How To Add Texture To Your In-Camera JPEGs

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Green Mountain On Canvas – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 – Canvas

A creative option found in many photo editing programs is texture. The texture, which might be canvas, paper, cloth, wood, etc., is added as a layer which can be blended as strongly or subtly as one might want. It’s a fun technique that adds an unexpected element to pictures. I used to occasionally do this when I used Alien Skin Exposure software. There are even some specialty films that have texture built-in, such as Revolog Texture films.

When I was experimenting with my Faded Color and Faded Monochrome film simulation recipes, which use double-exposure photography to create a vintage film aesthetic, it occurred to me that I could use the double-exposure feature of my Fujifilm X-T30 to add texture to my pictures in-camera. I could get a textured look without software. Incredible! So I begun to experiment with textured JPEGs, and the results were interesting.

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Canvas Daisy – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 – Canvas

You might ask, “I can do this in Photoshop in only a few seconds, so why would I want to do this in-camera?” That’s a good question that deserves a lengthy explanation. I used to shoot RAW, but I rely on camera-made JPEGs now. Why? It saves me tons of time and makes my photographs more honest. Since I started shooting JPEGs, my photography production has gone through the roof while my total time investment in photography has noticeably dropped. I’m creating more with less. It’s all thanks to Fujifilm’s superb JPEG engine. The honesty statement is a little more controversial, but it’s clear that photography in general has taken a large perception hit when it comes to integrity. Non-photographers (photography consumers) don’t take a picture at face value anymore, and “Photoshop” has negative connotations. People ask me, “How much is this Photoshopped?” I answer, “None of it, this is how the camera captured it. This picture is unedited.” You’d be surprised at the overwhelming positive responses that I get from this answer. People find it refreshing. Photographers don’t see anything wrong with photo manipulation; however, many non-photographers feel that it’s not the image that’s being manipulated by the photographer, but the general public. They feel as though they’re being tricked by dishonesty. Whether or not that perception is fair or should exist is a whole different discussion, but you can avoid it altogether by shooting JPEGs. People are looking for authenticity, and this is one way to move in that direction.

To capture a photograph with texture on your Fujifilm camera, you will first need to enable the double-exposure feature of your camera. On the X-T30 it’s found on a knob on top of the camera. You can use any film simulation, but note that double-exposure pictures on the camera will be flatter (have less contrast), so Velvia, Classic Chrome and Acros work best because they have more contrast. Astia and PRO Neg. Hi work alright, as well. You will want to have Highlight and Shadow set no lower than +2, and more might give better results. Don’t be afraid to try +4 on one or both. I also recommend DR100, and DR200 if the scene has a lot of contrast. I find that for the main exposure, exposure compensation typically needs to be in the +1/3 to +1 range. The second exposure, which will be the texture exposure, typically needs exposure compensation set to -1 to -2, and I usually start at -2 and adjust as necessary. The camera will show you what the picture will look like, and it also allows do-overs if you need it.

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Hanging B&W Picture – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 – Canvas

For texture, I found the best results came from a white stretched canvas for painting. I also tried other things, like burlap, cloth, paper, wood and metal, but the results weren’t as good in my opinion. I recommend trying different materials and seeing for yourself what you like or don’t like. After capturing the main exposure, capture a second exposure of the textured object. It’s really that simple. The camera gives a 50/50 blend of the two exposures, but because the first exposure is brighter and the second is darker, it will appear more in the neighborhood of 70/30, which is what you want. It might appear as though the image is actually printed on a textured surface.

This is a simple but creative way to use the double-exposure feature of your camera. You could really play around with this and get inventive. Try different settings, different subjects and different textures and see what happens. Below are examples of textured pictures I created using this technique on my Fujifilm X-T30:

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Afternoon Mountain – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 – Canvas

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Crop of the above image.

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Spring Green Hill – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 – Canvas

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Crop of the above image.

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Backlit Sycamore Leaf – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 – Canvas

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Crop of the above image.

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Hazy Light Tree Leaf – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 – Canvas

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Crop of the above image.

