Fujifilm X100V New Feature: Color Chrome Effect Blue

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The Fujifilm X100V, X-Pro3 and X-T4 have a new feature called Color Chrome Effect Blue. This is very similar to a different feature, which has a nearly identical name, that’s also found on X-Trans IV cameras, such as my X-T30, called Color Chrome Effect. What does Color Chrome Effect Blue do to photographs? How is it different than Color Chrome Effect? Those are questions that I hope to answer in this article.

The original Color Chrome Effect takes vibrant colors (mostly reds, but also yellows and greens to a lessor extent) and deepens their tones to retain color gradation. Fujifilm says that a short-lived color slide film called Fortia inspired this setting. Color Chrome Effect Blue is essentially the same, but for blue. It makes blues in the picture a deeper shade. It’s a lot like using a polarizing filter. You have three options: Off, Weak and Strong.

Let’s take a look at the pictures below:

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Color Chrome Effect Blue Off

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Color Chrome Effect Blue Weak

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Color Chrome Effect Blue Strong

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Color Chrome Effect Blue Strong & Color Chrome Effect Weak

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Color Chrome Effect Blue Strong & Color Chrome Effect Strong

Color Chrome Effect Blue noticeably darkens the blue sky. There’s a difference between Off and Weak and Strong that’s not too hard to spot. I added Color Chrome Effect to the bottom two images, and it doesn’t affect the sky—it barely affects the warm building; it’s so subtle that it’s hard to tell the difference even upon close inspection. I believe that Color Chrome Effect Blue makes more of a difference in an image than Color Chrome Effect, but they manipulate different colors, so they have different purposes. Disappointingly, Color Chrome Effect Blue doesn’t seem to change black-and-white images much at all.

For color images where you want blues to be rendered deeper, such as blue sky, Color Chrome Effect Blue is great! It’s like using a polarizing filter. If you want reds to be rendered deeper, use the original Color Chrome Effect. I hope this helps explain what the new Color Chrome Effect Blue feature is, how it’s different than Color Chrome Effect, and when to use it.

See also:
Clarity
B&W Toning
HDR

Fujifilm X100V Film Simulation Recipe: Fujicolor Superia 1600

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Red Rose – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V – “Fujicolor Superia 1600”

For some of you, this new Fujicolor Superia 1600 film simulation recipe will be your favorite! It is so good! It’s very analog-esque, and does a great job of mimicking the film in a number of circumstances. If you love my Fujicolor Superia 100 and my Fujicolor Reala 100 recipes, you’re bound to love this one, too!

For high-ISO color photography, Superia 1600 film was your best bet if you needed to go faster than ISO 800. It has higher contrast and lower saturation than other Superia films, and is also more grainy, but with a very nice look. There are people who use Superia 1600 just for its aesthetic. Fujifilm discontinued Superia 1600 in 2016, but supposedly Fujicolor Natura 1600 and Press 1600 are the same film, just sold to different markets.

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Sephora – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V – “Fujicolor Superia 1600”

I didn’t include a “typical” exposure compensation with this recipe because you can get some very interesting looks by underexposing and (especially) overexposing—don’t be afraid to try -1 all the way to +2! This recipe is only compatible with the Fujifilm X100V, X-Pro3 and X-T4 (hopefully someday the X-T3 and X-T30, too—Fujifilm, please!).

Classic Negative
Dynamic Range: DR400
Highlight: 0
Shadow: +2
Color: -3
Noise Reduction: -4
Sharpening: -1
Clarity: -4
Grain Effect: Strong, Large
Color Chrome Effect: Strong
Color Chrome Effect Blue: Strong
White Balance: Daylight, +3 Red & +1 Blue
ISO: 1600 to 6400

Example photographs, all camera-made JPEGs using this Fujicolor Superia 1600 film simulation recipe on my Fujifilm X100V:

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Electric Sunset – Kaysville, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Evening Overlook – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Sunlight Tree – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Country Fence – Kaysville, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Rose Bush Shadow – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Red Rose Bush – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Yellow Flower – South Ogden, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Not Yet Blackberries – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Backyard Girl – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Evening Light Tunnel – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Building in Evening Light – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Head On Illusion – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Walking Reflection – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Indoor/Outdoor Restaurant – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Carbonaro – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Vegetables – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Dessert – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Willards – Layton, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Thank You For You Patronage – South Ogden, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Wall Pipes – South Ogden, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Closed Gas Station Store – South Ogden, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Abandoned Drive Thru Window – South Ogden, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Abandoned Gas Station Overhang – South Ogden, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Light at the Top – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Blue in the Middle – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Moon Above – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Suburban Sunstar – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Bike 48 – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Sunstar in the City – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Strength and Endurance – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

See also: Film Simulation Recipes

This post contains affiliate links, and if you make a purchase using my links I’ll be compensated a small amount for it.

