
Noise Reduction: -4
Sharpening: -2
Grain Effect: Weak
Color Chrome Effect: Off
White Balance: Daylight, +4 Red & -5 Blue
ISO: Auto, up to ISO 6400
Exposure Compensation: +2/3 to +1 1/3 (typically)

Example photographs, all camera-made JPEGs using this Kodak Portra 160 film simulation recipe on my Fujifilm X-T30:

49714391966_33d41f4331_c

Last Light Roofline – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

49713840078_e850820071_c

Yellow House – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

49717893098_b46f5ec0dd_c

Rooflines – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

49714691967_3e8a4b7bd0_c

Garages – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

49717937323_8990ab022e_c

Blue Dumpster – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

49714521031_849507bebd_c

Stop – Kaysville, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

49714519756_ec15367087_c

Elevator Trucks – Kaysville, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

49713981198_6b13fa9a33_c

Bird Over Grain Elevator – Kaysville, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

49718740272_abafa4e331_c

Autumn Leftovers – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

49714378926_c7ee124993_c

Sky Reed – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

49714405676_be5528e262_c

Boy in Thought – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

49718003013_788021c4c7_c

Blue Wall Boy – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

49714403041_6a8acfd3cc_c

Girl by the Fence – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

49713864013_8010c0f300_c

Bike Seat – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

49722418511_17337a3d99_c

First Pear Bloom – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

49713850718_d88dd28769_c

Goosenecks – Goosenecks SP, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

49721515893_f387bfa8b5_c

Satellite Dish – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

49714520071_107c5d8884_c

Grey Sky Over Roof – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

49718737417_0f0c0fbd30_c

Red Barn Day – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

49714403011_51364b46fa_c

Sky Blooms – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

See also: Film Simulation Recipes

Fujifilm X100F Review Blog

Help Fuji X Weekly

Nobody pays me to write the content found on fujixweekly.com. There's a real cost to operating and maintaining this site, not to mention all the time that I pour into it. If you appreciated this article, please consider making a one-time gift contribution. Thank you!

$2.00

36 Exposures of Portra 160

49724525651_75c29c58dc_c

Last month I loaded a 36 exposure roll of Portra 160 film into my Asahi Pentax S1 SLR, and attached a Super-Takumar 28mm f/3.5 lens to it. I walked along a trail that borders a ranch and leads to Farmington Bay, which is a wetland near the shore of the Great Salt Lake in Utah, and I snapped a bunch of pictures. I hadn’t shot Portra for a number of years, so I was excited to get the film back from the lab.

Portra is a line of films that Kodak introduced in 1998. As the name implies, it was designed for portrait photography, although it has been used for many different genres, as it’s good for more than just portraits. Kodak made Portra in three different ISOs: 160, 400 and 800. The ISO 160 and 400 versions originally had two options: Neutral Color (NC) and Vivid Color (VC). In 2011 Kodak redesigned Portra, and they did away with the Neutral and Vivid versions, making instead only one option in each ISO. Portra has been a popular film since its introduction.

My 36 exposures of Portra came back from the lab yesterday. I was excited to see the results! As I viewed the scans on my computer, I couldn’t help but recall my great appreciation for this film and film photography. Portra 160 is wonderful! It makes me want to ditch digital and go back to my analog roots, as there’s something special about film that you just can’t replicate with modern cameras. Below are some of those 36 exposures of Portra 160 that I shot last month. Enjoy!

49721519198_e544076e1c_c

49722057411_25e23093c6_c

49722372377_6b768f6b09_c

49721519273_3cb6ece0d3_c

49721479873_1242a9055e_c

49722333287_c5b1c6472d_c

49721490748_448cafda31_c

49722345327_38bf26b718_c

49721490723_e3a2b96073_c

49722332277_8f12c94734_c

49722029681_c12dc0ae36_c

49721478263_db89477e99_c

49721491883_672b3d26ee_c

49721490493_4529c9724b_c

49721478298_9ac7d110c8_c

49722333207_6ea6138f84_c

You might notice that the date of this article is April 1st, which is April Fools Day. I did not, in fact, shoot these pictures on Portra film. They were captured on my iPhone. Just kidding! Yesterday I shot 36 exposures of a new film simulation recipe that will be called “Portra 160” on my Fujifilm X-T30. I did, in fact, use the 28mm Super-Takumar lens. This new film simulation recipe, which is what I used for these pictures, is compatible with all X-Trans III & IV cameras. I hope to publish the recipe later this week, so stay tuned!