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Tree Trunk In The Corner – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 – Canvas

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Crop of the above image.

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Weed Flower Canvas – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 -Canvas

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Crop of the above image.

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Yellow Flower on Canvas – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 – Canvas

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Crop of the above image.

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Yellow Blossom Burlap – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 – Burlap

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Bottle Still Life – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 – Canvas

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Coffee Still Life – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 – Metal

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Blue R – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 – Canvas

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Film on Canvas – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 – Canvas

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E To H – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 – Canvas

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Zenit E on Wood – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 – Wood

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Wood Mountain – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 – Wood

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Knot A Mountain – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 – Wood

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Window Birds Texture – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 – Cloth

My Fujifilm X-T30 Redscale Film Simulation Recipe

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Red Hill – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 – “Redscale”

Redscale is a photographic technique where you shoot film backwards. Instead of shooting the film through the front, you shoot it through the backside. In order to do this, one must load the film into the canister backwards, or buy film that’s already been purposefully loaded backwards. Normally, in color negative film, the red layer is exposed last, for the light has passed through other layers and filters before it reaches it. When you shoot from the wrong side, light hits the red layer first. The results can be quite unique!

What’s interesting about Redscale photography is that the results can vary greatly, depending on the film, exposure and development. Most commonly, Redscale images have a strong maroon, red, orange or yellow color cast. Sometimes the color cast can be extraordinarily bold and sometimes it can be quite subtle. Even one roll of film can produce different looks depending on the light and how it was shot. Generally speaking, darker images tend to be more red and brighter images tend to be more yellow, but there are certainly exceptions to that. A Redscale image is easy to spot when you see one, but it can be difficult to strictly define the aesthetic.

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Peach Morning – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 – “Redscale”

I was asked by Fuji X Weekly reader Aycan Gonenc to create a Redscale film simulation. He had developed one already and shared his settings with me, but was hoping that I might make some improvements. I made some changes and adjustments and the results are this recipe, so it is a collaborative effort. What I will say is that the settings can be adjusted considerably, and one can still achieve a Redscale look. Simply change the film simulation from Astia to something else and you will create a different Redscale look. The white balance can be dropped to as low as 7700K, and the shift can have blue added or subtracted. Any of the settings can be adjusted to taste. These settings are only what I felt would produce a good Redscale facsimile, and I believe it does that.

Astia
Dynamic Range: DR200
Highlight: +1
Shadow: +2
Color: -2
Noise Reduction: -4
Sharpening: -2
Grain Effect: Strong
Color Chrome Effect: Strong
White Balance: 10000K, +9 Red & 0 Blue
ISO: Auto up to ISO 6400
Exposure Compensation: -1/3 to +1/3 (typically)

Example photographs, all camera-made JPEGs captured using my Redscale film simulation recipe on a Fujifilm X-T30:

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Building Sky – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Cloud Around The Ridge – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Red Mountain – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Overcast Ridge – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Clouds Floating Above The Mountain – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Orange Hill Under Red Sky – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Westbound I-84 – Peterson, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Evening Freight – Henefer, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Wood Fence Roses – South Weber, Utah – Fujifilm X-T30

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Red Rose Fence – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Really Red Rose – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Pink Bud – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Floral Red – Ogden, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Yellow Rose Gold – Ogden, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Daisy Red – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Small Wild Blossoms – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Corner Trunk – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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T is for Tree – Ogden, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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An American Home – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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299 – Coalville, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Red Engineer – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Continental Bike Tire – Ogden, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Red Window – South Weber, Utah – Fujifilm X-T30

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Night Window – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Red Cross – Layton, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Tree Top – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Sunlit Leaf – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Russian Red – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Bolsey Orange – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Red Birds – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Red Eye Horse – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Girl & Hungry Horse – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Cat Cone – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Tractor Mirror – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Stucco Lamp – South Ogden, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Iced Coffee Cups – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

My Fujifilm X-T30 Faded Monochrome Film Simulation Recipe

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All Aboard Boy – Ogden, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 – “Faded Monochrome”

I love the results of my Faded Color recipe, so creating a Faded Monochrome recipe was a natural next step. This film simulation recipe requires the use of the double-exposure feature of the camera. The first exposure is a normal photo, and the second exposure is of something plain white. I’ve tried different things, but for me a 4″ x 6″ plain white index card works well. No need for the second exposure to be in focus. It’s a simple idea that I wish I had thought of earlier. I think I’ve just scratched the surface of what can be created using this technique.

