Timeless Negative — Fujifilm X-T5 (X-Trans V) Film Simulation Recipe

Soft Rose – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5 – “Timeless Negative”

On February 3, 2021, Fujifilm shared the very first Nostalgic Neg. Film Simulation Recipe. As part of their promotion for the GFX100S, which was the first camera to have the new Nostalgic Neg. film sim, Fujifilm Japan shared a YouTube video, and hidden within was a recipe put together by the creators of Nostalgic Neg. “Nostalgic Negative is tuned for the best allrounder settings, but if you want to tweak it to get that classic American New Color look from the ’70’s, there are some adjustments you should make.” Fujifilm recommended, when using the Nostalgic Neg. film simulation, to set everything to 0, Off, or Auto, except for three things: shift Auto White Balance to +2 Red & -3 Blue, adjust Shadow to -2, and reduce Color to -2. Additional to that, I recommend using -4 High ISO NR.

I’m not a huge fan of Nostalgic Neg. set to factory defaults. It’s not bad, but it’s not what it purports to be, which is a vintage 1970’s aesthetic inspired by Eggleston, Shore, Sternfeld, and Misrach. I think Fujifilm should have had the courage to make their recipe the default, and not worry so much that it wasn’t the “best allrounder” film simulation. Fujifilm’s suggested adjustments do improve Nostalgic Neg. and bring it closer to a ’70’s vibe, but I felt I could improve it just a little more. Of course, that’s all subjective, and you might prefer factory default Nostalgic Neg., or Fujifilm’s recommended recipe, or something different altogether—in other words, when I say that this is “improved” it’s perfectly alright to disagree with that assessment, but hopefully many of you will agree that this is indeed better—at least a little, as my adjustments to Fujifilm’s recipe are pretty subtle. This particular recipe seems to be especially versatile, and can be used for many different genres of photography and in various light conditions—it looks good most anytime of the day or night.

Evening Bougainvillea – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5 – “Timeless Negative”

This Timeless Negative Film Simulation Recipe is only compatible with (as of this writing) the Fujifilm X-T5, X-H2, and X-H2S. I assume that the GFX100S and GFX50S II can also use this recipe, but that it will render slightly different—I don’t have either of those cameras to test it to know for certain. Unless Fujifilm gives X-Trans IV cameras the Nostalgic Neg. film simulation, which I doubt they will do, this recipe is only for X-Trans V cameras, and maybe the latest GFX, too; however, Nostalgic Neg. isn’t too dissimilar from Eterna, so perhaps consider the Arizona Analog, SantaColor, Eterna V2, and Polaroid recipes as potential alternatives for those with X-Trans IV models.

Film Simulation: Nostalgic Neg.
Grain Effect: Weak, Small
Color Chrome Effect: Strong
Color Chrome FX Blue: Off
White Balance: Auto, +2 Red & -3 Blue
Dynamic Range: DR400
Highlight: +2
Shadow: -2
Color: -3
Sharpness: 0

High ISO NR: -4
Clarity: -2
ISO: Auto, up to ISO 6400
Exposure Compensation: -2/3 to +1/3 (typically)

Example photographs, all camera-made JPEGs using this “Timeless Negative” Film Simulation Recipe on my Fujifilm X-T5:

Dark Coffee – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Night Train – Williams, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Color Behind Frosted Glass – Williams, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Hot Hot Hot – Williams, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Sleigh Bell – Williams, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Round Trip Ticket – Williams, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Dusk Train – Williams, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Keep Off – Williams, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Please… Use RitchieCam – Williams, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Barricades – Williams, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
ATSF Caboose – Williams, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Route 66 Gift Shop – Williams, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Car Above, Coke Below – Williams, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
UnAmerican Experience – Williams, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Stop Route 66 – Williams, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Los Angeles, 1978 – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Looney Tune – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Backyard Trumpet Blossoms – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5

Comparison

Factory default Nostalgic Neg., except High ISO NR set to -4.
Nostalgic Neg. with Fujifilm’s suggested adjustments.
This new Timeless Negative Film Simulation Recipe.

This post contains affiliate links, and if you make a purchase using my links I’ll be compensated a small amount for it.

Fujifilm X-T5 in black:  Amazon  B&H
Fujifilm X-T5 in silver:  Amazon  B&H

Find this Film Simulation Recipe and over 250 more on the Fuji X Weekly — Film Recipes App!

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Fujifilm X100V (X-Trans IV) Film Simulation Recipe: Fujicolor 100 Gold

Morning Mist – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X100V – “Fujicolor 100 Gold

I get asked frequently to create Film Simulation Recipes that mimic the aesthetic of a certain film stock or the look of a particular photographer. In this case, it was the look of a specific photographer that I was asked to recreate. After viewing this person’s images, I thought that they had a lot of similarities with my Kodak Gold 200 recipe except with Superia greens and reds. So I programmed that recipe into my Fujifilm X100V, except with Classic Negative instead of Classic Chrome, plus I made a couple of small modifications. After testing it out, I felt that it produced pictures that were, in fact, quite similar to the photographer’s look. A few days went by, and by chance I stumbled upon some photographs captured with Fujicolor 100 film, and they looked pretty similar to this new recipe. After digging a little deeper, I found some more Fujicolor 100 pictures, and in the description of a few that seemed particularly similar, the photographer mentioned that they used an 81A warming filter.

