5 Ways to Master that Vintage Film Look

Going Out of Business – Prescott, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5 – “1970’s Summer” Recipe

What a wonderful surprise! Leigh & Raymond Photography (formally known as The SnapChick) posted a video explaining five ways to get a vintage film look from digital cameras. One of their tips is to shoot Fujifilm cameras and use Fuji X Weekly Film Simulation Recipes (that, of course, is an oversimplification of the tip, so be sure to watch the video). Another tip is to use the RitchieCam App on your iPhone. Whoa! I was very surprised by this unexpected double-shoutout.

For those who don’t know, I have my very own iPhone camera app called RitchieCam. The intention of it is to streamline your mobile photography workflow. It’s easy to use thanks to its intuitive design, making it useful for both novices and pros. It embraces a one-step philosophy, as the analog inspired filters deliver images that don’t require editing. If you have an iPhone, download it from the Apple App Store for free today!

Most of you are here, though, not for iPhone photography, but because you have a Fujifilm camera. Back in 2021 I published No Edit Photography: 7 Tips To Get The Film Look From Your Digital Photos, in which I gave some tips for achieving a film-like-look from your non-analog pictures. My advice was:
– Shoot with a Fujifilm camera
– Use Film Simulation Recipes
– Use diffusion filters, such as Black Pro Mist or CineBloom
– Shoot with vintage lenses
– Don’t be overly concerned with perfectly sharp pictures
– Use high-ISOs
– Overexpose and underexpose sometimes

Read the article to learn more about each tip. I recommend starting with both of the first two (Fujifilm cameras and Film Simulation Recipes), and then add one or two of the other five tips. For example, if you have a Fujifilm X-T20, you might use the Kodachrome II recipe plus a vintage lens. Or, if you have a Fujifilm X100V, you might use the Fujicolor Superia 800 recipe plus a 5% CineBloom filter. Anyway, you have to find what works best for you, but if you are not sure, that article is meant to provide some direction, which is hopefully helpful to you in some way.

Thank you, Leigh and Raymond, for all the kind words and support! Your video is much appreciated by me. To those of you reading this, be sure to visit their channel, watch the video, give it a thumbs-up, and subscribe if you don’t already.

Fujifilm Take Notice: Ricoh Just Did What You Won’t

Captured with the new “Negative Film” Picture Control Effect on my Ricoh GR III.

Fujifilm, pay close attention: Ricoh just did with their GR III and GR IIIx what you won’t do with your X-series cameras.

Fujifilm has stated that they’re moving away from Kaizen and to expect less of it going forward, but some other camera makers—including Ricoh—are embracing it. In fact, Ricoh just added a new Picture Control Effect, which is their Film Simulations equivalent, to their GR III and IIIx cameras. This new Effect is called Negative Film, and it looks pretty good so far to me. It’s not really like anything on Fujifilm exactly—perhaps it could be described as somewhat similar to a cross between Classic Negative and PRO Neg. Std—but it does produce an aesthetic that’s easy to appreciate.

I want to point out that the GR III was released almost at the same exact time as the Fujifilm X-T30. Since the release of the X-T30, Fujifilm has introduced three new Film Simulations—Classic Negative, Eterna Bleach Bypass, and Nostalgic Neg.—plus some other JPEG options like Color Chrome FX Blue, Clarity, and Grain size. None of it has trickled down to the X-T30 (or X-T3). Even the X-Pro3 and X100V—premium models, supposedly—weren’t given the Kaizen love that they (really, Fujifilm’s customers) deserve. Yet little ol’ Ricoh not only created a new Effect for apparently no reason other than the fun of it, and they gave it to the almost four-year-old GR III just because they wanted to make their customers happy.

Captured with the new “Negative Film” Picture Control Effect on my Ricoh GR III.

I have a ton of advice that I’d give to Fujifilm if they were ever interested in hearing my opinions. I mean, I have a pretty good pulse on a big chunk of their customer base, and I’ve done more than most to bring them new customers, whether directly or indirectly, so you’d think they would be interested in hearing what I have to say. The very first suggestion that I would have for them is to do more Kaizen and not less. I get that it costs time and money, but fostering a happy long-term repeat customer base is priceless, and well worth whatever it takes to do that. A lot of photographers go from brand-to-brand-to-brand, or they begrudgingly put up with a brand for a long time because they don’t want to endure the cost and headache of switching, and there is a surprisingly large amount of disloyalty among customers. Yes, there are the outspoken fanboys—I am one for Fujifilm—but while their voices are loud, their numbers are surprisingly small. So if a brand can actually make more of their customers loyal, which they do by showing them that they matter and are appreciated, it can have a significant long-term impact. Of course, if your customers don’t think you care about them, they’ll be more quick to leave when another brand offers something new and exciting, or if they think that another brand cares more about their customers than the one they’re currently using.

Ricoh just made sure that their customers know that they care. Fujifilm, make sure that your customers know you care!

Below are some examples of photos captured using the new Negative Film Picture Control Effect on my Ricoh GR III.

See also: Ritchie’s Ricoh Recipes

This post contains affiliate links, and if you make a purchase using my links I’ll be compensated a small amount for it.

Ricoh GR III  Amazon  B&H  Moment
Ricoh GR IIIx  Amazon  B&H  Moment

Vintage Cinema — Fujifilm X-T5 (X-Trans V) FXW App Patron Early-Access Film Simulation Recipe

Glimpse of a Fleeting Memory – Gilbert, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5 – “Vintage Cinema”

I recently binge-watched a number of classic movies from the 1950’s, and I was really inspired by their picture aesthetics. After some research, I discovered that Kodak ECN 5248 25T motion picture film was used in several of these flicks. The problem, of course, with trying to replicate the look of a motion picture film stock is that not only is the aesthetic dependent on the usual factors of how shot and developed, but also on the lighting and filters used, which can be different movie-to-movie and even scene-to-scene. Instead of attempting to mimic the look of any particular movie or cinema film stock, I wanted to create a certain feel or mood—a “memory color” reminiscent of color movies from the 1950’s.

This Vintage Cinema Film Simulation Recipe is a Fuji X Weekly App Patron Early-Access recipe, which means if you are an App Patron, you have access to it right now. The Fuji X Weekly App is free, yet becoming a Patron unlocks the best App experience! One benefit of being a Patron is you get early access to some new Film Simulation Recipes, such as this one. These Patron Early-Access Recipes will eventually become available free to everyone in time, including this new one. Patrons help support Fuji X Weekly and, really, without them there would be no App, so I want to give a special “thank you” to all of the Patrons!

Ball on a Wall – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5 – “Vintage Cinema”

The Vintage Cinema Film Simulation Recipe, which is the very first Patron Early-Access Recipe for X-Trans V, is only compatible with (as of this writing) the Fujifilm X-T5, X-H2, and X-H2S (and I’m sure the X-S20 when it’s released this spring). I assume that the GFX100S and GFX50S II can also use this recipe, but that it will render slightly different—I don’t have either of those cameras to test it to know for certain. This recipe is best for sunny daylight conditions, and seems especially well-suited for golden hour photography, but can sometimes produce interesting results in cloudy, shade, and indoor situations, too. I believe this recipe would pair especially well with vintage lenses and probably diffusion filters, but for these pictures I used Fujinon lenses, including the 27mm f/2.8, 35mm f/2, 90mm f/2, and 100-400mm, without any filters.

Example photographs, all camera-made JPEGs using this “Vintage Cinema” Film Simulation Recipe on my Fujifilm X-T5:

Birds of a Feather – Gilbert, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Flipped Reflection – Gilbert, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Three Ducks in a Lake – Gilbert, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Bougainvillea Blooms & Blue – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Bougainvillea Beams – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5 – Photo by Jonathan Roesch
Side Gate Cracked Open – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Bougainvillea Bush in Bloom – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Hanging Bougainvillea Blossom – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Desert Bunny – Gilbert, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Jo on a Dirt Path – Gilbert, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Jo on the Patio – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Late Autumn Yellow – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Leafless Tree – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5 – Photo by Jonathan Roesch
Do Not Enter When Flooded – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5 – Photo by Jonathan Roesch
Dry Leaves on a Patio Chair – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Pruner & Gloves – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Fruit – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5

Find this Film Simulation Recipe and over 250 more on the Fuji X Weekly — Film Recipes App!

This post contains affiliate links, and if you make a purchase using my links I’ll be compensated a small amount for it.

Fujifilm X-T5 in black:  Amazon  B&H  Moment
Fujifilm X-T5 in silver:  Amazon  B&H  Moment

SOOC Live Season 3 Kicks Off February 9!!

We’re two weeks away from kicking off SOOC Live Season 3! Join myself and Nathalie Boucry as we talk about Film Simulation Recipes, Fujifilm cameras, photography, and so much more. There will be quite a few changes to the show, which we’ll discuss in the initial episode, so you’ll want to tune in. We’ll be broadcasting live on February 9th at 9 AM Pacific Time, Noon Eastern Time, and we hope that you will join us. Mark your calendars now!

