Fujifilm X-T2 Vertical Power Grip Bundle Deal

 

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I pointed out last week that Fujifilm has some great deals when you bundle one of three f/2 prime lenses with the upcoming Fujifilm X-T30. There is a great deal being offered on the Fujifilm X-T2 that’s worth pointing out.

You can already get the X-T2 for an incredible price ($1,100 for the body or $1,500 with an 18-55mm lens), but if you bundle the X-T2 body with a vertical power grip, it’s only $1,100, and if you bundle the X-T2 with an 18-55mm lens with a vertical power grip, it’s only $1,500, which is about a $300 savings on top of what’s already a great deal. In other words, if you bundle the X-T2, body only or with the the 18-55mm lens, with the vertical power grip, you get the power grip for free! That’s incredible!

The Fujifilm X-H1 (body only) with a vertical power grip is also a great deal right now, coming in at just $1,300.

Antelope Island State Park In B&W

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Brush Strokes Over The Great Salt Lake – Antelope Island SP, UT – Fujifilm X-T20

The Great Salt Lake is the largest natural lake west of the Mississippi River, the largest salt water lake in the western hemisphere and the 33rd largest lake in the world. It’s massive! It can seem almost ocean-like, or perhaps more like a large ocean bay, but it is located far from any ocean. One difference between the Great Salt Lake and an ocean is that the lake is much saltier, and brine shrimp are the only thing alive in it. It is one of Utah’s natural wonders!

The largest island in the Great Salt Lake is Antelope Island, which is 15 miles long and five miles wide. The highest point, Frary Peak, is 6,594′, and is often snow-capped in the winter. It’s accessible by road via a causeway. Antelope Island is managed by the Utah State Park system.

Kit Carson and John C. Fremont, who visited Antelope Island in 1845, gave it its name after hunting pronghorn antelope on the island. Daddy Stump and Fielding Garr would build homes on Antelope Island over the next few years. This is a place that people have been coming to for a long time. In fact, there is evidence that native people have spent time on the island since at least the time of Christ.

Antelope Island seems like a world away from the Salt Lake City metro area, even though it is located very close to the city. It looks remote, and it must have been very remote before the road was built and the city grew. Interestingly enough, the oldest non-Native American structure in Utah is located on the island: an adobe ranch house built in 1848. The Fielding Garr Ranch was a working ranch from 1848 to 1981, and now the old ranch is open to the public for self-guided tours.

Wildlife abounds on Antelope Island, including buffalo, mule deer, pronghorn antelope, big horn sheep and many other animals. At one time the bison herd on Antelope Island was the largest in America. There are a huge variety of birds that migrate across the area.

The water is often calm and the reflections can be incredible. There are sandy beaches. There are trails that curve across the rugged landscape. There is a unique beauty to Antelope Island that draws me back. It’s one of my favorite places to photograph. But it’s also disgusting! There’s a certain “rotten egg” smell that can be found near the shores. There are tons and tons of bugs, including biting no-see-ums, brine flies (that cover the shore like a thick cloud), mosquitoes, tons of spiders (venomous and non-venomous), among other things. It’s pretty common to see dead birds. There’s plenty to love and hate about this place. I try to look beyond the gross to see the beauty.

Something interesting that I’ve discovered since moving to the Salt Lake City area almost three years ago is that most people who grew up in Utah don’t visit Antelope Island. Maybe they went on a school field trip as a kid, but they haven’t been back since. The majority of people you find on the island are from out-of-town. The locals who do visit are often those that moved to the area from someplace else. It’s too bad for those who don’t make the short trip to the island, because they’re really missing out!

Antelope Island is incredibly beautiful and tranquil. It is indeed odd, and one has to purposefully look beyond the negative aspects of the place to truly appreciate it. I feel like it is a secret treasure that is easily overlooked, and I feel honored to have found it and photographed it.

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Frary Fence – Antelope Island SP, UT – Fujifilm X-T20

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Coming Storm – Antelope Island SP, UT – Fujifilm X-A3

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Island Beach View – Antelope Island SP, UT – Fujifilm X100F

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White Rock Bay Vista – Antelope Island SP, UT – Fujifilm X-A3

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Bush In The Crag – Antelope Island SP, UT – Fujifilm X-A3

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Clouds Over The Great Salt Lake – Antelope Island SP, UT – Fujifilm X100F

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White Rock Bay – Antelope Island SP, UT – Fujifilm X100F

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Land & Lake Layers – Antelope Island SP, UT – Fujifilm X-T20

