Fujifilm Monochrome

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Mountains Dressed In Monochrome – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

Leica recently announced the M10 Monochrom, which is their third black-and-white only camera. It can’t capture a color picture because it doesn’t have a Bayer array. It only does black-and-white photography. Fujifilm should do something similar, even though most won’t buy it.

Believe it or not, there’s actually an advantage to a monochrome sensor. With a typical Bayer color array, only 50% of the light-sensitive sensor elements are recording luminosity information, while the other 50% are recording color information. With an X-Trans sensor, 55% of the light-sensitive sensor elements are recording luminosity information while 45% are recording color information. With a monochrome sensor, 100% of the light-sensitive sensor elements are recording luminosity information. Because of this, you get a higher perceived resolution, as pictures will appear more richly detailed, and there’s more shadow latitude, which also improves high-ISO capabilities. You can also use color filters like with black-and-white film.

I think an X-Pro3-M, a black-and-white only version of the X-Pro3, or an X100V-M, a black-and-white only version of the upcoming X100V, would do well enough commercially. Yes, it’s clearly a niche product, as there’s only a tiny market for it, yet Leica found a way to make it profitable, and Fujifilm could, too. There are plenty of photographers who use their X-Pro or X100 series camera to only shoot black-and-white. A Monochrome version would make things simpler for them, while improving perceived resolution, dynamic range and high-ISO. And, Fujifilm has a cool marketing angle: call it the X-Pro3 Acros or X100V Acros. People would eat that up. Increase the price a couple hundred dollars and it would sell well enough to be profitable, in my non-expert opinion.

The flip side to this is that Fujifilm X-Trans cameras, particularly X-Trans III and IV cameras that have the Acros film simulation, are already fantastic for black-and-white photography. Would a monochrome-only camera really produce enough of an improved image to justify buying one? I think that’s a tough question to answer, but my guess is probably not for most people. Still, a monochrome-only camera wouldn’t be for “most people” as it would be for a very small crowd, and for those people the difference would indeed justify buying it. For most, your current X-Trans camera is a great black-and-white photography tool, and there’s no need to get a monochrome-only camera. Some, however, would absolutely love to have one, and I think there’s enough of those people that such a camera could be profitable for Fujifilm, if they ever wished to create one. I hope they do.

Announced: Fujifilm X-T200

Fujifilm X-T200

Fujifilm just announced the upcoming X-T200, which is the successor to the X-T100. While the X-T200 looks a lot like the camera that it’s replacing, and some of the specs might seem identical, this is definitely an improved model. Essentially, it’s a Fujifilm X-A7 that looks like an X-T100, but with some brand new features. The camera will ship on February 27, but you can pre-order now.

The main upgrades on the X-T200 are auto-focus, video, and the rear screen. For still pictures, there’s not much to distinguish this camera over the previous model. Auto-focus got a very nice boost, with the same capabilities as the X-A7. This camera also now has the same rear screen as the X-A7. Video is a night-and-day difference. The X-T100 has disappointing video capabilities, while the X-T200 overflows in this department.

One of the interesting new features is called “digital gimbal” which essentially crops the image slightly to make a smooth video without image stabilization. It’s similar to what GoPro has on their new models. It’s a great addition for those who plan to use the camera for video.

Who is it for? The X-T200 would make an excellent first interchangeable-lens camera for someone new to photography. It could be a great second body for someone who already has another Fujifilm X camera. Those who vlog or make YouTube videos might especially appreciate this model.

The X-T100 was clearly a step-down from the X-T20, both in price and features, while the X-T200 keeps up with the X-T30 quite well, and is a little cheaper, but not by a huge amount. It is a Bayer sensor camera and not X-Trans, and because of that it’s missing some of the options that the X-T30 has, yet the X-T200 has some features that the X-Trans model doesn’t. I would recommend the X-T30, but if you want to save a little money, the X-T200 is a surprisingly solid alternative. The X-A7 doesn’t have the “digital gimbal” feature found on the X-T200, but it’s also a little cheaper, so if you don’t need it, you might as well buy the X-A7 instead, because it’s essentially the same camera, just in a different shape. For still photography, the X-T100 is basically just as good as the X-T200, and you can pick it up for much less, but if video is important to you, the X-T200 is the camera to buy.