I’ve heard it said that Fujifilm has historically saved their “best” films for Japan. Indeed, there are Fuji emulsions that, for whatever reasons, aren’t sold outside their home country. Fujicolor 100 is a one of those. I don’t know a whole lot about it (or if it is even still manufactured), but it is a consumer-grade color negative film. I believe that it’s a little warmer than most Fujicolor stocks, but that could also be a result of a warming filter, lens used, how shot, how developed, and/or how scanned, so I’m not completely certain of it. I didn’t model this recipe after Fujicolor 100, but it does seem at times to resemble it surprisingly closely.

Gated Camera Store – Phoenix, AZ – Fujifilm X100V – “Fujicolor 100 Gold”

Because this Fujicolor 100 Gold Film Simulation Recipe uses the Classic Negative film simulation, it’s not compatible with the Fujifilm X-T3 or X-T30, or any other camera without Classic Negative. It is intended for the Fujifilm X-Pro3, X100V, X-T4, X-S10, X-E4, and X-T30 II models. Because X-Trans V renders blue deeper, if you use it on an X-T5, X-H2, or X-H2S it will look slightly different, which you might like or dislike or be indifferent to—give it a try and see what you think.

Classic Negative
Dynamic Range: DR400
Highlight: -2
Shadow: +1
Color: +3
Noise Reduction: -4
Sharpness: -2
Clarity: -2
Grain Effect: Strong, Small
Color Chrome Effect: Off
Color Chrome Effect Blue: Off
White Balance: Daylight, +4 Red & -5 Blue
ISO: Auto, up to ISO 6400
Exposure Compensation: +2/3 to +1 1/3 (typically)

Example photographs, all camera-made JPEGs using this “Fujicolor 100 Gold” Film Simulation Recipe on a Fujifilm X100V:

Foto Forum – Phoenix, AZ – Fujifilm X100V
Gas Station Turned Diner – Williams, AZ – Fujifilm X100V
American Shooting Experience – Williams, AZ – Fujifilm X100V
66 Gifts – Williams, AZ – Fujifilm X100V
Hot Hare – Williams, AZ – Fujifilm X100V
Someday Sony – Phoenix, AZ – Fujifilm X100V
One of These is Not Like the Others – Phoenix, AZ – Fujifilm X100V
Self Reflection – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X100V
Confused Santa – Williams, AZ – Fujifilm X100V
Look at this Flower – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X100V
Girl by a Fountain – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X100V
Water Feature – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X100V
Fujifilm X-T5 in a Plant – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X100V
A Pink Bloom – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X100V
Garden Trumpets – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X100V
Small Boats at a Dock – Lynx Lake, AZ – Fujifilm X100V
Seven Mile Gulch – Lynx Lake, AZ – Fujifilm X100V
Log in the Water – Lynx Lake, AZ – Fujifilm X100V

Find this Film Simulation Recipe and over 250 more on the Fuji X Weekly — Film Recipes App!

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Making the Fujifilm X-T5 Make a Lot of Noise — Testing High-ISO on X-Trans V

Lights from a Frosted Window – Williams, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5 – “Kodachrome 64” – ISO 6400

A lot of people have asked me if the Fujifilm X-T5, with the new 40-megapixel X-Trans V sensor and processor, is better or worse than the 26-megapixel X-Trans IV cameras when it comes to high-ISO noise. Conventional wisdom would suggest that the lower-resolution sensor would be superior. Is it? Or did Fujifilm pull a rabbit out of a magic hat and somehow make X-Trans V better at high-ISO despite more megapixels?

I’ve spent some time pixel-peeping, comparing X-Trans V to X-Trans IV. Right off the bat I can tell you that both are pretty similar to each other. You’ll have a very hard time noticing the differences without pixel-peeping, and with pixel-peeping, they’re still quite similar. Below I’ve included a massive crop from an X-Trans V camera and an X-Trans IV camera. If these crops were sections of the whole pictures printed, I don’t know how large the prints would be, but they would be very large, so keep that in mind. The picture on the left (revealed by moving the bar to the right) is X-Trans IV, and the picture on the right (revealed by moving the bar to the left) is X-Trans V. Take a look at these two images.

You likely notice that the X-Trans V image is a little more detailed with noticeably finer digital noise, while the X-Trans IV picture is a tad fuzzier with chunkier digital noise. This is a result of the higher resolution sensor of the 40mp X-Trans V camera. What might be less obvious is that there seems to be just a bit more color blotchiness in the X-Trans V image. Perhaps even less obvious, I believe the X-Trans V camera is applying a slightly heavier-handed noise reduction to the picture than X-Trans IV, despite both set to -4 High ISO NR. However, please take all of this with a grain of salt, because we’re seriously pixel-peeping here. In real world photography, both cameras are pretty darn good at high-ISO, and neither are significantly better or worse than the other, and there’s no practical variance between the two. Unless you print posters or crop deeply, you’re not going to even notice a difference—even if you did print large or crop massively, the differences are pretty minor, but I guess you can feel confident that ultra-high ISO pictures will look slightly better (for the most part) on X-Trans V than X-Trans IV. That’s the takeaway, I think: high-ISO on X-Trans V cameras are just a hair better than X-Trans IV, but not enough to make a practical difference for most people. What I will add, though, is that it’s pretty amazing that they could do this while also increasing the resolution. I do wonder, though, if Fujifilm could make—say—a 20mp X-Trans camera with significantly increased dynamic range and high-ISO performance—that’s something I would be highly interested in.

Below are a few more high-ISO examples from my Fujifilm X-T5 camera.

