More Fujifilm Film Simulation Recipes!

Boy, did I go down a rabbit hole this morning!

As you probably know, I have published over 200 Film Simulation Recipes for Fujifilm cameras—it’s fast approaching 250! There are so many looks that you can achieve straight-out-of-camera no matter your Fujifilm model. But I’m not the only one who has created recipes, and maybe you’re after some look that I haven’t yet published, so I thought I’d compile a list of websites where you can find more recipes. Using Google, I was shocked by what I found: so many people have published recipes! I’m sure my list below is not exhaustive—if you know of something I’ve missed, feel free to leave it in the comments. It’s really quite amazing what’s out there!

If you have the Fuji X Weekly App on your phone and are an App Patron, you can use the Blank Recipe Cards feature to add any recipe that you find to the App so that you can always have it with you. Or if you’ve created your own recipe, you can add it into the App. Or if there’s a recipe that you’ve modified in some way and want to keep track of that modification, you can use it for that purpose, too.

Anyway, below are various websites that I found that have Film Simulation Recipes for Fujifilm cameras. Take a look!

Fuji X Weekly Community Recipes

Life, Unintended (Luis Costa)

Jamie Chance Travels

Pete Takes Pictures

Kevin Mullins

One Camera One Lens

Piotr’s Recipes

Reggie Ballesteros

Captn Look

Craig Bergonzoni

Kebs Cayabyab

Ivanyolo

Øyvind Nordhagen

The Big Negative

Alik Griffin

Helen Fennell

The Broketographers

Fujigraphy

Best Light Photo

Fujifilm X-Trans IV Film Simulation Recipe: Kodak Brilliance

Dock in the River – Fujifilm X-E4 – Hammond, OR – “Kodak Brilliance”

Thomas Schwab sent me modification of the Kodachrome I Film Simulation Recipe—he calls this new version Kodak Brilliance. You might recall that Thomas and I worked together on the Kodachrome I recipe, which was an update to the Vintage Kodachrome recipe. Those two recipes (Vintage Kodachrome and Kodachrome I) were modeled after the first era of Kodachrome film. My Old Kodak recipe is also a similar option.

This new version of the recipe isn’t intended to more accurately replicate the film, but instead offer a nice-looking alternative that still retains a vintage Kodak essence. It has a “memory color” that is reminiscent of classic Kodak slide film. I especially like how this recipe renders blues.

Tetons in March – Grand Teton NP, WY – Fujifilm X100V – “Kodak Brilliance”

Because the Kodak Brilliance recipe uses Clarity and Color Chrome FX Blue, it’s only compatible with the Fujifilm X-Pro3, X100V, X-T4, X-S10, X-E4, and X-T30 II cameras. I believe that you could also use it on newer GFX cameras, although I have not personally tested it. For the X-T3 and X-T30, feel free to try it, ignoring Clarity, Color Chrome FX Blue, and Grain size—it won’t look exactly the same, but will be pretty similar.

Classic Chrome
Dynamic Range: DR200
Highlight: +4
Shadow: -2
Color: +4
Noise Reduction: -4
Sharpness: -1
Clarity: +2
Grain Effect: Weak, Small
Color Chrome Effect: Strong
Color Chrome Effect Blue: Weak
White Balance: Daylight, +2 Red & -1 Blue
ISO: Auto, up to ISO 6400
Exposure Compensation: -1 to 0 (typically)

Example photographs, all camera-made JPEGs using this “Kodak Brilliance” Film Simulation Recipe on my Fujifilm X100V and Fujifilm X-E4:

On the Cusp of Spring – Hammond, OR – Fujifilm X-E4
Wet Fern – Columbia River Gorge, OR – Fujifilm X100V
Hanging Orange – Hammond, OR – Fujifilm X-E4
Blowing East – Hammond, OR – Fujifilm X-E4
Beach Staircase – Cannon Beach, OR – Fujifilm X-E4
Misty Ocean – Cannon Beach, OR – Fujifilm X-E4
Haystack Rock – Cannon Beach, OR – Fujifilm X-E4
Helicopter Behind Haystack Rock – Cannon Beach, OR – Fujifilm X-E4
Shipwreck Shell – Fort Stevens SP, OR – Fujifilm X100V
Peter Iredale at Sunset – Fort Stevens SP, UT – Fujifilm X100V

Find this film simulation recipes and over 200 more on the Fuji X Weekly — Film Recipes App!

Do Fujifilm Photographs Look Like Film?

The Big Ocean – Fort Stevens SP, OR – Fujifilm X-E4 – “Fujicolor Super HG

Do straight-out-of-camera JPEGs from Fujifilm X cameras actually resemble film?

I used to shoot film. I learned photography at the height of film, in the late-1990’s. I disliked digital when it began to get popular. Yes, I was a film snob for at least a decade, almost two. I don’t want to rehash my journey (you can read about it here), but I simply want to convey that for a long time I was a film-only guy, and I have a lot of experience with it. Now I rarely shoot film (only occasionally); instead, I use Fujifilm X cameras. I make Film Simulation Recipes that often mimic various film stocks and analog processes. I know a thing or two about film, Fujifilm, and making Fujifilm resemble film.

But does it? Can SOOC JPEGs really resemble film?

Horsetail Falls from Bridge – Columbia River Gorge, OR – Fujifilm X100V – “Improved Velvia

Why I’m writing this post is because I stumbled upon two articles on The Phoblogger: Fujifilm vs Film Photography and We Challenge You to Identify the Fujifilm Negative Film vs Simulation. Neither of these articles are particularly profound, and Film Simulation Recipes are not mentioned, and I’m pretty sure not used. I don’t know if any of my tips for achieving a film-look in-camera were implemented, but probably not. However, as I read these two articles I began to contemplate: what makes a film photograph special, why do we even want our digital pictures to look like film, and can they?

The answer to the first question—what makes film photographs special?—is soul. Digital and film, while very similar, have unique attributes—there are advantages and disadvantages for each. Digital is often very mathematical and clinical, which certainly serves a purpose. Film is more random and serendipitous, which is the character that gives it soul. With digital, the possibilities for an exposure are endless, but with film it is much more limited—yes, there’s a lot that can be done in the darkroom, but you’re still limited by the film itself and how it was shot. You get what you get—especially if it’s slide film—but that’s the fun of it.