This post contains affiliate links. I will be compensated a small amount if you make a purchase after clicking my links.

Fujifilm X-T200 (Body Only) $700   B&H   Amazon
Fujifilm X-T200 w/15-45mm lens $800   B&H   Amazon

Project: Farmington Bay, Part 2

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Farmington Bay Lake – Farmington Bay, UT – Fujifilm X-T1

Part 1

My project this year is to photograph the Farmington Bay Waterfowl Management Area in Farmington, Utah. My goal is visit this place with a camera at least once per month throughout 2020, but hopefully more often than that. I especially want to make it to Farmington Bay when there’s some interesting weather or a chance of great light. This was my second visit.

The Farmington Bay is a wetland along the Great Salt Lake, where freshwater meets saltwater. There are creeks and small lakes and lots of tall grass. It’s a popular spot for bird-watching. Farmington Bay is massive, and I’ve only explored maybe 10% of it at most, but probably not even that much. There’s a road that takes you fairly deep into the wetland, but the rest is accessible only by foot or bike or boat.

I captured these photographs using my Fujifilm X-T1 and Fujinon 35mm f/2. I used my Velvia and Monochrome recipes, plus a couple of experimental settings, but mostly Velvia. Farmington Bay is both beautiful and lonely. There are great expanses and fantastic views. I feel like I stumbled across a great treasure when I found this place. I look forward to returning with my camera in hand.

B&W

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Dike Road – Farmington Bay, UT – Fujifilm X-T1

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Dirt Road – Farmington Bay, UT – Fujifilm X-T1

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Gate – Farmington Bay, UT – Fujifilm X-T1

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Wasatch From Farmington Bay – Farmington Bay, UT – Fujifilm X-T1

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Cloud Reflection – Farmington Bay, UT – Fujifilm X-T1

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Ice in the Water – Farmington Bay, UT – Fujifilm X-T1

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Shore Post – Farmington Bay, UT – Fujifilm X-T1

Color

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Cattails On The Shore – Farmington Bay, UT – Fujifilm X-T1

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Red Door – Farmington Bay, UT – Fujifilm X-T1

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Tree in January – Farmington Bay, UT – Fujifilm X-T1

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Red Gate – Farmington Bay, UT – Fujifilm X-T1

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Red Cloth on Fence – Farmington Bay, UT – Fujifilm X-T1

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Greenland – Farmington Bay, UT – Fujifilm X-T1

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Green & White – Farmington Bay, UT – Fujifilm X-T1

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Eye of the Beholder – Farmington Bay, UT – Fujifilm X-T1

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Drain – Farmington Bay, UT – Fujifilm X-T1

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Wetland Grass – Farmington Bay, UT – Fujifilm X-T1

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Wetland – Farmington Bay, UT – Fujifilm X-T1

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Wetland Lake – Farmington Bay, UT – Fujifilm X-T1

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Bridge to Nowhere – Farmington Bay, UT – Fujifilm X-T1

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Eagle on Bridge – Farmington Bay, UT – Fujifilm X-T1

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Road Along The Water – Farmington Bay, UT – Fujifilm X-T1

First Fujifilm X-T1 Film Simulation Recipes

Fujifilm X-T1 Blog

I’ve had my Fujifilm X-T1 for less than two weeks. I plan to create many different film simulation recipes for it, but that takes time, so they’ll likely trickle out over the coming months. I did create three film simulation recipes, which you’ll find below. I like to mimic the aesthetic of vintage films with in-camera JPEG settings, as I learned photography in the film era. These three X-T1 recipes aren’t intended to mimic the look of any particular film; I just like how they look.

The in-camera JPEG options on the X-T1, which has an X-Trans II sensor, are different and much more limited than X-Trans IV or even X-Trans III cameras. Fujifilm continues to provide more and better features to achieve desired looks straight out of camera. While the X-T1 doesn’t have as many options, it’s still possible to get very nice pictures right out of the camera, no post-processing needed. Actually, sometimes it’s nice to have fewer choices as it makes things more simple.