Polar – Williams, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5 – “GAF 500” – ISO 12800
Train Wheels – Williams, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5 – “GAF 500” – ISO 12800
Tracks – Williams, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5 – “Kodachrome 64” – ISO 6400
Polar Express Passengers – Williams, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5 – “Kodak Tri-X 400” – ISO 12800
Tree Lights – Williams, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5 – “Kodachrome 64” – ISO 6400

This post contains affiliate links, and if you make a purchase using my links I’ll be compensated a small amount for it.

Fujifilm X-T5 in black:  Amazon  B&H
Fujifilm X-T5 in silver:  Amazon  B&H

Kodachrome 64 — Fujifilm X-T5 (X-Trans V) Film Simulation Recipe

Pilot – Cordes Lakes, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5 – “Kodachrome 64”

This isn’t a new Film Simulation Recipe; it’s simply a slight modification of my Kodachrome 64 recipe for X-Trans IV cameras to make it compatible with X-Trans V models. The adjustments are pretty simple: set Color Chrome FX Blue to Off and Shadow to +0.5. Why the Color Chrome FX Blue adjustment? I discovered that with Classic Chrome (and some other film simulations), X-Trans V cameras render blue deeper. Why the change to Shadow? I stated in the X-Trans IV version, “I would set Shadow to +0.5 if I were using these settings on [a] camera [with that option].” With those two modifications, the Kodachrome 64 recipe is ready for your Fujifilm X-Trans V camera!

Kodachrome was a brand-name of color reversal film made by Kodak between 1935 and 2009. There were three eras of Kodachrome: 1935-1960, 1961-1973, and 1974-2009. Each era produced a slightly different look, and the third era is the one you’re probably most familiar with. This recipe is intended to mimic the aesthetic of the third era of Kodachrome, specifically the ISO 64 emulsion.

Arizona Bougainvillea – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5 – “Kodachrome 64”

This Kodachrome 64 Film Simulation Recipe is intended for Fujifilm X-Trans V models, which (as of this writing) include the X-H2, X-H2S, and X-T5 cameras. It’s compatible with newer GFX models too, but will likely render slightly different on those cameras. Those with an X-Pro3, X100V, X-T4, X-S10, X-E4, or X-T30 II, try the Kodachrome 64 recipe for those models (click here). Those with an X-T3 or X-T30, try the Kodachrome 64 recipe for those cameras (click here). For those with an X-Trans II model, there’s a Kodachrome 64 recipe for you, too (click here).

Film Simulation: Classic Chrome
Grain Effect: Weak, Small
Color Chrome Effect: Strong
Color Chrome FX Blue: Off
White Balance: Daylight, +2 Red & -5 Blue
Dynamic Range: DR200
Highlight: 0
Shadow: +0.5
Color: +2
Sharpness: +1

High ISO NR: -4
Clarity: +3
ISO: Auto, up to ISO 6400
Exposure Compensation: 0 to +2/3 (typically)

Example photographs, all camera-made JPEGs using this “Kodachrome 64” Film Simulation Recipe on my Fujifilm X-T5:

Palm Tree Closeup – Palo Verde, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Abandoned Mobile Home – Arlington, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Store & Bar – Hassayampi, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Narrow Bridge – Arlington, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Concrete Railroad Ties & Steel Bridge – Arlington, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Gillespie Dam – Arlington, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Gila River Reeds – Arlington, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Flag, Bell, Cross – Arlington, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Princess Garden – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Secret Garden – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Blossomed Garden Rose – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Farm Truck – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Wall Shadow & Empty Pot – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Dusk Lamp – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Girl on Swing – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Desert Sunset – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5

This post contains affiliate links, and if you make a purchase using my links I’ll be compensated a small amount for it.

Fujifilm X-T5 in black:  Amazon  B&H
Fujifilm X-T5 in silver:  Amazon  B&H

Find this Film Simulation Recipe and over 250 more on the Fuji X Weekly — Film Recipes App!

Help Fuji X Weekly

Nobody pays me to write the content found on fujixweekly.com. There’s a real cost to operating and maintaining this site, not to mention all the time that I pour into it. If you appreciated this article, please consider making a one-time gift contribution. Thank you!

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1970’s Summer — Fujifilm X-T5 (X-Trans V) Film Simulation Recipe

Short Train – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5 – “1970’s Summer”

This Film Simulation Recipe is the aesthetic that I hoped to achieve with the new Nostalgic Neg. film simulation. What does it resemble? It very much has a nostalgic Kodak “memory color” (as Fujifilm likes to say) that is reminiscent of old color photographs from the 1970’s. You might notice some similarities to William Eggleston’s Election Eve and 2 1/4 series and some of his other work from the late-1960’s through the mid-1970’s—not every picture, but certainly several. You might spot some similarities between this look and some of Stephen Shore’s photographs from the early-to-mid 1970’s. I think there are some similarities to a few of Joel Sternfeld’s American Prospects pictures. There’s a noticeable likeness to several of Richard Misrach’s desert photographs. In other words, this recipe produces a distinct 1970’s American New Color aesthetic.

It shouldn’t surprise you that the Nostalgic Neg. film simulation produces this look because Fujifilm stated that the American New Color movement was the inspiration. Specifically, they looked at the photographs of Eggleston, Shore, Sternfeld, and Misrach, but out-of-the-box default Nostalgic Neg. doesn’t seem to resemble their work all that closely. After examining many of their photographs, and identifying a few from each with a similar aesthetic, I set out to create a Film Simulation Recipe that better mimics some of their pictures. I feel like a got pretty close, and this recipe produces a distinct 1970’s vibe—especially the warmth of summertime—and so I named it 1970’s Summer. This recipe works best in sunny daylight, and is excellent for midday photography.