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Promontory Peninsula – Antelope Island SP, UT – Fujifilm X-T20

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Sunlight Falling On The Salty Water – Antelope Island SP, UT – Fujifilm X-T20

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Light Streaming Over Antelope Island – Antelope Island SP, UT – Fujifilm X-E1

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Wasatch Mountains From The Causeway – Antelope Island SP, UT – Fujifilm X-E1

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Frary Peak Reflected – Antelope Island SP, UT – Fujifilm X-E1

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Deer Statue – Antelope Island SP, UT – Fujifilm X-E1

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Old Salty Stump – Antelope Island SP, UT – Fujifilm X-E1

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Frozen Stump – Antelope Island SP, UT – Fujifilm X-T20

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Ice, Lake & Mountains – Antelope Island SP, UT – Fujifilm X-E1

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Cracked Earth – Antelope Island SP, UT – Fujifilm X100F

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Buffalo Snow – Antelope Island SP, UT – Fujifilm X-T20

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Bison In The Road – Antelope Island SP, UT – Fujifilm X-E1

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Area Closed For Bison – Antelope Island SP, UT – Fujifilm X-E1

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One Buffalo – Antelope Island SP, UT – Fujifilm X-A3

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Pulling Hard – Antelope Island SP, UT – Fujifilm X100F

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Park Patrol – Antelope Island SP, UT – Fujifilm X100F

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On The Fence – Antelope Island SP, UT – Fujifilm X100F

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State Park Workday – Antelope Island SP, UT – Fujifilm X100F

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Waiting Game – Antelope Island SP, UT – Fujifilm X100F

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Leather Gloves – Antelope Island SP, UT – Fujifilm X100F

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Circle Hashtag – Antelope Island SP, UT – Fujifilm X-E1

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Fielding Garr Ranch Fence – Antelope Island SP, UT – Fujifilm X-E1

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Empty Marina – Antelope Island SP, UT – Fujifilm X-E1

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Boys Playing In The Great Salt Lake – Antelope Island SP, UT – Fujifilm X-E1

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Pollution – Antelope Island SP, UT – Fujifilm X-T20

Weekly Photo Project, Week 28

Another week in the books! This was a particularly photographically productive week. Not every day was especially productive, obviously, but on several days I created a number of good images. You’ve seen some of them already, and others will be shared in the coming weeks in various articles.

Sunday, February 10, 2019

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Colorful Chalk – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T20

Monday, February 11, 2019

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Evening Mountain Snow – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T20

Tuesday, February 12, 2019

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Coca-Cola Cans – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T20

Wednesday, February 13, 2019

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Morning Egg Bowl – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T20

Thursday, February 14, 2019

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Classic Camera – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T20

Friday, February 15, 2019

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Dramatic Clouds Over The Winter Mountain – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T20

Saturday, February 16, 2019

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Brush Strokes Over The Great Salt Lake – Antelope Island SP, UT – Fujifilm X-T20

Week 27  Week 29

Deal: Incredible Fujifilm X-T30 Pre-Order Bundles

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I don’t know if you saw these deals on the upcoming Fujifilm X-T30 camera, but I wanted to point them out to you in case you missed them. The body is $900, and you can bundle it with the kit 15-45mm lens for $100 more. But right now, if you pre-order, there are some intriguing prime-lens bundle options available. Instead of a cheap zoom, you could get the X-T30 with the 35mm f/2 for $1,000. Essentially, you get a $400 lens for only $100! You could also get the X-T30 bundled with the 23mm f/2 or the 50mm f/2 for $1,050, which means you are getting a $450 lens for only $150. These are great deals!

Fujifilm X-T30 Black with 35mm f/2 $1,000
Fujifilm X-T30 Silver with 35mm f/2 $1,000
Fujifilm X-T30 Charcoal with 35mm f/2 $1,000
Fujifilm X-T30 Black with 50mm f/2 $1,050
Fujifilm X-T30 Silver with 50mm f/2 $1,050
Fujifilm X-T30 Charcoal with 50mm f/2 $1,050
Fujifilm X-T30 Black with 23mm f/2 $1,050
Fujifilm X-T30 Silver with 23mm f/2 $1,050
Fujifilm X-T30 Charcoal with 23mm f/2 $1,050

If you’ve been considering the X-T30, and perhaps you have no interest in any of these lenses, you could potentially get the bundle deal and sell the lens, and use the profit from the lens sale to make the camera body cost less. In fact, if you go that route, you might be able to get the X-T30 for less than what the X-T20 is currently going for!