[Not] My Fujifilm X-T1 (X-Trans II) Kodak Portra 160 Film Simulation Recipe

49699176683_cae083b92d_c

Mitchell Mesa – Monument Valley, AZ – Fujifilm X-T1 “Kodak Portra 160”

Kodak introduced Portra film in 1998. As the name implies, this film was designed for portrait photography, as it produces pleasing skin tones. It came in three ISO options: 160, 400 and 800. The ISO 160 and 400 versions came in two varieties: Neutral Color (NC), which was less saturated, and Vivid Color (VC), which was more saturated. In 2011 Kodak did away with the Neutral Color and Vivid Color options, making a new version that was more-or-less in-between the two.

One of the top films that I’ve been asked to create a film simulation recipe for is Portra 160. I’ve tried many times, and I felt that I got close a couple of times, but I was never able to get it quite right. Fuji X Weekly reader Piotr Skrzypek recently created a Portra 160 film simulation recipe for his Fujifilm X-E2, and he gave me permission to share his settings with you! When I first looked at his pictures, I immediately thought that they resembled Portra, and I continued to think so as I used his recipe on my X-T1. Piotr has a lot of experience shooting film, and the main film that he uses is Portra 160. I’ve shot Portra before, but it’s been many years. How the film is shot, developed, and printed or scanned effects the way that it looks, so results can vary, but this recipe is overall an excellent facsimile of actual Portra 160 film. Great job, Piotr Skrzypek!

49709251142_d67a111630_c

Portra – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T1 “Kodak Portra 160”

I did alter Piotr’s recipe a little. I have Color set to +1, but he has Color set to +2, which I think more mimics Portra 160VC. Whether you set Color to +1 or +2, you are still getting a Portra look, and you can try it both ways and decide which you like better for your photographs. You can even try setting color to 0 to get a Portra 160NC look. The other change I made is to white balance, which I set to Daylight, while Piotr uses auto-white-balance. In many outdoor circumstances Daylight and AWB will produce identical results, so for the most part it doesn’t matter which you choose. I like Daylight a little more than AWB, but you can decide which you prefer for yourself. This recipe is intended for X-Trans II cameras, but there will be a Portra 160 recipe for X-Trans III and IV cameras coming soon!

Classic Chrome
Dynamic Range: DR-Auto
Highlight: -2 (Low)
Shadow: -2 (Low)
Color: +1 (Medium-High)
Sharpness: -2 (Low)
Noise Reduction: -2 (Low)
White Balance: Daylight, +3 Red & -4 Blue
ISO: Auto, up to ISO 3200

Example photographs, all camera-made JPEGs using this Kodak Portra 160 recipe on my Fujifilm X-T1:

49701971201_9c0600dabc_c

Snow on the Roofs – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T1

49702288112_34d8d3e022_c

Roof Snow – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm  X-T1

49700004812_fb1d40f39a_c

Faux Green – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T1

49705089056_0a0fa9dc04_c

Beside the Window – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T1

49700020707_4e2282a24d_c

Silver & Green – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T1

49701431443_c19aebc86a_c

Green Stems – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T1

49701953696_3774778736_c

Bright Blossoms – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T1

49699177038_513f9d241a_c

Future Fujifilm Photographer – Monument Valley, AZ – Fujifilm X-T1

49699179983_a3455d2a11_c

Girl, Horse & Books – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T1

49700005022_699e02f7e5_c

The Peg Game – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T1

49700004872_1ba73723ff_c

Girl & Game – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T1

49699710636_03e36a05be_c

Wood Ladder – Edge of the Cedars SP, UT – Fujifilm X-T1

49699710236_5717bfdcc4_c

Monumental Crosswalk – Monument Valley, UT – Fujifilm X-T1

49700021457_be64f668c6_c

Four Desert Horses – Monument Valley, AZ – Fujifilm X-T1

49699708476_5089f45f7f_c

Mittens Evening – Monument Valley, AZ – Fujifilm X-T1

49699711301_672183fb33_c

Rural Grass – Farmington Bay, UT – Fujifilm X-T1

49699180118_13a9c77e8f_c

Reeds & Mountain – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T1

See also:
Fujifilm X-T1 Kodacolor Recipe
Fujifilm X-T1 Kodachrome II Recipe
Fujifilm X-T1 Kodachrome 64 Recipe
Fujifilm X-T1 Ektachrome 100SW Recipe
Fujifilm X-T1 Agfa Optima Recipe

Fujifilm X100F Review Blog

Help Fuji X Weekly

Nobody pays me to write the content found on fujixweekly.com. There's a real cost to operating and maintaining this site, not to mention all the time that I pour into it. If you appreciated this article, please consider making a one-time gift contribution. Thank you!

$2.00

My Fujifilm X-T30 Cross Process Film Simulation Recipe

49691639643_658f55d205_c

Pot in the Sky – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 “Cross Process”

My last film simulation recipe was modeled after a look by photographer Jeff Davenport. Jeff has several different aesthetics, depending on his project. His Venice Beach Canals series has an interesting look that I wanted to attempt. I recognized right away the “look” that he created: orange and teal. Early color photography used two color layers (instead of three), orange-red and blue-teal. Digital software can mimic this aesthetic, and the strength of it can be adjusted. Exposure X5 software has a one-click preset for it. Jeff has customized his images to where both orange and pink lean towards peach.

I had a few ideas of how to create this look in-camera on my Fujifilm X-T30. I tried out those ideas and did some experiments, but unfortunately none of them worked. What you see here is the closest that I came to recreating Jeff’s Venice Beach Canals aesthetic. It’s not especially close, but I like it nonetheless. What this recipe actually reminds me of is Provia or Sensia cross processed. Cross processing color reversal film in C-41 chemicals isn’t uncommon. I’ve done it several times myself. I’ve already created a cross process film simulation recipe, but that recipe and this one produce somewhat different looks, despite both emulating cross processed film.

49692196596_1dbf4b65f6_c

Riding Around the Cones – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 “Cross Process”

When I created this film simulation recipe, I didn’t intend for it to look cross processed. It was after the fact that I decided it resembled that analog effect. If I wanted it to more resemble cross processed film, I’d probably set Grain to Strong, and consider setting Shadows to 0; however, I do like the results from the recipe as-is. Feel free to adjust it to your own personal preferences. This recipe is compatible with X-Trans III & IV cameras.

Classic Chrome
Dynamic Range: DR400
Highlight: +4
Shadow: -1
Color: +3
Noise Reduction: -4
Sharpness: +1
Grain Effect: Weak
Color Chrome Effect: Off
White Balance: 7700K, -8 Red & -3 Blue
ISO: Auto, up to ISO 6400
Exposure Compensation: -1/3 to -2/3 (typically)

Example photographs, all camera-made JPEGs using this Cross Process film simulation recipe on my Fujifilm X-T30:

49691653308_2c681f27f0_c

Cloud over Apex – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

49692496722_11808d69f6_c

Four Garages – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

49692498342_24af56e4de_c

Bike & Cones – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

49691228151_748b97d932_c

Roofline & Siding – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

49691640983_81d88fc344_c

Bike Park Bench – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

49692497662_feb40ceb54_c

Tennis Racket – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

49692182316_e7183db908_c

Razor – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

49692195001_c2d583688d_c

Self Shadow – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

49691653333_2a66e49294_c

Pedaling Around – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

49691231796_128fdfe49e_c

Reeds Cross Process – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

See also: Film Simulation Recipes

Fujifilm X100F Review Blog

Help Fuji X Weekly

Nobody pays me to write the content found on fujixweekly.com. There's a real cost to operating and maintaining this site, not to mention all the time that I pour into it. If you appreciated this article, please consider making a one-time gift contribution. Thank you!