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Fujifilm X100F Review Blog

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New Video: Fuji Film Simulation – Fujicolor Superia 100

I published a new video on the Fuji X Weekly YouTube Channel! This one showcases my Fujicolor Superia 100 film simulation on my Fujifilm X100V while at a local amusement park. I think it turned out pretty well, and it’s worth your time to watch. My wife, Amanda, shot all the footage and did all of the editing. I captured all of the photographs and did the narration. Check it out! Let me know what you think of it.

Fujifilm X-T20 (X-Trans III) Film Simulation Recipe: Cine Teal

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Garden Flowers Bloomed – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T20 – “Cine Teal”

My Fujifilm X100V “Cine Teal” film simulation recipe has been a lot more popular than I expected it to be. It requires the Eterna film simulation, plus some other settings only found on the newest Fujifilm models. I’ve been asked by a few people to create a “Cine Teal” recipe for X-Trans III cameras, which don’t have that film simulation and those new options, so I did! This recipe woks best during the “Blue Hour” of dusk and dawn, in shade and on overcast days.

PRO Neg. Std
Dynamic Range: DR400
Highlight: -1
Shadow: +3
Color: -3
Noise Reduction: -3
Sharpening: -1
Grain Effect: Weak
White Balance: 4500K, +2 Red & -8 Blue
ISO: Auto up to ISO 6400
Exposure Compensation: +2/3 to +1 (typically)

Example photos, all straight-out-of-camera JPEGs captured on a Fujifilm X-T20 using this “Cine Teal” Film Simulation recipe:

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Upside-Down Umbrella – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T20

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Green Tree & House – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T20

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Been Better – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T20

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Spring Leaves – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T20

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Tree Leaves Green – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T20

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Lavender Bloom – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T20

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Pine & Rock – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T20

These settings also work on the Fujifilm X-T30 and X-T3, just set Color Chrome Effect to Off. I captured the photographs below on my X-T30 using this “Cine Teal” film simulation recipe:

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Hazy Light Through The Tree – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Mountain Pines – Francis Peak, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Mountain Ridge – Francis Peak, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Mountain Radar – Francis Peak, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Dusting Snow & Clouds – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Clouds Around The Mountains – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Spirit of Photography – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Stairs & Reflection – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Morning Light & Shadows – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Film – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

See also: Film Simulation Recipes

Fujifilm X100F Review Blog

Help Fuji X Weekly

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Antelope Island State Park – Two Cameras, Two Photographers

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Rainbow over Antelope Island. Photo by Ritchie Roesch with a Fujifilm X100V.

One of my favorite places in northern Utah is Antelope Island State Park. It’s such a strange land! Antelope Island, which sits in the Great Salt Lake, seems like a world away from the Salt Lake City metro area, even though it is located very close to the city. Wildlife abounds, including buffalo, mule deer, pronghorn antelope, big horn sheep and many other animals. At one time the bison herd on Antelope Island was the largest in America. There are a huge variety of birds that migrate across the area. The water is often calm, and the reflections can be incredible. There are sandy beaches. There are trails that curve across the rugged landscape. There is a unique beauty to Antelope Island that draws me back. It’s one of my favorite places to photograph!

Antelope Island is also disgusting! There’s a certain “rotten egg” smell that can be found near the shores. There are tons and tons of bugs, including biting no-see-ums, brine flies (that cover the shore like a thick cloud), mosquitoes, tons of spiders (venomous and non-venomous), among other things. It’s pretty common to see dead birds. There’s plenty to love and hate about this place. I try to look beyond the gross to see the beauty. It is indeed an odd place, and one has to purposefully look beyond the negative aspects to truly appreciate it. I feel like it is a secret treasure that is easily overlooked.