In film photography, you could achieve a similar look by printing with a low-contrast filter. You could also develop the film for low contrast by adjusting any number of things in the lab. You might also get this look by accident if you reused the fixer one too many times. Sometimes underexposed pushed-processed film has a very similar aesthetic. It’s possible for negatives to fade over time, especially if not stored correctly, and that, too, might create a similar look. While “faded” is in the title of this recipe, the look isn’t so much faded as it is low-contrast with “milky” blacks. It works especially well for high-contrast scenes.

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Morning Coffee – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 – “Faded Monochrome”

To use this recipe, you will create two exposures using the double-exposure feature of your camera. The first exposure is the main image, and the second exposure is of something plain white, such as a 4″ x 6″ plain white index card. There is no need for the second exposure to be in focus. The exposure compensation for the second exposure can vary greatly depending on how bright the white is and how you want the picture to look. You will have to play around with it to figure out what works for you. The good news is that your camera will give you a preview of the finished image and will allow do-overs.

Acros (Acros+Y, Acros+R, Acros+G)
Dynamic Range: DR100
Highlight: +4
Shadow: +4
Noise Reduction: -4
Sharpening: +2
Grain Effect: Strong
Color Chrome Effect: Strong
Toning: 0 (Neutral)
ISO: Auto up to ISO 12800
Exposure Compensation: +1/3 to +1 (main exposure), 0 to -2 (second exposure)

Example photographs, all camera-made JPEGs using my Faded Monochrome recipe on a Fujifilm X-T30:

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Grey Rose – SLC, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Grey Lake – East Canyon SP, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Lake Boat – Willard Bay SP, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Tree Limbs – SLC, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Well – SLC, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Don’t Give – SLC, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Urban Escape – SLC, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Big Brick Buildings – SLC, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Center Reflection – SLC, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Urbanscape Monochrome – SLC, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Less Is More – SLC, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Urban Leaves – SLC, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Small Flower In The Big City – SLC, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Park Bench – Ogden, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Joshua Monochrome – Ogden, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Happy Girl – Ogden, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Children On A Park Slide – Ogden, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Instax Photographer – SLC, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Joy In The City – SLC, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Bank Time – SLC, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Water On The Glass – SLC, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Club – Ogden, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Stepping By – Ogden, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Vibes – Ogden, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Quiet – SLC, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Urban Cloud – SLC, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Angles & Lines – SLC, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Utah Artist – SLC, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Treading Lightly – SLC, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Marlboro Man – SLC, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Come Inside – SLC, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Mono Chrome – SLC, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Stop In Ogden – Ogden, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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UTA Station – Layton, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Train Ride Abstract – Kaysville, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Empty Train Seats – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Train Passenger – Roy, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Passenger Window – Layton, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Train 19 – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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UTA 19 – Ogden, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Train Host – Ogden, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Hungry Traveler – Ogden, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Caboose Steps Monochrome – Ogden, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Caboose Display – Ogden, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Industrial Sunlight – Ogden, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Ladder Climb – Ogden, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

Weekly Photo Project, Week 44

I must apologize because you’ve likely already seen most of these pictures before. The first three photographs were captured using my “Expired Eterna” recipe and the last two were captured using my “Fujicolor 100 Industrial” recipe, and the pictures were included in those articles. Even so, I hope that you appreciate this set.