I don’t know how long these X-T30 bundle discounts will last. It’s a great bargain if you have been thinking about getting the new camera. If you use my links to buy it, I will get a small payment from Amazon, and you’ll help to support this website. Nobody pays me to write the content that you find on this blog. If you were already going to order this camera through Amazon, I would appreciate it if you used my links to do so. Thank you so much!

Guest Post: Japan Street Photography by Michael Lynn

Photo by Michael Lynn

My name is Michael Lynn and I live in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma. The only camera I use is my Fujifilm X100F, which I love! It makes street and travel photography more interesting. I prefer RAW because that’s how I learned. I shoot mostly with an aperture of f/8 or f/11, with the shutter usually 1/125 or faster, and the ISO set manually. I never use a flash.

About a month ago I had the opportunity to travel to Japan. I visited Tokyo and Kyoto, which is where I captured these photographs. To see more, please visit my website.

Photo by Michael Lynn

Photo by Michael Lynn

Photo by Michael Lynn

Phot by Michael Lynn

Thank you, Michael, for sharing!

What Separates Great Photographers From Good Photographers?

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Brush Strokes Over The Great Salt Lake – Antelope Island SP, UT – Fujifilm X-T20

The question of what separates great photographers from good photographers is something that I’ve been turning in my mind for several weeks. I don’t know if I found any profound answers, but I did come up with several generalizations that I think give some clarity to the question. I know that these won’t be true all of the time, but there is truth in these statements.

  • Great photographers show fewer photographs. Sometimes perception is reality.
  • Great photographers are better at promoting their work. Branding cannot be understated.
  • Great photographers return to the same location, subject or concept over and over and over again, trying to create a better picture.
  • Great photographers worry about emotion and storytelling, not rules.
  • Great photographers have boat loads of patience to get a particular picture.
  • Great photographers create their own luck by placing themselves in the right places at the right times.
  • Great photographers do a lot of planning. Research is critical, especially if it’s an unfamiliar place or subject.
  • Great photographers constantly work at their craft. Practice, practice, practice. Try new techniques and perfect the old ones. Know their gear intimately.
  • Great photographers have a meaning to their madness. They are very deliberate.

I don’t want to go too deeply into what defines a “great” photographer. I would say that a great photographer is one who creates amazing pictures and is successful, whatever that means. My definition (which, by the way, is not something that I hold strictly onto) and your definition might be completely different. That’s perfectly alright. I think, no matter what the definition is, the generalized thoughts above will still apply, at least in part. If you want to go from being a good photographer to being a great photographer, these are things that you should strongly consider how to apply to yourself and your own photography. I’m trying to figure out how to incorporate those concepts into my own photographic ventures.

Weekly Photo Project, Week 27

After a short intermission, I’m back on track with my photo-a-day challenge, where I’m trying to capture at least one picture each day for a year, taking things one week at a time. I’ve shifted my week slightly, going Sunday through Saturday instead of Monday through Sunday. In 2018, starting out on Monday made sense with the flow of my week, but things have changed slightly this year, and so starting out on Sunday works well with how things are now.

You might notice that I have two different themes this week: monochrome and location. All of these pictures are black-and-white and they were all captured at or very near my home. You don’t have to go far to find interesting things to photograph. Sometimes you don’t even need to leave your home. Look for what’s right around you, wherever you happen to be. I chose monochrome simply because I had captured a number of black-and-white pictures this week, and decided to keep things consistent. I hope you enjoy!

Sunday, February 3, 2019

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Cold Mountain Monochrome – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T20

Monday, February 4, 2019

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Snow Falling On The Ridge – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T20

Tuesday, February 5, 2019

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Wood Gate – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm XF10

Wednesday, February 6, 2019

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Pentax 35mm Film Camera – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm XF10

Thursday, February 7, 2019

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February Storm Over Wasatch Mountains – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T20

Friday, February 8, 2019

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Illuminated Decor – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm XF10

Saturday, February 9, 2019

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Winter Ridges – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T20

Week 26  Week 28

Fujifilm X-T30 Now Available For Pre-Order

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Fujifilm announced the upcoming X-T30 yesterday, and today it’s officially available for pre-order. It won’t ship until March 20 (and not until June 30 for the charcoal grey version), but, if you don’t pre-order, it might be out of stock until sometime in April or even May if it sells really well. If you aren’t sure whether to buy the X-T30 or X-T20, I wrote an article that might help, explaining some reasons to choose one over the other.