Going Out of Business – Prescott, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5 – “1970’s Summer”

This 1970’s Summer Film Simulation Recipe is only compatible with (as of this writing) the Fujifilm X-T5, X-H2, and X-H2S. I assume that the GFX100S and GFX50S II can also use this recipe, but that it will render slightly different—I don’t have either of those cameras to test it to know for certain. Unless Fujifilm gives X-Trans IV cameras the Nostalgic Neg. film simulation, which I doubt they will do, this recipe is only for X-Trans V cameras, and maybe the latest GFX, too; however, if you are looking for something somewhat similar, try my Vintage Color recipe, or even Kodak Portra 400 Warm.

Film Simulation: Nostalgic Neg.
Grain Effect: Strong, Large
Color Chrome Effect: Strong
Color Chrome FX Blue: Strong
White Balance: 6500K, -1 Red & -4 Blue
Dynamic Range: DR400
Highlight: -2
Shadow: -0.5
Color: -2
Sharpness: -2

High ISO NR: -4
Clarity: -3
ISO: Auto, up to ISO 6400
Exposure Compensation: +1/3 to +1 (typically)

Example photographs, all camera-made JPEGs using this “1970’s Summer” Film Simulation Recipe on my Fujifilm X-T5:

Red & Gold – Prescott, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Adventure’s First Stop – Prescott Valley, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Hyundai – Prescott, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Cat Clock – Prescott, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Propane – Hassayampa, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Security Light – Palo Verde, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Hay, Detour – – Arlington, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Gila River Bridge – Arlington, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
13 FT 6 IN – Arlington, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Around the Bend – Arlington, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Gillespie Dam Bridge – Arlington, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Desert Dam – Arlington, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Julio Suarez – Arlington, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Dam Reflection – Arlington, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Broken Dam – Arlington, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Lakeview – Lynx Lake, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Attention Anglers – Lynx Lake, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Can’t See the Forest – Lynx Lake, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Rural Tree – Arlington, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Green Field – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Abandoned Rural Home – Palo Verde, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
More Than Double Wide – Arlington, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Hole in the Wall – Arlington, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
PRA – Arlington, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Abandoned & Leaning – Arlington, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Desert Basketball – Arlington, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Double Cross – Arlington, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Palm Trunk & Blocks – Arlington, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Fake Fall Flowers – Arlington, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Arlington Baptist Church – Arlington, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Gate 8 – Arlington, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Flowing Water & Broken Footbridge – Arlington, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Irrigation Mist – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5

This post contains affiliate links, and if you make a purchase using my links I’ll be compensated a small amount for it.

Fujifilm X-T5 in black:  Amazon  B&H
Fujifilm X-T5 in silver:  Amazon  B&H

Find this Film Simulation Recipe and over 250 more on the Fuji X Weekly — Film Recipes App!

Help Fuji X Weekly

Nobody pays me to write the content found on fujixweekly.com. There’s a real cost to operating and maintaining this site, not to mention all the time that I pour into it. If you appreciated this article, please consider making a one-time gift contribution. Thank you!

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I’ve Got the Fujifilm X-Trans V Blues….

I’ve been busy the last few days trying to see what is similar and what’s different about the JPEG output from my new Fujifilm X-T5 camera. How does X-Trans V compare with X-Trans IV? Are my X-Trans IV Film Simulation Recipes really compatible with the new Fujifilm cameras? Technically they are because the options are the same (except that X-Trans V has the new Nostalgic Neg. film simulation), but do they render the same, or at least similar enough?

I was surprised by something that I discovered. While many of the colors are extremely close in rendering, blues are not. Take a look at the comparison below. Both images were captured with identical settings and even the same lens—one with an X-Trans IV camera, and the other on X-Trans V—but the blue sky is not the same. If you study close enough you might notice some other extremely subtle differences, but the rendering of blue is a clearly not the same between the two sensor generations.

I looked very closely at all of the different film simulations, and I noticed that this difference in blue is film simulation dependent. Not all film sims render blue differently, and some vary more than others. Here are my discoveries:

Eterna Bleach Bypass on X-Trans V renders blue a little darker than on X-Trans IV with Color Chrome FX Blue set to Weak.
Classic Negative on X-Trans V renders blue identically to X-Trans IV with Color Chrome FX Blue set to Weak.
Classic Chrome and Eterna on X-Trans V renders blue just barely lighter than on X-Trans IV with Color Chrome FX Blue set to Weak.
Velvia, PRO Neg. Hi, and PRO Neg. Std on X-Trans V renders blue halfway in-between Color Chrome FX Blue set to Weak and Off on X-Trans IV.
Provia and Astia on X-Trans V renders blue identically to X-Trans IV with Color Chrome FX Blue set to Off.

In other words, with the exception of Provia and Astia, blue is different on X-Trans V than X-Trans IV. With Classic Negative, if an X-Trans IV Film Simulation Recipe calls for Color Chrome FX Blue set to Weak, if you set it to Off instead, it will render the same; if it call for Color Chrome FX Blue set to Strong, if you set it to Weak instead, it will render the same. You can also do that with Eterna Bleach Bypass, Eterna, and Classic Chrome, and it will be pretty close, but it won’t be identical. With Velvia, PRO Neg. Hi, and PRO Neg. Std, you can go either way (adjusting Color Chrome FX Blue or not), and it really doesn’t matter because it will be wrong by about the same amount, either too light or too dark.