Even though these recipes were created on a Fujifilm X-T1, they’re compatible with all X-Trans II cameras, such as the X100T, X-E2, and X-T10, as well as Fujifilm Bayer cameras, like the XF10, X-T100, and X-A7. The Velvia and Monochrome recipes are compatible with X-Trans I cameras, such as the X-Pro1, X100S and X-E1. I should also point out that my Fujifilm XF10 film simulation recipes are compatible with the X-T1 and other X-Trans II cameras.

Some of you have been asking me to create recipes that are compatible with the older models for some time now, and I’m happy to finally be able to share some. You’ve waited awhile! These three film simulations are just the beginning for the X-T1. I will be creating more. I hope to recreate some of my other looks with the X-Trans II sensor, but we’ll see how that goes. Some future recipes might require unconventional approaches. I can’t wait to see what I come up with! In the meantime, enjoy the recipes below.

Classic Chrome

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Praying the Order is Right – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-T1

Film Simulation: Classic Chrome
Dynamic Range: DR200
White Balance: Auto, -1 Red & -1 Blue
Color: +2 (High)
Highlight: +1 (Medium-High)
Shadow: +1 (Medium-High)
Sharpness: 0 (STD)
Noise Reduction: -2 (Low)
ISO: Auto, up to ISO 3200

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Rural Road In Winter – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-T1

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Winter Boxcar – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T1

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Flaming Lemon – South Ogden, UT – Fujifilm X-T1

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Joyful Dining – South Ogden, UT – Fujifilm X-T1

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Opening a Soda Bottle – South Ogden, UT – Fujifilm X-T1

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Egg, Bowl & Rice – South Ogden, UT – Fujifilm X-T1

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Grill Fire – South Ogden, UT – Fujifilm X-T1

Velvia

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Pink Penguin – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-T1

Film Simulation: Velvia
Dynamic Range: DR200
White Balance: Auto, 0 Red & -2 Blue
Color: +2 (High)
Highlight: -1 (Medium-Low)
Shadow: -1 (Medium-Low)
Sharpness : 0 (STD)
Noise Reduction: -2 (Low)
ISO: Auto, up to ISO 3200

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Kobe Cold – South Ogden, UT – Fujifilm X-T1

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Sushi Lamp – South Ogden, UT – Fujifilm X-T1

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For Goodness Sake – South Ogden, UT – Fujifilm X-T1

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Anchored Caboose – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T1

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Red In The Woods – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T1

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When The Season Is All Wrong – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T1

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Rudy Drain Winter – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-T1

Monochrome

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Rebuilt 24 – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T1

Film Simulation: Monochrome (+Y, +R, +G)
Dynamic Range: DR200
Highlight: +1 (Medium-High)
Shadow: +1 (Medium-High)
Sharpness : +1 (Medium -Hard)
Noise Reduction: -2 (Low)
ISO: Auto, up to ISO 6400

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Monochrome Lines – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T1

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Metal – South Ogden, UT – Fujifilm X-T1

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When Life Gives You Lemons – South Ogden, UT – Fujifilm X-T1

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Soup – South Ogden, UT – Fujifilm X-T1

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Jo With Chopsticks – South Ogden, UT – Fujifilm X-T1

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Drinking Soup – South Ogden, UT – Fujifilm X-T1

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Eating Rice – South Ogden, UT – Fujifilm X-T1

Intentionalism – Moving From More To Less

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The old house. Captured with a Fujifilm X-T30 & Fujinon 35mm f/2.

Less is more. That short and simple statement is true in both photography and in life. Less time commitments. Less money spent. Less accumulating stuff. Less frustrations. Less worrying. Less stress. More time spent with family and friends. More generosity. More doing what you love. More living life right now.

In America, and many other parts of the world, materialism is strong, and it constantly demands more. You need the best, the newest, the largest, and the most-expensive things that you can afford. If the Jones’ have it, you need it now! Envy is everywhere, and it’s difficult to escape its cold, choking grasp. People judge you on your possessions, at least that’s what you’re told, so your possessions better be good. You need to make a good impression quickly, as you might not get a second chance. You aren’t who you are, you are what you have. It’s an incredibly sad and selfish way to live, but it’s normal for a lot of people. I’m guilty of living this way just as much as the next person, but I’m tired of the materialistic life.