You might want your digital pictures to look like film for that analog soul. How can you get the best of both worlds and achieve a film-soul in a digital picture? How can you leave some of that clinical-ness behind and replace it with randomness and serendipity? My first advice is to use Fujifilm cameras, as Fujifilm has sought to use their vast film experience to infuse a little of that soul into their digital cameras. Next, I suggest shooting JPEG using Film Simulation Recipes, which make it a you-get-what-you-get process more similar to film. Then try some of my tips for achieving a film-look in-camera, such as diffusion filters, vintage glass, high-ISO, etc., etc.. This isn’t the only method, but simply what I use and recommend.

Desert Snow – Canyonlands NP, UT – Fujifilm X-Pro3 – “Old Ektachrome

Can you capture digital pictures that resemble film? Could they actually trick someone into thinking you shoot film when you don’t? While I think the answer to both questions is “yes” (at least to some extent), I think they’re the wrong questions. Instead, the questions should be: what process works for me? And: do my pictures have soul?

If your process doesn’t really work for you, then change it. It took me years to figure out what process works for me: shooting SOOC JPEGs using Film Simulation Recipes on Fujifilm cameras. I don’t edit (aside from minor cropping, straightening, and very occasional small adjustments), which saves me tons of time. The three pictures in this article are recently captured camera-made JPEGs using different recipes on different cameras. That process is great for me, and it might be for you, too, but it’s not for everyone because people are different. You have to do what works for you and not worry about what others are doing.

While the serendipity of film gives it soul, and some of that soul can also be found in Fujifilm cameras (and even in other cameras and processes), the number one thing that gives a picture soul is the photographer. What you do with your photography gear to craft an image is what’s most important. When you infuse a bit of yourself into your images, that’s what makes it special—much more than anything else. So whether your pictures do or don’t resemble film doesn’t matter, just as long as your process works for you and you are photographing with vision. Capture the images that you want to create in the way that you want to create them. The rest just doesn’t matter.

Tips for Photographing Fort Stevens State Park — The Incredible Apex of Oregon

Sea Grass – Fort Stevens SP, OR – Fujifilm X-E4 & Fujinon 90mm – “Fujicolor Super HG

There’s a photographic wonderland in the Pacific Northwest that everyone should visit if they have the opportunity: Fort Stevens State Park, which sits at the furthest northwest corner of Oregon where the Columbia River meets the Pacific Ocean. It’s about a 25 minute drive west of Astoria. There are many great picture opportunities at this historic location. If it’s your first visit, you might not know what you’ll find or where to begin—this article is intended to be a guide, so be sure to bookmark this if you think you might go.

Let’s take a look at what you’ll find at this incredible apex of Oregon!

Peter Iredale Shipwreck

Peter Iredale Remains – Fort Stevens SP, OR – iPhone 11 – RitchieCam app – Vibrant Color filter

Probably the most famous and most photographed landmark is the Peter Iredale shipwreck. This ship was a four-mast barque sailing vessel made of steel that, in 1906, was enroute to Portland from Santa Cruz, Mexico, with a load of rocks. High winds pushed the ship off course, and it ran aground at high tide near the Fort Stevens military base. Nobody was hurt, and for whatever reason the ship was left abandoned. What’s left of the ship can still be seen to this day, and is now an iconic picture location.

There are basically two times to photograph the Peter Iredale shipwreck: higher-tides and lower-tides. At higher-tides, the boat is partially covered in water and the waves crash into the metal remains. It’s less accessible and more photographically limited at high-tide than low-tide, and you’ll definitely want a telephoto lens, but it’s still worthwhile to capture some images. You can use the grassy sand-bluffs to frame the ship. At low-tide, you can walk right up to the ship—heck, you can drive right up to the ship! It’s most ideal if you can catch the shipwreck at low-tide and at sunset (this tide chart might be helpful), and a wide-angle lens will be your friend. Most likely you won’t be the only one at the boat, and it takes some patience to not get other people in your images (or yourself in their pictures).

Finding the shipwreck is super easy. Enter the park on the Peter Iredale Road and follow the well-marked signs (Google Maps). The parking lot is not far at all from the shipwreck, so it’s easily accessible. At low-tide you can drive right onto the beach (I suggest 4-wheel-drive), which makes it even more accessible.

High Tide

Beached Ship – Fort Stevens SP, OR – Fujifilm X-E4 & Fujinon 90mm – “Fujicolor Super HG”
Wet Shipwreck – Fort Stevens SP, OR – Fujifilm X-E4 & Fujinon 90mm – “Fujicolor Super HG”
Shipwreck Shore – Fort Stevens SP, OR – Fujifilm X-E4 & Fujinon 90mm – “Ferrania Solaris FG 400

Low Tide

Ship Remains – Fort Stevens SP, OR – Fujifilm X100V – “Kodak Tri-X 400
Shipwreck Remnants – Fort Stevens SP, OR – iPhone 11 – RitchieCam app – B&W Fade filter
Peter Iredale’s Bones – Fort Stevens SP, OR – Fujifilm X100V – “Kodak Gold v2
Rusty Ship Hull – Fort Stevens SP, OR – iPhone 11 – RitchieCam app – Color Negative Low filter
Golden Shipwreck – Fort Stevens SP, OR – Fujifilm X100V – “The Rockwell

Fort Stevens Military Base

Underground Building – Fort Stevens SP, OR – iPhone 11 – RitchieCam app – Vibrant Color filter

Fort Stevens State Park has an intriguing past—if you are a military history buff, this is a must-see place! Fort Stevens was an active military instillation from 1863 to 1947. On June 21, 1942, a Japanese submarine fired 17 shells at the base. While several of the shells hit Fort Stevens, aside from several severed power lines and some damage to a baseball diamond, they didn’t do any major destruction and nobody was hurt. This was the only attack on the 48-contiguous states during World War II.