My wife, Amanda, and I visited Antelope Island earlier this week. I brought my Fujifilm X100V, while she had her X-T20 with a Fujinon 10-24mm f/4 lens attached to it. For my pictures, I used my Kodak Tri-X 400 film simulation recipe for black-and-white and my Fujicolor Reala 100 film simulation recipe for color. I reprocessed in-camera a couple of the rainbow pictures using Velvia. Amanda had PRO Neg. Hi loaded into her camera, but she reprocessed most of her pictures using either Acros or Velvia.

Even though we used different cameras with different generation sensors, I thought that our pictures worked well together. I wanted to share them with you as a set. I found it interesting that for some images our vision was nearly identical, and for others we captured our pictures differently. Amanda did a great job, and it was a fun experience to go out and photograph with her. Antelope Island once again proved to be a great location for photography. Enjoy!

B&W

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Photo by Amanda Roesch with a Fujifilm X-T20 and 10-24mm.

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Photo by Amanda Roesch with a Fujifilm X-T20 and 10-24mm.

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Photo by Ritchie Roesch with a Fujifilm X100V.

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Photo by Ritchie Roesch with a Fujifilm X100V.

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Photo by Amanda Roesch with a Fujifilm X-T20 and 10-24mm.

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Photo by Ritchie Roesch with a Fujifilm X100V.

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Photo by Ritchie Roesch with a Fujifilm X100V.

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Photo by Ritchie Roesch with a Fujifilm X100V.

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Photo by Ritchie Roesch with a Fujifilm X100V.

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Photo by Ritchie Roesch with a Fujifilm X100V.

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Photo by Ritchie Roesch with a Fujifilm X100V.

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Photo by Amanda Roesch with a Fujifilm X-T20 and 10-24mm.

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Photo by Ritchie Roesch with a Fujifilm X100V.

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Photo by Ritchie Roesch with a Fujifilm X100V.

Color

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Photo by Amanda Roesch with a Fujifilm X-T20 and 10-24mm.

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Photo by Ritchie Roesch with a Fujifilm X100V.

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Photo by Ritchie Roesch with a Fujifilm X100V.

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Photo by Ritchie Roesch with a Fujifilm X100V.

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Photo by Amanda Roesch with a Fujifilm X-T20 and 10-24mm.

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Photo by Ritchie Roesch with a Fujifilm X100V.

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Photo by Ritchie Roesch with a Fujifilm X100V.

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Photo by Ritchie Roesch with a Fujifilm X100V.

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Photo by Amanda Roesch with a Fujifilm X-T20 and 10-24mm.

This post contains affiliate links, and if you make a purchase using my links I’ll be compensated a small amount for it.

Fujifilm X100V Black    Amazon   B&H
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Fujifilm X-T20   Amazon   B&H
Fujinon 10-24mm f/4   Amazon   B&H

Fujifilm X100V Film Simulation Recipe: Fujicolor Reala 100

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Amusement Poles – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V – “Fujicolor Reala 100”

Fujicolor Reala 100 was Fujifilm’s first Superia film, even though initially it did not have Superia in the name. Superia films shared Fuji’s “4th layer technology” and Reala was the first to have it, but Reala was marketed towards “pro” photographers while Superia was marketed towards “consumer” photographers. Eventually Fujifilm added Superia to Reala’s name. There were several different versions of Reala manufactured, including a high-ISO Tungsten one made for motion pictures, but Reala 100 was the most popular.

The Classic Negative film simulation is “modeled after” Superia with “Superia-like” colors, so it’s the best starting point for a Reala recipe. Reala 100 was very similar to Superia 100, but Superia 100 was intended for “general purpose” photography while Reala 100 was intended for portrait photography (interestingly, my wedding photos were shot on Reala). Colors are rendered a little differently between the two films, especially blue, which is deeper and more saturated on Reala, despite Reala being overall slightly less saturated than Superia 100. You’ll find that this recipe and my Fujicolor Superia 100 recipe replicate these differences quite nicely. Reala film was discontinued in 2013.