$2.00

My Fujifilm X-T30 Jeff Davenport Night Recipe

49682742378_aa9effa7b4_c

Reflected Red – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 “Jeff Davenport Night”

I was asked to create a film simulation recipe that mimics the aesthetics of photographer Jeff Davenport. Interestingly enough, Jeff uses Fujifilm cameras (X100F and X-H1). He shoots RAW and has his own post-processing workflow that allows him to create the specific looks that he wants. He has a few different styles, depending on what (and what time) he’s shooting. Jeff has several different photographic series, and each has its own look. My attempt here was to create something in-camera that produces results similar to his night pictures.

This recipe, which I call Jeff Davenport Night, isn’t an exact match to Jeff’s look, but it’s pretty close. His blue tends to lean slightly more towards green, but if I replicate that it throws everything else off. Orange in his pictures tend to turn red, which is something I can’t replicate. I think a lot of how a picture looks (both in Jeff’s case and with these settings) depends on the light in the scene. Results can vary greatly. Jeff might possibly use flash with colored gels, as well (something you could try if you wanted). Anyway, despite not being exact, this recipe is pretty close to recreating his look in-camera on my Fujifilm X-T30.

If you want a recipe that is good for night photography, this is one you should consider, along with my CineStill 800T recipe, because of the Kelvin temperature of the white balance, which goes well with artificial light. You don’t have to use it exclusively after dark, as results can be interesting sometimes when used in daylight. It’s fun to experiment with! For night photography, this will be one of your best options.

49683278031_2c6d0ccefb_c

Pleiku – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 “Jeff Davenport Night”

When I attached my camera to a tripod, I used ISO 1600 or lower. When I did hand-held photography, I used up to ISO 6400. I think if you can take your time and use a tripod, it’s good to use a lower ISO, but you can still get good results with higher ISOs. Because of the use of the Color Chrome Effect, this recipe is intended for X-Trans IV cameras, but feel free to try it on your X-Trans III camera; it will look very similar, but not exactly the same.

PRO Neg. Hi
Dynamic Range: DR400
Highlight: +1
Shadow: +0
Color: +2
Noise Reduction: -4
Sharpness: +1
Grain Effect: Weak
Color Chrome Effect: Strong
White Balance: 2650K, -1 Red & +4 Blue

Example photographs, all camera-made JPEGs using this “Jeff Davenport Night” recipe on my Fujifilm X-T30:

49681936621_66a99d6867_c

Button – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

49683275376_8fb75386b4_c

Unlucky 13 Take Out – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

49682744998_526782cde0_c

Blue Street – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

49683569267_e6b7254c84_c

Blue Buildings – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

49682226992_378eb143db_c

Blue Lights – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

49683449836_6d9c9741a9_c

So Much Bicycling – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

49683277071_fe6e80088f_c

Red – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

49670310113_bf26c9f81f_c

Closed Red Umbrellas – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

49679464263_70e39daed8_c

Parked Car at Night – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

49679463853_944928d826_c

Night Hotel – Farmington, UT -Fujifilm X-T30

49679464838_d373bfccc3_c

Caution Poles – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

49679995786_be6b3cff01_c

Dumpster 204 – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

49658394973_903e321c9f_c

Lights Beyond The Rooftop – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

49658395133_a4db97fa17_c

Nighttime Neighborhood – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

49658941061_43980663c7_c

Francis Peak at Night – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

49678428167_21f399d22b_c

Reach for the Sky – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

49678143656_e9d64af77d_c

Illuminated Houses – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

49680282597_e6b2968408_c

Wind Sock – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

49681933511_311c002493_c

No Thanks – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

49681935331_4f89fff640_c

Earn Points – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

49682232567_6542aa24fd_c

Refining – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

49681937636_a611151abe_c

Night Walking – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

49681396718_0e229122e2_c

McKay – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

49683573002_14b7d93775_c

Flag & Window – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

49682917338_5161143c5c_c

Illuminated Blue – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

49683449471_4d14840213_c

Multi-Color Triangle – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

49683746437_8d475f503b_c

Center Street Lamp – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

49683573047_597329d3b6_c

Don’t – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

49683278076_6fa46610c7_c

Wet Glass Bokeh – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

See also: Film Simulation Recipes

Fujifilm X100F Review Blog

Help Fuji X Weekly

Nobody pays me to write the content found on fujixweekly.com. There's a real cost to operating and maintaining this site, not to mention all the time that I pour into it. If you appreciated this article, please consider making a one-time gift contribution. Thank you!

$2.00

 

Fujifilm X-T1 Agfa Optima (Provia) Film Simulation Recipe


49671501026_e0c6bffa21_c

Reeds & Mountain – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T1 “Agfa Optima”

The film simulation recipe in this article is my Agfa Optima recipe, which is compatible with X-Trans III & IV cameras, converted for use on my Fujifilm X-T1. While the X-T1 is an X-Trans II camera, you can also use this recipe on X-Trans I and Bayer sensor cameras. Agfa Optima is a color negative film that was around from the mid-1990’s to the mid-2000’s.

Provia
Dynamic Range: DR100
Highlight: -1 (Medium-Low)
Shadow: +1 (Medium-High)
Color: -2 (Low)
Sharpness: 0 (Medium)
Noise Reduction: -2 (Low)
White Balance: Daylight, -3 Red & +1 Blue
ISO: Auto, up to ISO 3200

Example photographs, all camera-made JPEGs using this Agfa Optima recipe on my Fujifilm X-T1:

49677671741_4e6c56c5ef_c

Eggs in a Bowl – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T1

49677139998_d54da562b4_c

Take a Picture Pronto – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T1

49671483431_d21b6ec6e1_c

Fruity Cereal – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T1

49674202233_973930b0c6_c

Stealth Mode – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T1

 

49671483201_75bf79bb2b_c

Suburban Alleyway – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T1

49671483571_99cfb38546_c

Windows & Shadows – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T1

49671767972_9fa473858e_c

Pine Tree & Sky – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T1

49671768307_44916c4d79_c

Green & Fence – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T1

49671483726_68b1d45a13_c

Rural Metal Fence – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T1

49671492281_e3a1a68e2d_c

Marshland Sky – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T1

See also: Film Simulation Recipes

Fujifilm X100F Review Blog

Help Fuji X Weekly

Nobody pays me to write the content found on fujixweekly.com. There's a real cost to operating and maintaining this site, not to mention all the time that I pour into it. If you appreciated this article, please consider making a one-time gift contribution. Thank you!

$2.00

My Fujifilm X-T30 Classic Slide Film Simulation Recipe


49650724577_63d1178d25_c

Winter Reeds – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 “Classic Slide”

A lot of my film simulation recipes lean towards a warm cast. In the film days, many different films, especially those by Kodak, tended to lean warm. I often used a warming filter for my landscape photography, which made an even more pronounced color cast. This was all very common and normal. But not all films were balanced that way, not even all of Kodak’s. Since films have a specific Kelvin temperature (often “daylight balanced”), the light conditions could create a cool cast even on a warm-toned film. I decided that I needed another film simulation option with a cool color cast, because film isn’t always warm, and sometimes the scene demands something that’s cool.

I call this film simulation recipe “Classic Slide” because it has a slide-film aesthetic, in my opinion. I didn’t go about trying to mimic the look of any specific film. I think it’s in the neighborhood of Ektachrome 100G, or Elite Chrome 100, or Provia 100F and 400X, although it’s not an exact match to any of those films. It’s probably a bit closer to Provia than Ektachrome. It has a general color reversal film look, without matching any one in particular.