There are a lot of old military buildings in various conditions within the state park⁠—about 25⁠ structures, some of which are massive—and many of these are open to the public. It could be an all-day or even multi-day event to explore them all, or, if you’re not all that interested, can be briefly experienced within less than an hour. There are three sites: Fort Stevens Historic Area (Google Maps), Observation Pillbox (Google Maps), and Battery Russell (Google Maps). The Fort Stevens Historic Area is where most of the buildings are located plus the visitor’s center. The Observation Pillbox is accessible via hiking trails. Battery Russell is located not far from the Peter Iredale shipwreck, and can be easily explored right before or just after seeing the old boat.

For photography, wide-angle lenses are probably your best bet, and a large aperture option is a good idea. Consider bringing a tripod for shooting in the dark. Those interested in military history or abandoned buildings will find Fort Stevens State Park to be a treasure-trove of photographic opportunities!

Watch Your Children – Fort Stevens SP, OR – iPhone 11 – RitchieCam app – MetroColor filter
Abandoned Fort – Fort Stevens SP, OR – iPhone 11 – RitchieCam app – B&W Fade filter
Big Hole – Fort Stevens SP, OR – iPhone 11 – RitchieCam – B&W Fade filter
Empty Walkway – Fort Stevens SP, OR – iPhone 11 – RitchieCam app – B&W Fade filter
Spiral Stairs – Fort Stevens SP, OR – Fujifilm X100V – “Ilford HP5 Plus 400
Old Fireplace – Fort Stevens SP, OR – Fujifilm X100V – “Ilford HP5 Plus 400”
Stairs in the Forest – Fort Stevens SP, OR – Fujifilm X100V – “Ilford HP5 Plus 400”

Pacific Ocean

The Big Ocean – Fort Stevens SP, OR – Fujifilm X-E4 & Fujinon 90mm – “Fujicolor Super HG”

There’s about four miles of sandy beach along the Pacific Ocean within Fort Stevens State Park. There’s also additional beach access on the Columbia River side of the park, which is interesting, too⁠—especially if you want to see large ships coming and going⁠—but the vast ocean with its lengthy sandy-beach is the real star.

At the south end is Strawberry Knoll (Google Maps), which is a good place for 4×4 vehicles to access the beach, but for everyone else will require a short hike to the ocean, and there’s limited parking. The easiest beach access is probably at the Peter Iredale shipwreck (Google Maps), which has more parking, but is also the most visited site. As you drive north on Jetty Road, Lot A (Google Maps) has easy beach access and plenty of parking, Lot B (Google Maps) has plenty of parking but it is a short hike to beach, Lot C (Google Maps) has an observation tower, a lot of rocks, a longer hike to the beach, and tons of parking, and Lot D (Google Maps) has plenty of easy beach access and parking, but technically this is the Columbia River side, and the water will be a lot more calm. Any of these locations can be good for photography.

I recommend having both telephoto and wide-angle lenses at your disposal. High-tide and low-tide can be interesting, and sunrise, midday, and sunset all offer interesting light. There’s no right or wrong time to go, and visiting at different times and during different conditions will give you vastly different photographic opportunities. I think one could spend days, weeks, or even months photographing the beaches at Fort Stevens and not run out of inspiration.

Beach Alone – Fort Stevens SP, OR – Fujifilm X-E4 & Fujinon 90mm – “Kodak Tri-X 400”
Pacific Shore Monochrome – Fort Stevens SP, OR – Fujifilm X100V – “Kodak Tri-X 400”
South Jetty – Fort Stevens SP, OR – Fujifilm X100V – “Ilford HP5 Plus 400”

Other Sites

Morning Drive – Fort Stevens SP, OR – iPhone 11 – RitchieCam app – MetroColor filter

There are miles of hiking trails, thick forests, camping, ponds, lakes, and streams within Fort Stevens State Park. There’s abundant wildlife, including deer, elk, sea lions, bald eagles, heron, puffins, and occasionally gray whales off the coast. No matter where you are in the park, there are picture opportunities literally everywhere! The landscape is just incredible, and surprisingly varied. It might be easy to overlook all of this in-between the beach, shipwreck, and abandoned base, but don’t! Keep your eyes open, your adventurous spirit eager, and your camera ready, and you’re sure to capture some amazing yet unexpected pictures.

If you have the time and energy, the Fort Stevens/Jetty Loop/Ridge Loop Trail is great—mostly paved and fairly easy, but at nine-miles is a bit long (you don’t have to cover the whole thing). Coffenbury Lake (Google Maps) is worthwhile, and somewhat accessible from the Battery Russell parking lot.

If you are a wildlife photographer, you’ll definitely want to keep your long-telephoto lens handy. If you are a landscape photographer, wide-angle lenses will often be your best bet. Having a couple cameras, one with a telephoto lens and one with a wide-angle, or perhaps a good zoom lens, is a solid strategy.

Forest Pond – Fort Stevens SP, OR – Fujifilm X-E4 & Fujinon 90mm – “Ferrania Solaris FG 400”
Elk Alone – Fort Stevens SP, OR – Fujifilm X-E4 & Fujinon 90mm – “Fujicolor Super HG”
Clatsop Spit Tower – Fort Stevens SP, OR – iPhone 11 – RitchieCam app – B&W Fade filter

Conclusion

Driftwood & Shipwreck – Fort Stevens SP, OR – Fujifilm X100V – “Kodachrome 64

Fort Stevens State Park is one of the most spectacular locations in northwest Oregon! It is a worthwhile photographic excursion that can be experienced in a day, but if you have more time to spend in the park you will surely be rewarded for it. Some parts of the park (Coffenbury Lake and Fort Stevens Historic Area) require a daily self-pay $5 parking fee per vehicle, and camping isn’t free, but otherwise the other parts of the park don’t have any fee to access.

I used three cameras to capture these pictures: Fujifilm X-E4, Fujifilm X100V, and iPhone 11. On the Fujifilm cameras I used various Film Simulation Recipes, and on my iPhone I used the RitchieCam app. All of the pictures in this article are unedited (aside from minor straightening and cropping, they’re straight-out-of-camera images), which means that I didn’t spend hours manipulating them in software. This is a great way to save time and make photography even more enjoyable. Capturing photographs that don’t require any post-processing is a wonderful way to streamline your workflow and simplify your photographic life. When traveling, where you’re making tons of exposures and opportunities to post-process those pictures are limited, things that save you time can make a huge difference. If you own a Fujifilm camera, I invite you to try Film Simulation Recipes (check out the App!) on your next photography outing. If you own an iPhone, download the RitchieCam camera app for free today!