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Tunnel & Fountain – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V – “Fujicolor Reala 100”

This Fujicolor Reala 100 film simulation recipe is a great all-around option. It looks good under many circumstances. The aesthetic of this recipe is very close to my Superia 100 recipe, and I’m not sure which one I like better. This one is better for stronger blues, and the other is better for stronger reds, but they’re not far apart from each other. Unfortunately, as of this writing, this Reala recipe is only compatible with the Fujifilm X100V, X-Pro3 and X-T4 cameras.

Classic Negative
Dynamic Range: DR400
Highlight: -1
Shadow: -1
Color: +0
Noise Reduction: -4
Sharpening: -2
Clarity: -3
Grain Effect: Weak, Small
Color Chrome Effect: Strong
Color Chrome Effect Blue: Strong
White Balance: Daylight, 0 Red & 0 Blue
ISO: Auto, up to ISO 6400
Exposure Compensation: 0 to +1 (typically)

Example photographs, all camera-made JPEGs using this Fujicolor Reala 100 film simulation recipe on my Fujifilm X100V:

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Ferris Wheel – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Ferris Wheel Through The Trees – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Hands Raised – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Blue Coaster – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Waterless Waterslides – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Umbrella Ride – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Green Trees, Blue Sky – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Cat Statue – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Ride Operator – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Waiting to Fly – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Sunstar Tree – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Backlit Fountain – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Flowerbed – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Field of Wildflowers – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Potted Blooms – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Flowers in a Garden – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Blossoms Along a Fence – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Red Blossoms – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Covered Wagon – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Man Waiting – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Standing, Waiting – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Corner – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Puddle Reflections – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Stroller – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Almost – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Please Unload Children – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Lying on a Bench – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Pink Hair Bow – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Backpack – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Josh Riding Carousel – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Happy Jon – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Map on a Fence – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Woodford, Iowa – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Forest Trees – Fruit Heights, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Windshield Rain – Fruit Heights, UT – Fujifilm X100V

See also: Film Simulation Recipes

This post contains affiliate links, and if you make a purchase using my links I’ll be compensated a small amount for it.

Fujifilm X100V Black    Amazon   B&H
Fujifilm X100V Silver   Amazon   B&H

Fujifilm X100F Review Blog

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Nobody pays me to write the content found on fujixweekly.com. There's a real cost to operating and maintaining this site, not to mention all the time that I pour into it. If you appreciated this article, please consider making a one-time gift contribution. Thank you!

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Making Color Pictures Using Acros, B&W Toning & Multiple Exposures

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This is a combination of 8 B&W Exposures with different color toning applied to each.

The Fujifilm X100V, X-Pro3 and X-T4 cameras have a new tool for toning black-and-white pictures in-camera. I mentioned in my article about this new toning feature that there’s the potential to get creative with it, especially when combined with multiple exposure photography. I thought that it might be possible to create color pictures using the Acros film simulation, B&W toning and multiple exposures. This is certainly an unusual use of those tools! A sturdy tripod is a requirement for this experiment.

On my X100V, there are 1,368 possible colors to tone B&W pictures, but I concentrated on the more bold options. To make this work, the best results are found in the +/- 15-18 range. My camera has four multiple exposure options: Additive, Average, Bright and Dark. Additive and Average won’t work for this project because it muddies the colors. Bright and Dark will work, and they work similarly. For Bright, the camera compares the exposures and chooses only the brightest pixel at each location; for Dark, it chooses the darkest pixel. I found that one option typically works better than the other, depending on the scene. You could get creative and adjust the exposure of each image to control which colors are chosen; however, I didn’t do that for these pictures.

At first I tried using just three exposures: one with Toning set to WC -18 MG 0 (Blue), one set to WC +18 MG -18 (Red), and the other set to WC 0 MG +18 (Green). This worked alright, but there are not any in-between colors. The transitions from one color to the next are harsh. Still, I was able to create color pictures this way.

After a little experimenting, I decided that eight exposures worked better (you can combine up to nine). In addition to the Toning described in the previous paragraph, I added one with WC 0 MG -18 (Magenta), WC -18 MG -18 (Purple), WC -18 MG +18 (Teal), WC +18 MG +18 (Yellow), and WC +18 MG 0 (Orange-Red). This made the color transitions a little less harsh, but it’s still not ideal. The pictures look strange and nothing like “normal” color photographs. I also tried reducing some colors to as low as +/- 15 (instead of 18) in an attempt to control the outcome a little, but it’s hard to know what you’ll get until you’ve made all eight exposures.

