Want to be a Wedding Photographer? Your Opportunity Awaits!

Pay attention!

The day after Christmas I saw an article by Charissa Cheong on Insider.com, Professional TikTok creators are charging couples to film their weddings in a bid to help them go viral on their special day. Despite the long title, I read the article, but I didn’t pay much attention. The next day someone shared it with me and told me that I should, in fact, pay careful attention to it.

Why should I? I’m not a wedding photographer. Sure, like many who carry a camera, I have been asked a few times to capture the big day for family and friends. But that’s not something I’m interested in doing as a career. It’s too much work. Oftentimes, the wedding photographer is the first to arrive and one of the last to leave. Twelve hours of photography might equal 24 hours of culling and editing. Besides that, people sometimes don’t like pictures of themselves, because they see their own perceived flaws as flaws in the pictures, which is an unfortunate predicament for the photographer who photographs people. I’m also not a TikTok influencer. Yeah, I have social media accounts, and my Instagram has nearly 35,000 followers; while I never thought it would ever grow anywhere near that big, it’s still small-potatoes to be considered within “influencer” territory.

The article—what I missed the first time I read it—is about the power of swiftness. People are turning to TikTok creators to capture their wedding day because they can get ready-to-share pictures and videos quickly. People nowadays are less interested in a photo-book or DVD of their big day; instead, they want something that they can post to their social media accounts. Yeah, those polished products with a one or two week turnaround are great, but by the time the married couple receives them, the wedding is old news. Instant can be better than perfection. The younger generation in particularly would rather sacrifice “quality” for quickness.

Something else the article brings up is that people are interested in intimate and genuine content. “[Taylor Richardson] focuses on taking ‘raw footage’ and ‘candid’ images,” the article states, “which have a more ‘personal’ and ‘organic’ feel.” Richardson is then quoted, “The results end up looking like I was attending the wedding myself, like an amazing friend who never put her phone down the entire day.” It’s like the whole blurry picture trend—imperfections make it seem more true, more real, less staged. That’s what the younger crowd wants—authenticity. Or, at least, perceived authenticity.

What does any of this have to do with Fujifilm? Well, you all have a huge advantage! You can shoot straight-out-of-camera pictures using Film Simulation Recipes, and deliver amazing edited-looking pictures very quickly. Because you don’t need to edit, aside from perhaps some cropping, straightening, and maybe occasional very minor touchups, your biggest challenge is culling and delivery, not post-processing. That’s huge! Remember, it’s not perfection the client wants, but authentic pictures, quickly.

It’s not just photographs that the newlyweds want, but also ready-to-share videos. Video editing is even more slow and cumbersome than photo editing, but it doesn’t have to be. You can use Film Simulation Recipes for video, too (note that Grain, Clarity, and Color Chrome Effects are unavailable in video mode), so no need to color grade. You will have to splice clips to make under-a-minute short videos that are oriented tall and not wide. Consider having one camera dedicated to video and another for stills. If you don’t have much experience filming and editing short-form videos, that’s something you’ll want to get comfortable with well before the wedding day, and I suppose that’s why TikTokers have a leg up on everyone else. Storytelling is much more important than perfection, so consider ahead of time which clips you want to get to tell the story that you want to create.

Some people will look at the Insider article with disappointment. Those darn social media influencers with their iPhones and TikToks are ruining wedding photography! Some people will look at it with indifference. Why should I care? I’m not a social media influencer or wedding photographer. For some, though, who pay close attention, there’s a great opportunity for you, and the time is now to jump on it. You are already ahead of the curve because you own a Fujifilm camera and shoot with Film Simulation Recipes. Worry less about perfection and more about authentic in-the-moment images that are perhaps more raw and candid. The quicker that you can get these pictures into the hands of the client, the better.

The real advantage that you have over “TikTok Wedding Content Creators” is quality. While the iPhone is a good photographic and videographic tool—and don’t forget the RitchieCam App (a shameless plug)—it pales in comparison to what your Fujifilm camera is capable of. Your image and video quality can be so much superior while equally quick. The fruit is ripe for you, all you have to do is harvest it. Yes, it’s easier said than done, but if this is something you’ve been thinking about, it’s time to be decisive with your decision. If you want to be a wedding photographer, your opportunity awaits.

Ilford FP4 Plus 125 — Fujifilm X-T5 (X-Trans V + X-Trans IV) Film Simulation Recipe

Gift Giving – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5 – “Ilford FP4 Plus 125”

Anders Lindborg is, in my opinion, the guru on Fujifilm black-and-white Film Simulation Recipes. After all, he invented the Kodak Tri-X 400, Ilford HP5 Plus 400, and Ilford Pan F Plus 50 recipes, and co-created the Kodak T-Max 400 recipe. These are some of my favorite monochrome options, and Kodak Tri-X 400 is my all-time favorite recipe, period. Anders also created the Kodak Gold v2 recipe, seven Fujicolor Pro 160NS recipesseven Fujicolor Pro 400H recipes, and made an important D-Range Priority discovery. This Ilford FP4 Plus 125 recipe was invented by Anders Lindborg, too, so I know that you will love it! It’s a real honor to publish it on Fuji X Weekly, and I appreciate his willingness to share it with all of you.

The story doesn’t end there. Recently, Fuji X Weekly reader Dan Allen wanted to help create an Ilford FP4 Plus 125 recipe, and he purchased some rolls of the film to shoot side-by-side with his Fujifilm camera. When he told me this, I sent him Anders’ recipe to try. After he did his experiment, Dan shared with me the results, which were quite fascinating. It turns out that Dan’s Ilford frames and his Fujifilm digital pictures (using Anders’ recipe) looked similar, but the Ilford frames had less contrast, with softer highlights and shadows, so I made a few small modifications to Anders’ recipe to better match Dan’s pictures. Of course, one film can have many different looks, depending on how it was shot, developed, printed, and/or scanned. “This particular film stock,” Anders told me, “is highly tunable, ranging from super clean to ultra gritty.” No single recipe will ever recreate every possible aesthetic from the film.

“Just like the real thing,” Anders explained to me, “a slight underexposure protects the highlights and improves contrast. Centered around the upper half of the grayscale, this recipe ranges from soft and dreamy to sharp and almost graphic with pencil-like lines. It will almost never go entirely black and is great for shadow details.” Ilford originally introduced FP4 Plus 125 way back in 1968, and in 2014 they improved the emulsion, which is what’s currently available.

Bougainvillea Grey – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5 – “Ilford FP4 Plus 125”

If you want to use Anders Lindborg’s recipe as he created it, set Dynamic Range to DR100, Highlight to 0, and Shadow to -1. He says that you can “really go crazy” with Clarity and Grain—try Clarity anywhere from -2 to +4, with Grain Weak/Small when using less Clarity (for a cleaner look) and Grain Strong/Large when using more Clarity (for a grittier look). Also, feel free to use the different faux filter options (+Ye, +R, +G) with this recipe.

The Ilford FP4 Plus 125 Film Simulation Recipe is compatible with X-Trans V cameras, which (as of this writing) are the Fujifilm X-T5, X-H2, and X-H2S, and newer X-Trans IV cameras: X-T4, X-S10, X-E4, and X-T30 II. If you have an X100V or X-Pro3, you can use Anders’ unmodified version (explained above); for the X-T3, X-T30, plus X-Trans III, additionally ignore Clarity and Grain size. This recipe is especially well suited for mid-to-high contrast scenes, paying careful attention to the highlights so as to not clip them.

Film Simulation: Monochrome
Grain Effect: Weak, Large
Color Chrome Effect: Off
Color Chrome FX Blue: Off
White Balance: Daylight, +6 Red & -8 Blue
Dynamic Range: DR200
Highlight: -0.5
Shadow: -1.5
Monochromatic Color: 0 WC & 0 MG
Sharpness: 0

High ISO NR: -4
Clarity: +2
ISO: Auto, up to ISO 6400
Exposure Compensation: -1 to -1/3 (typically)

Example photographs, all camera-made JPEGs using this “Ilford FP4 Plus 125” Film Simulation Recipe on my Fujifilm X-T5:

Projector Light – Surprise, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Fog Lights – Surprise, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Disco Ball – Surprise, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Christmas Concert – Surprise, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Light Lines – Surprise, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Window Shade Pull – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Window Light on a Small Rug – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Call it a Fuji X Weekly Holiday – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Christmas Gift – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Legos for Christmas – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Was a Rose – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Backlit Petunia – Goodyear, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Dark Bougainvillea – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Lizard on a Wall – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Block Wall – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Gate – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Joy – Goodyear, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Waiting by the Pool – Goodyear, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Butcher – Avondale, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Tamale TV – Avondale, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Reading the Morning Paper – Goodyear, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Coffee Sugar – Goodyear, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Hydrant Top – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Geometric – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Suburban Rooftop – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5

This post contains affiliate links, and if you make a purchase using my links I’ll be compensated a small amount for it.