One big change is that SOOC Live has its own YouTube channel. All of the “old” episodes will be added there, but it is a work-in-progress and will take some time, so please excuse the construction. You’ll want to take a moment right now to subscribe to the SOOC Live channel, that way you’ll get notified of new broadcasts. Also, the Season 3 Kickoff episode has already been scheduled, so be sure to set the reminder. You know, hit the bell and smash the button and all that fun stuff.

If you haven’t uploaded your photos, don’t forget to do so soon (click here)! Which pictures should you share? Submit up to three of your favorite images captured with the Mystery Chrome Film Simulation Recipe (which was created live during the last episode of Season 2) and/or festive photographs captured over the holiday season with any Film Simulation Recipe. Be sure to include your name and the recipe used in the file name. All the pictures submitted will be included in a slide show, and some will be shown during the show. Everyone who submits a photo will be entered into a drawing for a chance to win a 12-month Patron subscription to the Fuji X Weekly App. Please submit your pictures by February 7th.

If you haven’t visited the SOOC Live website, you’ll want to do so and bookmark it. It’s also a work-in-progress, and you’ll see a few changes and updates over the coming weeks and months.

There are some big things in store for SOOC Live Season 3! Come along for the ride and see where this journey takes us.

Clarifying (Typical) Exposure Compensation

One aspect of Film Simulation Recipes that I get asked about a lot is Exposure Compensation. It has caused much confusion. This article is intended to clarify it, and hopefully by the end this puzzling parameter will be fully understood.

First, let’s briefly talk about the exposure triangle. In photography, the exposure triangle refers to the three main elements that control the brightness of an image: aperture, shutter speed, and ISO. Aperture controls the amount of light entering the camera through the lens by adjusting the size of the opening, measured in f-stops. Shutter speed controls the amount of time that the camera’s sensor (or the film) is exposed to light, measured in seconds or fractions of a second. ISO measures the sensitivity of the camera’s sensor (or the film) to light, with lower ISO values indicating lower sensitivity and higher ISO values indicating higher sensitivity. These three elements work together to determine the overall exposure of an image.

Illumination in the Dark Desert – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5 – “CineStill 400D v1” Recipe – Exposure Compensation: 0

Whenever you are not shooting fully manual, but are relying on an auto or semi-auto feature, such as Aperture-Priority (you choose the Aperture, but the camera chooses the Shutter and possibly the ISO) and Shutter-Priority (you choose the Shutter, but the camera chooses the Aperture and possibly the ISO), you adjust the exposure using Exposure Compensation, which on most Fujifilm cameras is via a knob on top of the camera. You can increase or decrease the exposure in 1/3-stop increments. While some people do shoot fully manual, including myself on occasion, many photographers choose to use a semi-auto mode so that the camera handles some lesser important tasks for them. Because more people shoot semi-auto than fully manual, in the Film Simulation Recipes I state the appropriate Auto-ISO and typical Exposure Compensation, but this causes a point of confusion for the fully manual shooter: what do you do? The solution is simple: increase or decrease the exposure over what the light meter suggests by whatever the recipe says. If a particular recipe calls for +1/3 to +2/3 Exposure Compensation, simply increase the exposure over what the light meter says by that amount.

Which brings me to an important point. The suggested Exposure Compensation is not intended to be a rule, but merely a starting point. There are a lot of factors that determine the luminosity curve—the film simulation, Dynamic Range settings, Highlight, Shadow, and even Color Chrome Effect, Color Chrome FX Blue, and Clarity play a role—and that curve is applied to the exposure (the entirety of the triangle). Because of this, it’s important to judge each exposure individually, to determine how the luminosity curve best fits within an exposure, depending on the exact light situation. In other words, “typical” Exposure Compensation is nothing more than a suggestion, which will work sometimes and won’t work other times, and it is up to you to figure out what will work best for each image.

Cactus Evening – Goodyear, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4 – “Bright Kodak” Recipe – Exposure Compensation: +1

Another important point is metering. I use Multi most of the time, but sometimes I use Spot instead. It doesn’t really matter which one you use, because whichever you choose, you’ll still need to judge each exposure individually. However, it can be helpful to know that the typical metering mode used for suggested Exposure Compensations is Multi. If you are using the “typical” Exposure Compensation as a starting point, it will likely work better for you more often if you are also using Multi metering mode. It’s not critical to use any particular metering mode, but, if you are using something other than Multi, you should be aware that the suggested Exposure Compensation will be a little less helpful.

You cannot save an Exposure Compensation within the C1-C7 Custom Presets. Instead, you adjust it (on most Fujifilm cameras) via the Exposure Compensation Knob on the top plate. If your camera has the ability to Custom Name each preset, you could add the “typical” Exposure Compensation to the name as a reminder if you want to. Since you get immediate feedback on what your picture will look like, I wouldn’t get too caught up in worrying about “typical” Exposure Compensation; instead, simply look at the image, and determine if it is too dark or bright, and adjust if necessary.

Cactus Spiderweb – Goodyear, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4 – “Low Key” Recipe – Exposure Compensation: -1 1/3

Most Film Simulation Recipes often look better with a little boost in exposure over what the light meter says, and some look better with a decrease in exposure. But, it’s also situationally dependent. You might find that with a certain recipe you often use +2/3 Exposure Compensation, but then for a certain picture you set it to -1/3. Flexibility is key. To an extent, using Film Simulation Recipes is kind of like shooting slide film, in that you have to get the exposure correct in-the-field at the time of the exposure; however, your camera allows you to see exactly what the picture is going to look like, and you have some excellent tools in-camera to help, such as a histogram and highlight alert.

The takeaways are 1) the “typical” Exposure Compensation listed in each recipe is merely a suggested starting point and nothing more, and 2) each exposure should be judged individually. It’s understandable why this setting is confusing, and why I get so many questions about it. My best advice is to carefully examine the instant feedback your camera is providing you in a situation, and adjust the exposure, either brighter or darker, until it is how you want it to be. I hope this clears things up a bit.

The SOOC Revolution

Fence & Desert – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5 & Fujinon 35mm f/2 – “Vintage Bronze” Recipe

“The effect of one-step processing on both amateur and professional creative photography has been revolutionary.”

—Ansel Adams, Polaroid Land Camera

I woke up this morning unsure what to write about. It just so happened that I had a handful of exposures I captured yesterday evening still sitting on the SD Card in my Fujifilm X-T5. Using Fujifilm’s Cam Remote App, I transferred the pictures from the camera to my iPhone, cropped and straightened a few of them, and uploaded the images to cloud storage. It took maybe 10 minutes tops start-to-finish, and I don’t even think it was that long. One-step photography, which removes the second-step (the editing step), is truly revolutionary, just as Ansel Adams stated. Of course he was talking about instant film—something he was a big fan of—and we’re talking about straight-out-of-camera JPEGs, something that I’m a big fan of. Now I know what to write about today!

First Sign of Spring – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5 & Fujinon 35mm f/2 – “Vintage Bronze” Recipe

Why is shooting straight-out-of-camera (SOOC) JPEGs revolutionary?

First, it allows for a faster, more streamlined workflow. When you use Fujifilm cameras and Film Simulation Recipes, the camera does all the post-processing work for you. You don’t have to spend hours and hours sitting in front of a computer fiddling with images. This can save you an extensive amount of time and effort, which can significantly increase your productivity, plus make photography more enjoyable. It’s not only a faster workflow, but an easier workflow. Achieving a desired aesthetic is as simple as programming the correct recipe into your camera.

Yellow Wildflowers – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5 & Fujinon 35mm f/2 – “Vintage Bronze” Recipe

Next, SOOC JPEGs allow you to be more consistent. Because the camera is applying the recipes, the photographer doesn’t have to worry about inconsistencies in their editing process. This makes achieving cohesive results for a photo series or project much easier.

Also, JPEGs are more efficient than RAW in terms of storage space. You don’t need to buy a larger SD Card or external hard drive or pay for more cloud storage nearly as quickly. Upload and download times are faster. You have a ready-to-share photo the moment that it’s captured—you don’t have to wait for a program to process it first.

Jon at the Fishin’ Pond – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5 & Fujinon 35mm f/2 – “Vintage Bronze” Recipe

Finally, SOOC JPEGs might be considered more authentic. Film Simulation Recipes often replicate the look and feel of classic film stocks and processes, and seem less digital-like in their rendering. There is a growing sentiment among photography consumers (not photographers, but those who view pictures) that “Photoshop” is bad, and picture manipulation equals people manipulation; however, unedited images don’t carry that stigma, and can come across as more authentic.

All of this and more are why there is a revolution in photography right now. More and more photographers—from first-camera beginners to experienced pros with recognizable names—are using Film Simulation Recipes and shooting SOOC JPEGs. It’s a growing trend, and I believe it will become much bigger in the coming years. I’m truly honored to be a part of it, and I’m glad that you’ve come along for the ride.

Budding & Blooming – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5 & Fujinon 35mm f/2 – “Vintage Bronze” Recipe

This post contains affiliate links, and if you make a purchase using my links I’ll be compensated a small amount for it.

Fujifilm X-T5 in black:  Amazon  B&H  Moment
Fujifilm X-T5 in silver:  Amazon  B&H  Moment
Fujinon 35mm in black:  Amazon  B&H  Moment
Fujinon 35mm in silver:  Amazon  B&H  Moment

Find this Film Simulation Recipe and over 250 more on the Fuji X Weekly — Film Recipes App!