Sunday, June 2, 2019

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Bright Storm Clouds – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 & Asahi Auto-Takumar 55mm f/2.2 – 1/250, aperture unknown, ISO 160

Monday, June 3, 2019

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Red Tricycle – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 & Asahi Auto-Takumar 55mm f/2.2 – 1/750, aperture unknown, ISO 160

Tuesday, June 4, 2019

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Lady’s Sun Hat – Ogden, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 & Asahi Auto-Takumar 55mm f/2.2 – 1/420, aperture unknown, ISO 160

Wednesday, June 5, 2019

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White Arrow – Ogden, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 & 90mm f/2 – 1/1000, f/8, ISO 640

Thursday, June 6, 2019

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Green Slope & Melting Snow – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 & 50-230mm @217mm – 1/1500, f/8, ISO 640

Friday, June 7, 2019

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Rosebud Sky – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 & 90mm f/2 – 1/4400, f/5, ISO 640

Saturday, June 8, 2019

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Leaves In The Sky – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 & 90mm – 1/2000, f/8, ISO 640

Week 43

My Fujifilm X-T30 Faded Color Film Simulation Recipe

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Fading Memories – Ogden, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 – “Faded Color”

This recipe is a failure. More accurately, it’s a failed attempt at a certain aesthetic. It doesn’t look like what I was hoping it would look like. It’s close, but no cigar. What it does look like are faded color photographs from perhaps the 1950’s through 1970’s. I have some old issues of Arizona Highways magazine from the 1950’s, and these pictures have a similar look to what’s found in those magazines. You might have some old family photos that have faded over time and perhaps look like the pictures that this recipe creates. You can also achieve this washed-out “milky” look through darkroom techniques. Even though this recipe doesn’t look like what I was trying to create, it looks really amazing, and I am astonished that this look can be achieved in-camera.

What I was trying to create was a certain cinematic characteristic. I was asked by a Fuji X Weekly reader to create a film simulation recipe that produces a look similar to the aesthetic of the Wong Kar Wai movie Chungking Express. I had never seen this movie, so I had to do much research, and thankfully a lot of great information was easily found online. I discovered that the motion picture film used in the movie was Agfa XT320, and that it was often (but not always) push-processed, sometimes one stop and sometimes two. A technique called flashing was used a number of times in the movie, which involves flashing the film with light to give it a smoky, atmospheric, or faded feel, lowering contrast. It’s a type of double exposure, except that the second exposure is nothing more than a little light. Another technique that was used in the movie was to give different scenes a certain color cast using gels. Wong Kar Wai likes to create scenes with one predominant color, and so you will find elements in the scene that are the same color as the color cast. He used a slow shutter speed in the movie to blur motion. There were a ton of different techniques used, and so you can probably understand the difficulty of the task. You cannot incorporate everything into one recipe, so I had to make some choices and create a plan to try to achieve something that looks similar to the movie.

My idea was to attempt a recipe that resembled push-processed Agfa XT320 that has been flashed and has a color cast. I decided to use the double-exposure feature on my Fujifilm X-T30 and white balance shift to achieve this. For the second exposure, which needed to be white, I tried a number of things, including a miniature portable studio, but after some trial-and-error, I settled on a plain white 4″ x 6″ index card. I would hold it a few inches in front of the lens and make the second exposure. Auto-focus would never lock onto it, and I figured that a blurry exposure might actually be preferable. For the color cast, I found that one exposure should not have a shifted white balance and the other should. Initially I was adding the color cast to the main exposure and not the white exposure, but then I switched that and liked the results better for some reason. I used the 16:9 aspect ratio to make it a more cinematic shape. Unfortunately, I could never get the results to look quite right for Chungking Express. I think I was in the general ballpark, but not as close as I was hoping. Fortunately, what I did create was pretty interesting, so I kept shooting with it, except I used the 3:2 aspect ratio.