Fujifilm X-T5 in black:  Amazon  B&H
Fujifilm X-T5 in silver:  Amazon  B&H

Find this Film Simulation Recipe and over 250 more on the Fuji X Weekly — Film Recipes App!

So You Got Some Amazon Gift Cards for Christmas

I don’t know about you, but I received several Amazon gift cards for Christmas. You might want to use those gift cards to purchase photography gear, but perhaps you are not sure what to buy. So—if you are stuck—let me offer some ideas. Since this is a Fujifilm blog, these items are mostly geared towards Fujifilm photographers.

This post contains affiliate links, and if you make a purchase using my links I’ll be compensated a small amount for it.

$25

If your Amazon gift card is $25, here are some camera things you can buy:

SanDisk 128GB Extreme Pro — It’s normally $34, but right now it’s on sale.
Fujifilm X-E4 Thumb Grip (Black)Fujifilm X-E4 Thumb Grip (Silver)
Fotasy M42-to-Fuji-X Adapter — So that you can use vintage M42 lenses.
Xuan 30mm Body Cap Lens — It’s actually $26, but close enough….

$50

If your Amazon gift card is $50, here are some camera things you can buy:

Risespray 35mm f/1.6 — I have no idea if this lens is good or bad, but it is cheap.
Neewer 35mm f/1.4 — Never used it, so I can’t vouch for the quality.
National Geographic 2344 Shoulder Camera Bag — This is my travel camera bag.
1/4 Black Pro Mist10% CineBloom
NP-126 Batter Charger — I don’t travel without this.
Kodak Ektar H35 Half Frame Camera — Not Fujifilm related, but would be fun to try.

$75

If your Amazon gift card is $75, here are some camera things you can buy:

Geekoto Tripod — I don’t have this tripod, but it looks like a good option.
Meike 35mm f/1.7 — Excellent lens for the price.
TTArtisan 25mm f/2 — No idea if this lens is good or not.
Meike 25mm f/1.8 — I’ve never used this one.
7Artisans 25mm f/1.8 — Pretty decent and fun lens.
7Artisans 50mm f/1.8 — Good lens for portraits.

$100

If your Amazon gift card is $100, here are some camera things you can buy:

TTArtisan 35mm f/1.4 — I’ve used this lens on a Nikon Zfc, and it’s pretty good.
Meike 35mm f/1.4 — I’ve heard good things about this lens, but I’ve never used it myself.
Brighten Star 50mm f/1.4 — No idea if this is good or not.
Pergear 50mm f/1.8 — Has character.
Fujifilm Instax Mini 40 — Instant film is fun!
Instax Mini Link 2 Printer — More convenient than a camera.

I hope you all had a very merry Christmas!

Kodak Negative — Fujifilm X-T5 (X-Trans V) Film Simulation Recipe

Desert Fence – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5 – “Kodak Negative”

This recipe began as an attempt to mimic my “Nostalgic Negative” Film Simulation Recipe for X-Trans IV cameras using the new Nostalgic Neg. film simulation instead of Classic Chrome. I made that recipe before any camera with Nostalgic Neg. had even been released, when there weren’t very many samples available, and little information had been given about it. I observed “something along the lines of Eterna gradation, [with] the Classic Chrome color palette (however, with a warm shift)….” I also stated that it would “likely turn out to be an inaccurate facsimile to the real Nostalgic Negative film simulation….” Turns out that I was right about both.

I set out to see how close I could get to that X-Trans IV Nostalgic Negative recipe using Nostalgic Neg, on my X-T5. I was hoping that I could get a close match, but unfortunately I was only able to get it to be about 90% similar. Even though it wasn’t an exact match, I still liked the aesthetic. From there I gave it a couple of small tweaks to make it look better (but less like the X-Trans IV recipe), and that’s how this Kodak Negative recipe came to be.

To my eyes, without digging too deeply into samples (just “memory color”), this recipe is reminiscent of Kodak Ektar 100. Maybe +4 Color isn’t quite high enough to mimic Ektar film, but there are definitely some similarities between this recipe and the film. I didn’t set out to recreate Ektar, so I’m not worried that it’s not an exact match. There’s certainly a vibrant Kodak color negative film vibe to this recipe; if not Ektar, then maybe Royal Gold 100 or Gold 100 or something along those lines.

Looking Through the Stone – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5 – “Kodak Negative”

This Kodak Negative Film Simulation Recipe is only compatible with (as of this writing) the Fujifilm X-T5, X-H2, and X-H2S. I assume that the GFX100S and GFX50S II can also use this recipe, but that it will render slightly different—I don’t have either of those cameras to test it to know for certain. This Kodak Negative recipe is especially well-suited for golden hour photography, but can also be used during most other light situations.

Film Simulation: Nostalgic Neg.
Grain Effect: Weak, Large
Color Chrome Effect: Off
Color Chrome FX Blue: Off
White Balance: Auto, +1 Red & -4 Blue
Dynamic Range: DR400
Highlight: -0.5
Shadow: +2.5
Color: +4
Sharpness: -1

High ISO NR: -4
Clarity: -3
ISO: Auto, up to ISO 6400
Exposure Compensation: +1/3 to +2/3 (typically)

Example photographs, all camera-made JPEGs using this “Kodak Negative” Film Simulation Recipe on my Fujifilm X-T5:

Church Dome – Litchfield Park, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Empty Cage – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Water & Reflection – Litchfield Park, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Lake Lamp – Litchfield Park, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Pond at Last Light – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Disappearing Desert Light – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Approaching Dusk at Pond – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Pond Water – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Palm Tree Moon – Litchfield Park, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Media Center – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Golden Triangle – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Golden Leaves – Litchfield Park, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Tree Top Clouds – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Lakeside Townhomes – Litchfield Park, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Soft Shrub – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Three Oranges – Litchfield Park, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Me Photographing Me – Litchfield Park, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Observing the Lake for Fish – Litchfield Park, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Worn Wood – Litchfield Park, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Pier Leg – Litchfield Park, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Lantana – Litchfield Park, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5

This post contains affiliate links, and if you make a purchase using my links I’ll be compensated a small amount for it.

Fujifilm X-T5 in black:  Amazon  B&H
Fujifilm X-T5 in silver:  Amazon  B&H

Find this Film Simulation Recipe and over 250 more on the Fuji X Weekly — Film Recipes App!

Help Fuji X Weekly

Nobody pays me to write the content found on fujixweekly.com. There’s a real cost to operating and maintaining this site, not to mention all the time that I pour into it. If you appreciated this article, please consider making a one-time gift contribution. Thank you!

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Five Fujifilm X-T5 AI AWB Workarounds

Yesterday I stated that I don’t like the inconsistent results from the new AI Auto White Balance found on the Fujifilm X-T5 and the other X-Trans V cameras. This isn’t a problem for most people, I don’t think; however, if you are a wedding or event photographer (or someone who needs consistent rendering over a series of pictures), if you use Film Simulation Recipes and rely on the out-of-camera JPEGs, and if you commonly use Auto White Balance, this is an issue you are likely to encounter, and you will surely be frustrated by it.

For those who are looking for a workaround to this problem, I want to offer you five potential solutions that might be helpful. None are perfect, so I hope that Fujifilm addresses this with a firmware update in the near future, but in the meantime perhaps one of these will be at least ok for you.

1. Use a Film Simulation Recipe that doesn’t use AWB yet matches the lighting conditions. For example, if you will be photographing indoors under artificial light, instead of using AWB, try Serr’s 500T (which uses a specific Kelvin temperature) or CineStill 800T (which uses Fluorescent 3). While AWB recipes are easy to like because of their versatility (Jack-of-all-trades), Auto White Balance won’t always deliver the best results. You’ll have to figure which recipe might be most appropriate for whatever it is that you are photographing, and there could only be one or two that will really work well; however, if you can match the recipe with the scene and situation, that’s when you’ll get the best outcome.

2. Use Custom White Balance. Instead of using Auto White Balance, take a custom white balance measurement in each lighting condition that you encounter. Your camera has three Custom White Balance banks, so you can take a measurement in up to three different situations at the beginning, and just switch between the three banks as you move throughout the event. For example, Custom 1 could be for outdoors, Custom 2 could be for the reception, and Custom 3 could be for the dressing room. If the light changes significantly due to (for example) the sun’s position in the sky or cloud coverage, you might have to remeasure at various times. You’ll have to remember to switch to the appropriate Custom White Balance bank as the light situation changes.