Thoughts on the Upcoming X-S20

According to Fujirumors, who has a reputation for being quite accurate, the next Fujifilm model will be the X-S20, which will be announced at the X-Summit in April. What are my thoughts on this upcoming camera?

First of all, I want to state that I have zero inside information. Fujifilm doesn’t tell me anything. I haven’t spoken with anybody who has knowledge about upcoming cameras. What I state about the X-S20—or any unreleased model—is my opinion (nothing more) and should be consumed with a grain of salt.

The X-S10 was a successful model for Fujifilm, doing what it was intended to do: attract those unsatisfied with their Canikony camera who have an interest in Fujifilm but are intimidated by the traditional dials because they have only ever used PASM. I have no doubt that the X-S20 will be just as successful, if not more so.

I believe it will have the same 40-megapixel sensor as the X-H2 and X-T5. It won’t be weather-sealed. It will be 95% the same camera as the X-S10, just with the new sensor and processor. I would be surprised if there were any big surprises. If the X-H2 is too expensive for you, or if you have an X-H2 but want a smaller and cheaper second body, the X-S20 will be the one to consider.

What will separate the X-S20 from the X-S10? Megapixels. Autofocus. Improved IBIS algorithm. Nostalgic Neg. 6K video. I don’t expect the new version to be head-and-shoulders better, but an improvement nonetheless, but with some give-and-take, so an argument could be made that the X-S10 is actually “better” (subjectively, of course), just like the X-T4 might be considered better than the X-T5 by some.

I do wonder if Fujifilm has intentions of introducing a mid-level PASM model. The X-H2/X-H2S cameras are “flagship” cameras that are true “hybrid” models (excellent for both stills and video), but unfortunately those are PASM models, which means long-time Fujifilm photographers were left out in the cold—the X-T4 and X-H1 are the only “flagship hybrid” cameras for you to choose from (yes, an argument could be made for the X-T5, but it is clear Fujifilm intends it for those who primarily are still photographers, not videographers). The X-S10 and X-S20 are entry-level (as in the new entry-level, which used to be mid-level). What’s in-between the high-end X-H2 and the low-end X-S20? For the PASM shooter, nothing. I’m not certain if something is needed, but I wouldn’t be surprised if Fujifilm is exploring that possibility, or even in the process of creating it.

I don’t think, in the current market, that it makes sense to have three entry-level models. That means either the X-E line or X-T00 line is likely on the way out. The X-T00 has historically been more popular, but the X-E line is beloved, and the X-E4 has been especially successful. I’m not sure what might get the ax or when, but it’s possible that the X-T30 II or X-E4 was the last in their respective series. Or maybe the X-T40 (or X-T50… they might skip using four because it is an unlucky number in Japan) or X-E5 will be the last. I hope I’m wrong about this, and both lines continue for years to come, but I don’t think that will be the case.

I’m disappointed that the X-S20 is the next camera to be announced. Six out of the last nine Fujifilm cameras will have been PASM models—X-S10, GFX100S, GFX50S II, X-H2S, X-H2, and X-S20—while one of the three non-PASM models—X-T30 II—wasn’t much more than a firmware update (so essentially 3/4 of Fujifilm’s latest releases have been PASM). I think it’s clear that Fujifilm is more interested in becoming a part of Canikony (Canikonyfilm?), which they see as their future growth potential, than to embrace and better communicate what makes them unique (and why that uniqueness is desirable). Shame. But, at the same time, the X-S line was due for an update, so I’m not too surprised that this is their next model. Still, I think with the current demand for the X100V, which Fujifilm cannot keep up with due to parts shortages, that they would expedite the X100Z (or whatever it will be called). To me, that would have made more sense.

This post contains affiliate links, and if you make a purchase using my links I’ll be compensated a small amount for it.

Fujifilm X-S10:  Amazon  B&H  Moment

Evergreen 35mm Film Canister Case

I used to shoot a lot of film. When I finally discovered the joy of Fujifilm cameras, with their incredible JPEG output, I practically stopped using analog cameras—not entirely, mind you, but almost. It was 25 years ago this upcoming fall (I cannot believe I’m that old…) that I began shooting film, yet I never once figured out a good storage system for my film canisters.

At the pinnacle of my analog adventures, you’d find a half-dozen or so unused film canisters in the refrigerator, another handful in the fridge exposed and waiting development, and another handful stuffed into various pockets of my camera bag, waiting for their chance in the camera. I wasn’t nearly prolific enough to have hundreds of rolls of film in the refrigerator or freezer, but I was a regular at my local lab, buying more film once every week or two. Despite all of the film coming and going for years, not once did I ever have a good system for it. My wife once complained about all of the film in the fridge because it was in the way of the food.

The good folks at Evergreen Cases, who happen to be big fans of Fujifilm cameras and Film Simulation Recipes, sent me a Seahorse X Waterproof 35mm Film Canister Case (with the Fuji X Weekly logo printed on it!). Where was this 25 years ago? If I had had two of these cases, my film could have been a lot more organized. I would have had one case for the refrigerator, where film-in-waiting (either to be exposed or developed) would be stored, and a case in my bag, for the film waiting for its turn in the camera. Now that I shoot a lot less film, one case is enough for me. Film is extremely expensive nowadays, so I’m glad that I use Fujifilm cameras for the vast majority of my photography.

This article doesn’t have much to do with the usual topics of this website, so—to bring it back home real quick—let me tell you a little about the two photographs above, which (admittedly) are nothing special. I used my Fujifilm X-T5 with the Kodak Portra 400 v2 Film Simulation Recipe to capture them. With Fujifilm cameras and recipes, I’m able to quickly and easily snap pictures that are ready to share—whether on social media or this website or with friends and family—the moment that they’re captured. No waiting for the lab. No sitting in front of a computer fiddling with files. Eliminating that second step is revolutionary—at least that’s what Ansel Adams said.

Elevating Your Street Photography with Fujifilm Film Simulation Recipes + 5 Recipes to Try Today!

Friendly Wave – Carlsbad, CA – Fujifilm X100V – “Kodachrome 64”

Street photography is a unique and challenging form of photography that requires a keen eye for detail, a sense of timing, and a deep understanding of light and composition. One of the best ways to elevate your street photography is by using Film Simulation Recipes, such as Kodachrome 64, on your Fujifilm camera. These recipes can help you quickly and easily achieve a specific look and feel in your photographs that can be more difficult to replicate with other techniques.

One of the key benefits of using Film Simulation Recipes is that they allow you to emulate the look and feel of traditional film stocks. The Kodachrome 64 recipe, for example, is known for its warm, saturated colors and high contrast, which can add a sense of nostalgia and emotional depth to your street images. By using this recipe, you can give your photos a vintage look that is both timeless and evocative.

SS At 35th – Phoenix, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4 – “Kodachrome 64”

Another benefit of using recipes on your Fujifilm camera is that they can help you achieve a more consistent aesthetic across your photos. This is especially important for street photographers who often work in rapidly changing light conditions. Using just one recipe over a series of pictures can ensure that your photos have a consistent color palette and tonal range, which can help to tie your photos together and give them a cohesive feel. With that said, it’s important to consider how to use recipes in a way that is true to your personal vision and style. While it can be tempting to simply use (for example) Kodachrome 64 with every exposure, it’s important to remember that each recipe has its own unique characteristics and should be used in a way that complements the subject and mood.

Also, it’s important to remember that Film Simulation Recipes are not a substitute for good technique and composition. While they can help to add a sense of style and character to your photos, they are not a magic bullet that can fix poor technique or composition. In order to achieve the best results, it’s important to combine the use of these recipes with good technical skills and an understanding of light and storytelling.

Going Out of Business – Prescott, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5 – “1970’s Summer

Using recipes with your Fujifilm camera can be a powerful tool for street photographers who want to add a unique and personal touch to their work. These recipes can help you quickly and easily achieve a specific look and feel in your photos. By combining the use of these recipes with good technique and composition, you can take your street photography to the next level and create truly stunning and evocative images.

This post contains affiliate links, and if you make a purchase using my links I’ll be compensated a small amount for it.

Fujifilm X-T5 in black:  Amazon  B&H  Moment
Fujifilm X-T5 in silver:  Amazon  B&H  Moment
Fujifilm X100V in black:  Amazon   B&H  Moment
Fujifilm X100V in silver: Amazon   B&H  Moment
Fujifilm X-E4 in black:  Amazon   B&H  Moment
Fujifilm X-E4 in silver:  Amazon   B&H  Moment

Five Fujifilm Film Simulation Recipes to try for street photography today:

Find these Film Simulation Recipes and over 250 more on the Fuji X Weekly — Film Recipes App!

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CineStill 400D v2 — A Fujifilm X-Trans IV & V Film Simulation Recipe

Orange & Blue – Phoenix, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5 – “CineStill 400D v2”

CineStill 400D is a cinematic color negative film meant for C41 processing that’s been around for less than a year. Unlike other cinematic films, the “D” doesn’t apparently stand for “Daylight” (even though it is Daylight balanced), but “Dynamic” because it has a large latitude for push processing. I’ve had a number of requests to create a Film Simulation Recipe that mimics the aesthetic of CineStill 400D. The problem I encountered is that this emulsion has a lot more variance than most films. All films can produce different looks depending on a host of factors, including how shot, developed, and scanned, but CineStill 400D seems especially so. As I understand, this film “scans flat” and some degree of post-processing is necessary, which likely accounts for some of that variance, as each photographer will manipulate the file to their own tastes to produce a final image.