The opposite of materialism is minimalism, which is living with the absolute least amount of stuff that you need to survive. If you don’t need it, you shouldn’t have it. If it doesn’t add value to your life, you shouldn’t have it. It’s not about things, it’s about not having things. I’m not against minimalism, but I do feel like it’s a rabbit hole that can miss the point. Having less can be very good, but there’s a point where the pursuit of it can be oppressive and as equally vain as the pursuit of frivolous stuff.

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View from the old house. Captured with a Fujifilm X-T30 & Fujinon 50-230mm.

There’s a reasonable middle ground, where you’re not consumed by consumerism and you’re not subservient to minimalism. It’s called intentionalism, which is being intentional with your time and treasures. The idea is that everything you own should serve a purpose or bring you joy. If it doesn’t have a purpose in your life or if it doesn’t bring you joy, you don’t need it, so get ride of it! It’s about living with less. It’s having less clutter; having less things that you don’t really need taking up space in your life. Everything that you buy should be purchased very intentionally. Thoughtful consideration is required for what you spend money on. Spend less on junk. You shouldn’t be a servant to money, but instead money should serve you. Also, be careful of things that rob your time, because time is incredibly short.

Cut down on what you’ve accumulated. Lessen time spent unnecessarily. Trim what you spend money on. Scale down yourself, so that you can gain what those things can never provide. Reduce, so that you can obtain joy. Reduce, so that you can spend more time with family and friends. Reduce, so that you can be more generous with others. Reduce, so that you can live more freely. Not less for the sake of less, but less for the sake of more.

I don’t want to sound too preachy; I’m writing these things to myself just as much as I’m writing them to you. I’m telling you about this philosophical road that I’m beginning to journey down because you might notice some changes. Actually, the journey began several months ago, but the changes will become more obvious on Fuji X Weekly as time goes on.

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View from the new house. Captured with a Fujifilm X-T1 & Funinon 35mm f/2.

Something that I’ve been working towards is fewer articles on this blog, yet higher quality content. I want to spend less time on insignificant posts, and use that time instead for more meaningful articles. I hope that this will improve Fuji X Weekly. Another change is that I sold my house and moved. For me, a big part of intentionalism is downsizing, which I’ve been doing, and now I live in a different town. That will affect my pictures in some way, although I’m not certain exactly how at the moment. Anytime that you change where you’re photographing, it will change your photography, at least a little.

How does intentionalism relate to photography and Fujifilm? Well, for me, Fujifilm cameras save me a ton of time because I can rely on camera-made JPEGs. I rarely sit at a computer editing pictures. I can use that time for other things, such as playing with my kids or a date night with my wife or visiting a friend or capturing more pictures. This isn’t new for me, but it does fit well with this philosophy. Another way that this relates is that I should only own gear that I need (serves a purpose) or that brings me joy. Of course, all of it brings me joy! But things that sit on a shelf collecting dust and taking up space, rarely used, aren’t really bringing joy, they’re just clutter. If something is working well for me, there’s no need to replace it just because something new came out. It’s good to get your money’s worth out of what you buy before replacing it. Buy things of quality and really use them, and don’t be in a hurry to upgrade.

Intentionalism is a journey towards simplicity. It’s similar to minimalism, but the end goal isn’t less for the sake of less, it’s less for the sake of more. It’s a path towards joy and a meaningful life, where I’m less important and those around me are more important. It’s a journey of generosity. It’s finding ways to make life simpler so that I can focus more on what’s really important. Less can indeed be more.

When Weather Sealed Cameras Matter

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Cold Cargo – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-T1

I’ve always felt that, for me, a weather sealed camera isn’t essential. It’s certainly a nice feature, but not something I just have to have. Cameras that aren’t weather sealed can handle the elements to an extent, and oftentimes there are easy steps to mitigate the weather conditions (such as an umbrella), so I haven’t found it to be a limiting factor to my photography. Yet, there have been times that having a weather sealed camera has allowed me to “get the shot” when I might not have otherwise.