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Main Motion – SLC, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 – “Faded Color”

To use this recipe, you must set the camera to double-exposure, which on the X-T30 is found on a knob on the top. You capture the main exposure, then you must make some adjustments for the second exposure. The white balance must be shifted and the exposure compensation must be adjusted. For the white balance shift, I found going almost to the extremes works well. For a yellow cast, choose 0 Red & -8 Blue. For an orange cast, choose +8 Red & -8 Blue. For a red cast, choose +8 Red and 0 Blue. For a purple cast, choose +8 Red & +8 Blue. For a blue cast, choose 0 Red and +8 Blue. For a cyan cast, choose -8 Red and +8 Blue. For a green cast, choose -8 Red & 0 Blue. For green-yellow cast, choose -8 Red & -8 Blue. The exposure compensation for the white exposure is a little tricky. A lot depends on how bright the white is (whether it has direct light on it or if it is in shade) and how faded you want the image to look. It takes a little practice, but the good news is that the camera shows you exactly what the results are going to be, and even allows you do-overs if you don’t like it. I found that sometimes 0 was good, I found that sometimes -2 was good, and often -2/3 or -1 was a good choice. Each picture should get individual consideration. The second exposure is a picture of something white, such as the blank index card that I already described, although you could certainly try other things if you find something that might work better for you. This creates a faded look that almost seems unbelievable that it came out of the camera unedited.

Classic Chrome
Dynamic Range: DR100
Highlight: +3
Shadow: +4
Color: +4
Color Chrome Effect: Strong
Sharpening: +2
Noise Reduction: -4
Grain Effect: Strong
White Balance: Auto (use a shift on the second exposure)
ISO: Auto up to ISO 12800
Exposure Compensation: +1/3 to +1 (main exposure), 0 to -2 (second exposure)

Example photographs, all camera-made JPEGs using my Faded Color recipe on a Fujifilm X-T30:

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Good Life – Ogden, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Or Another – Ogden, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Summer Santa – Ogden, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Makeup – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Walking Without Wondering – Ogden, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Bike Repair – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Transit Train Transportation – SLC, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Kid Bowling – Kaysville, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Instax Girl – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Guitar Cat – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Cracked Eggs – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Good Vibes – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Steps & Vines – Ogden, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Lake Grass – Willard Bay SP, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Faded Daisies – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Soft Rose – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Summer Roses – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Red Rose Faded – Ogden, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Dark Rose – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Big Red Ball Catching – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Tona – Ogden, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Hanging Bulbs – Ogden, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Wet Bloom – SLC, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Caboose Steps – Ogden, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Breakboy – Ogden, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Lake Boy – East Canyon SP, UP – Fujifilm X-T30

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Springtime Lake – East Canyon SP, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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East Canyon Reservoir – East Canyon SP, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

My Fujifilm X-T30 Fujicolor 100 Industrial Film Simulation Recipe

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Urban Binding – SLC, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 – “Fujicolor 100 Industrial”

I get asked frequently to create different film simulation recipes, and I always put some consideration into those requests. I don’t get around to attempting all of them, although I do attempt many, but I at least think about how I might create a certain look. Even if I do attempt it, I’m not usually successful, as it just doesn’t look right quite often, so I go back to the drawing board when time and inspiration allows. On rare occasions I’m able to create a certain aesthetic quickly and easily. This recipe falls into the latter category.

I have to be honest, when I was asked to create a recipe to mimic the look of Fujicolor 100 Industrial film, I had never heard of it and knew absolutely nothing about it. I had to do some research on this film, and I found lots of good and helpful information. As it turns out, Fujicolor 100 Industrial is a negative film only sold in bulk in Japan, although you can purchase it from some camera stores who sell it individually. It’s actually re-branded Fujicolor 100, well, the Japanese version of Fujicolor 100, which is not the same film as Fujicolor 100 in America, although they’re similar to each other. Something interesting about Fujicolor 100 Industrial (and Fujicolor 100 Japan, which is the same film) is that it has a Tungsten emulsion (with a Kelvin temperature of 3200), but it is daylight balanced because the dye colors have been shifted to account for the cooler temperature. Weird, huh? Well, it turns out that you can do the same thing in your Fujifilm camera using white balance shift, and it creates a similar aesthetic.

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Backyard Daisy – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 – “Fujicolor 100 Industrial”

I find that this recipe is especially good in higher-contrast scenes, although it can still deliver interesting results in lower-contrast scenes. It’s a milder recipe that doesn’t have a lot of saturation, although sometimes just the right amount, and it handles shadows and highlights well. It creates lovely pictures that are soft and not bold. It needs the right subject and light to stand out, but it can look really great in the right situations. It definitely has a low-ISO print-film quality to it, and resembles Fujicolor 100 Industrial film surprisingly well.