No one recipe will ever come close to replicating all of the possible aesthetics from CineStill 400D, so instead I’m publishing a series of CineStill 400D Film Simulation Recipes, each a facsimile of a different look produced by the film. This recipe—CineStill 400D v2—has less contrast and leans more red/purple than the previous version. I think it is especially well suited for “golden hour” photography, but it is also a good option for overcast, shade, and midday sun. While it is certainly usable for many genres of photography, I particularly appreciate this one for urban and street photography.

This CineStill 400D v2 recipe was a joint effort between myself and Nestor Pool (Instagram, TikTok, Facebook, YouTube). We went back-and-forth on the settings, trying to match some examples of the film. After a few attempts, we decided it was best to focus on the “right feel” for what we wanted than an exact replication of the emulsion, especially since there was so much variance. After more fine-tuning, this is the recipe we created together. Nestor recommends using a 5% Moment CineBloom filter with these settings, although I didn’t do that with these pictures because my filter doesn’t have the right thread size for the lenses I used. It was a real honor to work with Nestor Pool, and I want to give him a special “thank you” for his efforts on this!

City of Grace Tower – Phoenix, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5 – “CineStill 400D”

This CineStill 400D v2 Film Simulation Recipe is compatible with “newer” Fujifilm X-Trans IV cameras—X-Pro3, X100V, X-T4, X-S10, X-E4, and X-T30 II—and all X-Trans V models—as of this writing, X-T5, X-H2, and X-H2S. Unfortunately, it is not compatible with the X-T3 and X-T30. Those with newer GFX models should be able to use it, too, but the rendering will be slightly different (try it anyway). Click here for CineStill 400D v1.

Film Simulation: Astia
Grain Effect: Strong, Small
Color Chrome Effect: Strong
Color Chrome FX Blue: Weak
White Balance: Fluorescent 1, -2 Red & +4 Blue
Dynamic Range: DR200
Highlight: -2
Shadow: 0
Color: +2
Sharpness: -2

High ISO NR: -4
Clarity: -4
ISO: Auto, up to ISO 6400
Exposure Compensation: +1/3 to +1 (typically)

Example photographs, all camera-made JPEGs using this “CineStill 400D v2” Film Simulation Recipe on my Fujifilm X-T5:

Hiker, Birdwatcher & Fisherman – Gilbert, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Faded Trail Sign – Gilbert, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Masonic Walker – Phoenix, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Waiting in Yellow – Phoenix, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Alleyway Bike – Phoenix, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Green Land Rover – Phoenix, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
No P – Phoenix, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Urban Palms – Phoenix, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Cross Palms – Phoenix, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Closed Church – Phoenix, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Building Blue – Phoenix, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Orange Reflection – Phoenix, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Building Within a Building – Phoenix, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Arrogant – Phoenix, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Vegan – Phoenix, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Haircut – Phoenix, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
11 – Phoenix, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Sidewalk Dog – Phoenix, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Boarded Doors – Phoenix, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Cars & Closed Church – Phoenix, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Urban Skateboarder – Phoenix, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Orpheum – Phoenix, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Spanish Baroque Tower – Phoenix, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Night Beacon – Phoenix, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5

This post contains affiliate links, and if you make a purchase using my links I’ll be compensated a small amount for it.

Fujifilm X-T5 in black:  Amazon  B&H  Moment
Fujifilm X-T5 in silver:  Amazon  B&H  Moment

Find this Film Simulation Recipe and over 250 more on the Fuji X Weekly — Film Recipes App!

Help Fuji X Weekly

Nobody pays me to write the content found on fujixweekly.com. There’s a real cost to operating and maintaining this site, not to mention all the time that I pour into it. If you appreciated this article, please consider making a one-time gift contribution. Thank you!

$5.00

CineStill 400D v1 — A Fujifilm X-Trans IV & V Film Simulation Recipe

Illumination in the Dark Desert – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5 – “CineStill 400D v1”

CineStill 400D is a cinematic color negative film meant for C41 processing that’s been around for less than a year. Unlike other cinematic films, the “D” doesn’t apparently stand for “Daylight” (even though it is Daylight balanced), but “Dynamic” because it has a large latitude for push processing. I’ve had a number of requests to create a Film Simulation Recipe that mimics the aesthetic of CineStill 400D. The problem I encountered is that this emulsion has a lot more variance than most films. All films can produce different looks depending on a host of factors, including how shot, developed, and scanned, but CineStill 400D seems especially so. As I understand, this film “scans flat” and some degree of post-processing is necessary, which likely accounts for some of that variance, as each photographer will manipulate the file to their own tastes to produce a final image.

No one recipe will ever come close to replicating all of the possible aesthetics from CineStill 400D, so instead I will publish a series of CineStill 400D Film Simulation Recipes, each a facsimile of a different look produced by the film. This recipe—CineStill 400D v1—has more contrast and leans more green/yellow than the other versions that will follow. I think it is especially well suited for sunny daylight conditions, but it is also a good option for dreary overcast days. While it is certainly usable for many genres of photography, I particularly appreciate this one for landscapes.

Bougainvillea Warm – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5 – “CineStill 400D v1”

This CineStill 400D v1 Film Simulation Recipe is compatible with “newer” Fujifilm X-Trans IV cameras—X-Pro3, X100V, X-T4, X-S10, X-E4, and X-T30 II—and all X-Trans V models—as of this writing, X-T5, X-H2, and X-H2S. Unfortunately, it is not compatible with the X-T3 and X-T30. Those with newer GFX models should be able to use it, too, but the rendering will be slightly different (try it anyway). Click here for the CineStill 400D v2 recipe.

Film Simulation: Astia
Grain Effect: Strong, Small
Color Chrome Effect: Strong
Color Chrome FX Blue: Strong
White Balance: Fluorescent 1, -6 Red & -3 Blue
Dynamic Range: DR200
Highlight: +3
Shadow: +1
Color: +2
Sharpness: -2

High ISO NR: -4
Clarity: -4
ISO: Auto, up to ISO 6400
Exposure Compensation: -1/3 to +2/3 (typically)

Example photographs, all camera-made JPEGs using this “CineStill 400D v1” Film Simulation Recipe on my Fujifilm X-T5:

Red Pipe – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Dreary Bougainvillea – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Raindrop on Curled Leaf – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Fujifilm X100V on a Wet Table – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Autumn Sidewalk – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Suburban Bush – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Reflection on the Floor – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Dog Waste – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Stone Blooms – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Tree in the Cloudy Desert – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Suburban Stop Sign – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Joy – Gilbert, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Saguaro Storm – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Reflecting on Perspective – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Evening in the Desert – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Cactus Reflected – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Light & Clouds on Mountain Ridges – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Sunset Clouds – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Desert in Shadow & Light – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Last Sunlight Pouring Through a Pass – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Saguaro Fingers – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Dark Saguaro – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Cactus in Golden Light – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5

This post contains affiliate links, and if you make a purchase using my links I’ll be compensated a small amount for it.

Fujifilm X-T5 in black:  Amazon  B&H  Moment
Fujifilm X-T5 in silver:  Amazon  B&H  Moment

Find this Film Simulation Recipe and over 250 more on the Fuji X Weekly — Film Recipes App!

Help Fuji X Weekly

Nobody pays me to write the content found on fujixweekly.com. There’s a real cost to operating and maintaining this site, not to mention all the time that I pour into it. If you appreciated this article, please consider making a one-time gift contribution. Thank you!

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Kodak Ultramax 400 — A Film Simulation Recipe for the Fujifilm X-T5 (X-Trans V)

Spring is a Dream – Gilbert, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5 – “Kodak Ultramax 400”

This isn’t a new Film Simulation Recipe, but simply a tweak of the X-Trans IV Kodak Ultramax 400 recipe to make it compatible with X-Trans V cameras. Because blue in Classic Chrome is rendered deeper on X-Trans V than X-Trans IV, Color Chrome FX Blue needs to be set to Off instead of Weak. Otherwise, this recipe is identical to the X-Trans IV version. For those with an X-T3, X-T30, or X-Trans III camera, there’s a version for you, too.

Kodak Ultramax 400 is a consumer grade ISO 400 color negative film. Kodak has sold Ultramax 400 under many different names, beginning in 1987 with Kodacolor VR-G 400, rebranded Gold 400 one year later, called simply GC at one point, and finally, in 1997, Kodak settled on Ultramax 400. Kodak still sells Ultramax 400, although it’s not the same film as Kodacolor VR-G 400. This film has been tweaked and updated at least nine times over the years; however, the overall aesthetic is still substantially similar between all variations.