3. Use Auto White Balance Lock (AWB-L). This feature allows you to lock onto a specific white balance for as long as you keep it locked. To do this, first, while in the Shooting Mode (not Playback), press and hold the Disp/Back button until the Bluetooth & Function (Fn) Setting Menu appears. Pick an Fn button (whichever one you like, as long as it isn’t a touchscreen gesture) to customize, and set it to AWB-L. Next, open the Wrench Menu subset, click Button/Dial Setting, select AWB-Lock Mode, and set it to AWB On/Off Switch. Now, when you think AWB is producing a good white balance for the situation, simply press the Fn button you chose to enable AWB-L, and the camera will keep that white balance until you press the button again to disable it. Don’t forget to disable AWB-L when you encounter different lighting.

4. Program the same Film Simulation Recipe into several C1-C7 Custom Presets, but (for example) set the white balance to Daylight (for outdoors) on one, maybe Fluorescent 3 (for indoors) on another, and some other white balance (for another light you expect to encounter) on another. Definitely check the results at the very beginning to make sure it all looks good (and adjust if necessary) before photographing the whole event this way. You’ll have to remember to change to the correct C1-C7 preset as the light situation changes.

5. Take your chances with AWB. If you shoot RAW+JPEG, even if you have no intentions of editing the RAW files, you can reprocess the pictures in-camera or with X RAW Studio if, by chance, a crucial exposure has a weird color cast. You can simply adjust the white balance to be closer to the others, or apply a B&W recipe (such as Kodak Tri-X 400) and call it being creative.

Creative Collective 037: Tilted Filter for Flare

I made a really interesting discovery: if you tilt a diffusion filter and spin it, you can control the lens flare and bloom. For example, in the pictures above, I twisted the tilted filter, and the flare and bloom around the street lamp go from sideways to diagonal. There are several creative applications of this!

Below, I’ll explain how I made this filter (it’s simple!), and what you can do with it.

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Why I Don’t Like the New AI AWB on the Fujifilm X-T5

Fujifilm used “deep-learning AI Technology” to improve Auto White Balance on the X-T5 (or, more accurately, on X-Trans V cameras—not just the X-T5). According to the promotional statement, the camera is able to more accurately identify warm tints, and adjust to compensate for that when using Auto White Balance. Sounds impressive, right?

When I first learned about this, I was a little concerned that the new Auto White Balance would affect Film Simulation Recipes that use AWB. So I took a few test shots with the X-T5 and an X-Trans IV model side-by-side to compare, and I didn’t notice any difference between the two regarding white balance. It looked the same to me. But now that I’ve used the X-T5 a little longer, I do, in fact, at times notice something that I initially overlooked.

In the banner above, which comes from Fujifilm’s promo materiel for the X-T5 (even though the X-H2 has this same feature, it wasn’t promoted with that camera), you can see the “conventional model” vs the X-T5 AWB rendering in identical light. I assume that the so-called conventional model wasn’t a Sony or Canon, but an X-T4 (or other X-Trans IV camera). I personally prefer the more golden rendering of the “conventional” AWB to the copper rendering of the AI AWB, but each has their own tastes, so there’s no right or wrong answer. Perhaps you prefer the image on the right over the one on the left. It’s definitely subjective.

Something I have noticed—and I don’t like—is that this new rendering is inconsistent. From one exposure to the next, with identical lighting and identical settings, you can get something more like the “conventional model” rendering or something more like the AI AWB rendering. I’ve noticed it in artificial light, and I’ve noticed it in golden-hour/sunset situations. Two exposures, one right after the other—nothing’s changed—but the camera produces two very different tints when using AWB. Take a look at the two pictures below for an example of this. They were captured under identical light with identical settings, but they clearly aren’t identical. This was in a set of 32 pictures (of my son opening birthday gifts); 19 had the golden-ish cast and 13 had the copper-ish cast (these are frames nine and ten, for those wondering).

Obviously if you are a wedding or event photographer, and you rely on Auto White Balance, this could be a big issue for you, because you want consistent results. You don’t want the white balance to be bouncing back-and-forth between two tints. I don’t even want it for my son’s birthday pictures! If the camera chose one rendering in the situation, and consistently applied that to each image, whether gold or copper or something else entirely, that’s fine—it’s what is expected to happen—but bouncing between renderings is bad and should not happen. If you can’t trust AWB, and if it’s a tool that you commonly use, the X-T5 (or any of the X-Trans V models) might not be the camera for you.

Of course, for many people this might not be an issue whatsoever. Maybe you don’t even use AWB. Perhaps you do but you don’t care if the results are different between exposures. It could be that you’re going to adjust white balance in software later anyway, so what the camera records makes no difference to you. If that’s you, and none of this matters to you, great! But I do want to point it out for those who it might matter for, because they should know. It’s better to find out now before dropping so much money on something that’s just going to frustrate you.

I imagine that this is something Fujifilm could fix fairly easily via a firmware update. A simple tweak to the code could possibly make this behavior happen much less frequently. Fujifilm should address this issue. I hope in a few months from now this will all be a past problem that was fixed and forgotten. Or it could be the expected behavior that all Fujifilm X-Trans V cameras will have, and it will only be fixed by an even more improved AI-AWB on X-Trans VI models. Time will tell.

See also: Five Fujifilm X-T5 AI AWB Workarounds

Fujifilm X-Pro1 (+ X-E1) Film Simulation Recipe: Color Analog

109 – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-Pro1 – “Color Analog”

For this Film Simulation Recipe I didn’t attempt to model any specific film; instead, I wanted a low-saturation, low-to-mid contrast recipe that would remind me of color negative film. I wanted it to be warm, but not overly warm. After several tries, I landed on some settings that I liked. While I didn’t have any film in mind when I created this recipe, it is vaguely reminiscent of Kodak Portra 160 NC, which was a “neutral color” (low-saturation) version of Portra film that was around from 1998 to 2010, when it was discontinued. It’s not an exact match to that film, but is simply by chance in the neighborhood of it. As Lefty Gomez famously said, “I’d rather be lucky than good.”

This recipe is a good daylight and golden hour option, and does alright in overcast conditions, too. If I were to suggest C1-C7 Custom Presets for the X-Pro1, this is one that I would include. I would also consider Color Negative Film, either Kodachrome I or Kodachrome II, Vivid Color, Superia Xtra 400, and Monochrome. I know that’s only six (not seven), but you wouldn’t have to remember to change the White Balance Shift when switching presets because each of these calls for a different White Balance type—you could pick one other recipe (but you’ll just have to remember to switch the shift when changing presets) or leave the seventh spot empty.

Sunset Branch – Bountiful, UT – Fujifilm X-Pro1 – “Color Analog”

This Color Analog recipe was an Early-Access Recipe on the Fuji X Weekly App, and Patrons have had access to it since April. It’s been replaced by a different Early-Access Recipe (look for that one in the App!), so now this Color Analog recipe is available to everyone! It’s compatible the Fujifilm X-Pro1 and X-E1 cameras, but not the X-M1 because that camera doesn’t have PRO Neg. Std for some reason. Those with X-Trans II and Bayer cameras can also use it, although the results will be just a little different.

PRO Neg. Std
Dynamic Range: DR200
Highlight: -1 (Medium-Soft)
Shadow: +1 (Medium-Hard)
Color: -2 (Low)
Sharpness: -1 (Medium-Soft)
Noise Reduction: -2 (Low)
White Balance: Daylight/Fine, -1 Red & -4 Blue

ISO: Auto, up to ISO 3200
Exposure Compensation: +1/3 to +2/3 (typically)

Example photographs, all camera-made JPEGs captured using this “Color Analog” Film Simulation Recipe on my Fujifilm X-Pro1:

Daffodil Garden – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-Pro1
Daylight Pines – Bountiful, UT – Fujifilm X-Pro1
Pear Blossom Sky – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-Pro1
Creek Rocks – Bountiful, UT – Fujifilm X-Pro1
Newly Bloomed – Bountiful, UT – Fujifilm X-Pro1
White Fruit Tree Blossoms – Bountiful, UT – Fujifilm X-Pro1
Round & Red – Bountiful, UT – Fujifilm X-Pro1
Aperture Artifact Apparition – Bountiful, UT – Fujifilm X-Pro1
Sunlight Through Tree Branches – Bountiful, UT – Fujifilm X-Pro1
Suspended Sun – Bountiful, UT – Fujifilm X-Pro1
Reflection Structure – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-Pro1
Train 16 – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-Pro1

Find this Film Simulation Recipe and over 250 more on the Fuji X Weekly — Film Recipes App!