PRO Neg. Std
Dynamic Range: DR400
Highlight: +1
Shadow: +2
Color: +1
Color Chrome Effect: Weak
Sharpening: +2
Noise Reduction: -4
Grain Effect: Weak
White Balance: 3200K, +8 Red & -8 Blue
ISO: Auto up to ISO 6400
Exposure Compensation: +1/3 to +2/3 (typically)

Sample photographs, all camera-made JPEGs, captured with a Fujifilm X-T30 using this Fujicolor 100 Industrial recipe:

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US Bike Lane – SLC, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Twilight Temple – SLC, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Broadway Me – SLC, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Three Stories – SLC, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Boston Building Reflection – SLC, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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The Corporate Ladder – SLC, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Their Bank – SLC, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Urban Sunset – SLC, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Partial Loaf – SLC, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Purple Zebra – SLC, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Leaves In The Sky – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Partly Cloudy – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Rosebud Sky – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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In Case of Fire – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Watching Television – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Little Feet – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Donut Eater – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Plastic Hand – SLC, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

Weekly Photo Project, Week 43

I immensely enjoyed attaching a vintage Asahi-Pentax Auto-Takumar 55mm f/2.2 lens to my Fujifilm X-T30 during this week. It’s easy to forget that it’s such a great lens, even though it’s older than I am. It pairs especially well with the two film simulation recipes that I created during these days: Ilford HP5 Plus 400 Push-Process and Expired Eterna. The combination of film simulation recipes that produce an analog aesthetic and vintage glass can be a magical experience.

Sunday, May 26, 2019

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Lilac – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 & 50-230mm @162mm – 1/2700, f/10, ISO 640

Monday, May 27, 2019

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Fresh Spring Snow – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 & Asahi Auto-Takumar 55mm f/2.2 – 1/1700, aperture unknown, ISO 640

Tuesday, May 28, 2019

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Grey Flowers – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 & Asahi Auto-Takumar 55mm f/2.2 – 1/32000, aperture unknown, ISO 51200

Wednesday, May 29, 2019

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Dark Cloud Over The Dark Mountain – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 & Asahi Auto-Takumar 55mm f/2.2 – 1/32000, aperture unknown, ISO 25600

Thursday, May 30, 2019

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Established 2003 – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 & Asahi Auto-Takumar 55mm f/2.2 – 1/170, aperture unknown, ISO 25600

Friday, May 31, 2019

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Boots on the Carpet – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 & Asahi Auto-Takumar 55mm f/2.2 – 1/220, aperture unknown, ISO 25600

Saturday, June 1, 2019

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Purple Bloom – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 & Asahi Auto-Takumar 55mm f/2.2 – 1/220, aperture unknown, ISO 160

Week 42  Week 44

Current Fujifilm Deals

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I’m asked fairly regularly for suggestions on what gear to buy. One common question is what’s the best camera for a beginner to get into the Fujifilm system. My top recommended camera has been for awhile and still is the Fujifilm X-T20, because right now there’s not a better bang for your buck. It’s a camera you can grow with and keep for awhile, yet not overwhelming for beginners. The X-E3 would be a close second place. If you plan on shooting a lot of video, perhaps consider the X-T30 instead. If the X-T20 is too expensive for your budget, the X-T100 is a good inexpensive alternative. If money is no object, you can get into medium-format for only $5,000, which was unfathomable until very recently.