Does it matter? it’s not a huge difference, but it is a difference. You might prefer the rendering of X-Trans IV or you might prefer the rendering of X-Trans V. I think, personally, I’m leaning towards preferring the X-Trans V rendering—many of my recipes use Color Chrome FX Blue set to Weak or sometimes Strong, and with X-Trans V that’s already built-in now on some of the film simulations. But it also means that many X-Trans IV recipes will render differently, and, while technically compatible, aren’t truly compatible with X-Trans V cameras.

I captured with picture on my Fujifilm X-T5 using the new Nostalgic Neg. film simulation.

Why did Fujifilm do this? I don’t think this is anything new. For example, Fujifilm has tweaked Velvia film, because the original Velvia emulsion was a “mistake” (although many photographers didn’t think so—if it was an accident, it was a very happy one). I remember reading once that Fujifilm, with each sensor generation, reevaluates each film simulation to see if it’s possible to get them closer to the intended aesthetic. Fujifilm likely decided that the blue of previous generations wasn’t quite “right” for many of the film simulations and so they fixed it. You might not thought that it was “broke” so you’re wondering why they felt the need to “fix” it; however, the folks at Fujifilm must have thought something wasn’t quite right, so they adjusted it.

What else is different? I’m still looking closely, so I don’t have all the answers yet. I think the rendering of cool colors is slightly different, but blue is by far the biggest change—even with a close side-by-side comparison it’s difficult to spot the differences of the greens and purples, but blue is obvious. Shadows and luminance in general seem to be just a hair dissimilar, but it’s close. Warm colors seem to be pretty much identical; if they’re different it’s tough to spot—maybe yellow is the most dissimilar of the warm colors, but it is still very similar, and I think it might have more to do with general luminance than a color difference. Really, blue rendering is the only significant difference I’ve found so far between X-Trans IV and X-Trans V.

With the Fuji X Weekly App, I don’t have X-Trans IV recipes currently listed as compatible with X-Trans V cameras. There are some—those that use Provia or Astia—that could be listed as compatible because they’ll render the same. For others, a Color Chrome FX Blue adjustment will make them compatible. For others, they won’t ever look the same but will still look pretty similar. I’m still deciding how I’ll handle this. The easy route would be to just say they’re all compatible—that they’re close enough—but I don’t think that’s the right path. I ask for patience as I wade through these waters—the rendering of that blue water on X-Trans V—and how to best present it to you in the form of Film Simulation Recipes.

Nostalgia Negative — My First Fujifilm X-T5 (X-Trans V) Film Simulation Recipe!!

Lynx Lake Overlook – Lynx Lake, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5 – “Nostalgia Negative”

I spent $1,700 to get the Nostalgic Neg. film simulation. When I tried out-of-the-box default Nostalgic Neg., I was initially disappointed. It didn’t seem like anything special, or even particularly nostalgic. After a closer look, I saw the potential. The Nostalgic Neg. film simulation is like a cross between Eterna and Classic Chrome. It has soft tonalities in the shadows like Eterna, and warm colors are similar to Eterna, but with contrast and an overall palette more similar to Classic Chrome. There are some aspects that aren’t necessarily like either Eterna or Classic Chrome, but, for the most part, if Eterna and Classic Chrome had a baby, it would be Nostalgic Neg.

For this first Fujifilm X-Trans V Film Simulation Recipe, I wasn’t trying to emulate any specific film or process. I just wanted something that looked good. I simply attempted to create a better Nostalgic Neg., something that I would like shooting with. I hoped that perhaps it would even evoke feelings of nostalgia—that’s why I call this recipe Nostalgia Negative—and it would produce a vintage analog-like aesthetic. I think it does.

I really like this recipe for daylight situations. It does quite well in both midday and golden hour light. It’s pretty decent in shade, too. It’s not particularly well suited for indoor artificial light or nighttime photography, so I would avoid it for that. Otherwise, use it for landscapes, portraits, urban—it will look good for pretty much any genre of photography. I think this will be an instant favorite recipe for those with the latest cameras. Because this recipe uses Clarity, you cannot use the HEIF format, because HEIF disables Clarity. Also, for those who aren’t aware, Clarity causes the camera to pause briefly after each shot, similar to the amount of time it takes to advance to the next frame of film on an analog camera. I have Smooth Skin Effect Off, but I’m sure it’s fine if you enable it, either Weak or Strong, if you prefer.

Two Ducks – Lynx Lake, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5 – “Nostalgia Negative”

This Nostalgia Negative Film Simulation Recipe is only compatible with (as of this writing) the Fujifilm X-T5, X-H2, and X-H2S. I assume that the GFX100S and GFX50S II can also use this recipe, but that it will render slightly different—I don’t have either of those cameras to test it to know for certain. Unless Fujifilm gives X-Trans IV cameras this film simulation, which I highly doubt that they will, this recipe is only for X-Trans V, and maybe the latest GFX, too; however, my Nostalgic Negative recipe for X-Trans IV cameras is actually not too far off from the Nostalgic Neg. film simulation, so you might appreciate using that recipe while you wait to get a camera with the new film simulation.