Help Fuji X Weekly

Nobody pays me to write the content found on fujixweekly.com. There’s a real cost to operating and maintaining this site, not to mention all the time that I pour into it. If you appreciated this article, please consider making a one-time gift contribution. Thank you!

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Fujifilm X-M1 (X-Trans I) FXW App Patron Early-Access Film Simulation Recipe: Reminiscent Print

Bougainvillea Day – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-M1 – “Reminiscent Print”

This Film Simulation Recipe came about as an experiment after reading that film photographers weren’t meant to like the Provia film simulation because they’d find it to be too hard. So, I thought, maybe that’s true, and perhaps I can make it less hard and more, something that film photographers might find to be “just right” (as Fujifilm put it). It took some trial-and-error, but I do believe that I have succeeded! This is a much, much better “standard” setting than default Provia, and, if you have a background in film photography, you’ll appreciate this recipe.

I find this new recipe to be reminiscent of cheap color negative film shot in point-‘n’-shoot cameras and printed at a one-hour lab, probably on Fujicolor Crystal Archive paper. It’s not intended to resemble that, but to me it does. I’m reminded of the 4″ x 6″ prints from 20+ years ago that are sitting in a box in the closet, or are carefully arranged in a photo album at my parent’s house. That’s why I call it Reminiscent Print.

Classic Car Denim – Goodyear, AZ – Fujifilm X-M1 – “Reminiscent Print”

This new Reminiscent Print Patron Early-Access recipe is compatible the Fujifilm X-Pro1, X-E1, and X-M1 cameras. Those with X-Trans II and Bayer cameras can also use it, although the results will be just a little different. If you are a Fuji X Weekly App Patron, it’s available to you right now on the App!

The Fuji X Weekly App is free, yet becoming a Fuji X Weekly Patron unlocks the best App experience! One benefit of being a Patron is you get early access to some new Film Simulation Recipes. These Early-Access Recipes will eventually become available free to everyone in time, including this new one. Patrons help support Fuji X Weekly and, really, without them there would be no App, so I want to give a special “thank you” to all of the Patrons!

Example photographs, all camera-made JPEGs captured using this “Reminiscent Print” Film Simulation Recipe on my Fujifilm X-M1:

Pier Post – Litchfield Park, AZ – Fujifilm X-M1 – Photo by Jonathan Roesch
Light & Water – Litchfield Park, AZ – Fujifilm X-M1 – Photo by Jonathan Roesch
Fine Morning for Fishing – Litchfield Park, AZ – Fujifilm X-M1 – Photo by Jonathan Roesch
Line in the Lake – Litchfield Park, AZ – Fujifilm X-M1 – Photo by Jonathan Roesch
Pier Reflections – Litchfield Park, AZ – Fujifilm X-M1 – Photo by Jonathan Roesch
Better Days Behind – Litchfield Park, AZ – Fujifilm X-M1
Church Bells – Litchfield Park, AZ – Fujifilm X-M1
Unlit Canopy – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-M1
Red Bougainvillea Blossoms – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-M1
Backyard Bougainvillea – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-M1
Autumn Orange – Litchfield Park, AZ – Fujifilm X-M1
Oranges – Litchfield Park, AZ – Fujifilm X-M1
Bucket Blossom – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-M1
Pink Rose Bud – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-M1
Peace & Minecraft – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-M1
Ball Toss – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-M1
All the World’s a Stage – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-M1
Steps – Litchfield Park, AZ – Fujifilm X-M1
Outside Tables – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-M1
Made With Passion – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-M1
Duster Headlamp – Goodyear, AZ – Fujifilm X-M1
Radial G/T – Goodyear, AZ – Fujifilm X-M1
Rear Duster – Goodyear, AZ – Fujifilm X-M1

Find this Film Simulation Recipe and over 250 more on the Fuji X Weekly — Film Recipes App!

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A $400 Alternative to the Fujifilm X100V, X-E4, and X70

Since the Fujifilm X100V is difficult to find and sometimes outrageously expensive, something that I inadvertently had a hand in, people have been asking for recommendations on alternatives. Of course, the X100F or any of the older X100-series versions would be a top substitute, but even those are going for a lot of money, more than they should be for how old they are. The Fujifilm X-E4 with a Fujinon 27mm f/2.8 could be a very nice consolation prize, but due to parts shortages, those can be difficult to find, too, but thankfully there doesn’t seem to be much price gouging on it (knock on wood). The Fujifilm X70 would be a solid alternative, but they are pretty pricy, often going for the same or more than the original MSRP, despite being almost seven-years-old. If you are really set on owning a Fujifilm X100V (as a proud X100V owner I can understand why), if you just exercise some patience and constantly stay on the lookout, you are sure to find one for a reasonable price. If you are not patient, a used X100F isn’t too difficult to get, or even consider an X-E3, which can still be found brand-new if you look hard enough.

I’ve had a few people ask me for a recommendation on an X100V-like alternative for under $500, and one even asked for under $400. At first I scoffed at the idea. Even the original 12-year-old X100 currently goes for more than that, as well as every iteration of that camera since. Fujifilm doesn’t make entry-level cameras anymore, but even when they did, they were more than $500. Then I looked at my camera case, and I noticed two things: a Fujifilm X-M1 and a TTArtisan 27mm f/2.8. Hmmm. Maybe it’s possible after all.

Fujifilm introduced the X-M1—the third and last X-Trans I model—nine years ago. It’s an unusual camera, because it has an X-Trans I sensor but the X-Trans II processor, and in the same body as the Bayer-sensor X-A1. I think Fujifilm had some spare X-Trans I sensors sitting around after moving onto X-Trans II, and this camera was their way to unload them. There was never a predecessor, so when the X-M1 was discontinued so was the line. I paid $210 for mine two years ago. More commonly they’re found for around $250, and I’ve seen them for under $200 a couple times.

I think the X-E1 is a better body than the X-M1, and you can find those sometimes for $250 or less, but more often they’re $300-$350. If you see a good deal on one, I’d choose that over the X-M1. The X-A1 is basically the same thing as the X-M1, but with a Bayer sensor instead of X-Trans, and those are often a little cheaper. It’s definitely easier to find one under $250, and it’s not uncommon to see one under $200; however, between the X-A1 and X-M1, I’d choose the X-M1, but the difference isn’t huge. The X-A2 often is found for $250, and is another option. Occasionally you might find a good deal on an X-A3 or X-E2 (or X-E2s), so it’s worth looking just to see if you can get lucky, because that would be even better. If your budget is $500, you certainly have more options, but if the ceiling is only $400, you are much more limited, and the X-M1 is probably your best bet.

Of course, there’s still the lens. Sometimes you can buy the body bundled with a kit lens for nearly the same price as body-only (my X-M1 was bundled with 16-50mm zoom, for example), but the cheap kit zoom isn’t going to give you an X100-like experience. You’ll need a prime, but it has to be compact and cheap. The options are pretty limited, and are even more limited if you expect an autofocus option—the TTArtisans 27mm f/2.8 pancake-ish autofocus lens is the only one I can think of that is both cheap and small. If you don’t mind manual-focus-only, there are a few other lenses that could work, but I think this TTArtisan option is your best bet, and it’s only $160.

So, yeah, add $210 and $160 and you’re under $400. Will the X-M1 with the TTArtisan 27mm really give an X100-like experience? No, not at all. But, for under $400, it’s surely as close as you’ll get. If your budget is $500, spring for an X-E1 instead of the X-M1 and you’ll be a little closer, but still not there. The X-M1 is not as good as any in the X100-series models (or X-E-series or the X70), but that doesn’t mean that it’s not a decent camera capable of capturing good photos, because it is!

So if you are looking for a low-budget alternative to the Fujifilm X100V, X-E4, or X70, I suggest to you the X-M1 with the TTArtisan 27mm lens attached to it. The X-M1 is smaller than the X100V and X-E4, and just a little bigger than the X70. Obviously the TTArtisan lens, despite being pancake-ish, is bigger than the lens attached to the X100V and is especially larger than the one on the X70. It’s also a little bigger than the Fujinon 27mm lens (a popular companion to the X-E4). The Fujifilm X-M1 with the TTArtisan lens is small enough to be in the same compact category as those cameras, but is much, much cheaper. If you can spend more, there are better options; however, if you don’t have much to spend or are looking for an inexpensive first-camera, this is my recommendation for under $400.

It would be easy for me to suggest this to you, and not use it myself. That would not be very genuine of me, so I did use the Fujifilm X-M1 with the TTArtisan 27mm f/2.8. I also let me 13-year-old son, Jonathan, use it a little, too. This combo is very capable of producing lovely pictures straight-out-of-camera that have character and some analog-like qualities. It’s also easy to use for those who want good results without much fuss.