If you want to pre-order the X-T30 through Amazon, here are the links:

Fujifilm X-T30 Body-Only Black $900
Fujifilm X-T30 Body-Only Silver $900
Fujifilm X-T30 Black with 15-45mm lens $1,000
Fujifilm X-T30 Silver with 15-45mm lens $1,000
Fujifilm X-T30 Charcoal with 15-45mm lens $1,000
Fujifilm X-T30 Black with 18-55mm lens $1,300
Fujifilm X-T30 Silver with 18-55mm lens $1,300
Fujifilm X-T30 Charcoal with 18-55mm lens $1,300
Fujifilm X-T30 Black with 15-45mm + 50mm f/2 $1,150 (save $300)
Fujifilm X-T30 Silver with 15-45mm + 50mm f/2 $1,450 (save $300)
Fujifilm X-T30 Charcoal with 18-55mm + 50mm f/2 $1,150 (save $600)
Fujifilm X-T30 Black with 50mm f/2 $1,050
Fujifilm X-T30 Silver with 50mm f/2 $1,050
Fujifilm X-T30 Charcoal with 50mm f/2 $1,050
Fujifilm X-T30 Black with 35mm f/2 $1,000
Fujifilm X-T30 Silver with 35mm f/2 $1,000
Fujifilm X-T30 Charcoal with 35mm f/2 $1,000
Fujifilm X-T30 Black with 23mm f/2 $1,050
Fujifilm X-T30 Silver with 23mm f/2 $1,050
Fujifilm X-T30 Charcoal with 23mm f/2 $1,050

Also, Fujifilm announced the XF 16mm f/2.8 R WR lens, which will also be released on March 20, for $400.

I am an Amazon Affiliate partner, and I receive a small payment if you use my links to order an item. Nobody pays me to write the articles that you find on this blog. One way to help support this website is to use my Amazon links to order things. If you were already planning to order this camera through Amazon, it would be much appreciated if you used the links above to do so. If not, please feel zero pressure from me to order anything. Thanks so much!

5 Reasons To Choose The Fujifilm X-T30 & 5 Reasons To Choose The Fujifilm X-T20

Fujifilm just announced the upcoming X-T30. It’s expected to be released in late-March for $900 for the camera body. This camera replaces the X-T20, which was my top recommended Fuji camera. What’s new? What’s improved? Which should you buy? I will attempt to answer those questions by listing five reasons to choose each one. Only you can decide if either of these cameras are right for you, but hopefully I can help add some clarity to your decision.

5 Reasons To Choose The Fujifilm X-T30:

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#5 – Joystick

Fujifilm chose to replace the D-Pad that’s found on the X-T20 with a joystick and touch-screen controls. This is the same setup that’s on the X-E3 and other Fujifilm cameras. If you like the focus joystick, the X-T30 has it and the X-T20 doesn’t.

#4 – Charcoal Grey

Besides all-black and silver-and-black, Fujifilm has made a third color option for the X-T30 camera body: grey-and-black. I’m on the fence if I love it or hate it, but if you love it, it’s available on the X-T30.

#3 – New JPEG Features

The X-T30 has a few new features not available on the X-T20, including Color Chrome effect, Eterna film simulation, and color toning of Acros. If you shoot JPEG, these are nice options that Fujifilm has included to help you achieve your desired look in-camera.

#2 – Improved Auto-Focus

The X-T30 has the new X-Trans IV sensor and processor, which produces less heat that in turn allows for quicker operations. The X-T30 is a faster camera than the X-T20, and it’s most prevalent in the improved auto-focus. If you shoot fast moving subjects, the X-T30 will be the better choice.

#1 – Impressive Video

Perhaps the biggest improvements found on the X-T30 are with regards to video. Things like DCI 4K 30fps, H.264 4:2:2 10-bit external, and F-Log make this a better option for video than the X-T20. It’s not quite as good as the X-T3, which is to be expected, but it’s definitely a step up from the camera it is replacing. No doubt, the X-T30 could be used for serious videography.

5 Reasons To Choose The Fujifilm X-T20:

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#5 – D-Pad

While some people might prefer the joystick on the X-T30, others will prefer the D-Pad on the X-T20. If that’s you, you might appreciate the X-T20 more. Want both the joystick and D-Pad? You’ll have to get an X-T3 or other high-end model.

#4 – It’s Essentially the Same Camera

Aside from some small changes and improvements, the X-T20 and X-T30 are not much different from each other. The X-T20 has a good auto-focus system and decent video capabilities, and if you don’t need them to be better, there’s not a big advantage to owning the new camera.