49650461431_50440ccaf5_c

Indoor Green – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 “Classic Slide”

To create this film simulation recipe I began with my Kodachrome 64 recipe. You might notice many similarities. In fact, the white balance shift is the biggest change. I adjusted Sharpness down one notch just because Kodachrome was known as a “sharp” film, and this isn’t Kodachrome, but, in reality, the difference between +1 and +2 is tiny. I also set Color Chrome Effect to Off, which makes it completely compatible with all X-Trans III & IV cameras.

Classic Chrome
Dynamic Range: DR400
Highlight: +1
Shadow: +2
Color: 0
Sharpening: +1
Noise Reduction: -4
Grain: Weak
Color Chrome Effect: Off
White Balance: Daylight, -2 Red & +3 Blue
ISO: Auto up to ISO 6400
Exposure Compensation: +1/3 to +2/3 (typically)

Example photographs, all camera-made JPEGs using this Classic Slide film simulation recipe on my Fujifilm X-T30:

49657081307_88c7f4c492_c

Yellow Couch – Layton, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

49652964393_8d0cbb6a2c_c

Chair & Blue Pillow – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

49657083837_026d550bf8_c

Green Leaves Indoors – Layton, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

49650449261_2526693c7f_c

Dresser Decor – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

49653508706_f48d035c91_c

Laying in the Light – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

49650449436_00e58be5e4_c

Blinded by the Light – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

49649900153_8328956be4_c

Duck out of Water – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

49653763912_3644d1ff8b_c

Crossing Flags – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

49653763332_e088fc978a_c

Remaining Relic in Disrepair II – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

49650424676_835cc593b7_c

Francis Peak in Evening Light – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

Fujifilm X100F Review Blog

Help Fuji X Weekly

Nobody pays me to write the content found on fujixweekly.com. There's a real cost to operating and maintaining this site, not to mention all the time that I pour into it. If you appreciated this article, please consider making a one-time gift contribution. Thank you!

$2.00

Kodacolor Film Simulation Recipe, Part 2

49653763352_d258940451_c

Remaining Relic in Disrepair – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

One of the most popular film simulation recipes that I’ve created is Kodacolor, which mimics the look of Kodacolor VR film, and ColorPlus 200 (the same film re-branded). A Fuji X Weekly reader recently asked me to create a recipe that resembles the aesthetic of photographer Stephen Shore. Stephen has been around for many, many years, and he’s still photographing today. Over the decades he’s used many different films, and perhaps even digital in recent years, but most notably he shot Kodacolor in 35mm, 4″ x 5″ medium-format, and especially 8″ x 10″ large format.

When I was looking at Stephen Shore’s pictures, there was something about it that seemed “off” when compared to my Kodacolor recipe. Close, but off. Some of that could be attributed to the use of different films, or how the film was shot, developed and/or printed. Then I read that the medium-format and especially the large-format versions of Kodacolor film were more vibrant, more saturated, then the 35mm version, and I realized why my recipe seemed off. It needed Color to be turned up in order to mimic Stephen Shore’s pictures.

This is not a new recipe. It is my Kodacolor recipe with one change: Color is to 0 instead of -2. That’s it! The results are only subtly different, but closer to Stephen Shore’s aesthetic. I think, alternatively, setting Grain to Weak could also be appropriate, but I left it at Strong. All of the pictures in this article were captured using this modified Kodacolor recipe on my Fujifilm X-T30. This recipe (as well as the original Kodacolor recipe) is compatible with all X-Trans III & IV cameras.

Classic Chrome
Dynamic Range: DR400
Highlight: -1
Shadow: +2
Color: 0
Sharpening: +2
Noise Reduction: -4
Grain: Strong
Color Chrome Effect: Off
White Balance: 6300K, -1 Red & -4 Blue
ISO: Auto up to ISO 6400
Exposure Compensation: +2/3 to + 1-1/3 (typically)

49650698657_cb7b3a4aab_c

Francis Peak Afternoon – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

49650460861_857d80f651_c

March Reeds – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

49656791146_1941c8c258_c

Ready To Swing – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

49657083537_2496cf98c7_c

Potted Plant by a Window – Layton, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