The 15 pictures below are all unedited (aside from some cropping and straightening), captured with the Fujifilm X-M1 and TTArtisan 27mm f/2.8.

Fujifilm X-M1 + TTArtisan 27mm f/2.8 – Photo by Jonathan Roesch
Fujifilm X-M1 + TTArtisan 27mm f/2.8 – Photo by Jonathan Roesch
Fujifilm X-M1 + TTArtisan 27mm f/2.8 – Photo by Jonathan Roesch
Fujifilm X-M1 + TTArtisan 27mm f/2.8 – Photo by Jonathan Roesch
Fujifilm X-M1 + TTArtisan 27mm f/2.8 – Photo by Jonathan Roesch
Fujifilm X-M1 + TTArtisan 27mm f/2.8 – Photo by Ritchie Roesch
Fujifilm X-M1 + TTArtisan 27mm f/2.8 – Photo by Ritchie Roesch
Fujifilm X-M1 + TTArtisan 27mm f/2.8 – Photo by Ritchie Roesch
Fujifilm X-M1 + TTArtisan 27mm f/2.8 – Photo by Ritchie Roesch
Fujifilm X-M1 + TTArtisan 27mm f/2.8 – Photo by Ritchie Roesch
Fujifilm X-M1 + TTArtisan 27mm f/2.8 – Photo by Ritchie Roesch
Fujifilm X-M1 + TTArtisan 27mm f/2.8 – Photo by Ritchie Roesch
Fujifilm X-M1 + TTArtisan 27mm f/2.8 – Photo by Ritchie Roesch
Fujifilm X-M1 + TTArtisan 27mm f/2.8 – Photo by Ritchie Roesch
Fujifilm X-M1 + TTArtisan 27mm f/2.8 – Photo by Ritchie Roesch

Now, let me tell you about the Film Simulation Recipes, because otherwise I’ll get a whole bunch of inquiries—you all want to know, right?! The top picture (of the X-M1 by itself) was captured with a Fujifilm X-E4 and Fujinon 27mm using the Fujicolor Pro 400H recipe. The next four pictures (the X-M1 with other cameras) were captured with a Fujifilm X-T5 and Fujinon 90mm using an upcoming recipe that I’ll publish soon. The 15 pictures above were captured with a Fujifilm X-M1 and TTArtisan 27mm using an upcoming recipe that I’ll publish soon. So, for now, only the very top picture is a recipe that you can currently use—you’ll have to stay tuned for the others.

This post contains affiliate links, and if you make a purchase using my links I’ll be compensated a small amount for it.

TTArtisan 27mm f/2.8  Amazon

Kodak Portra 400 v2 — Fujifilm X-T5 (X-Trans V) Film Simulation Recipe

Swath of Red – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5 – “Kodak Portra 400 v2”

This is a simple update to the Kodak Portra 400 v2 Film Simulation Recipe, which was originally made for X-Trans IV cameras. I discovered that a slight tweak is needed for X-Trans V models, because the new sensor renders blues just a little deeper on some film simulations, including Classic Chrome. For this recipe, simply setting Color Chrome FX Blue from Weak to Off makes it compatible with (as of this writing) the Fujifilm X-T5, X-H2, and X-H2S.

Kodak Portra 400 is a popular professional-grade color negative film introduced in 1998. There’s been a number of revisions and improvements to the emulsion over the years, so the Portra that’s available today is slightly different than the original Portra from roughly 25 years ago. As the name suggests, it’s intended for portraitures, but is also a popular option for many other genres of photography. One film can have several different aesthetics depending on many factors, and this particular Film Simulation Recipe is modeled after the Kodak Portra 400 pictures from a specific photographer. It’s one of my absolute favorite recipes for daylight and especially golden hour photography, and it does pretty well in several other light conditions; however, it’s probably not the best option for indoor artificial light, unless you want especially warm pictures.

Succulent Stories – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5 – “Kodak Portra 400 v2”

This Kodak Portra 400 v2 Film Simulation Recipe is intended for Fujifilm X-Trans V models. It’s compatible with newer GFX cameras too, but will likely render slightly different. If you have an X-Pro3X100V, X-T4, X-S10, X-E4, or X-T30 II, try the Kodak Portra 400 v2 recipe for those models (click here). If you have an X-T3 or X-T30, try the version for those cameras (click here). 

Film Simulation: Classic Chrome
Grain Effect: Strong, Small
Color Chrome Effect: Strong
Color Chrome FX Blue: Off
White Balance: 5200K, +1 Red & -6 Blue
Dynamic Range: DR400
Highlight: 0
Shadow: -2
Color: +2
Sharpness: -2

High ISO NR: -4
Clarity: -2
ISO: Auto, up to ISO 6400
Exposure Compensation: +1/3 to +1 (typically)

Example photographs, all camera-made JPEGs using this “Kodak Portra 400 v2” Film Simulation Recipe on my Fujifilm X-T5:

Christmas Angel – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Nativity – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Happy Holidays – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Lemons – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Changing Seasons – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Leaves on the Concrete – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
GCR – Williams, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Lighted Cupola – Williams, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Sisters – Williams, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Brothers – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
December Fog – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Multi-Arm Saguaro – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Saguaro Mist – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Wall Cage – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Super Star – Glendale. AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
I Believe – Avondale, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Standing in the Sun – Avondale, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Untidy Palm – Palo Verde, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Misty Desert Hills – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
It Was All Yellow – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Small Pop of Color – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Clouds & Brown Trees – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Golden Neighborhood – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5

This post contains affiliate links, and if you make a purchase using my links I’ll be compensated a small amount for it.

Fujifilm X-T5 in black:  Amazon  B&H
Fujifilm X-T5 in silver:  Amazon  B&H

Find this Film Simulation Recipe and over 250 more on the Fuji X Weekly — Film Recipes App!

Help Fuji X Weekly

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Fujifilm X100V (X-Trans IV) Film Simulation Recipe: Timeless Negative

Cold Morning Light – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X100V – “Timeless Negative”

I purchased the Fujifilm X-T5 specifically to try the Nostalgic Neg. film simulation, then, after using it, I discovered Nostalgic Neg. has a lot in common with Eterna. I initially stated that the new film simulation is as if Classic Chrome and Eterna had a baby—it has some similarities to both—but it is more like Eterna than Classic Chrome. If a Nostalgic Neg. recipe calls for minus Color, it’s possible to fairly closely approximate it with Eterna. One difference is that Nostalgic Neg. has more warmth and vibrancy in the shadows, which is unique to the new film simulation, but otherwise you can get pretty close.

This Film Simulation Recipe is a facsimile of Timeless Negative for X-Trans V cameras, using Eterna instead of the Nostalgic Neg., as only the latest cameras have the new film simulation. I think many of you are going to like it because it produces very lovely images in a variety of situations. It’s great for daylight, nighttime, golden hour, overcast, indoor, portraits, landscapes, etc., etc.. Once you program this one into your camera, you might not ever replace it, since it does so well in a lot of scenarios.

Holiday Ball – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X100V – “Timeless Negative”

This version of Timeless Negative is intended for the Fujifilm X-Pro3, X100V, X-T4, X-S10, X-E4, and X-T30 II cameras. You can use this on X-Trans V cameras, too, if you want (although I would suggest the recipe with Nostalgic Neg.) by setting Color Chrome FX Blue to Off. For the X-T3, X-T30, if you ignore Grain size, Color Chrome FX Blue, and Clarity (or, even better, use a 5% CineBloom diffusion filter in lieu of Clarity), you’ll still get similar results, but it will look slightly different (give it a try anyway). I am currently working on a Nostalgic Neg.-like recipe for the X-T3 and X-T30 (and possibly the X-H1, too); if you are a Fuji X Weekly App Patron, there is an Early-Access Recipe (actually, two) called Vintage Eterna that unintentionally has some similarities to Nostalgic Neg., and I invite you to give that a try, too.

Eterna
Dynamic Range: DR200
Highlight: +1
Shadow: -1
Color: +3
Noise Reduction: -4
Sharpness: 0
Clarity: -2
Grain Effect: Weak, Small
Color Chrome Effect: Strong
Color Chrome Effect Blue: Weak
White Balance: Auto, +4 Red & -5 Blue
ISO: Auto, up to ISO 6400
Exposure Compensation: -1/3 to +1/3 (typically)

Example photographs, all camera-made JPEGs using this “Timeless Negative” Film Simulation Recipe on my Fujifilm X100V:

Candle – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X100V
Drab Pink Blossom – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X100V
Rainy Day Lightbulb – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X100V
Joyful Corridor – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X100V
Coffee, Waiting – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X100V
Dear Santa – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X100V
Oh Christmas Tree – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X100V
North Pole Post – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X100V
Saint Nicholas – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X100V
Metalic Pinecone – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X100V
Oleander Evening – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X100V
Downtown Dusk – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X100V
Color Transparencies – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X100V
Night Lights – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X100V
O Tannenbaum – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X100V
Fountain – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X100V
Green Leaf – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X100V
Aslan – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X100V
Upward Abstract – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X100V
Palm Sky Vapor – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X100V
Autumn Gold – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X100V
Transition – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X100V
Bougainvillea & Changing Weather – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X100V
Bougainvillea in Autumn – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X100V

Find this Film Simulation Recipe and over 250 more on the Fuji X Weekly — Film Recipes App!