Fujifilm X Cameras:

Fujifilm X-T3 (Body Only) $1,400
Fujifilm X-T3 w/18-55mm lens $1,700
Fujifilm X-T20 (Body Only) $700
Fujifilm X-T20 w/16-50mm lens $800
Fujifilm X-T20 w/18-55mm lens $1,000
Fujifilm X-T30 (Body Only) $900
Fujifilm X-E3 (Body Only) $700
Fujifilm X-T100 w/15-45mm lens $500
Fujifilm X-Pro2 (Body Only) $1,500
Fujifilm X-H1 (Body Only) w/power grip $1,300
Fujifilm X100F $1,200
Fujifilm XF10 $450

Fujifilm X Lenses:

Fujinon 8-16mm f/2.8 $1,900
Fujinon 10-24mm f/4 $900
Fujifilm 14mm f/2.8 $650
Fujinon 16mm f/1.4 $900
Fujinon 16-55mm f/2.8 $1,100
Fujinon 18-135mm f/3.5-5.6 $800
Fujinon 23mm f/1.4 $650
Fujinon 23mm f/2 $400
Fujinon 27mm f/2.8 $400
Fujinon 50mm f/2 $345
Fujinon 50-140mm f/2.8 $1,500
Fujinon 56mm f/1.2 $900
Fujinon 60mm f/2.4 $400
Fujinon 80mm f/2.8 $950
Fujinon 90mm f/2 $850
Fujinon 100-400mm f/4.5-5.6 $1,700

Fujifilm GFX Cameras:

Fujifilm GFX 50R (Body Only) $4,000
Fujifilm GFX 50R w/63mm lens $5,000
Fujifilm GFX 50R w/32-64mm lens $5,800
Fujifilm GFX 50S (Body Only) $5,500
Fujifilm GFX100 (Body Only) $10,000

Fujifilm GFX Lenses:

Fujinon GFX 23mm f/4 $2,100
Fujinon GFX 32-64mm f/4 $1,800
Fujinon GFX 63mm f/2.8 $1,000
Fujinon GFX 100-200mm f/5.6 $1,500
Fujinon GFX 250mm f/4 $2,800

As always, nobody pays me to write the articles that you find on Fuji X Weekly, so using my Amazon affiliate links is pretty much the only way to financially support this website. I would never ask you to buy something that you didn’t want, but if you were already planning to purchase something, it’s greatly appreciated if you did so using my links. It definitely helps! I want to give a special thank you to those who have done this already.

My Fujifilm X-T30 Expired Eterna Film Simulation Recipe

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Red Tricycle – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 – “Expired Eterna”

I used to shoot film. I don’t much anymore, but I was one of those crazy holdouts that refused to go digital when it seemed as though everyone else had. Eventually I succumbed, and I’ve been shooting digitally for awhile now. One thing that I appreciate about Fujifilm cameras is that they produce images that are a little more film-like and a little less digital-esque than other camera brands. This shouldn’t surprise anyone as Fujifilm started out as a film company. On Fujifilm cameras one will find many great film simulation options. The most recent addition is Eterna, which is modeled after their motion picture films, but it can be made to resemble color negative film. What I appreciate about film is it has character that’s often lacking in digital cameras.

While Eterna was a motion picture film, it was also made and sold in limited quantities for still photography. A Fuji X Weekly reader recently purchased and used an expired roll of Eterna and shared one of the pictures. Using expired film is always an interesting endeavor because you don’t know exactly what you’ll get. Depending on the film, how long it has been expired and how it was stored, the results can vary significantly. The picture that the Fuji X Weekly reader shared had a purple color cast, which is a common trait of expired film.

There are many reasons why an analog picture might have a purple color cast, not just because the film expired. If the film was exposed to too much heat (such as left in a hot car) the pictures might have a purple cast. If a print or slide isn’t stored correctly it could turn purple over time. I’ve seen cross-processed film produce a purple color cast. You can even buy purple film. While I’ve called this recipe “Expired Eterna,” it’s not necessarily meant to exactly mimic expired Eterna film, but to produce an analog film look that could have turned purple for any number of reasons, including but not limited to being expired.

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American Debt – Layton, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 – “Expired Eterna”

You might notice that I didn’t include an ISO setting in this recipe, and that’s because you can use any ISO you’d like. I got interesting results all the way up to ISO 25600. In fact, you might use an ultra-high ISO on purpose to get a certain look that you can’t get at a lower ISO. Trying this recipe at different ISOs is a fun experiment. It’s also interesting to see the results you get from different exposures, whether slightly overexposed or underexposed. Expired Eterna is a fun recipe to play around with, and I enjoyed pairing it with vintage lenses.