Video: SOOC Season 02 Episode 01 Viewer’s Images

This video is the viewer submitted photographs from SOOC Season 02 Episode 01. Yes, your pictures! Thank you to everyone who shared their images, to everyone who participated, and to everyone who tuned in!

For those who don’t know, SOOC is a monthly live video series, with each episode focused on a different Film Simulation Recipe. It is a collaboration between Tame Your Fujifilm (Fujifilm X-Photographer Nathalie Boucry) and Fuji X Weekly (Ritchie Roesch). SOOC is a fun and educational experience where we not only talk about Fujifilm camera settings, but also answer your questions and give tips and tricks. Basically, we’re trying to help you master your Fujifilm camera, with a focus on simplifying your photographic workflow.

The next episode of SOOC will be live on April 14th, so mark your calendars now!

Watch: SOOC Season 2 Episode 1 — Kodak Gold 200 & Kodak Tri-X 400!

Season 2 of SOOC kicked off this morning! You can watch it (above) if you missed it. It was a really good show full of fun and surprises, so you’ll want to hit play. In our usual fashion, the broadcast went a little long, but I hope you find it well worth your time.

For those who don’t know, SOOC is a monthly live video series, with each episode focused on a different Film Simulation Recipe. It is a collaboration between Tame Your Fujifilm (Fujifilm X-Photographer Nathalie Boucry) and Fuji X Weekly (Ritchie Roesch). SOOC is a fun and educational experience where we not only talk about Fujifilm camera settings, but also answer your questions and give tips and tricks. Basically, we’re trying to help you master your Fujifilm camera, with a focus on simplifying your photographic workflow.

In Episode 01 of Season 02, among other things, we conclude our discussion (from Season 01) of the Kodak Gold 200 Film Simulation Recipe, and introduce the next recipe-of-the-month: Kodak Tri-X 400. We had a special guest, Anders Lindborg—it was fun talking shop with him, and seeing his wonderful photographs. Thanks, Anders, for joining us live! To submit pictures captured with the Kodak Tri-X 400 Film Simulation Recipe for Episode 02, click here.

Something else to note: we had our first Pre-Show, that was a more informal experience. You can watch it (above) if you missed it. The Pre-Show will be a regular feature, so if you have a few minutes before a broadcast, be sure to join in!

Thank you to everyone who watched, to everyone who participated, and for all who submitted pictures. You all are the best! Episode 02, where we’ll conclude Kodak Tri-X 400 and introduce the next recipe-of-the-month (Kodak Vision3 250D), will be April 14th, so mark your calendars now! See you then!

Click here to see previous episodes!

Fujifilm X-Trans IV Film Simulation Recipe: Ilford HP5 Plus 400

Haystack Driftwood – Cannon Beach, OR – Fujifilm X100V – “Ilford HP5 Plus 400”

This new film simulation recipe comes from Anders Lindborg (Instagram). Anders is the one who created the Kodak Tri-X 400 recipeIlford Pan F Plus 50 recipe, Kodak Gold v2seven Fujicolor Pro 160NS recipesseven Fujicolor Pro 400H recipes, and made an important D-Range Priority discovery. So I know that you’ll love this one, too! He was kind enough to share it with me and allow me to share it with all of you—thank you, Anders!

Anders sent me a lengthy note on his process to create this recipe, and I want to share with you a short snippet just so you get an idea of the effort put into this. “I checked the spectrum sensitivity chart and looked for any significant bumps in the wavelengths,” he wrote. “For the largest bump, I checked what color it represents to try to match it as close as possible with the white balance shift. This recreated the bump in the recipe to make the simulation a bit extra sensitive to that specific color.” This was point four of seven in his process, and shows the kind of effort that can go into creating Film Simulation Recipes.

Specifically about this recipe, Anders noted, “Middle gray is the game here. Soft highlights and things disappearing into deep dark shadows, but never as black as Tri-X. Great for all day shooting in just about any weather. Looks totally awesome on winter shots!” I can add that it looks great on both sunny days and rainy days, too. I think it does especially well in moderate and high contrast situations.

Footbridge & Falls – Multnomah Falls, OR – Fujifilm X100V – “Ilford HP5 Plus 400”

Ilford began the Hypersensitive Panchromatic (HP) series in 1931. HP5 Plus 400 is the latest version, released in 1989, and still available today. This is a classic black-and-white film stock that has stood the test of time, and Anders did a great job mimicking it on Fujifilm cameras. This recipe is intended for use on the X-Pro3, X100V, X-T4, X-S10, X-E4, and X-T30 II cameras; however, for the X-T3 and X-T30, as well as X-Trans III cameras, simply ignore Grain size, and this recipe is compatible with those cameras, so anyone with an X-Trans III or IV camera can use this.

A side note: this recipe is different than my old Ilford HP5 Plus and Ilford HP5 Push Process recipes, which I still quite like, and are both excellent in low and mid contrast situations. Try those or Anders’ version—or all three if you are feeling adventurous!

Monochrome
Dynamic Range: DR400
Highlight: -1
Shadow: +1
Noise Reduction: -4
Sharpness: -2
Clarity: 0
Grain Effect: Strong, Large 
Color Chrome Effect: Off
Color Chrome Effect Blue: Off
White Balance: Daylight, +1 Red & -8 Blue
ISO: Auto, up to ISO 6400
Exposure Compensation: -2/3 to +2/3 (typically)

Example photographs, all camera-made JPEGs using this “Ilford HP5 Plus 400” Film Simulation Recipe on my Fujifilm X100V:

Horsetail Falls From Bridge – Columbia River Gorge, OR – Fujifilm X100V
Horsetail Falls – Columbia River Gorge, OR – Fujifilm X100V
Upper Falls – Multnomah Falls, OR – Fujifilm X100V
36 CFR 261.53(e) – Multnomah Falls, OR – Fujifilm X100V
Use Caution For Slipping Bandits – Multnomah Falls, OR – Fujifilm X100V
No Cars – Astoria, OR – Fujifilm X100V
Two Elk in a Yard – Warrenton, OR – Fujifilm X100V
Spiral Stairs – Fort Stevens SP, OR – Fujifilm X100V
Old Fireplace – Fort Stevens SP, OR – Fujifilm X100V
Stairs in the Forest – Fort Stevens SP, OR – Fujifilm X100V
Astoria & Columbia River – Astoria, OR – Fujifilm X100V
Two Ships in the Columbia River – Astoria, OR – Fujifilm X100V
Tetons, As Seen By Oneskies – Grand Teton NP, WY – Fujifilm X100V
South Jetty – Fort Stevens SP, OR – Fujifilm X100V
Pointing To The Pacific – Cannon Beach, OR – Fujifilm X100V
Haystack Sticks – Cannon Beach, OR – Fujifilm X100V

Find this film simulation recipes and over 200 more on the Fuji X Weekly — Film Recipes App!