Fujifilm has a few cameras with weather sealing. The X-T0, X-Pro, and X-H series are all weather sealed, while the X-T00, X-T000, X-A, X-M, XF, X-E, X100, and X00 series (am I missing any?) are not. I’ve owned a few of these non-weather-sealed cameras, and I’ve used them with success in conditions that might warrant weather sealing. Take a look at the pictures below:

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Monte Cristo Mountain Snow – Monte Cristo Mountains, UT – Fujifilm X-E1

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Out In The Cold – Cedar City, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Umbrella Overpass – Edmonds, WA – Fujifilm X100F

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Dust In The Wind – Bonneville Salt Flats, UT – Fujifilm X-E1

The photographs above were all captured in conditions where a weather sealed camera would have been nice, but I got along just fine without it. The X-E1, X100F and X-T30, which are the cameras that I used for those pictures, are not weather sealed; despite that, I was able to get the picture that I wanted. I didn’t allow it limit my photography.

A weather sealed camera allows you to photograph with confidence in more extreme conditions, such as cold, rain, snow and dust. While non-weather-sealed cameras might get the job done, a weather sealed camera definitely will. Each time that I pushed the envelope on what my camera was designed to handle, it worked fine, but I worried about it. I hoped that I wasn’t ruining an expensive photographic tool.

There was one situation where I know that if I hadn’t used a weather sealed camera, I would have ruined the camera, or at least would have had to have it serviced. More likely, I wouldn’t have photographed at all, knowing that the camera couldn’t handle it, and I would have missed some great pictures. But I did have a weather sealed camera, and I have the shots that I wanted. Those pictures, which were captured on a windy day at Great Sand Dunes National Park in Colorado using an X-Pro2, are below:

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From Dust To Dust – Great Sand Dunes NP, CO – Fujifilm X-Pro2

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Sandal – Great Sand Dunes NP, CO – Fujifilm X-Pro2

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Passerby – Great Sand Dunes NP, CO – Fujifilm X-Pro2

The conclusion is this: you don’t need a weather sealed camera until you do. Almost always your non-weather-sealed camera will suffice, especially if you take action to mitigate the conditions, but occasionally you might run into a situation where you really do need weather sealed gear. In those circumstances, you’ll either get the shot because of your camera, you’ll get the shot in spite of your camera (and you might find yourself in the market for a new one), or you won’t get the shot because of your camera. I do think those situations are rare for most people, and whether or not you have weather sealed gear is unimportant for most, but it’s sure nice to have it when you need it.

My Fujifilm X-T1 Arrived!

Fujifilm X-T1

I mentioned a couple of weeks ago that I purchased a used Fujifilm X-T1 for only $300. The condition of the camera said “low shutter count” and “in like-new condition.” When you’re purchasing things off the internet, my experience is that it’s rarely exactly as described. Oftentimes the condition is overstated. I wasn’t sure what I was going to find when the package arrived. Well, the packaged was delivered a couple days ago; I opened up the box with anxious curiosity and found inside…

…a near mint Fujifilm X-T1. Yea! It looked brand new except it was missing the sync cap. It really did appear unused! It even had the original firmware installed. I don’t know the story behind it, but it seems like maybe someone used it a couple of times and didn’t like it, so they boxed it up and it sat on a shelf for four or five years. It’s very difficult for me to believe that I snagged this beauty for only $300. This was a $1,300 camera not very long ago. I remember seeing the X-T1 on sale for “only” $1,000 and that was considered a bargain at the time. At $300, the camera’s a steal!

Fujifilm X-T1 Fujinon 35mm f/2

Fujifilm X-T1 Blog

Unfortunately, digital is disposable. People buy cameras and use them for a year or two or maybe three, and then they move on to whatever is new. It’s a byproduct of technology that advances quickly, and also habits formed when digital photography was new and not especially good. There were significant leaps when new camera models came out. There are still big leaps happening today, but we’ve reached a point of diminishing returns, and those leaps don’t mean as much in practical application.