Kissed by Light – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5 – “Kodak Ultramax 400”

This Kodak Ultramax 400 Film Simulation Recipe is intended for Fujifilm X-Trans V models, which (as of this writing) include the X-H2, X-H2S, and X-T5 cameras. It’s compatible with newer GFX models too, but will likely render slightly different on those cameras. This recipe is highly versatile—a great option for daylight, overcast, indoor, nighttime, landscapes, portraits, etc.—really, it’s good most any type of photography.

Film Simulation: Classic Chrome
Grain Effect: Strong, Large
Color Chrome Effect: Weak
Color Chrome FX Blue: Off
White Balance: Auto, +1 Red & -5 Blue
Dynamic Range: DR-Auto
Highlight: +1
Shadow: +1
Color: +4
Sharpness: 0

High ISO NR: -4
Clarity: +3
ISO: Auto, up to ISO 6400
Exposure Compensation: +1/3 to +1 (typically)

Example photographs, all camera-made JPEGs using this “Kodak Ultramax 400” Film Simulation Recipe on my Fujifilm X-T5:

Watching Firecrackers – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Red, Fire & Blue – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Sparkler – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Dressed for the Holiday – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Mango – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Days – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Rainy Day Window – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Happiness and Wondering – Gilbert, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Wet Bougainvillea – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Sunny Day Bougainvillea – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Lakeside Saguaro – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Cactus Bird – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Cactus on a Hill – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Rocks Among Clouds – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Victory Mountain – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Desert Ridge with Lifting Clouds – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Blue Sky Moon – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Dusk Sky – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5

This post contains affiliate links, and if you make a purchase using my links I’ll be compensated a small amount for it.

Fujifilm X-T5 in black:  Amazon  B&H  Moment
Fujifilm X-T5 in silver:  Amazon  B&H  Moment

Find this Film Simulation Recipe and over 250 more on the Fuji X Weekly — Film Recipes App!

Help Fuji X Weekly

Nobody pays me to write the content found on fujixweekly.com. There’s a real cost to operating and maintaining this site, not to mention all the time that I pour into it. If you appreciated this article, please consider making a one-time gift contribution. Thank you!

$5.00

Vintage Bronze — Fujifilm X-T5 (X-Trans V) Film Simulation Recipe

Autumn Rainbow – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5 – “Vintage Bronze”

This Vintage Bronze Film Simulation Recipe was an accident. It came about when Fuji X Weekly reader Dan Allen was first trying Anders Lindborg‘s Ilford FP4 Plus 125 recipe, and he accidentally selected the Eterna Bleach Bypass film sim instead of Monochrome. The results were pretty interesting, with a vintage alternative-process aesthetic—which I happened to really like—so I decided to make it an official recipe.

The Eterna Bleach Bypass film simulation is intended to replicate the look of motion picture film that has had the bleach step reduced or skipped. With this Vintage Bronze Film Simulation Recipe, there are some similarities to that (Michael Radford’s 1984 comes to mind), but it also reminds me a little of Kodak ColorPlus film cross-processed in E6 chemistry. Obviously, it’s not modeled after any specific film or process, so any similarities are simply happy accidents. I don’t think this recipe is necessarily a close facsimile to bleach-bypassed motion picture film or cross-processed ColorPlus, and not really an exact match to anything that I have seen, but it’s in the general neighborhood of those alternative-process aesthetics. I think an argument could be made that Kodacolor that’s faded a little is also somewhat similar.

Paperflowers – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5 – “Vintage Bronze”

Because of the blue color rendering difference between X-Trans IV and V, this Vintage Warm Film Simulation Recipe is only compatible with (as of this writing) the Fujifilm X-T5, X-H2, and X-H2S. You can use it on those X-Trans IV cameras with Eterna Bleach Bypass, but the rendering will be slightly different (give it a try anyway). I assume that the GFX100S and GFX50S II can also use this recipe, but that it will render slightly different—I don’t have either of those cameras to test it to know for certain.

Film Simulation: Eterna Bleach Bypass
Grain Effect: Weak, Large
Color Chrome Effect: Off
Color Chrome FX Blue: Off
White Balance: Daylight, +6 Red & -8 Blue
Dynamic Range: DR200
Highlight: 0
Shadow: -1
Color: 0
Sharpness: -2

High ISO NR: -4
Clarity: -2
ISO: Auto, up to ISO 6400
Exposure Compensation: -2/3 to 0 (typically)

Example photographs, all camera-made JPEGs using this “Vintage Bronze” Film Simulation Recipe on my Fujifilm X-T5:

Sunset Over White Truck – Surprise, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Ford Wagon – Surprise, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
5 & 6 – Surprise, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Cart Lock – Avondale, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Bus – Goodyear, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Jon in December – Surprise, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Johanna & Lens Flare – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Outdoor Lightbulbs – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Projector – Surprise, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Abstract Snow – Surprise, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Christmas Song – Surprise, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Winter Guitar – Surprise, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
A Gift For You – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Joy, Unsure – Goodyear, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Reading the Paper in December – Goodyear, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Sprinkled Donut – Goodyear, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Softdrinks – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Rudolph – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5

This post contains affiliate links, and if you make a purchase using my links I’ll be compensated a small amount for it.

Fujifilm X-T5 in black:  Amazon  B&H  Moment
Fujifilm X-T5 in silver:  Amazon  B&H  Moment

Find this Film Simulation Recipe and over 250 more on the Fuji X Weekly — Film Recipes App!

Moment — The Marketplace for Creatives

What’s the coolest online camera store? Moment! The Marketplace for Creatives. To say that it’s just a camera store is incorrect, because it’s an experience. Whether you are a beginner, a journeyman, or advanced photographer or videographer, there’s something on Moment’s website for you.

For the beginner, there are online courses to help you get started. There’s a Fujifilm X100V In-Depth Setup Guide, for example. Or Everyday Fujifilm Camera Basics. There was even an over-four-hour live Fujifilm workshop that’s still available to watch. These are put together by some highly reputable photographers, including Faizal Westcott, Andrew Kearns, and Gajan Balan.

Dr Pepper Closed – Childress, TX – Fujifilm X-E4 – “Reggie’s Portra”

For the journeyman, check out Shooting Lifestyle on Fuji, Shooting Portraits on Fuji, and Shooting for Brands. Again, these are put together by some talented photographers, including Victoria Wright and Reggie Ballesteros. You might already be familiar with Reggie’s Portra Film Simulation Recipe.

For the advanced photographer, check out some experiences: Jordan Photo Tour and Faroe Islands Photo Tour. Or, maybe become a Gear Guide or create a course for Moment.

The point is, no matter your skill level—from first-camera beginner to seasoned pro—Moment has something for you. In fact, much more than I just shared above, so check out all of their courses, reviews, and experiences.

iPhone 11 + Moment 58mm – RitchieCam App – “Faded Film” – Canyonlands NP, UT

And I haven’t even talked about their gear yet! They sell their own brand of products, such as CineBloom filters (that’s Tip 3 in my 7 Tips To Get The Film Look From Your Digital Photos article), and cellphone lenses (check out my review of the Tele 58mm lens). They have apps. And, of course, they sell Fujifilm cameras and Fujinon lenses.

I know this sounds like a paid sponsored post, but I promise it’s not. I just think Moment is the coolest online camera store out there, and I wanted to say so—this is my website, so I’m allowed to do that. I do have a history with Moment. You might recall that back in 2021 I jointly wrote an article with them, Why I Never Shoot RAW — FujiFilm Simulations, Recipes, and More! Also back in 2021, Fuji X Weekly and Moment teamed up to give away some CineBloom filters. Anyway, even though I’m not getting paid to do so, I thought I’d take this opportunity to introduce you to Moment just in case you’ve never visited their wonderful website, which is the marketplace for creatives.

Using Film Simulation Recipes to Recreate Vintage Looks — 10 Recipes to Try Today!

More Than Double Wide – Arlington, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5 – “1970’s Summer” recipe

Fujifilm cameras have color profiles called Film Simulations, which can be customized to create various looks, including emulating the aesthetics of different types of film. Fuji X Weekly Film Simulation Recipes, which are a set of specific camera settings that produce many different looks in-camera without the need for editing, can be used to easily apply various vintage film looks to photos taken with Fujifilm cameras. These recipes can be used without the need for post-processing because they are essentially a set of camera settings that are tailored to emulate the aesthetic of a specific type of film—you get the retro analog look straight-out-of-camera.

One of the benefits of using these Film Simulation Recipes is that they can save a significant amount of time in post-processing. Instead of having to manually adjust various settings in editing software to achieve a vintage film look, photographers can simply apply the appropriate recipe in-camera and get the desired look straight-out-of-camera. The photos are finished and ready to share the moment that they are captured. You don’t even need to involve a computer at any point in your workflow, if you don’t want to. Not editing is a huge timesaver that allows photographers to be more productive thanks to a streamlined workflow.

Another benefit of using the Fuji X Weekly Film Simulation Recipes is that they can help new photographers achieve vintage film looks without having to learn cumbersome, intimidating, and expensive software. These recipes provide an easy way to experiment with different analog aesthetics. Film is expensive, and recipes are a quicker, more convenient, and cheaper alternative that still produces film-like results. And there is instant gratification when the unedited picture looks good, as if it had been post-processed or shot on film.