Join Fuji X Weekly Live Tomorrow — SOOC Season 2 Episode 1

Season 2 of SOOC kicks off this Thursday, March 24th, at 10 AM Pacific Time, 1 PM Eastern. That’s tomorrow!

SOOC is a monthly live video series, with each episode focused on a different film simulation recipe. It is a collaboration between Tame Your Fujifilm (Fujifilm X-Photographer Nathalie Boucry) and Fuji X Weekly (Ritchie Roesch). SOOC is a fun and educational experience where we not only talk about Fujifilm camera settings, but also answer your questions and give tips and tricks. Basically, we’re trying to help you master your Fujifilm camera, with a focus on simplifying your photographic workflow. It’s an interactive show, and your participation is essential, so I really hope to see you there!

This episode will conclude our discussion of the Kodak Gold 200 Film Simulation Recipe, and introduce the next recipe-of-the-month: Kodak Tri-X 400. It will be a great time, with wonderful photographs and discussions. You won’t want to miss it!

Also, there will be a 30-minute pre-show that I invite you to join. So if you have a little time before the show, even if it’s only five or ten minutes, please tune in as we showcase some of your pictures and have an informal chat with the audience.

See you tomorrow!

Fujifilm X100V vs iPhone, Part 2: Multnomah Falls

iPhone 11 – RitchieCam app – Faded Film filter

Part 1: Grand Tetons

Multnomah Falls is an iconic scenic stop along the historic Columbia River Highway in Oregon. Found within the Columbia River Gorge, it is the tallest year-round waterfall in Oregon, and the most visited natural site in the Pacific Northwest of the United States. The famous footbridge was constructed in 1915, while the gift-shop at the bottom—originally a lodge—was built in 1925, and both are on the National Register of Historic Places. It is an incredible location to experience, with beauty that rivals what one might find within National Parks.

I recently visited Multnomah Falls, and used my Fujifilm X100V and iPhone 11 to photograph this amazing spot. Unsurprisingly, I had several of my Film Simulation Recipes programmed into my X100V, and I used my RitchieCam camera app on my iPhone. Because there is a lot of mist from the falls, and it was a rainy day (as is common there), having weather-sealed cameras was important—both the X100V (as long as a filter is on the front) and the iPhone can handle getting wet, and both did get wet. Really wet.

While it might seem unnecessary to carry both an X100V and an iPhone, that turned out not to be the case for two reasons: focal-length, and ease of sharing. The X100V has a very useful 34.5mm (equivalent) focal-length lens, while the iPhone 11 has a 26mm (equivalent) camera and 13mm (equivalent) camera (if I had the “Pro” version, it would also include a 52mm camera, but alas I don’t have that model). The X100V was wide-angle enough to capture some good photographs of the falls, but the wider-angle lenses on the iPhone 11 were often better options, and I used it more than the Fujifilm camera at this location. To the second point, I was able to text pictures of the falls to some family and friends immediately—before even getting back to the car—and share with you via social media pictures of the falls within minutes. The X100V pictures were pretty quick and easy to share, too—thanks to the wonderful JPEG output of the camera—but not quite as immediate as the iPhone images.

iPhone 11 – RitchieCam app – MetroColor filter

What’s better, X100V or iPhone? For pure image quality, the Fujifilm camera is hands down better, but that only really matters if you are viewing the pictures large. Looking at them on this website or on social media, the quality difference is hard to spot, and even if you can see it, the quality difference is pretty insignificant. If you were viewing 11″ x 14″ prints of the pictures, the quality difference would still be fairly small, although if you compared them side-by-side you could tell without much trouble that the X100V is superior. But if you are viewing 16″ x 20″ prints or larger, the iPhone images just don’t hold up nearly as well as the Fujifilm. So the X100V is definitely the better tool if you might print the pictures large, but the iPhone is a capable tool if you don’t think you’ll be printing large—let’s face it, most pictures don’t get printed large, or even printed at all.

There’s no reason why both the X100V and the iPhone (or other cellphone camera) can’t both live together in peace and harmony. They’re different photographic tools that have different advantages and disadvantages, and they can both serve purposes within your photography. Film Simulation Recipes make the Fujifilm workflow more streamlined and the process more enjoyable. RitchieCam does the same thing for your iPhone photography. One tool might be better in a certain circumstance, and the other might be better in another circumstance, and perhaps both might be useful in a circumstance like Multnomah Falls.

Do you like the Fujifilm X100V pictures better, the iPhone pictures better, some of each, or none at all? Which Film Simulation Recipe that I used do you prefer? Which RitchieCam filter did the best? Let me know what you think in the comments!

Fujifilm X100V – New Recipe Coming Soon
Fujifilm X100V – New Recipe Coming Soon
Fujifilm X100V – Kodachrome 1 recipe
iPhone 11 – RitchieCam app – Vintage Kodak filter
Fujifilm X100V – Vintage Vibes recipe
iPhone 11 – RitchieCam app – B&W Fade filter
Fujifilm X100V – Kodak High Definition Plus 200 recipe
iPhone 11 – RitchieCam app – Faded Film filter
Fujifilm X100V – Vintage Vibes recipe
iPhone 11 – RitchieCam app – B&W Fade filter
iPhone 11 – RitchieCam app – B&W Fade filter

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Creative Collective 019: Reflections

Vespa Mirror Reflection – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-H1 – “Kodak Gold 200

Reflections are everywhere, and sometimes we try to photographically avoid them. In fact, you might even use a polarizer filter to reduce reflections. But you can incorporate reflections into your photography and use them creatively, making them an element of your pictures. Let’s take a look!