The results remind me of some cross processing experiments that I did a number of years ago. You can get weird results, depending on the film and process. The toned B&W multiple exposures on my X100V loosely resemble the “worst” cross-processing results from those analog experiments years ago. This isn’t something that I’d want to do all of the time, but it was fun nonetheless. Most people will never try this, but a few of you will. I can see someone doing an abstract photography project using this technique.

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I used three exposures for this picture.

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Another three exposure picture.

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This is an eight exposure image.

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Another eight exposure picture.

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I used eight exposures for this picture. 

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Another eight exposure picture.

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Eight exposures. The wind moved the grass between exposures.

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This is another eight exposure image.

I never really thought that I’d be creating color images from black-and-white in-camera. The results aren’t especially great, so it’s not really a practical thing, more gee-whiz. I do believe, with practice and experimentation, it’s possible to get better results. I hope that you found this article interesting, and perhaps even a few of you were inspired to do your own experiments.

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Fujifilm X100V Film Simulation Recipe: Kodak Tri-X 400

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Leaves in the Forest – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V – ISO 3200 – “Kodak Tri-X 400”

The number one black-and-white film simulation recipe that I’ve been asked to create is Kodak Tri-X 400, but I’ve never been satisfied with my own attempts. Thankfully for you, Fuji X Weekly reader Anders Lindborg (Instagram) was able to do it! This is brilliant, and I’m sure you’ll love it. It’s the only B&W recipe I’m using on my Fujifilm X100V right now.

Kodak introduced Tri-X in the early 1940’s, and in the 1950’s they began selling it in 35mm format. Ever since, it has been the “standard” high-ISO black-and-white film for photographers. It’s been made in ISO 160, 200, 320 and 400 versions; this recipe is based on Tri-X 400. Kodak re-engineered Tri-X 400 in 2007 with finer grain and lower contrast, but it’s still nearly identical to the old stock.

Anders actually made three recipes in one: low-contrast, mid-contrast, and high-contrast. Tri-X, like most films, can be made more contrasty or less contrasty based on how it’s developed (chemicals used and/or development times) or printed (contrast filters). The recipe further down this article is the mid-contrast version. For low contrast, set Highlight to -1 and Shadow to +2. For high contrast, set Highlight to +1 and Shadow to +4. This film simulation recipe was designed for the X-T3 and X-T30, but I changed a couple of things for the X100V: I set Clarity to +4 (which isn’t available on the X-T3 and X-T30) and Grain to Strong & Large (on the X-T3 and X-T30, Grain is set to Strong). Because it adds contrast, setting Clarity to +4 actually makes this look more like the high-contrast version. If you are using this on the X100V, X-Pro3 or X-T4, feel free to try all three contrast versions, with or without Clarity, to see which you like better. For X-Trans III cameras, which don’t have Color Chrome Effect, you can still use this recipe; while it won’t look exactly the same, it will still look very similar. In other words, even though the title says “Fujifilm X100V Film Simulation Recipe” you can actually use it on any camera with the Acros film simulation—I’ve tried it on an X-T30 and X-T20, and it looks great!

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Forest Edge – Fruit Heights, UT – Fujifilm X100V – ISO 1600 – “Kodak Tri-X 400”

I found that this recipe looks best when set to ISO 1600 or higher. From ISO 1600 to 3200, the results more resemble newer Tri-X 400 film. From ISO 6400 to ISO 12800, the results more resemble older Tri-X 400 film. I want to give a big thank-you to Anders Lindborg for creating this recipe, sharing it, and allowing me to publish it here—you are appreciated! Thank you!