There are four reasons why photographers might want their pictures to have a retro analog look:

  1. Aesthetics — Vintage looks can evoke a sense of nostalgia and give photos a timeless quality that can be pleasing to the eye.
  2. Branding — Some photographers may want to apply vintage looks to their work as a way to set their brand apart or to appeal to a specific target market that appreciates the vintage aesthetic.
  3. Storytelling — Applying a vintage look to a photo can also help to tell a story or convey a certain mood or atmosphere that may be difficult to achieve with a more modern look.
  4. Experimentation — Some photographers may also want vintage looks as a form of creative experimentation or as a way to add an extra layer of meaning to their photos.

Film Simulation Recipes that produce a nostalgic aesthetic are popular. Below are 10 of my favorite Film Simulation Recipes that recreate vintage film looks.

Kodachrome 64

Abandoned Mobile Home – Arlington, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5 – “Kodachrome 64”

Old Ektachrome

Approaching Mesa Arch – Canyonlands NP, UT – Fujifilm X-Pro3 – “Old Ektachrome”

Chrome Slide

Airstream – Pismo Beach, CA – Fujifilm X-E4 – “Chrome Slide”

1970’s Summer

Going Out of Business – Prescott, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5 – “1970’s Summer”

Nostalgia Color

Seagull Sky – Cannon Beach, OR – Fujifilm X-E4 – “Nostalgia Color

Fujicolor Natura 1600

Tree Blossom Sky – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4 – “Fujicolor Natura 1600”

Vintage Color

Sentinel & Merced – Yosemite NP, CA – Fujifilm X100V – “Vintage Color”

Vintage Vibes

Autumn Aspen – Big Arm, MT – Fujifilm X100V – “Vintage Vibes”

Vintage Negative

Suburban Reed Evening – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V – “Vintage Negative”

Xpro ’62

Empty Diner – Reno, NV – Fujifilm X100V – “Xpro ’62”

Obviously, there are a lot more options than just these 10—in fact, there are over 250 Film Simulation Recipes published on Fuji X Weekly and found in the Fuji X Weekly App! There are a lot to choose from, and if you are not sure, the list above should provide you with at least a few to try.

See also: Which Film Simulation Recipe, When?

Find these Film Simulation Recipes and over 250 more on the Fuji X Weekly — Film Recipes App!

This post contains affiliate links, and if you make a purchase using my links I’ll be compensated a small amount for it.

Fujifilm X-T5 in black:  Amazon  B&H
Fujifilm X-T5 in silver:  Amazon  B&H
Fujifilm X100V in black:  Amazon   B&H
Fujifilm X100V in silver: Amazon   B&H
Fujifilm X-E4 in black:  Amazon   B&H
Fujifilm X-E4 in silver:  Amazon   B&H
Fujifilm X-Pro3:  Amazon   B&H

Help Fuji X Weekly

Nobody pays me to write the content found on fujixweekly.com. There’s a real cost to operating and maintaining this site, not to mention all the time that I pour into it. If you appreciated this article, please consider making a one-time gift contribution. Thank you!

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Creative Collective 039: Modifying Film Simulation Recipes to Suit Your Personal Style

Above-Left: Kodak Portra 400 v2 recipe — Above-right: same recipe, but slightly modified.

Film Simulation Recipes are one way to replicate the look and feel of traditional film on your Fujifilm camera. You can do something like this by editing RAW files and applying Alien Akin, VSCO, RNI, etc., presets during post-processing; however, using recipes cuts out this step, saving you a lot of time and hassle. One-step photography (as discussed by Ansel Adams in his book about Polaroid photography, which he was fascinated with) is an easier approach. Some advantages of using recipes on Fujifilm cameras are simplicity (quickly and easily achieve a desired aesthetic with little or no editing), authenticity (film-like quality that doesn’t appear heavily manipulated), consistency (a single recipe over a series of pictures produces a cohesive visual style), and productivity (not editing pictures saves a lot of time). There are over 250 Film Simulation Recipes published on Fuji X Weekly, which are also available on the Fuji X Weekly App.

Even though there are a lot of recipes to choose from, you may not always find one that’s the perfect fit for your personal style, subject matter, or lighting condition. I’ve often said that it is fine to “season to taste” any recipe to make it work for you, because making it work for you is preferable to rigidly adhering to a recipe and being dissatisfied with the results (the notes section in the App underneath a recipe is an excellent place to keep track of your modifications). In this post, we will discuss some reasons why someone might choose to modify a Film Simulation Recipe to suit their personal style.

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Five Film Simulation Recipes Every Social Media Influencer Should Try on Their Fujifilm X100V

The Fujifilm X100V is a popular camera with social media influencers—so much so that it’s become hard to find and expensive. One of the main reasons why social media influencers love the camera is its retro design, which gives it a timeless and stylish look that stands out in a sea of modern and generic-looking camera bodies. The X100V’s sleek and compact form factor also makes it easy to carry around, which is ideal for influencers who are often on the go and need a camera that they can take with them wherever they go.

Another reason why the X100V is popular with social media influencers is its image quality. The camera is equipped with a 23mm f/2 lens, which produces sharp and detailed images. The X100V also features a 26-megapixel APS-C sensor that, thanks to the X-Trans array and processor, delivers excellent low-light performance and a wide dynamic range. These features, combined with Fujifilm’s renowned color science, produce images that are rich and vibrant with a film-like quality that is highly sought after by influencers.

The X100V is also popular with influencers because of its advanced manual controls. Unlike most compact cameras, the X100V provides users with the ability to effortlessly manually adjust settings—such as shutter speed, aperture, and ISO—giving them more creative freedom and control over their images. This makes the X100V an ideal camera for influencers who want to take their photography to the next level and produce professional-looking content.

And, of course, Film Simulation Recipes allow social media influencers to quickly get finished photographs straight-out-of-camera that are ready to share the moment that they are captured. This not only makes photography easier (and perhaps more fun), but it also saves a lot of time over post-processing RAW files. While there are literally hundreds of recipes that you could use, below are five Film Simulation Recipes that every influencer should try on their Fujifilm X100V.

Kodak Portra 400 v2

Once Was a Gas Station – Avondale, AZ – Fujifilm X100V – “Kodak Portra 400 v2”

Kodak Portra 400 is one of the most popular film stocks available today, so it shouldn’t be surprising that the Kodak Portra 400 Film Simulation Recipes are some of the most popular. Of these, Kodak Portra 400 v2 is my personal favorite. One film can produce many different looks depending on a host of factors—including how it was shot, developed, and scanned—and this recipe closely mimics the aesthetic of one photographer’s Portra pictures—feel free to also try Kodak Portra 400, Kodak Portra 400 Warm, and Reggie’s Portra. This Kodak Portra 400 v2 recipe produces bright and warm images, and is particularly great for portraits and golden hour photography. Use it in daylight natural light situations for best results.

Pacific Blues

Fox Holding Flower – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X100V – “Pacific Blues”

The Pacific Blues recipe mimics the aesthetic of Lucy Laucht‘s Spirit of Summer series, particularly the Positano Blues photographs. It is especially well suited for a summer day at the beach, but it is also great for many other situations, including shade, fog, and even night photography. It’s a bold recipe, yet is still good for portraits. Use it for travel, or even just snapping pictures around the house.

Kodachrome 64

Open Warning – Butte, MT – Fujifilm X100V – “Kodachrome 64”

Kodachrome is such an iconic film that once graced the covers of National Geographic, Arizona Highways, and most travel magazines. Sadly it has been long-discontinued; however, thanks to Fujifilm cameras, you can still shoot a reasonably close facsimile of the film today! Kodachrome 64 is one of my favorite recipes for travel photography, producing results reminiscent of classic images from the ’70’s, ’80’s and ’90’s.

Vintage Color

Sentinel & Merced – Yosemite NP, CA – Fujifilm X100V – “Vintage Color”

“This is an artist’s recipe!” That’s what I said of the Vintage Color Film Simulation Recipe. It produces painterly results that are reminiscent of famed Hudson River School painter Albert Bierstadt, particularly his Yosemite paintings. While not modeled after any film stock, it does have a vintage film-like quality that’s easy to appreciate. It’s best suited for sunny daylight situations, yet it is also a good option for shade or overcast.

Kodak Tri-X 400

Motel – Panguitch, UT – Fujifilm X100V – “Kodak Tri-X 400”

Kodak Tri-X 400 is probably the most well-known black-and-white film stock, so it should be no surprise that the most popular black-and-white recipe is Kodak Tri-X 400. While color recipes tend to be much more popular than monochrome, if you want to emulate a classic photographic aesthetic, this recipe should be one of your top considerations. Producing moody images, Kodak Tri-X 400 allows you to focus on the elements within the frame without the distraction of color. In one word, Timeless is how I would best describe this recipe.

Find these Film Simulation Recipes and over 250 more on the Fuji X Weekly — Film Recipes App!

This post contains affiliate links, and if you make a purchase using my links I’ll be compensated a small amount for it.

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Achieving Consistent Results with Fujifilm Film Simulation Recipes

Pilot – Cordes Lakes, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5 – “Kodachrome 64

Film Simulation Recipes are a great way to achieve consistent results when shooting with Fujifilm cameras. These recipes allow you to replicate the look and feel of various film stocks by applying specific settings to your camera. For a certain photo series or project, you might want all of the images to appear cohesive, and recipes are an easy way to do that. Let’s go over some quick tips for achieving consistent results using Film Simulation Recipes.