Eterna
Dynamic Range: DR100
Highlight: +4
Shadow: +4
Color: +4
Noise Reduction: -4
Sharpening: -2
Grain Effect: Strong
Color Chrome Effect: Weak
White Balance: Auto, +5 Red & +5 Blue
Exposure Compensation: -1/3 to +1/3 (typically)

Example photographs, all camera-made JPEGs using this recipe on my Fujifilm X-T30:

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Bloom Purple – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 – “Expired Eterna”

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Pink Paper Flower – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 – “Expired Eterna”

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Sunlight Through The Tree – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 – “Expired Eterna”

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Backlit Leaf – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 – “Expired Eterna”

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Rural Evening – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 – “Expired Eterna”

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Country Trees – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 – “Expired Eterna”

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Cottonwood Trunk – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 – “Expired Eterna”

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Little Flowers & Stone – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 – “Expired Eterna”

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Rosebud – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 – “Expired Eterna”

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Country Foot Bridge – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 – “Expired Eterna”

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Boy Behind Chain-Link – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 – “Expired Eterna”

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Orange Cones – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 – “Expired Eterna”

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Reaching Rosebud – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 – “Expired Eterna”

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Sycamore Leaf – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 – “Expired Eterna”

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Dusk Mountain – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 – “Expired Eterna”

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Mountain View Evening – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 – “Expired Eterna”

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Spring Sky Mountain – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 – “Expired Eterna”

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Sunset Whisper – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 – “Expired Eterna”

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Dramatic Sky Behind Tree – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 – “Expired Eterna”

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Bright Storm Clouds – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 – “Expired Eterna”

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Grey Tree – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 – “Expired Eterna”

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Disk Girl – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 – “Expired Eterna”

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Jo In A Hat – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 – “Expired Eterna”

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Wearing Grandpa’s Hat – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 – “Expired Eterna”

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Lady’s Sun Hat – Ogden, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 – “Expired Eterna”

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Girl Climbing Bleachers – Ogden, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 – “Expired Eterna”

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Number of Intersecting Lines – Ogden, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 – “Expired Eterna”

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One Through Six – Ogden, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 – “Expired Eterna”

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Parked RV – Layton, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 – “Expired Eterna”

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American Suburb – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 – “Expired Eterna”

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Light Flag – Layton, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 – “Expired Eterna”

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Green Spray Bottle – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 – “Expired Eterna”

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Curious Kitchen Curios – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 – “Expired Eterna”

High ISO:

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Cirrus Clouds – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 – “Expired Eterna” – ISO 12800

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Sycamore Sky – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 – “Expired Eterna” – ISO 12800

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Cottonwood – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 – “Expired Eterna” – ISO 12800

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Cottonwood Cotton – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 – “Expired Eterna” – ISO 25600

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Old Wheelbarrow – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 – “Expired Eterna” – ISO 25600

“Expired Eterna” for X-Trans III:

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Bottle Vases – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 – “Expired Eterna”

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Alternate recipe using PRO Neg. Std instead of Eterna.

I know that not every Fujifilm camera has the Eterna film simulation. Right now Eterna can only be found on the X-T3, X-T30, X-H1 and the GFX line. For those who don’t have it, I’ve made an alternative recipe that produces similar results using PRO Neg. Std. I found that Shadow set to 0 isn’t quite strong enough, but +1 is too strong, so pick whichever you like better. While the results aren’t 100% identical, it’s still a pretty close match. You do have to drop the exposure by about 1/3 stop compared to using Eterna. I hope that this is useful for some of you.

PRO Neg. Std
Dynamic Range: DR200
Highlight: +1
Shadow: 0
Color: 0
Noise Reduction: -4
Sharpening: -2
Grain Effect: Strong
White Balance: Auto, +5 Red & +5 Blue
Exposure Compensation: -2/3 to 0