Film Simulation: Nostalgic Neg.
Grain Effect: Strong, Small
Color Chrome Effect: Strong
Color Chrome FX Blue: Weak
White Balance: Daylight, +3 Red & -3 Blue
Dynamic Range: DR400
Highlight: -1
Shadow: +1
Color: +4
Sharpness: -1

High ISO NR: -4
Clarity: -3
ISO: Auto, up to ISO 6400
Exposure Compensation: 0 to +2/3 (typically)

Example photographs, all camera-made JPEGs using this new “Nostalgia Negative” Film Simulation Recipe on my Fujifilm X-T5:

Blue Tree – Lynx Lake, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Lake Log – Lynx Lake, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
311 – Lynx Lake, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Caution: Nature – Lynx Lake, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
To – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Believer – Lynx Lake, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
CVS Obscured – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Golden Tower – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
The Burmister – Prescott, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Dusk Blazer – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Spiderweb Rocks – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Don’t Shoot – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Warning – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Triumph – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Golden Light Chair – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Lake Rocks – Lynx Lake, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Log on the Lake – Lynx Lake, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Brush Above the Water – Lynx Lake, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Private Dock – Lynx Lake, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
PFG Boy – Lynx Lake, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Amanda – Lynx Lake, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Forest Abstract – Lynx Lake, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Last Light on the Desert Mountain Ridge – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5

This post contains affiliate links, and if you make a purchase using my links I’ll be compensated a small amount for it.

Fujifilm X-T5 in black:  Amazon  B&H
Fujifilm X-T5 in silver:  Amazon  B&H

Find this Film Simulation Recipe and over 250 more on the Fuji X Weekly — Film Recipes App!

I Have A Fujifilm X-T5!

Wow! It’s been crazy the last several days. Fujifilm released the X-T5 on the 17th. Not everyone got their orders.

Let’s back this up. Amazon apparently listed the X-T5 too early on announcement day. By contract, everyone is supposed to go live no earlier than a certain time, but Amazon jumped the gun. I preordered an X-T5 on Amazon because I had reward points that I wanted to use. When the 17th came around, some people received their preorders that day. For others it shipped that day, and arrived in the next day or two. For me? Nothing. Those who ordered on Amazon were left in the dark. What I didn’t know is that Fujifilm decided to punish Amazon for their sins and not give them any cameras to sell; sadly, only Fujifilm photographers who ordered through Amazon were actually punished. Is it Amazon’s fault? Yes. Is it Fujifilm’s fault? Sure—they could have done something else to teach Amazon a lesson, while still allowing people to receive the cameras they ordered. Is it my fault? No. Is it your fault? No. But you and I didn’t get our gear when others did. I know this is a first-world problem, and in the grand scheme of things it doesn’t matter, but it is something that many people have experienced.

Amazon is a huge company, and Fujifilm sales are a tiny drop in a massive bucket. If Fujifilm stopped selling to Amazon altogether, it wouldn’t hurt Amazon in any way, shape, or form. I get that Fujifilm has to hold them accountable. I get that it wasn’t fair to their other retail customers. But let’s be real: crap rolls down hill. Who ended up with the crap? Me. You, if you, too, ordered through Amazon. Fujifilm’s customers are who got punished, not Amazon. I’m sure Amazon gave two seconds to this situation, and hasn’t cared one iota since. When they get their cameras, they’ll sell every single copy, and it will have such a small impact on the bottom line that you need a powerful magnifying glass just to see it. Those trying to be patient with their Amazon preorders might have to be extremely patient—I’ve heard that it might be sometime in January before orders are shipped. I don’t know that for a fact, but it’s what I have heard, and it may or may not be true—I hope it isn’t true.

So how did I get my X-T5? I called around to local camera stores, and I found one in stock. Luckily, Foto Forum in Phoenix had a body-only copy, plus one bundled with the 18-55mm f/2.8-f/4 kit zoom. I purchased the one with the lens. If you are still waiting for yours to ship, maybe call around to local camera stores to see if they still have an X-T5 in stock, and if so purchase from them instead.

That’s my story. What about you? Did you buy a Fujifilm X-T5? Did it arrive or are you still waiting?

People have already begun asking me for my impressions on this camera. I think a number of you are waiting to learn a little more about it before spending so much money. It’s way too soon to provide you with anything valuable. I’ll tell you my way-too-soon initial impressions, but please take them with a large grain of salt. I’ve only barely begun to use the camera and really haven’t had a chance to properly test it. I’ll give a full review later.

First, let’s talk about megapixels. Do you need 40? If you crop deeply, print posters, or just love to pixel-peep, then maybe. But if you don’t crop deeply, don’t print posters, or don’t pixel-peep, then you definitely don’t need 40mp—it’s way overkill. Fortunately, it doesn’t seem to negatively affect the speed of the camera or even the file transfer speed when using the Fujifilm Cam Remote app. Unfortunately, it does take up more space on the SD Card, phone/computer, and storage, and uploads to my cloud storage are noticeably slower. There’s pluses and minuses to 40mp; I don’t anticipate the pluses coming in handy for me very often. For some of you, though, it is an important upgrade.

I haven’t put the autofocus improvements to the test whatsoever, but through three days of shooting, I haven’t noticed it being any more snappy than my X-E4. The only thing I noticed is that face detection locked onto a face that was far away, which I wouldn’t expect to happen on my X-E4. Since I wasn’t trying to photograph the person, it actually wasn’t a positive thing, but I can see this being an improvement. I haven’t even attempted continuous tracking or anything like that yet, so I can’t speak of it.

I was really excited for HEIF, but discovered that it disables Clarity. That’s disappointing. No HEIF for me, since I use Clarity a lot. Speaking of Clarity, I was also very disappointed that it isn’t any faster on the X-T5, and the Storing pause is identical to X-Trans IV. Fujifilm should have spent some time speeding this up, in my opinion. Oh, and somehow I keep bumping the drive switch, and accidentally switching to CL or HDR, both of which disable Clarity—I’ll have to figure out how to not bump that switch.