Help Fuji X Weekly

Nobody pays me to write the content found on fujixweekly.com. There’s a real cost to operating and maintaining this site, not to mention all the time that I pour into it. If you appreciated this article, please consider making a one-time gift contribution. Thank you!

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5 Ways the Fujifilm X-T4 is Better Than the Fujifilm X-T5

The Fujifilm X-T5 is better—at least slightly—than the X-T4 in a many ways, but not every way. Perhaps you have an X-T4 and are considering upgrading to the latest iteration, or maybe you cannot decide between the X-T4 or X-T5—this article will point out some reasons why you might consider the X-T4 over the new model. Don’t get me wrong, I’m not saying that the X-T4 is better, only that in some ways it is indeed better; however, overall, the X-T5 is, in my opinion, the superior camera, but only by a small margin (I’ll have a full review of the new camera soon, so keep an eye out for that). Below are five ways the Fujifilm X-T4 is actually better than the X-T5.

1. Heat Dispersion

There are a few true workhorses in the Fujifilm lineup. These cameras just go and go and go. They’re eager to work and don’t need a break. The X-H1 is probably the best. The X-T4 is not far behind.

I don’t usually have heat issues with Fujifilm cameras in my day-to-day photography, but when I do the monthly SOOC broadcast, I need a camera that will run 4K video for several hours. My X-H1 will do it. The X-T4 will do it, too. But, I found out that the X-T5 will only last for about 45 minutes before overheating. Interestingly enough, I accidentally forgot to turn off the X-T4, and it kept running for 24 hours straight, no overheating! Before you scoff, the camera was plugged into the wall with a faux battery power cord and it was tethered to my computer, so it is, in fact, possible for the camera to run 4K for hours and hours and hours, just so long as it doesn’t power down due to overheating.

After I discovered the X-T4 had been inadvertently running for a whole day, I powered it off and let it rest for 15 minutes, then I used it for a three-and-a-half hour broadcast. It worked like a champ! The X-T5 overheats much too quickly to even be considered for this use. If you will be video broadcasting or recording long clips, the X-T4 is the clear winner. The almost-five-year-old X-H1 is better than the X-T5 in this regard, too. I’m not surprised, because Fujifilm stuffed a high-resolution sensor and quick processor into a small body, and the consequence of that is heat, and there’s just not enough heat dispersion. For most people, this is no big deal at all, but for those videographers who need to record extended-length clips, the X-T5 should be avoided, and the X-T4 is a much better option.

2. Rear Screen

I like the X-T5’s three-way tilt screen better than the flippy screen on the X-T4, but not everyone agrees with me on that. For some, the X-T4’s screen is superior. You can do a lot more with it, and being able to see yourself while recording video of yourself is big plus for some. Personally, what I like best about the X-T4’s screen is that you can close it backwards, and it is sort of like shooting with an X-Pro3 (kinda, but not really)—no other X-T series camera can do that, only the X-T4. You might actually prefer the X-T4’s rear screen over the X-T5. Different strokes for different folks, right?

3. Vertical Battery Grip

I’ve never used a vertical battery grip on any camera ever, but some do use it, either for the extra battery power, the extra grip, or both. Every single camera in this series—including the X-T1—has had an optional vertical battery grip accessory for those who want one, except for the X-T5. In this way, the X-T5 is more like the X-T00 series, and it cheapens the line (not in cost, but in perceived quality). Most people don’t use the vertical battery grip, so for the majority this is no big deal whatsoever, but for some this is a dealbreaker.

4. Body Size

A lot of people (myself included) have applauded the smaller size of the X-T5, but some prefer the bigger X-T4 body. Those with big hands might prefer the grip on the X-T4, and those who frequently shoot with large, heavy lenses might prefer using them attached to the bulkier frame. For me, just doing some testing in preparation for the upcoming X-T5 review, the larger X-T4 body felt better when using the Fujinon 100-400mm lens than the smaller X-T5, but that was simply my experience and my preference. I would suggest that the shooting experience of the X-T4 might be slightly superior if you do use large lenses a lot, but it is a personal preference.

5. Resolution

More is more, right? 40 is better than 26, right? If you crop deeply, print poster, or enjoy pixel-peeping, the higher resolution sensor of the X-T5 is probably for you. Otherwise, the X-T4 has more resolution than most people typically use or need. The disadvantage of more resolution is that it takes up more digital storage space (on your SD cards, phone, computer, external hard drive, and cloud storage), and it can take longer to process or upload files—an extra second here and there doesn’t seem like much, but if you add it up over ten thousand pictures (the course of a year for me), you’re talking about hours that the higher resolution sensor cost you. Sometimes less is more. Personally, I prefer the 26-megapixel resolution of the X-T4 over the X-T5’s 40-megapixels; some of you might even prefer the X-T1’s 16-megapixels.


But, but, but… the X-T5 has the new super-quick autofocus, that finally brings it up to par with Canikony! That alone makes it worthwhile, right? Outside of dim-light situations, I found the X-T1’s eight-year-old autofocus to be plenty quick for me, including for sports and wildlife photography. The X-T4’s autofocus, which is even better, is more than good enough for almost everyone.

It’s not the gear that’s incapable. People have been capturing amazing photographs for 150+ years, and whether for stills or motion pictures, the focus capability of the gear has never stood in the way. People have done so much more with so much less for so many decades. If you looked at photography forums and such lately, you’d wonder how anyone ever managed to capture an in-focus picture prior to the Sony A7 III. We must have imagined it all, because it’s just not possible without the quickest autofocus—and if you don’t have the quickest, you got nothing. That’s how it seems. The focus inability of camera gear is a very recent phenomena. With that said, if a camera offers a tool that makes photography a little easier for you, that’s a good thing. Certainly autofocus in general, and the gradual improvements in autofocus capabilities over the years, have opened up photography for people who don’t have the skill or experience or desire to get the shot otherwise—that’s not a dig, by the way, as I believe opening up photography to those who the door would otherwise be closed to is important. Film Simulation Recipes do that for those who don’t have the skill, time, desire, or access to computer/software to edit RAW files—for me, that’s time and desire; for you, it might be something else—and it has become an important tool for the visually impaired. So, yeah—bravo to better autofocus! But, if you do find the focus capabilities lacking on whatever gear you are using, know that you do have it within you to overcome that issue, and it doesn’t involve buying new gear.

Back to the cameras in question…. In AF-S, I didn’t hardly notice any difference between the X-T4 and the X-T5 (or even the X-T1 and X-T5 in normal light). I think the visual confirmation of focus is a hair quicker, but the actual focus isn’t (I hope that makes sense). The X-T5 recognizes faces a little further away, if that matters. In AF-C, I do think the X-T5 is just a tad better at finding and correctly focusing on the intended subject, but it’s not a night-and-day difference, only a small improvement (but an improvement nonetheless). Where I believe the X-T5 is indeed superior to the X-T4 with regard to autofocus is continuous subject-tracking. The X-T5 can recognize more various subjects to track (not just human face/eye), and does a better job of tracking. So if you do use continuous subject-tracking autofocus, you’ll find the X-T5 to be better than the X-T4; if you don’t, you’ll find the X-T5’s autofocus to be only marginally improved.

This post contains affiliate links, and if you make a purchase using my links I’ll be compensated a small amount for it.

Fujifilm X-T4 in black:  Amazon  B&H
Fujifilm X-T4 in silver:  Amazon  B&H

Fujifilm X-T5 in black:  Amazon  B&H
Fujifilm X-T5 in silver:  Amazon  B&H

What Film Simulation Recipe Was That?

I get asked at least once per week which Film Simulation Recipe was used for a picture in the Fuji X Weekly homepage gallery. It’s my fault for not telling you. I should have made it much more obvious. Maybe I should make posts with galleries (but actually include the recipes used so that you don’t have to wonder)? If you see a particular picture you like, perhaps you’ll be inspired to try that recipe.