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Fujifilm X-Trans IV Film Simulation Recipe: Serr’s 500T

11th Street – Astoria, OR – Fujifilm X100V – “Serr’s 500T”

Back in May of 2021, a really cool video by Serr (Instagram, YouTube) appeared on YouTube called Fujifilm Film Simulation Recipes That Will Make You Stop Shooting RAW. It features three Film Simulation Recipes: two by me—LomoChrome Metropolis and Xpro ’62—and the third was my Bright Summer recipe slightly modified. If you haven’t seen the video, be sure to watch it! Anyway, Serr contacted me recently to share a Film Simulation Recipe that he created, which was inspired by ISO 500 Tungsten motion picture film. I gave his recipe a try and really liked it! Serr gave me permission to publish his recipe on this website and the Fuji X Weekly App.

If you are searching for a good blue-hour and nighttime Film Simulation Recipe, this is one you should try! I used it recently in Jackson Hole, Wyoming, and Astoria, Oregon, and was impressed with the results. I invite you, if you will be photographing after dark anytime soon, to give this recipe a try—you’ll be glad that you did! I suspect that this will become a favorite recipe for some of you.

Night Statue – Jackson Hole, WY – Fujifilm X100V – “Serr’s 500T”

This recipe is compatible with the Fujifilm X-Pro3, X100V, X-T4, X-S10, X-E4, and X-T30 II cameras. For those with an X-T3 or X-T30, you can use this recipe but you’ll have to ignore Grain size and Color Chrome FX Blue—the results will be slightly different, but pretty close. Those with X-Trans III cameras will additionally have to ignore Color Chrome Effect. Because Clarity is set to 0 in this recipe, I used a 5% CineBloom filter on my X100V for these pictures—alternatively, you could set Clarity to -2 and get similar results.

Classic Chrome
Dynamic Range: DR-Auto
Highlight: -2
Shadow: -1
Color: -1
Noise Reduction: -2
Sharpness: -1
Clarity: 0
Grain Effect: Strong, Large
Color Chrome Effect: Strong
Color Chrome Effect Blue: Strong
White Balance: 3200K, -1 Red & +4 Blue
ISO: Auto, up to ISO 6400
Exposure Compensation: -1/3 to +1/3 (typically)

Example photographs, all camera-made JPEGs using “Serr’s 500T” Film Simulation Recipe on my Fujifilm X100V:

Dairy Maid – Warrenton, OR – Fujifilm X100V
Cold Nights – Jackson Hole, WY – Fujifilm X100V
Magic Fork – Astoria, OR – Fujifilm X100V
Salmon – Astoria, OR – Fujifilm X100V
Walking Tadziu – Jackson Hole, WY – Fujifilm X100V
Street Reflection – Astoria, OR – Fujifilm X100V
Stop Do Not Enter – Astoria, OR – Fujifilm X100V
Night Shoes – Astoria, OR – Fujifilm X100V
Night Vacuums – Astoria, OR – Fujifilm X100V
CocoLove – Jackson Hole, WY – Fujifilm X100V

Find this film simulation recipes and over 200 more on the Fuji X Weekly — Film Recipes App!

Fujifilm X100V vs iPhone, Part 1: Grand Tetons

Sun Behind The Tetons – Grand Teton NP, WY – Fujifilm X100V – “Elite Chrome 200
Sun Behind Tetons & River – Grand Teton NP, WY – iPhone 11 – RitchieCam – “Color Negative Low”

I recently visited the Grand Teton National Park in Wyoming. This iconic mountain range sits just north of the tourist town of Jackson Hole. If you’ve never been, this is a “bucket list” kind of place that you should absolutely try to see in person if you can. My visit was a quick weekend getaway, and not surprisingly the weather didn’t really cooperate. Still, I wanted to get in some photography, and so I did.

Reviewing the pictures, I noticed that I captured some similar images with my Fujifilm X100V using various Film Simulation Recipes and my iPhone 11 with the RitchieCam app using various filters. For those who don’t know, I created an iPhone camera app called RitchieCam, which you can learn more about by clicking here. I thought comparing the X100V and iPhone pictures would make an interesting article.

What I don’t want to do is view massive crops side-by-side. The Fujifilm X100V and the iPhone are much different tools, so this will be a very general overview without pixel-peeping.

Technically speaking, the X100V is far superior, and it isn’t even close. For technical image quality, the X100V is the camera to grab, but the iPhone, with its tiny little sensor, is surprisingly good, all things considered. The advantage of the iPhone is that you have it with you all of the time, and you can quickly and easily share the pictures captured with it across the world (especially if you used the RitchieCam app). Convenience and speed are the reasons to choose the iPhone over the X100V, but the X100V is pretty compact and quick, too. For printing or viewing large, the X100V is the right tool. For quick sharing, the iPhone is the right tool. Here’s the great news: you don’t have to choose—use both, or use the one that you happen to have with you.

This is the first in a series of articles where I’ll compare photographs captured with the Fujifilm X100V using Film Simulation Recipes and the iPhone using the RitchieCam app. Below are photographs captured with these cameras at the Grand Tetons in Wyoming. Let me know in the comments which pictures you like best!

Fujifilm X100V

Snake River Overlook Morning – Grand Teton NP, WY – Fujifilm X100V – “The Rockwell
OneSkee – Grand Teton NP, WY – Fujifilm X100V – “Retro Gold Low Contrast
Mountains & Frozen Land – Grand Teton NP, WY – Fujifilm X100V – “Elite Chrome 200”
Pinky Rose – Jackson Hole, WY – Fujifilm X100V – “Kodachrome 64
Cold Nights – Jackson Hole, WY – Fujifilm X100V – Upcoming Recipe
Night Statue – Jackson Hole, WY – Fujifilm X100V – Upcoming Recipe
Tetons in March – Grand Teton NP, WY – Fujifilm X100V – Upcoming Recipe
Snake River Overlook Monochrome – Grand Teton NP, WY – Fujifilm X100V – “Kodak Tri-X 400

iPhone + RitchieCam

Morning at Snake River Overlook – Grand Teton NP, WY – iPhone 11 – RitchieCam – “Analog Gold”
OneSkee Snow – Grand Teton NP, WY – iPhone 11 – RitchieCam – “Instant Color 1”
Sunset Behind the Tetons – Grand Teton NP, WY – iPhone 11 – RitchieCam – “Color Negative Low”
Railroad – Jackson Hole, WY – iPhone 11 – RitchieCam – “Analog Gold”
CocoLove – Jackson Hole, WY – iPhone 11 – RitchieCam – “Night Negative”
Cowboy Bar – Jackson Hole, WY – iPhone 11 – RitchieCam – “Night Negative”
Tetons in Winter – Grand Teton NP, WY – iPhone 11 – RitchieCam – “Color Negative”
Snake River & Tetons – Grand Tetons NP, WY – iPhone 11 – RitchieCam – “Dramatic B&W”

Part 2: Multnomah Falls

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Review: Fujifilm X-Pro3 in 2022?