While the X-T5 is smaller than the X-T4, and just a little bigger than the X-T1 and X-T30, it is definitely heavy. Seems like a similar weight to the X-T4—not sure if it is or isn’t, but it’s hefty. I personally prefer the weight of the X-T1 or X-T30, but if you use large lenses a lot, you might appreciate the solid base of the X-T5.

The reason that I purchased the Fujifilm X-T5 is because this camera has the new Nostalgic Neg. film simulation. What do I think of it so far? If Eterna and Classic Chrome had a baby, it would be Nostalgic Negative. It has some similarities to both of those film simulations, with soft gradations in the shadows similar to Eterna and with some Eterna-like colors (particularly the warm colors), and with contrast, saturation, and an overall palette more similar to Classic Chrome. I’m not a huge fan of default straight-out-of-the-box Nostalgic Neg.—I was actually initially disappointed—but with some adjustments it can become magical. I love it! Nostalgic Neg. is another analog-esque film sim from Fujifilm that’s sure to become a classic. Expect some recipes soon!

I don’t have any other observations yet. I hope to do some more serious experimentations soon, and when I do I’ll share those impressions with you. In the meantime, here are some straight-out-of-camera Nostalgic Neg. pictures that I captured with my Fujifilm X-T5:

Two Ducks – Lynx Lake, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
311 – Lynx Lake, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Caution: Nature – Lynx Lake, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Believer – Lynx Lake, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Cat Clock – Prescott, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Dusk Blazer – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Spiderweb Rocks – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Don’t Shoot – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Warning – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Golden Light Chair – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Red & Gold – Prescott, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Going Out of Business – Prescott, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Hyundai – Prescott, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Short Train – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Around the Bend – Arlington, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Lakeview – Lynx Lake, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Log on the Lake – Lynx Lake, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Private Dock – Lynx Lake, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Can’t See the Forest – Lynx Lake, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Irrigation Mist – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5

This post contains affiliate links, and if you make a purchase using my links I’ll be compensated a small amount for it.

Fujifilm X-T5 in black:  Amazon  B&H
Fujifilm X-T5 in silver:  Amazon  B&H

Fujifilm X-T1 Short-Term Project, Update 3

Desert Sunset – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T1 – “Ektachrome 100SW” – Day 14

Part 1 Part 2

This is the third and final installment of this series. As a reminder, I photographed only with my Fujifilm X-T1 from the announcement day of the Fujifilm X-T5 (November 2) until the release date (November 17). Why? First, even though the Fujifilm X-T1 is eight-years-old (and approaching nine), it is still such a great little camera. It took three years for Fujifilm to bring this model to the market because they wanted to get it right, and it was one of their most important cameras ever released. The Fujifilm X-T1 was one of the first, if not the first, Fujifilm cameras that widely appealed to professional photographers. It was Fujifilm’s most successful model at the time—outselling all the previous cameras—and launched the extremely successful X-T line. The X-T5 is the latest iteration. This project was intended to give me a better understanding of how the X-T5 has evolved from the original model. It also allowed me to demonstrate that previous models, including the original X-T1, are still really good.

I wanted to try some things with the X-T1 that I wasn’t able to do in the first 10 days, including wildlife and low-light. I had been sick, which made this a much more difficult project than I had anticipated, so I tried to make the most of the last five days. In the end I didn’t do everything that I wanted, but I was able to do a lot, and I’m happy with how it all came together.

I was really impressed with the Fujifilm X-T1—even in 2022, it is an excellent body that’s quite capable of capturing beautiful photographs. I thoroughly enjoyed shooting with it, more than I thought I would. The only shortcoming that I encountered was in dim light, the autofocus tended to hunt. This didn’t prevent me from getting the pictures, but it did make me work a little harder to do it. Otherwise, the camera performed exceptionally well in a whole host of situations. If you have one, it’s definitely a keeper. If you are in the market for a used Fujifilm model, this is one that I have no problems recommending. Is the X-T5 better? Sure. Is the X-T4 better? Yeah. Is the X-T3 better? Affirmative. Is the X-T2 better? I’m certain that it is. But, the X-T1 is still really good, and the newer iterations aren’t miles ahead—each new model is marginally better than the previous, which means that the latest is only four small steps ahead; ahead indeed, but the ol’ X-T1 holds its own surprisingly well.

I hope that you enjoyed this short-term project as much as I did!

Day 11

Curling Leaves – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T1 – “Classic Kodak Chrome
Leaf Abstract – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T1 – “Color Negative Film
Monochromatic Leaf – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T1 – “Monochrome
Hanging Leaves – Buckeye. AZ – Fujifilm X-T1 – “Classic Kodak Chrome”

Day 12

Ka-Chow – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T1 – “Classic Kodak Chrome”
American 4×4 – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T1 – “Classic Kodak Chrome”
Bougainvillea Bunch – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T1 – “Classic Kodak Chrome”
Bougainvillea Palm – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T1 – “Classic Kodak Chrome”
Work Ahead – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T1 – “Classic Kodak Chrome”
Fallen Flags – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T1 – “Classic Kodak Chrome”
Fallen Signs – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T1 – “Classic Kodak Chrome”
It Better Not Flood – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T1 – “Classic Kodak Chrome”
Big Yellow Cat – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T1 – “Classic Kodak Chrome”
168 – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T1 – “Classic Kodak Chrome”
Golden Saguaro – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T1 – “Classic Kodak Chrome”
Bird Home – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T1 – “Classic Kodak Chrome”