First and foremost, it’s important to understand the different Film Simulation Recipes available to you—there are over 250 on this website and the Fuji X Weekly App—and how they differ. Fujifilm offers a variety of film simulations, each with its own unique look and feel, that are then customized to create specific aesthetics. Most, but not all, are designed to mimic the look of classic film stocks or analog processes. Some are more ideal for certain light situations or subjects. Experimenting with various recipes can help you find the one that best suits your style and subject matter.

Denny’s Days – Beaver, UT – Fujifilm X-E4 – “Kodachrome 64

Once you’ve chosen a Film Simulation Recipe, it’s important to stick with it. Consistency is key when it comes to achieving consistent results. This means using the same recipe for all of the shots in a given series or project. This will ensure that all of your images have a cohesive look and feel, rather than appearing disjointed due to using multiple recipes.

Another tip for achieving consistent results is to make sure your camera is set up properly. This might include using or not using flash, shooting through just one lens, using a certain filter, or even selecting a particular aperture or ISO, depending on how strict you want to get. These factors can all impact the final look of your images, so it’s important to get them right throughout the entirety of the project.

Red Taco Trailer – Culleoka, TX – Fujifilm X-E4 – “Kodachrome 64”

In addition to setting up your camera properly, it’s also important to consider the lighting conditions when using Film Simulation Recipes. Different lighting conditions can have a big impact on the final look of your images, so it’s important to take this into account when shooting. For example, if you will be photographing in artificial light, you may want to choose a recipe that is designed to mimic the look of a Tungsten film stock. You might consider using similar light for all of the photographs within the series.

Finally, it’s worth noting that Film Simulation Recipes are just one aspect of achieving consistent results. Other factors, such as composition and subject matter, can all have an impact on the final look of your images. However, by following the tips outlined in this article, you can get started on the path towards achieving consistent results with your Fujifilm camera.

This post contains affiliate links, and if you make a purchase using my links I’ll be compensated a small amount for it.

Fujifilm X-T5 in black:  Amazon  B&H
Fujifilm X-T5 in silver:  Amazon  B&H
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Using Fujifilm Film Simulation Recipes to Emulate Your Favorite Film Stocks

Flock of Cranes – Gilbert, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5 – “Kodak Portra 400 v2

Film suddenly became expensive, and it might get worse before it gets better. If you shoot with a Fujifilm X camera, like the popular X100V or brand-new X-T5, you are fortunate, because you can emulate your favorite film stocks with Film Simulation Recipes. If Kodak Portra 400 film is too expensive, you can use a Film Simulation Recipe instead!

Film Simulation Recipes are JPEG camera settings that produce a specific look—often based on classic film stocks—straight-out-of-camera, no editing required. I have published over 250 Film Simulation Recipes on this website, which can also be found on the Fuji X Weekly App for easy access on the go. Using recipes on Fujifilm cameras is an excellent way to streamline your workflow while still getting great results that appear as though you post-processed or perhaps even shot with film. Some advantages of using recipes on Fujifilm cameras are simplicity (quickly and easily achieve a desired aesthetic with little or no editing), authenticity (film-like quality that doesn’t appear heavily manipulated), consistency (a single recipe over a series of pictures produces a cohesive visual style), and productivity (not editing pictures saves a lot of time). 

Friendly Wave – Carlsbad, CA – Fujifilm X100V – “Kodachrome 64

Many of the Film Simulation Recipes are intended to produce an analog aesthetic. You might even find a recipe that mimics your favorite film stock. Here are some of the most popular ones:

Kodachrome 64
Kodachrome 25
Kodachrome II
Vintage Kodachrome
Kodak Portra 160
Kodak Portra 400
Kodak Portra 400 v2
Kodak Ultramax 400
Kodak Gold 200
Kodak Ektar 100
Kodak Tri-X 400
CineStill 800T
Fujicolor Superia 100
Fujicolor C200
Fujicolor Pro 400H

There are, of course, many more—the list above is simply some of the most popular.

Do Film Simulation Recipes actually resemble film? Fujifilm has tapped into their vast experience with analog photography—even utilizing their still-active film department—to create their film simulations, so that they more closely resemble film than the typical digital capture from other brands. With further tweaks and adjustments, one can get even closer to the look of actual analog stocks. There are three important things to note: 1) one film can produce many different aesthetics depending on a host of factors (how shot, developed, scanned, etc.), 2) digital and film render differently (each with unique strengths and weaknesses), and 3) Fujifilm has limited tools (recipes are created within those limitation). With that said, it is surprising that one can achieve a close facsimile to actual film stocks using Fujifilm X cameras.

Below are some videos that compare Film Simulation Recipes to actual film. Are the recipes close enough to film that you could use your Fujifilm camera instead of your analog camera? You will have to judge that for yourself. For me personally, the answer is yes, absolutely!

See also:
No Edit Photography: 7 Tips to Get the Film Look from Your Digital Photos
When SOOC Digital Looks Like Film

This post contains affiliate links, and if you make a purchase using my links I’ll be compensated a small amount for it.

Fujifilm X-T5 in black:  Amazon  B&H
Fujifilm X-T5 in silver:  Amazon  B&H
Fujifilm X100V in black:  Amazon   B&H
Fujifilm X100V in silver: Amazon   B&H

Find these Film Simulation Recipes and over 250 more on the Fuji X Weekly — Film Recipes App!

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Creating Your Own Film Simulation Recipe for a Unique Look + Emulsion ’86, a Fujifilm X-T5 (X-Trans V) Film Simulation Recipe

Dreary Beach – Oceanside, CA – Fujifilm X-T5 – “Emulsion ’86”

Many Fujifilm photographers use Film Simulation Recipes, which are JPEG camera settings that produce a specific look (often based on classic film stocks) straight-out-of-camera, no editing required. I have published over 250 Film Simulation Recipes on this website, which can also be found on the Fuji X Weekly App for easy access on the go. Using recipes on Fujifilm cameras is a great way to streamline your workflow while still getting great results that appear as though you post-processed or perhaps even shot with film.

Some advantages of using recipes on Fujifilm cameras are simplicity (quickly and easily achieve a desired aesthetic with little or no editing), authenticity (film-like quality that doesn’t appear heavily manipulated), consistency (a single recipe over a series of pictures produces a cohesive visual style), and productivity (not editing pictures saves a lot of time). Because there are so many recipes to choose from, it can be difficult to know which recipe to use when; perhaps none of them are precisely what you are looking for, or you are just feeling adventurous, so you want try your hand at crafting your very own Film Simulation Recipe.

A lot of people don’t have an interest in creating recipes; instead, they want one that’s already been perfected and matches their style. For most people, a Film Simulation Recipe currently exists that works well for them, it’s just a matter of figuring out which one (or ones, as it could be several, situationally dependent). Or maybe you enjoy trying them all! There’s no singular approach to using recipes with your Fujifilm camera.

Those who do want to try to make their very own recipe—because they haven’t found “the one” yet, or because they want a look that’s unique to them, or because they’re feeling creative and adventurous—might not know how to do it or even where to start. This article is intended to help with that. I will walk you through the process of crafting a Film Simulation Recipe, so that you know how to make your own.

Don’t Climb on the Bikes – Oceanside, CA – Fujifilm X-T5 – “Emulsion ’86”

Each Film Simulation Recipe has its own origin story. Very rarely did two come about the exact same way. Most, however, begin with an aesthetic idea—what look do I want the recipe to resemble? A lot of times it’s a specific film stock, usually specific images from a certain film. One film can usually produce many different looks depending on a whole host of factors, including (but not limited to) how it was shot, developed and scanned. I study pictures to get a good sense of what the aesthetic is, so that I can recreate it as closely as possible on my Fujifilm camera. It’s never a perfect facsimile because the tools on the camera are limited, film and digital behave divergently, and one film can produce many looks; however, I surprise myself sometimes just how close one recipe can come to the aesthetic I was trying to mimic. There’s a lot of trial-and-error involved. A lot of testing. But the beginning is almost always an idea or inspiration. For the Film Simulation Recipe example in this article—Emulsion ’86—the origin was the pilot episode of Little House on the Prairie. I was really attracted to the cinematography, and wanted to recreate the look.

Once you know the aesthetic that you want to achieve, the next step is figuring out a base starting point—the Film Simulation. I decided the film simulation that most closely matched the cinematography was Nostalgic Neg., which is only found on the newest cameras, including the Fujifilm X-T5. Eterna is similar, too, but I felt not vibrant enough or warm enough in the shadows—it could also be a good starting point, and I considered using it, but opted for Nostalgic Neg. instead. Each film simulation produces a different look, so you want to find the best base film simulation for your recipe. If you want to learn more about the various film simulations, there is a video by Vistek that’s definitely worth watching (click here).

Once you have the base figured out, it’s time to fine-tune it to achieve your desired look. There are a lot of different settings, some of which are only available on the newer models. We’ll only briefly discuss each, because I don’t want to get bogged down in the details. I’ll link to an article or video for the settings, in case you need further explanations. You can find these settings in the IQ Menu subset and in Edit/Save Custom Settings. If you are unsure of how to program a Film Simulation Recipe into your Fujifilm camera, click here and here.