Fujifilm sent me an X-Pro3 to try for a few weeks. I put it through its paces as best as I could in that short time, and wanted to publish a review; however, what fresh insight can I give that hasn’t already been said over and over? Instead of rehashing all the technical data you probably already have known for awhile, I thought I’d simply answer this question: Is the Fujifilm X-Pro3 still a camera worth buying in 2022? And, is this a camera that you should consider?

The X-Pro3 was originally released in November of 2019, which was more than two years ago. In the digital era, a lot of people “upgrade” their gear every two-ish years, so does that mean the X-Pro3 is beginning to feel dated? Will it seem old even though you bought it brand-new? Will the X-Pro4 be announced the day after your X-Pro3 arrives in the mail?

Fujifilm sent me a well-used X-Pro3, but it was still in great shape. The majority of the reviews you find on the internet were probably from this exact same body. I won’t say that I got it last, but more-or-less that’s true.

It’s still a very similar size, weight, shape, and design as the original X-Pro1—Fujifilm didn’t change much externally over the last decade, but what they did change has certainly caused a lot of controversy. The headline change, of course, is the backwards-mounted rear screen, which forces you to use the hybrid-viewfinder for most of your photography, and only use the rear LCD when you absolutely have to. While I thought I’d love this, I think the execution was lacking, and I found it frustrating at times. Instead of folding down, I think flipping out to the side, and then twisting up or down, would have made a lot more sense. I think removing the D-Pad was a bit of a mistake, too.

Image quality on the X-Pro3 is fantastic—exactly the same as the X100V, X-T4, and the other X-Trans IV cameras. Unfortunately, and despite this being a “premium” model, Fujifilm hasn’t given this camera the Kaizen love that it deserves, and you won’t find Eterna Bleach Bypass, half-step Highlight and Shadow adjustments, or the two new Auto White Balance options. This is a real shame, because otherwise it would feel just as up-to-date as the latest models, but instead it has a sense of being slightly dated. The X-E4, the current entry-level model, has more JPEG options than the X-Pro3, and that just doesn’t seem right to me.

Enough of the negativity, though, because the X-Pro3 is an awesome camera! I thoroughly enjoyed using it. It is such a beautiful model, and is just as beautiful on the inside as it is on the outside. I can’t imagine anyone hating it. Yeah, it has a couple disappointing design choices, but if you are aware of those things going into the purchase, you won’t be disappointed. Best-looking body combined with Fujifilm’s fantastic film simulations is a winner in my books!

February Reaching – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-Pro3 – “Vintage Color v2

Here’s something that maybe hasn’t been talked about much: the ability to save TIFFs. Most Fujifilm models can either do RAW or JPEG (or RAW+JPEG), but you have an additional option of TIFF on the X-Pro3. I didn’t notice any image quality difference between TIFF and JPEG, but the TIFF should allow you more room for editing before the files start to degrade. There’s also the potential that the TIFFs, having more bits, do actually deliver an improved image quality, but if so it is really subtle and I couldn’t tell.

The X-Pro3, though, isn’t a practical purchase—it’s emotional. The rational side of your brain will tell you that the X-T4 is slightly better and slightly cheaper. The rational side of your brain will tell you that the X-E4 is much cheaper, smaller, and lighter, yet basically the same thing, and since you rarely shoot in the rain you don’t really need weather-sealing anyway. But the emotional side tells you that those cameras aren’t as timeless as the X-Pro line. The X-Pro3 is a beast that you’ll keep and use and love for ages. It’s your Leica, except that it’s Fujifilm.

Mutual Conversation – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-Pro3 – “Agfa Ultra 100

On a more serious note, though, the X-Pro3 is a solid body that balances well with larger lenses. Sometimes, on my smaller cameras, my bigger and heavier lenses are a bit awkward to use, but not on the X-Pro3. If you often use these larger and heavier lenses, you might appreciate the larger, sturdier body of the X-Pro3.

While X-Trans V is just around the corner, I don’t believe that the X-Pro4 is going to be announced anytime soon—I think maybe in 2023, but I’d be pretty shocked if Fujifilm replaced the X-Pro3 anytime this year. I’ve certainly been wrong before, but I haven’t heard anything about an upcoming X-Pro4 on the horizon.

Abandoned Ice Chest – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-Pro3 – “Standard Provia

I think by-and-large those who would love the X-Pro3 know who they are already. If you are uncertain, that’s a pretty good indication that this camera isn’t for you. That’s not to say you’d dislike it, but you should strongly consider a different model instead. For those who are pretty confident that the X-Pro3 is the camera for them, you can know that you are probably right, and you’re going to love it. So, my conclusion is that the X-Pro3 isn’t perfect and it isn’t for everyone, but for some it will be a much appreciated, much loved, and much used camera for years to come.

I was sad to send Fujifilm their X-Pro3 back, and I’ll certainly miss it.

This post contains affiliate links, and if you make a purchase using my links I’ll be compensated a small amount for it.