49656802986_4904007235_c

Pointing Towards the Sky – Layton, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

49650439681_6710b89e10_c

House Window – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

49650733847_859190fd84_c

Colorful Neighborhood – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

49653482491_5fd9d400dd_c

Kiss The Crepes – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

49653762862_6780df05c9_c

5:20 – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

49653502431_dc034a9ee6_c

Packed Parking Lot – Bountiful, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

See also: Kodacolor for X-Trans II

My Fujifilm X-T30 Monochrome Kodachrome Film Simulation Recipe


49650712947_d12c3dafbc_c

Light on the Wall – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 “Monochrome Kodachrome”

Kodachrome was a black-and-white film. No, really, it was! The color dyes were actually added during development. The process to develop Kodachrome color transparencies was complex and toxic. As demand for the film decreased and Kodak experienced financial troubles, both the film and the chemicals to develop it were discontinued. If you still have some undeveloped Kodachrome film sitting around, there’s absolutely no place in the world that can process it; that is, except as black-and-white negatives. It’s true: Kodachrome can be developed to this day as a black-and-white film!

While I think that this recipe does more-or-less mimic the look of Kodachrome developed as black-and-white, that’s not necessarily the intent of it. This recipe began as an experiment by Fuji X Weekly reader Thomas Schwab, who created the Urban Vintage Chrome recipe. He took my Vintage Kodachrome recipe and replaced the Classic Chrome film simulation with Acros, Monochrome and Sepia, and the results were quite interesting! I made a couple of minor adjustments to create this recipe. This is definitely a joint effort, and it wouldn’t exist without Thomas Schwab’s experiments and willingness to share the results. Thank you!

49657082752_0b87e234b6_c

Window & Blinds – Layton, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 “Monochrome Kodachrome”

What I like about this Monochrome Kodachrome film simulation recipe is that it has a great film-like quality to it. This recipe pairs especially well with vintage lenses (I used an Asahi Super-Takumar 28mm for about half of these pictures). Even though it says “Fujifilm X-T30” in the title, it can be used on any X-Trans III & IV camera. You can also use this same recipe with the Monocrome+R film simulation, for a slightly different result.

Acros+R
Dynamic Range: DR200
Highlight: +4
Shadow: -2
Noise Reduction: -4
Sharpening: +1
Grain Effect: Strong
Color Chrome Effect: Off
Toning: 0
White Balance: AWB, 0 Red & +9 Blue
ISO: Auto, ISO 3200 to ISO 12800
Exposure Compensation: -1/3 to +2/3 (typically)

Example photographs, all camera-made JPEGs using this Monochrome Kodachrome film simulation recipe on my Fujifilm X-T30:

49650698947_1a6bacb2ac_c

Roman – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

49656802726_775f23af3c_c

Cleaning Cart – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

49649934993_f273110ff2_c

Fake Potted Plant – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

49653483786_302aa4906a_c

Tree Shadow on a Brick Wall – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

49656254028_0fb853b802_c

Small Bridge – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

49656791826_8fe785b142_c

Rural Road – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

49656254163_dee22bc5a9_c

Monochrome Mountain Landscape – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

49650451196_378acfca2b_c

B&W Reeds – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

49656255203_6907a1dc20_c

Tennis Swing – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

49649921743_b02a5efb9b_c

Engaged In Television – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

49650474646_468c41ce44_c

Little Jo – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

49650425846_b51c8fb4f4_c

Hand Washing – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

49650439601_14969e5d6e_c

Faceless – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

49653782217_d17a0808c9_c

Muffins – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

49650746112_b38c768b16_c

Pronto! – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

49649898123_1b70706493_c

Daylight Balanced – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

See also: Film Simulation Recipes

Fujifilm X100F Review Blog

Help Fuji X Weekly

Nobody pays me to write the content found on fujixweekly.com. There's a real cost to operating and maintaining this site, not to mention all the time that I pour into it. If you appreciated this article, please consider making a one-time gift contribution. Thank you!

$2.00