Anyway, this article is simply an explanation of which recipe was used for each picture in the homepage gallery. If you’ve ever wondered, now you know. I’ll probably change out some of the images within the next few weeks, so keep an eye out for that.

For those keeping score, seven of the pictures were captured with a Fujifilm X100V, two were captured with a Fujifilm X-E4, and one each were captured with an X-T30, X-Pro2, and X-T200,

Find these Film Simulation Recipes and over 250 more on the Fuji X Weekly — Film Recipes App!

Creative Collective 036: Film Simulation Bracket, Part 2

Classic Chrome
Eterna
Astia

There’s a feature on Fujifilm cameras that I don’t utilize often enough: Film Simulation Bracket. This processes one exposure as three different images, each with a different film simulation applied. You cannot change any other parameters—only the film sim—so you cannot use three different Film Simulation Recipes, only one recipe, but with three film simulations. It would be great if Fujifilm made a Custom Preset Bracket where you could choose three C1-C7 presets to process the exposure with, but that unfortunately doesn’t exist. Another limitation worth noting is that on newer cameras, Film Simulation Bracket disables Clarity, which is a shame.

I already discussed Film Simulation Bracket in a previous Creative Collective article, so I’ll try to take a slightly different approach with this one, and not rehash everything that’s already been said. When is Film Simulation Bracket a useful tool? Read on to find out!

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Kodak Vericolor Warm — Fujifilm X-T5 (X-Trans V) Film Simulation Recipe

Right Around the Bend – Arlington, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5 – “Kodak Vericolor Warm”

I wasn’t sure if I should publish this Film Simulation Recipe, but then I thought, why not? Initially, the intention was simply to see how the Nostalgic Neg. film simulation looks with Dynamic Range set to DR100, and how the X-T5 images look at ISO 125, which is the base-ISO of X-Trans V cameras. I didn’t model these settings after any specific film aesthetic; instead, I borrowed the GAF 500 Film Simulation Recipe‘s white balance (modified just a little after a couple test shots), and was also inspired by Kodak Portra 400 and Reggie’s Portra recipes. I wasn’t sure what to expect from this, but I ended up really liking it!

So what does this Film Simulation Recipe most closely resemble? Unintentionally, I think it has some similarities to Kodak Vericolor film. What’s Kodak Vericolor? Originally introduced in 1971 as an ISO 100 professional color negative film, Kodak made two version of Vericolor: NPS (also known as S-Type) for short exposures (Daylight balanced) and NPL (also known as L-Type) for long exposures (Tungsten balanced). Just a few years later Kodak improved the emulsions and in 1974 introduced Vericolor II NPS and NPL, which was also ISO 100. In 1983 Kodak improved the emulsion once again and introduced Vericolor III, which was ISO 160 for NPS and ISO 100 for NPL; however, the NPL version was later spun off as Ektacolor Pro Gold 100T and later Portra 100T, while Vericolor III NPS was renamed Vericolor III 160. Later (sometime in the late-1980’s, although I couldn’t pinpoint a specific year), Kodak introduced a new high-ISO version called Vericolor III 400. Vericolor III 160 and 400 were replaced by Portra 160 and 400 in 1998. This recipe by chance shares a resemblance to Vericolor III 160 or perhaps Vericolor II NPS, but I think it is more warm, and perhaps more like if an 81A Color Correction Filter was used in conjunction with the film, a common technique in the film era, and maybe a CPL filter, too.

Hanging Garden Light – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5 – “Kodak Vericolor Warm”

This Kodak Vericolor Warm Film Simulation Recipe is only compatible with (as of this writing) the Fujifilm X-T5, X-H2, and X-H2S. I assume that the GFX100S and GFX50S II can also use this recipe, but that it will render slightly different—I don’t have either of those cameras to test it to know for certain. Unless Fujifilm gives X-Trans IV cameras the Nostalgic Neg. film simulation, which I doubt they will do, this recipe is only for X-Trans V cameras, and maybe the latest GFX, too; however, consider the Kodak Portra 160, Kodak Portra 400, and Reggie’s Portra as alternatives for those with X-Trans IV models. This Kodak Vericolor Warm recipe is especially well-suited for daylight photography, but can also be used during “blue hour” and overcast situations.

Film Simulation: Nostalgic Neg.
Grain Effect: Weak, Small
Color Chrome Effect: Strong
Color Chrome FX Blue: Strong
White Balance: 3000K, +8 Red & -9 Blue
Dynamic Range: DR100
Highlight: -2
Shadow: -1
Color: +2
Sharpness: -2

High ISO NR: -4
Clarity: -2
ISO: Auto, up to ISO 6400
Exposure Compensation: 0 to +2/3 (typically)

Example photographs, all camera-made JPEGs using this “Kodak Vericolor Warm” Film Simulation Recipe on my Fujifilm X-T5:

Blue Sky Bougainvillea Blossom – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Rose in the Garden – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Triple Leaves – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Water Pipe – Arlington, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Trioliet – Arlington, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Tired Old Bus – Arlington, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Four Lights – Arlington, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Tractor Pipe – Arlington, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Cattle Co – Arlington, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Industrial Water – Arlington, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Tree on the Bank – Arlington, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Fujifilm Photographer – Arlington, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Roadside Memorial – Arlington, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Feed Barn – Palo Verde, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Metal Garage – Arlington, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Rust & Lock – Arlington, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Ome – Arlington, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
No Loitering on Bridge – Arlington, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Love the Bridge – Arlington, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Goat Man – Arlington, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5

This post contains affiliate links, and if you make a purchase using my links I’ll be compensated a small amount for it.

Fujifilm X-T5 in black:  Amazon  B&H
Fujifilm X-T5 in silver:  Amazon  B&H

Find this Film Simulation Recipe and over 250 more on the Fuji X Weekly — Film Recipes App!

Help Fuji X Weekly

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Superia Xtra 400 — Fujifilm X-T5 (X-Trans V) Film Simulation Recipe

Red & Green Bush – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5 – “Superia Xtra 400”

This is a simple update to the Superia Xtra 400 Film Simulation Recipe, which was originally made for X-Trans IV cameras. I discovered that a slight tweak is needed for X-Trans V models, because the new sensor renders blues just a little deeper on some film simulations, including Classic Negative. For this recipe, simply setting Color Chrome FX Blue from Strong to Weak makes it compatible with (as of this writing) the Fujifilm X-T5, X-H2, and X-H2S.

Thomas Schwab created the Superia Xtra 400 recipe by capturing a roll of actual Superia Xtra 400 film while also capturing identical exposures with his Fujifilm cameras, then, using X RAW Studio, he worked on the settings until he found a match. As you can imagine, he put a lot of time and effort into creating it! He shared with me some of his side-by-side pictures—comparing the film with his recipe—and it was tough to figure out which was which—they looked so close! Also, just recently another photographer shot a roll of Superia Xtra 400 film and used the Superia Xtra 400 recipe on his Fujifilm camera, and he shared with me the similar results he got between the two. Amazing! Of course, with film, so much depends on how it’s shot, developed, and scanned or printed, and the aesthetic of one emulsion can vary significantly.

Lemon Bowl – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5 – “Superia Xtra 400”

Fujifilm introduced Superia Xtra 400, a consumer-grade color negative film, in 1998, replacing Super G Plus 400. This film has been updated a couple of times, first in 2003 and again in 2006. It’s been widely used, thanks to its low cost and versatility. I’ve shot several rolls of this film over the years. This recipe is for Fujifilm X-Trans V cameras. Those with newer GFX models can use it, too, although it will likely render slightly differently.

Film Simulation: Classic Negative
Grain Effect: Strong, Small
Color Chrome Effect: Off
Color Chrome FX Blue: Weak
White Balance: Auto, +3 Red & -5 Blue
Dynamic Range: DR400
Highlight: 0
Shadow: -1
Color: +4
Sharpness: -1

High ISO NR: -4
Clarity: -2
ISO: Auto, up to ISO 6400
Exposure Compensation: 0 to +1 (typically)

Example photographs, all camera-made JPEGs using this “Superia Xtra 400” Film Simulation Recipe on my Fujifilm X-T5:

Forwards or Backwards – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Standing Tall – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Hiding Saguaro – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Don’t Touch – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Neighborhood Fog – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Dark Desert – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Misty Desert – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Clearing Clouds & Desert Mountain – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Ground Fall – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Wet Blossom – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Wet Rosebud – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Early Morning Lamp – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Night Blossoms – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Western Boots – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5

See also:
Fujifilm X-Trans V Film Simulation Recipes
Fujifilm X-Trans IV Film Simulation Recipes

This post contains affiliate links, and if you make a purchase using my links I’ll be compensated a small amount for it.