Fujifilm X-Pro3 Amazon B&H

Example photographs, captured with a Fujifilm X-Pro3:

Approaching Mesa Arch – Canyonlands NP, UT – Fujifilm X-Pro3 – “Old Ektachrome
Clearing Clouds Over Winter Ridge – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-Pro3 – “Standard Provia”
Desert Snow – Canyonlands NP, UT – Fujifilm X-Pro3 – “Old Ektachrome”
Red – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-Pro3 – “Agfa Ultra 100”
Blu – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-Pro3 – “Agfa Ultra 100”

Rescheduled: SOOC Season 2 Episode 1 now March 24

I’m really sorry, but today’s SOOC broadcast has been postponed to March 24, due to an unexpected and lengthy power outage in South Africa. Keep Nathalie, her great team, and all those without power, in your thoughts and prayers, as it’s a disruptive situation they’re enduring, and the impact extends well beyond this show.

Trust me, I’m just as bummed about this as you are, because Season 2 Episode 1 is going to be a great broadcast, but I hope that you’ll join us in two weeks, as we kick off the new season. I apologize for any inconvenience this might have caused, and I look forward to seeing you March 24!

Below is the new scheduled YouTube broadcast:

SOOC Season 2 Kicks Off This Thursday!

Season 2 of SOOC kicks off this Thursday, March 10th, at 9 AM Pacific Time, 12 PM Eastern.

SOOC is a monthly live video series, with each episode focused on a different film simulation recipe. It is a collaboration between Tame Your Fujifilm (Fujifilm X-Photographer Nathalie Boucry) and Fuji X Weekly (Ritchie Roesch). SOOC is a fun and educational experience where we not only talk about Fujifilm camera settings, but also answer your questions and give tips and tricks. Basically, we’re trying to help you master your Fujifilm camera, with a focus on simplifying your photographic workflow. It’s an interactive show, and your participation is essential, so I really hope to see you there!

Fujifilm X-Pro3 (X-Trans IV) Film Simulation Recipe: Old Ektachrome

Approaching Mesa Arch – Canyonlands NP, UT – Fujifilm X-Pro3 – “Old Ektachrome”

I was asked to recreate the aesthetic from a frame of a classic movie. I don’t know which movie, but only that it was shot on “Eastmancolor” film, which is a brandname for many different motion picture films and processes going back to the 1950’s. In fact, Eastmancolor Negative, better known as ECN, is still the development process used for today’s motion picture film. It’s unknown which film was used for the frame I was shown, but I did my best to recreate it on a Fujifilm X-Pro3.

After using these settings for several days, I decided that it really reminds me of old Ektachrome color reversal film, perhaps from the 1970’s. Ektachrome was known for fading rather quickly, with some color shifts if not stored well. Aside from some faded slides from my grandparents, most of the Ektachrome I’ve seen from this era have been in classic photography magazines. I don’t know how faithfully this recipe mimics old Ektachrome film, but it definitely has the right “memory color” for me. I hope that you like it, too.

Abandoned Ferris Wheel – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-Pro3 – “Old Ektachrome”

This “Old Ektachrome” film simulation recipe is compatible with the Fujifilm X-Pro3, X100V, X-T4, X-S10, X-E4, and X-T30 II cameras. This recipe isn’t compatible with the X-T3 or X-T30, but if you disregard Color Chrome FX Blue, disregard Grain size, and use a diffusion filter in lieu of Clarity, you’ll get similar results.

Classic Chrome
Dynamic Range: DR400
Highlight: +2
Shadow: +1
Color: +3
Noise Reduction: -4
Sharpness: 0
Clarity: -4
Grain Effect: Strong, Large
Color Chrome Effect: Strong
Color Chrome Effect Blue: Weak
White Balance: Daylight, +3 Red & +2 Blue
ISO: Auto, up to ISO 6400
Exposure Compensation: 0 to +2/3 (typically)

Example photographs, all camera-made JPEGs using this “Old Ektachrome” film simulation recipe on a Fujifilm X-Pro3:

Blue Roof – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-Pro3
Old Carnaval Ride – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-Pro3
Too Late To Ride – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-Pro3
Early Blossoms – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-Pro3
Potted Plant – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-Pro3
Desert Snow – Canyonlands NP, UT – Fujifilm X-Pro3
Rock & Half Arch – Arches NP, UT – Fujifilm X-Pro3
Cave & Juniper – Arches NP, UT – Fujifilm X-Pro3
Snow in the Desert – Arches NP, UT – Fujifilm X-Pro3
Sign Stickers – Canyonlands NP, UT – Fujifilm X-Pro3
Red Rock Tree – Canyonlands NP, UT – Fujifilm X-Pro3
View Through Mesa Arch – Canyonlands NP, UT – Fujifilm X-Pro3

Find this film simulation recipes and over 200 more on the Fuji X Weekly — Film Recipes App!

Introducing RitchieCam!

Surprise! I just released an iPhone camera app. I call it RitchieCam, and it’s available in the App Store right now for free!

What is RitchieCam? It’s an easy-to-use streamlined camera intended to bring one-step photography to the iPhone. You’ll find 17 analog-inspired filters so that you don’t have to edit your mobile pictures if you don’t want to. I think you will appreciate the app, yet it is intended for anyone and everyone with an iPhone, and not just photographers. You can read all about it at ritchiecam.com.

This is a project I’ve been secretly working on for nearly a year. While I always thought it would be difficult and complicated, I had no idea just how much so! I’m extremely happy with how it turned out, yet I hope that this is just the beginning, as there are several new features and improvements already in the works, and even more on my wish-list. I’m very proud of RitchieCam, and I hope that you find it fun and useful. I personally have enjoyed using it over the last several weeks, including on a road trip to Moab, Utah.

RitchieCam is free! Or, really, it’s a “freemium” app, and for $9.99 (USD +Tax annually) you can unlock all of the filters and features.

Some pictures I captured with RitchieCam on that Moab road trip:

Standard Film
Faded Film
Instant Color 3
Analog Gold
Night Negative

Creative Collective 018: FXW Zine — Issue 04 — March 2022

The fourth issue of FXW Zine is out now, and if you are a Fuji X Weekly Creative Collective subscriber, you can download it now!

What’s in the March issue? The cover story is Serendipity In Photography, which demonstrates what happens when you take advantage of unexpected photographic opportunities. There are a total of 22 photographs this month, including the cover image (above). I hope that you find it enlightening, entertaining, and inspiring!

If you haven’t joined the Creative Collective, consider subscribing today to get access to bonus articles and the FXW Zine—not just this issue, but the first three issues, too!

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