My first SLR was a 20-year-old Canon AE-1, which I purchased over 20 years ago when I was in Photography 101 in college. I used the camera for a number of years. Can you imagine someone buying a 20-year-old digital camera today to use as their main camera? And using that camera for five or more years? That’s unheard of, but it used to be normal in the days of film. Roughly 10 years ago digital camera technology reached a point where people could keep it and use it for years to come because the quality was there. There’s no reason that a five-year-old camera can’t have 15 or more years of life in it as long as the mechanical components continue to work. People often don’t keep them around long enough to find out.

Fujifilm X-T1 Dials

Fujifilm X-T1 Blog

The Fujifilm X-T1 is downright fantastic! It’s plenty quick. The image quality is great. The camera is weather sealed and feels very solid. It’s a little smaller than the X-T2 and X-T3 and not all that much bigger and heavier than my X-T30. I do wish it had the focus joystick and some of the JPEG options that the newer cameras have, but it’s not a big deal that the camera lacks those things. It’s still a very good camera capable of capturing beautiful pictures.

The photographs below are the first images captured with my new Fujifilm X-T1. These are camera-made JPEGs. I don’t have any recipes yet, but you can rest assured that I will be creating some, and when I do I will share them on Fuji X Weekly. Even though the camera is five-years-old, I’m very excited to go out and shoot with the brand-new-to-me X-T1.

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Hardware Carts – Riverdale, UT – Fujifilm X-T1 & Fujinon 35mm f/2

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Americana Neighborhood – Roy, UT – Fujifilm X-T1 & Fujinon 35mm f/2

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Equal Rights – Uintah, UT – Fujifilm X-T1 & Fujinon 35mm f/2

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Coffee Beans – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T1 & Fujinon 35mm f/2

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Selfie – Unitah, UT – Fujifilm X-T1 & Fujinon 35mm f/2

3 New Cameras Confirmed

Fujifilm Film Simulation Blog

In my last post I mentioned the rumor that Fujifilm will be releasing three new cameras this spring. The details were pretty limited at that time, but a lot more information has come out since then (thank you, Fujirumors), so I wanted to pass along a quick update to those who are interested.

One of the three cameras will be the X-T4, which will be the successor for both the X-T3 and X-H1. It will be nearly identical to the X-T3, but with a slightly larger body, and will feature in-body-image-stabilization (IBIS) and 6K video capabilities. I’m not sure if it will use the X-Trans IV sensor and X-Processor 4, or if X-Trans V is right around the corner. Clearly, it’s a merger of the X-T and X-H lines, and will be Fujifilm’s flagship APS-C camera. I’m sure it will be priced higher than the X-T3.

Another camera will be the X100V, which will indeed have a redesigned lens. The X100 series has had the same lens from the beginning, so this will be the first with different optics. What will be different about it is unknown. Details are pretty vague right now, but I’m sure in the coming weeks we’ll know much more.

The third camera will be the X-T200, the successor to the X-T100. It sounds like it will be essentially the same camera as the X-A7, but in the shape of the X-T100. In other words, the rear screen, auto-focus and video capabilities will be much improved, and everything else will be pretty much the same.

And, apparently, there will be no new GFX camera in 2020, but sometime in 2021 instead. They are working on one, that’s already been determined, but I guess aren’t ready to release it for awhile. That concludes your gear update for today.

3 New Fujifilm Cameras Coming Soon!

Fujifilm X100F Blog

There’s some exciting news that I want to pass along to you. I don’t want Fuji X Weekly to be completely centered on gear, but I also want to keep you in the know, and so I try to keep things balanced. Anyway, according to Fujirumors.com, there are three new Fujifilm cameras coming this spring. One is the X100V, which will replace the excellent X100F. Another, which might be called X-T3s or X-T5 (in Japan, the number four is bad luck), will replace the not-very-old X-T3. The third is a mystery, but I’m betting that it’s a medium-format GFX camera. Let’s briefly talk about each.

The X100V has been whispered and rumored across the internet for many months. There’s no surprise that it’s coming soon. What we don’t know is how much different it will be from the X100F. It will certainly have the 26-megapixel X-Trans IV sensor and processor, and probably all of the new JPEG tools of the X-Pro3, but beyond that nobody knows. There’s been speculation for some time that Fujifilm redesigned the lens, but I don’t know if that’s true or not. It could be a mild update to the X100F, which makes sense, because if it ain’t broke don’t fix it. Or it could be a moderate overhaul, similar to what Fujifilm did with the X-Pro3. We will know soon enough.