#3 – You Have Another X-Trans III Camera

Although still image quality is nearly identical between X-Trans III and X-Trans IV sensors, there are still some very minor differences that might require processing exposures slightly different. If you already have a different X-Trans III camera (say, and X-T2, X-Pro2 or X100F) you might want to choose the X-T20 just to keep post-processing the same.

#2 – X-T20 is Cheaper

While the MSRP is the same between the X-T20 and X-T30, the X-T20 has been discounted for several months now. In fact, at Amazon, the X-T20 is currently $700 for the body and $1,000 bundled with the 18-55mm f/2.8-4 lens. That’s $200 cheaper for what is 95% the same exact camera. With the imminent release of the X-T30, the X-T20 might see even bigger discounts in the coming weeks.

#1 – You Can Buy the X-T20 Now

The X-T30 won’t be released until late-March. It’s not even available yet for pre-order (although it should be soon), and if you don’t pre-order you won’t likely get your hands on one until sometime in April, and, depending on how popular it is, maybe not even until May. The X-T20 is in-stock and could be in your hands within a couple of days.

Fujifilm Provia Film Simulation Settings – Or, My Agfa Optima 200 Recipe

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Colorful Chalk – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T20 “Agfa Optima”

With the start of the new year I decided that I wanted to rethink my Fujifilm film simulation settings and make new recipes with each option. I wanted to start with Provia, not only because it’s the “standard” option on Fujifilm X cameras, but also because I’ve been asked many times to create a film simulation recipe that uses Provia as the base. I do have a film simulation recipe that uses Provia, but it’s definitely not for everyone. This one could actually be someone’s standard recipe on their camera.

I’ve never been a fan of the Provia film simulation on Fujifilm X cameras, partly because the film simulation looks very little like the film that it derives its name from. Curiously, Provia film actually more closely resembles the Astia film simulation and Astia film more closely resembles the Provia film simulation (although neither are close to being an exact match). I don’t think Fujifilm ever considered making the Provia film simulation resemble the film that it was named after or really any film, they just wanted to use the trademark name for their standard setting. The Provia film simulation is designed to give generally pleasing results to the masses. Some people love it, but I personally find it to be the least interesting of the color options available.

While I never intended to mimic the look of any specific film with this recipe, I think that it fairly closely resembles Agfa Optima 200. If you are looking for an Agfa Optima recipe, look no further! Agfa made many different films over the years. They were never as big as Kodak or Fujifilm, but they weren’t that far behind, either. Agfa Optima 200 was a color negative film that was introduced in 1996, replacing AgfaColor XRS 200, and was discontinued in 2005. I never used this film myself, but I have seen it in person and on the internet plenty of times, so I have a good idea of what it looks like. Even though I didn’t intend to recreate the look of a film with this recipe, the fact that it happens to resembles one is a very happy accident. Sometimes it’s better to be lucky than good.

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Morning Egg Bowl – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T20 “Agfa Optima”

I’ve found that this particular film simulation recipe looks best when using an ISO between 1600 and 3200. That’s not to say that you shouldn’t use a lower or higher ISO, because I certainly do, but for some reason that ISO range seems to produce the most pleasing result. I have flirted with the idea setting the ISO range to be between 1600 and 3200, but I have yet to do that. This recipe says to set ISO to Auto up to ISO 6400, but please don’t feel like you have to set it to that just because that’s what settings I typed out. As always, choose what works best for you and your photography.

Provia
Dynamic Range: DR100
Highlight: -2
Shadow: +2
Color: -2
Noise Reduction: -3
Sharpening: 0
Grain Effect: Weak
White Balance: Auto, -1 Red & -1 Blue
ISO: Auto up to ISO 6400
Exposure Compensation: +2/3 to +1 (typically)

Example photographs, all straight-out-of-camera JPEGs made using this Provia film simulation recipe:

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Coca-Cola Cans – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T20 “Agfa Optima”

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Bolsey 35 Model B – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T20 “Agfa Optima”

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Mercantile Coffee Cup – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T20 “Agfa Optima”

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Durable Nonstick Pot – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T20 “Agfa Optima”

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Oil Pastels – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T20 “Agfa Optima”

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Table Curve – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T20 “Agfa Optima”

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Window Grass – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T20 “Agfa Optima”

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Indoor Decor – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T20 “Agfa Optima”

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Blinded – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T20 “Agfa Optima”

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Shrub In The Snow – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T20 “Agfa Optima”

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Waiting For Warmer Weather – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T20 “Agfa Optima”

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For Everything There Is A Season – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T20 “Agfa Optima”

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Fading Light On The Ridge – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T20 “Agfa Optima”