Fujifilm X-T5 in black:  Amazon  B&H
Fujifilm X-T5 in silver:  Amazon  B&H

Find this Film Simulation Recipe and over 250 more on the Fuji X Weekly — Film Recipes App!

Help Fuji X Weekly

Nobody pays me to write the content found on fujixweekly.com. There’s a real cost to operating and maintaining this site, not to mention all the time that I pour into it. If you appreciated this article, please consider making a one-time gift contribution. Thank you!

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Fujifilm X-Trans III + X-T3 & X-T30 Film Simulation Recipe: Mystery Chrome

Backlit Lightbulbs – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-H1 – “Mystery Chrome”

During this last SOOC broadcast, we attempted something never done before by anyone ever: create a new Film Simulation Recipe live on YouTube (which you can find at the 2:09:19 mark, if you missed the show). It was all done randomly. We spun wheels, used random number apps and programs, picked paper out of a hat, conducted a couple polls, and even had a kid pick a number—this recipe was a group effort created by you using chance. A special Thank You to everyone who participated! This was, of course, for fun. I would say that this is the least serious recipe ever to be published on this website, but that doesn’t mean you can’t use it for serious photography, because you absolutely can!

After completing the recipe, we took up name suggestions from the audience, and then ran a poll to decide which to go with, and “Mystery Chrome” won by a significant margin. The mystery is, perhaps, whether or not this is any good, or if anyone will actually use it—or maybe because it was all a mystery as it was being formed, parameter-by-parameter. We (as in the hosts, the guests, and those in the audience) also programmed this recipe into our cameras right away, and while still broadcasting live, we captured a picture, uploaded it, and shared them in the show (my picture is below). That’s the power of Fujifilm cameras and Film Simulation Recipes: within minutes of creating a recipe, people can program it into their cameras, capture an image, and share it across the globe—it can be that quick. Amazing!

Slides – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-H1 – “Mystery Chrome”

Interestingly, this recipe—completely by luck—has a Kodak-like reversal film look, thanks to Classic Chrome, the white balance, and Highlight/Shadow settings. I think it’s somewhat similar to Kodachrome 200—it’s not quite right for that, but certainly in the ballpark, and probably the closest recipe on this website for that film. This is a high-contrast recipe, and is best for use in low-contrast situations or to achieve bold results in mid or high contrast scenarios. It certainly has the potential to be well-liked, but I don’t suspect it will be anyone’s go-to recipe for everyday photography.

If it were up to me, I would make one modifications to Mystery Chrome: Noise Reduction to -4 instead of +4. I’m not a big fan of the in-camera Noise Reduction, and I like to take it all the way down. For internet viewing, and even 8″ x 12″ prints, you’ll have a hard time even noticing the difference between +4 and -4, but if you zoom in or print larger, it becomes more obvious. Maybe you prefer the increased Noise Reduction; personally, I do not. All of the photos in this article were captured with Noise Reduction set to +4.

Twin Flags – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-H1 – “Mystery Chrome”

This Mystery Chrome Film Simulation Recipe is compatible with all Fujifilm X-Trans III cameras—X-Pro2, X100F, X-E3, X-T2, X-T20, and X-H1—plus the X-T3 and X-T30 by simply setting Color Chrome Effect to Off. For newer X-Trans IV cameras, additionally set Color Chrome FX Blue to Off, Clarity to 0, and choose a Grain size (either Small or Large)—if you use it on X-Trans V cameras, blues will render slightly more deeply. For GFX, shadows will render slightly less dark, which you might actually prefer.

Classic Chrome
Dynamic Range: DR400
Highlight: +3
Shadow: +4
Color: 0

Color Chrome Effect: N/A (X-Trans III) or Off (X-T3/X-T30)
Sharpness: -4
Noise Reduction: +4
Grain: Strong
White Balance: Daylight, +3 Red & -5 Blue
ISO: Auto up to ISO 6400
Exposure Compensation: +1/3 to +2/3 (typically)

Example photographs, all camera-made JPEGs captured using this “Mystery Chrome” Film Simulation Recipe on my Fujifilm X-H1:

Slides Plus Canisters – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-H1
Corvette Abstract – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-H1
Taco Lamp – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-H1
Happy Girl – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-H1
Late Bloomer – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-H1
Rainbow Trumpets – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-H1
Wren in Rome – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-H1
Traffic Flag – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-H1
Pergola Lights – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-H1
Autumn Rainbow – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-H1
Amber Autumn – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-H1
Brilliant Leaf – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-H1
Yellow Tree – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-H1
Bougainvillea & Palm Fronds – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-H1
Contrasty Tree – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-H1
Saguaro Brothers – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-H1
Tall Saguaro – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-H1
Little Cactus – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-H1
Brixton Boy – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-H1
Out of the Shadows – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-H1
Blending In – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-H1

Find this Film Simulation Recipe and over 250 more on the Fuji X Weekly — Film Recipes App!

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Pacific Blues — Fujifilm X-T5 (X-Trans V) Film Simulation Recipe

Up or Down – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5 – “Pacific Blues”

I published the Pacific Blues Film Simulation Recipe just four months ago, and it has already become one of the most popular on Fuji X Weekly. The aesthetic is intended to emulate Lucy Laucht‘s Spirit of Summer series, particularly the Positano Blues photographs. While it is intended for a summer day at the beach, the recipe works great for many different subjects and situations. Foggy mornings? Yes! Dreary overcast? Yep! Desert landscapes? Sure! Garden flowers? Autumn leaves? Dramatic portraits? Absolutely. And lots, lots more. I’ve even seen some really interesting night photographs with it. Try this recipe for many different light scenarios and different subjects—you’re bound to love it!

Pacific Blues was made for X-Trans IV cameras, and I discovered that a slight tweak is needed for X-Trans V models, because the new sensor renders blues just a little deeper on some film simulations. For X-Trans IV recipes that use Classic Negative, Classic Chrome, Eterna, or Eterna Bleach Bypass and calls for Color Chrome FX Blue Strong, you’ll need to adjust it to Weak on X-Trans V; if it calls for Color Chrome FX Blue Weak, you need to adjust it to Off. If it calls for Color Chrome FX Blue Off, well, you just have to know it will render differently on X-Trans V and there’s nothing you can do about it. For Pacific Blues, setting it to Weak instead of Strong makes it compatible with X-Trans V.

Misty Saguaro – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5 – “Pacific Blues”

If you have an X-Pro3, X100V, X-T4, X-S10, X-E4, or X-T30 II, you’ll want to use the original Pacific Blues Film Simulation Recipe. For those with an X-T3 or X-T30, unfortunately Fujifilm never gave your camera the Classic Negative film simulation, so you cannot use Pacific Blues. For those with GFX, if it’s an older model, I think the X-Trans IV version is likely most compatible, and for newer models, this version is likely most compatible; however, I have not tested either version on any GFX model to know for sure. If you have an X-H2, X-H2S, or X-T5 (or any other X-Trans V camera that is released after publication), this is the Pacific Blues recipe that you want to use.

Film Simulation: Classic Negative
Grain Effect: Strong, Large
Color Chrome Effect: Strong
Color Chrome FX Blue: Weak
White Balance: 5800K, +1 Red & -3 Blue
Dynamic Range: DR400
Highlight: -2
Shadow: +3
Color: +4
Sharpness: -2

High ISO NR: -4
Clarity: -3
ISO: Auto, up to ISO 6400
Exposure Compensation: +2/3 to +1 (typically)

Example photographs, all camera-made JPEGs using this “Pacific Blues” Film Simulation Recipe on my Fujifilm X-T5:

Minolta Garden – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Ground Leaves – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Wet Lightbulb – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Flower in the Rain – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Wet Red Rosebud – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Wet Red Bougainvillea – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Afternoon Bougainvillea – Bcukeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Illuminated Branch – Buckeye, AZ Fujifilm X-T5
Spiderwebs – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Desert Cactus – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Misty Morning Desert – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Foggy Tree – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Neighborhood Fog – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Autumn Walkway – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Lifting Clouds Over Veiled Ridge – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5

See also:
Fujifilm X-Trans V Film Simulation Recipes
Fujifilm X-Trans IV Film Simulation Recipes

This post contains affiliate links, and if you make a purchase using my links I’ll be compensated a small amount for it.

Fujifilm X-T5 in black:  Amazon  B&H
Fujifilm X-T5 in silver:  Amazon  B&H

Find this Film Simulation Recipe and over 250 more on the Fuji X Weekly — Film Recipes App!

Help Fuji X Weekly

Nobody pays me to write the content found on fujixweekly.com. There’s a real cost to operating and maintaining this site, not to mention all the time that I pour into it. If you appreciated this article, please consider making a one-time gift contribution. Thank you!

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