It’s very surprising to me that Fujifilm will be announcing a replacement to the X-T3 so soon. Why? Because the X-T3 will only be one-and-a-half years old when its successor is released. Digital technology advances quickly, but I’m not sure there’s enough to justify a whole new camera in that short amount of time. Is there a new sensor coming? New processor? If not, a simple firmware update would breathe a second wind into what’s already a successful camera model. If there’s nothing big to separate the upcoming model from the current one, I don’t think it will be a huge success because there’s no incentive to buy the new camera. Why pay more for something that’s essentially exactly the same? It will be interesting to see what Fujifilm has up its sleeve on this one.

The third camera is an unknown model, but fuzzy pictures have leaked out of Japan of a new GFX body. It could be a non-IBIS 100-megapixel camera. It could be a 50-megapixel body with IBIS. It could be the first GFX with an X-Trans sensor. Fujifilm has done well in the medium-format market, quickly setting themselves up as the leader, so it would be unsurprising if they added another camera to the GFX lineup.

What other cameras should Fujifilm release in 2020? I’d like to see an X70 but with an X-Trans IV sensor. How about an X-H2? While it was well-received by users, I don’t believe the X-H1 was especially commercially successful, but Fujifilm should have at least one APS-C camera with IBIS for those who want it, so an X-H2 makes sense. That is, unless the X-T3 successor has IBIS. The X-E line is due for an update. Keep the body the same, but put the X-Trans IV sensor inside, and you have an X-E5. Simple enough, right? It will be exciting to see whatever is forthcoming from Fujifilm, and I will do my best on the Fuji X Weekly blog to keep you updated, but hopefully without overwhelming you with gear posts.

5 Tips For Photographing Grand Teton National Park (Without Going Inside The Park)

John Moulton Barn Grand Teton National Park

Barn by the Tetons – Grand Teton NP, WY – Fujifilm X-E1

The Grand Teton National Park in western Wyoming is incredibly beautiful! It’s one of my favorite places. Once you’ve been, you’ll want to return again and again. There’s a magical quality to it, similar to that first view of the Grand Canyon or a misty morning in Yosemite Valley. If you’ve never visited the range, it should be high on your bucket list of places to see! The Grand Tetons are a landscape photographer’s playground, and you definitely need to visit with a camera in hand.

Many people who see the Grand Tetons do so from their car. U.S. Highway 191 runs north and south just east of the mountain, offering spectacular sights the whole length. There are so many amazing views of the range that don’t require an entrance into the park. Yellowstone National Park, which is a little north of the Grand Tetons, is the more popular park of the two, and Jackson Hole has itself become a destination, so a lot of people only see the Teton Range as they travel between the two places. While taking time to go inside the Grand Teton National Park is certainly a worthwhile endeavor, it’s definitely possible to experience exquisite views from outside the gate. Going inside the national park isn’t required for a memorable Teton visit. Below are five tips for photographing the Grand Tetons from outside the park entrance.

The Off Season Is The Best Season

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Tetons From Mormon Row – Grand Teton NP, WY – Fujifilm X-E1

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Avalanche Canyon – Grand Teton NP, WY – Fujifilm X-E1

The Grand Teton National Park can get very crowded. Even though it plays second fiddle to nearby Yellowstone, it still sees a ton of visitors from across the world, especially in the summer months. The winter months are harsh yet could provide some amazing photographic opportunities for those willing to brave the elements, but that’s not when I’d recommend visiting. There are a couple of small windows that are better suited for travel to the Grand Tetons.

The month of May is an excellent time, as the crowds are low since school is still in for many people, and the weather is usually decent enough. The earlier in the month you go, the smaller the crowds will be, but the temperatures will be colder and it still might feel like winter. Mid-May is the sweet spot. Mid-September to mid-October is another excellent time, as most children have returned to school, and the weather is still decent enough. The earlier you go the better the weather, but the larger the crowds will be. Late September is another sweet spot for visiting Grand Teton National Park. If the forecast is for clouds and cold temperatures, it could provide a dramatic environment for your pictures, so it might be preferable over endless sunshine, but be prepared for the conditions.