Dynamic Range. Choose either DR-Auto (the camera will choose either DR100 or DR200), DR100, DR200, or DR400 (note: D-Range Priority or HDR can be used in lieu of a DR setting, and can also be considered). The Dynamic Range settings are primarily for protecting highlights, but affect the luminosity curve. DR100 protects highlights from clipping the least, while DR400 protects the highlights from clipping the most; however, DR400 requires a higher ISO and produces a lower-contrast image. Click here, here, here, here, and here to learn more. For my recipe, I wanted to protect highlights the most because I planned to expose the image more, so I chose DR400.
Grain. Only X-Trans III and newer cameras have a faux Grain option (Off, Weak, or Strong), and only the X-Pro3 and newer have the option for Grain Size (Small or Large). The Acros film simulation is the only one with built-in grain (the faux Grain options can be used in addition to the built-in Acros grain). High-ISO digital noise on Fujifilm cameras can produce a film-grain-like effect, too, and is something else to be considered. Click here, here, here, and here to learn more. For this recipe, I decided I like Grain set to Strong/Small after testing a couple options.
Color Chrome Effect and Color Chrome FX Blue. These settings deepen the tonality of certain colors (renders them darker) so that they retain more details when they are especially vibrant. For each, the options are Off, Weak, or Strong. For more information, click here, here, and here. I chose Color Chrome Effect set to Strong (for darker reds) and Color Chrome FX Blue set to Off (for lighter blues).

Pink Blossom Bush – San Diego, CA – Fujifilm X-T5 – “Emulsion ’86”

White Balance and Shift. This is an important tool for altering the aesthetic of the base film simulation. First, it’s important to understand that most color films were either Daylight balanced (around 5500K) or Tungsten balanced (around 3200K), so if you want to mimic film, choosing a similar white balance is a good option. You can significantly manipulate the cast using white balance and shift together. Unfortunately, cameras older than the X-Pro3 cannot save a WB Shift within C1-C7 Custom Settings Presets. Click here, here, and here to learn more. After much experimenting, I landed on Daylight White Balance with a Shift of +2 Red & -1 Blue.
Highlight and Shadow. This is found within Tone Curve on newer cameras. Highlight and Shadow is what adjusts the luminosity curve. -2 is the least (least highlight, least shadows), and +4 (or +2 on older models) is the most (strongest highlights, deepest shadows). This also highly affects contrast. To learn more, click here and here. I set Highlight to -2 to soften them and protect them from clipping, and I set Shadow to +2 to deepen shadows and increase contrast.
Color. This sets the vibrancy, from -4 (least vibrant) to +4 (most vibrant). For more information, click here. I wanted more highly saturated colors, so I went with +4.
Sharpness and Noise Reduction. Choose between -4 and +4 (-2 and +2 on older models). On newer cameras, Noise Reduction is renamed High ISO NR, but it’s the same thing. I typically (but not always) stay within -2 and +2 Sharpness (-1 and +1 on older models). I feel that Fujifilm’s Noise Reduction is too strong, so I like to use a minus setting. Click here, here, and here to learn more. I set Sharpness to -2 and Noise Reduction to -4 for this new recipe.
Clarity. This is a micro-contrast adjustment, either more (+1 to +5) or less (-1 to -5), with 0 being Off. Using a minus Clarity setting is similar to using a diffusion filter. Clarity does slow down the camera, as there is a “Storing” pause after each exposure, and continuous shooting modes (CL and CH) disable this setting. Only the X-Pro3 and newer models have Clarity. Click here and here for more information. I wanted a softer look, so I set Clarity to -3.

There are two other important parts of a recipe. First, you have to decide the maximum (and maybe minimum) ISO. I like to use Auto-ISO the majority of the time. For color photography, I feel most Fujifilm cameras do well up to ISO 6400, but that’s just my personal tolerance. You might want to top it out at ISO 3200 or ISO 12800, or whatever you prefer. To learn more, click here, here, and here. For this recipe I set Auto-ISO to be up to ISO 6400. Finally, you have to decide how much Exposure Compensation you typically want. Do you want brighter or darker results? This works hand-in-hand with the luminosity curve you’ve created with DR, Highlight, and Shadow. A word of caution is that each exposure should be judged individually, and typical exposure compensation is merely a starting point, and not a rule. Click here and here to learn more. For my recipe, I wanted a brighter picture, so I usually increase the exposure over what the meter says, typically by +2/3 to +1-1/3 stop.

The very last step is to give your new Film Simulation Recipe a name. Even though the pilot episode of Little House on the Prairie was the initial inspiration for my recipe, after visiting Balboa Park in San Diego, I had a change of perspective. You see, Balboa Park has hosted two different World Expositions (in 1915 and 1935)—remnants of which are still prominent to this day—which reminded me of my own World’s Fair experience: when I was six years old, my family and I went to Expo ’86 in Vancouver, Canada. I found many old pictures of that event—personal, in books, and online—and this recipe was highly reminiscent of some of those photographs. This Film Simulation Recipe produces a nostalgic analog aesthetic that is similar to some pictures from the mid-1980’s (presumably primarily Kodak emulsions, but I’m not certain), so I named it Emulsion ’86.

If you like your recipe creation, consider sharing it with the Fujifilm community so that others can use it, too. If you don’t have a place to share it, the Fuji X Weekly Community Recipes page is for you!

Old California Architecture – San Diego, CA – Fujifilm X-T5 – “Emulsion ’86”

This Emulsion ’86 Film Simulation Recipe is only compatible with (as of this writing) the Fujifilm X-T5, X-H2, and X-H2S. I assume that the GFX100S and GFX50S II can also use this recipe, but that it will render slightly different—I don’t have either of those cameras to test it to know for certain. This recipe does well for both sunny daylight and rainy overcast photography.

Film Simulation: Nostalgic Neg.
Grain Effect: Strong, Small
Color Chrome Effect: Strong
Color Chrome FX Blue: Off
White Balance: Daylight, +2 Red & -1 Blue
Dynamic Range: DR400
Highlight: -2
Shadow: +2
Color: +4
Sharpness: -2

High ISO NR: -4
Clarity: -3
ISO: Auto, up to ISO 6400
Exposure Compensation: +2/3 to +1-1/3 (typically)

Example photographs, all camera-made JPEGs using this “Emulsion ’86” Film Simulation Recipe on my Fujifilm X-T5:

Bobcat on the Beach – Oceanside, CA – Fujifilm X-T5 – “Emulsion ’86”
Rainy Day at the Beach – Oceanside, CA – Fujifilm X-T5 – “Emulsion ’86”
No Lifeguard on Duty – Oceanside, CA – Fujifilm X-T5 – “Emulsion ’86”
Two Surfers Walking – Oceanside, CA – Fujifilm X-T5 – “Emulsion ’86”
Pacific Wave Rider – Oceanside, CA – Fujifilm X-T5 – “Emulsion ’86”
Sahand Nayebaziz – Oceanside, CA – Fujifilm X-T5 – “Emulsion ’86”
Gull View – Oceanside, CA – Fujifilm X-T5 – “Emulsion ’86”
Two Seagulls & Giant Binoculars – Oceanside, CA – Fujifilm X-T5 – “Emulsion ’86”
Bird Can – Oceanside, CA – Fujifilm X-T5 – “Emulsion ’86”
Saltwater Fisherman – Oceanside, CA – Fujifilm X-T5 – “Emulsion ’86”
Red Steps – Oceanside, CA – Fujifilm X-T5 – “Emulsion ’86”
Tag Us – Oceanside, CA – Fujifilm X-T5 – “Emulsion ’86”
Holiday Marlboro – El Centro, CA – Fujifilm X-T5 – “Emulsion ’86”
Noel – San Diego, CA – Fujifilm X-T5 – “Emulsion ’86”
Museum – San Diego, CA – Fujifilm X-T5 – “Emulsion ’86”
Pool Reflection – San Diego, CA – Fujifilm X-T5 – “Emulsion ’86”
Curved Colonnade – San Diego, CA – Fujifilm X-T5 – “Emulsion ’86”
Clouds Above Octagon – San Diego, CA – Fujifilm X-T5 – “Emulsion ’86”
Golden Architecture – San Diego, CA – Fujifilm X-T5 – “Emulsion ’86”
Natural History Museum – San Diego, CA – Fujifilm X-T5 – “Emulsion ’86”
Palm Tree Sky – San Diego, CA – Fujifilm X-T5 – “Emulsion ’86”

This post contains affiliate links, and if you make a purchase using my links I’ll be compensated a small amount for it.

Fujifilm X-T5 in black:  Amazon  B&H
Fujifilm X-T5 in silver:  Amazon  B&H

Find this Film Simulation Recipe and over 250 more on the Fuji X Weekly — Film Recipes App!

Help Fuji X Weekly

Nobody pays me to write the content found on fujixweekly.com. There’s a real cost to operating and maintaining this site, not to mention all the time that I pour into it. If you appreciated this article, please consider making a one-time gift contribution. Thank you!

$5.00