Acros (+Y, +R, +G)
Dynamic Range: DR200
Highlight: 0
Shadow: +3
Noise Reduction: -4
Sharpening: +1
Clarity: +4
Grain Effect: Strong, Large
Color Chrome Effect: Strong
Color Chrome Effect Blue: Off
White Balance: Daylight,+9 Red & -9 Blue
ISO: ISO 1600 – 12800
Exposure Compensation: +1/3 to +1 (typically)

Example photographs, all camera-made JPEGs using this Kodak Tri-X 400 film simulation recipe on my Fujifilm X100V:

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Fallen Trunk – Fruit Heights, UT – Fujifilm X100V – ISO 1600

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The Forest – Fruit Heights, UT – Fujifilm X100V – ISO 1600

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Light in a Dark Canopy – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V – ISO 1600

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Sunlight & Leaves – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V – ISO 12800

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Monochrome Backlit Leaves – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V – ISO 1600

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Drops on a Window – Fruit Heights, UT – Fujifilm X100V – ISO 1600

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Half Leaf In The Road – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V – ISO 1600

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Footstep – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V – ISO 1600

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Barrier – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V – ISO 1600

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Corner Benches – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V – ISO 6400

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Drinking Fountains – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V – ISO 1600

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Feel Like A Kid Again – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V – ISO 1600

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Walking at an Amusement Park – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V – ISO 1600

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Waiting at the Exit – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V – ISO 3200

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Diagonal Light Boy – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V – ISO 12800

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FED 5c Film Camera – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V – ISO 3200

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Coffee Grounds in a Filter – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V – ISO 3200

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Rainbow Feet on the Floor – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V – ISO 3200

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Girl in Zebra Shirt – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V – ISO 12800

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Rainy Day Siblings – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V – ISO 3200

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Level Up – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V – ISO 12800

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Wet Leaf in the Grass – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V – ISO 5000

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Wet Tree Leaves – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V – ISO 3200

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Leaf of a Different Color – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V – ISO 3200

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Emptiness – Roy, UT – Fujifilm X100V – ISO 3200

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Empty Boxes in an Abandoned Home – Roy, UT – Fujifilm X100V – ISO 12800

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Nobody’s Home – Roy, UT – Fujifilm X100V – ISO 3200

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White Truck – Roy, UT – Fujifilm X100V – ISO 3200

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Dead End Night – Roy, UT – Fujifilm X100V – ISO 12800

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Trolley Bus – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V – ISO 12800

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Wrong Way – Centerville, UT – Fujifilm X100V – ISO 12800

See also:
Film Simulation Recipes
Tri-X Push-Process Film Simulation Recipe

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Fujifilm X100V New Feature: B&W Toning

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With the X-T3 and X-T30, Fujifilm introduced black-and-white toning. With the X100V, X-Pro3 and X-T4, Fujifilm took B&W toning to a whole new level! On the X-T3 and X-T30, you have the option of 0 (for neutral), +1 through +9 for warm, and -1 through -9 for cool. On the new cameras, toning is set up more like white-balance-shift, except you can move as many as 18 spots up or down and left or right. Yes, on the X100V, there are 1,368 possible colors to tone your black-and-white pictures! You can even tone B&W video.

The up-and-down option is called “WC” for warm/cool; plus is warm, minus is cool, and 0 is neutral. The left-and-right option is called “MG” for magenta/green; plus is green, minus is magenta, and 0 is neutral. The further you get from 0, the stronger the color, and the closer you get to 0, the more subtle the color. Most people will likely use subtle toning, but some will appreciate the bold options.

I think there is the potential for some very creative uses of this new feature, especially when paired with multiple exposure photography. I haven’t explored the possibilities yet, but I will! If you are a fan of toning your black-and-white pictures, you’ll love this new option. The only thing missing is split-toning, which Fujifilm very well might add on future models—I hope so, anyway! In the meantime, I’ll explore the potential of this new toning feature on the X100V.

Examples of black-and-white toning on the Fujifilm X100V:

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WC 0 MG 0

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WC +5 MG 0

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WC +5 MG +5

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WC 0 MG +5

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WC -5 MG +5

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WC -5 MG 0

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WC -5 MG -5

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WC 0 MG -5

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WC +5 MG -5

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WC +18 MG 0

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WC +18 MG +18

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WC 0 MG +18

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WC -18 MG +18

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WC -18 MG 0

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WC -18 MG -18

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WC 0 MG -18

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WC +18 MG -18

See also:
Fujifilm X100V New Feature: Clarity
Fujifilm X100V New Feature: HDR

This post contains affiliate links, and if you make a purchase using my links I’ll be compensated a small amount for it.

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Nobody pays me to write the content found on fujixweekly.com. There's a real cost to operating and maintaining this site, not to mention all the time that I pour into it. If you appreciated this article, please consider making a one-time gift contribution. Thank you!

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