Early Morning Is Magical

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Mountain & Clouds – Grand Teton NP, WY – Fujifilm X-E1

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Sliver of Illumination – Grand Teton NP, WY – Fujifilm X-E1

While sunset can be a spectacular time to photograph the Grand Tetons, nothing beats sunrise. Since the highway runs on the east side of the range, the sunrise light is often better for photographing the mountains. The early morning “golden hour” is a time that you don’t want to miss. Be sure to arrive well before the official sunrise because the peaks will illuminate before the valley. If you can only be there for either sunrise or sunset (and not both), make sure that it’s sunrise. It’s worth getting up while it’s still dark outside to catch the early morning light on the Teton Range.

Because the sunrise will light the tips of the peaks first, it’s a good plan to begin the day with a telephoto lens. Once more of the landscape has daylight, you can switch to a wide-angle lens if you’d like. The Grand Tetons are a place where you’ll want the option for both telephoto and wide-angle focal lengths, and you’ll probably switch between both frequently.

Mormon Row Is Historic

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Mountain & Mormon How – Grand Teton NP, WY – Fujifilm X-E1

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Barn In The Mountains – Grand Teton NP, WY – Fujifilm X-E1

If you are starting off your photographic journey in the early morning, make the Mormon Row Historic District your first stop. It’s located just north of the Grand Teton National Park entrance on the east side of the highway. The old houses and barns are found about a mile down Antelope Flats Road. The John Moulton Barn is probably the most famous of the historic structures, and surely you’ve seen pictures of it, but there are other buildings that are equally picturesque. Mormon Row is one of the most famous spots at the Grand Tetons for photography, so even during the off season you’re likely to find a crowd with cameras at this place.

Besides the historic buildings, this is a location where you might spot bison, as buffalo commonly graze in the area. You might also see deer or even moose. Always be vigilant around wildlife and keep a safe distance. While the animals are fairly used to crowds of people, they can still be quite dangerous, so don’t get too close.

Schwabacher Landing Is Unbelievable

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Tetons From Schwabacher Landing – Grand Teton NP, WY – Fujifilm X-E1

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Schwabacher Landing Beaver Dam – Grand Teton NP, WY – Fujifilm X-E1

After you are done photographing the barns at Mormon Row, head further north up the highway to Schwabacher Landing. There’s a little road on the west side of the highway that takes you down close to the river, which is calm and reflective thanks to a bunch of beaver dams. Honestly, this place is magical! It can feel unreal. It’s my favorite place at the Grand Tetons, so be sure to stop here.

If there’s a place that you’ll want to use a tripod and really take your time, this is it. Walk around the trails a little. Soak in the scene. Enjoy the incredible nature that’s around you. Don’t be in a hurry to head down the road. Be in the moment, because the moment is amazing. If you are visiting during the off season, there’s a good chance you’ll have the place to yourself. Don’t miss Schwabacher Landing because it’s unbelievably beautiful!

Snake River Overlook Is Iconic

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Snake River Fog – Grand Teton NP, WY – Fujifilm X-E1

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The Tetons and the Snake River, 2017 – Grand Teton NP, WY – Fujifilm X-E1

About 21 miles north of Jackson Hole, Wyoming, is the Snake River Overlook, which is a pullout on the west side of Highway 191. There are a bunch of scenic pullouts along the highway that offer stunning views of the Grand Tetons, but this one is special because Ansel Adams captured one of his most iconic pictures at this spot. What makes it especially great is that you can capture the Snake River winding in front of the incredible mountain range. This is a good place to finish the morning, and, if you can, return for sunset.

As a photographer who has studied Ansel Adams’ work, who has been inspired and influenced by his pictures, there’s something prodigious about being in the exact spot where he captured one of his famous pictures. It’s walking in the footsteps of greatness. It seems particularly appropriate, when you visit the Teton Range, to pay homage to Adams by making your own photographs at the Snake River Overlook.

See also: 5 Tips To Become A Better Photographer