Day 13

Evening Light Saguaro – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T1 – “Classic Kodak Chrome”
Desert Peak – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T1 – “Classic Kodak Chrome”
Bougainvillea Over Wall – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T1 – “Classic Kodak Chrome”
Twin Bulbs Hanging – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T1 – “Classic Kodak Chrome”
Pigeon Tiles – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T1 – “Classic Kodak Chrome”
Bird in a Tree – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T1 – “Kodak Portra 160”
Little Birdie – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T1 – “Kodak Portra 160”
Curious Birdie Hiding – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T1 – “Kodak Portra 160”
Vulture – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T1 – “Kodak Portra 160”

Day 14

Sunset Over a Desert Ridge – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T1 – “Ektachrome 100SW”
Purple Mountains – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T1 – “Classic Kodak Chrome”
Last Light on Desert Mountain – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T1 – “Classic Kodak Chrome”
It’s a Bird, It’s a Plane, It’s a… B2 – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T1 – “Classic Kodak Chrome”
Evening Light on a Desert Hill – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T1 – “Classic Kodak Chrome”
Deflating Rainbow – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T1 – “Classic Kodak Chrome”
Deflating Balloon – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T1 – “Classic Kodak Chrome”
Perched at the Top – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T1 – Buckeye, AZ – “Classic Kodak Chrome”
Waiting to Hum – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T1 – Classic Kodak Chrome”

Day 15

Carts – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T1 – “Monochrome”
Red, White, Blue – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T1 – “Classic Kodak Chrome”
CVS – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T1 – “Classic Kodak Chrome”
Lightning Rod Bird – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T1 – “Classic Kodak Chrome”
November Palm – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T1 – “Classic Kodak Chrome”
Waiting is the Hardest Part – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T1 – “Kodak Portra 160”
Urban Bloom – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T1 – “Kodak Portra 160”
Blossoms in the City – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T1 – “Classic Kodak Chrome”

Day 16

Bolsey – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T1 – “Classic Kodak Chrome”
X100V – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T1 – “Classic Kodak Chrome”
Piano Hands 1 – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T1 – “Monochrome”
Piano Hands 2 – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T1 – “Monochrome”
Singing – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T1 – “Monochrome”

When Things Don’t Go As Planned (a.k.a. Technical Difficulties Suck) + A Special Announcement + YOUR Pictures!

Sunrise Lamp – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T30 – “Fujichrome Sensia 100”

Today’s SOOC live broadcast started out well. Very well, in fact. A lot of you tuned in—even Fujirumors! There was a lot of participation. It was on pace to be one of the best episodes yet!

Then it all came to an abrupt end.

When you do a live broadcast, there’s bound to be some trouble. Especially since we’re doing this from two different continents, there’s a lot of opportunities for technical difficulties. If you’ve watched a couple SOOC broadcasts before, you’ve likely seen some of these unfortunate issues. It’s expected that things won’t go completely according to plan, and there will be some minor hiccups here and there. Today’s hiccup was far from minor. At almost the two-hour mark, as we were nearing the end of the show (but not at the end—we still had plenty to say), YouTube cut us off. The broadcast just ended, mid-sentence. We were suddenly done. We tried to get it up-and-running again, but that was a failure, too, due to additional technical difficulties.

If you didn’t watch it live, you can view the broadcast below—just know that it ends quite abruptly when it shouldn’t. It’s incomplete.

I have to apologize for this. There’s a lot of problems that we can work through. “The show must go on,” is the saying, and normally that’s what we do. There was no going on from this, though—it was a fatal flaw. The broadcast was over, and we couldn’t salvage it. I’m really sorry, because you gave up a lot of your time to tune in and participate. We want to give you our best, and we couldn’t do that. It’s embarrassing. I hope that our situation wasn’t too much trouble for you.

Nathalie and I want to finish the show. We tried to do that today, but it didn’t work out. So, instead, we’ll finish the episode with a Part 2 on Tuesday, November 22nd, at 9:30 AM Pacific Time, 12:30 Eastern. We’d like to finish our discussion of the recipe-of-the-month, Kodak Ektachrome 100SW (here and here), reveal the giveaway winner, and make a special announcement. Those are the things we couldn’t say today because we were cutoff. This special edition Part 2 on Tuesday will be a much shorter show. I hope that you can join us live!

For those who don’t know, SOOC is a monthly live video series, with each episode focused on a different Film Simulation Recipe. It is a collaboration between Tame Your Fujifilm (Fujifilm X-Photographer Nathalie Boucry) and Fuji X Weekly (Ritchie Roesch). SOOC is a fun and educational experience where we not only talk about Fujifilm camera settings, but also answer your questions and give tips and tricks. Basically, we’re trying to help you master your Fujifilm camera, with a focus on simplifying your photographic workflow. It’s also interactive, and your participation makes it great!

I want to say a big “thank you” to everyone who submitted pictures using the Fujichrome Sensia 100 Film Simulation Recipe! The Viewers’ Images slideshow video is below, so be sure to take a look!

Creative Collective 034: Add Lens Flare by Reflecting

Vailed Bougainvillea – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T1 – “Classic Kodak Chrome

I love using vintage lenses because they often have character. Modern lenses are often technically perfect (or close to it), but they usually lack the character that is a hallmark of analog photography—perhaps the precision engineering makes them too good. The imperfections of old glass is what gives them their unique qualities. One of those qualities is sometimes interesting lens flare. Some people love lens flare and some people hate it—if you are one of those who loves it, I discovered a trick that you might appreciate. It is simple (yet can be tricky), and you probably already have what you need to do it.

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Which Film Simulation Recipes, When? — Part III (X-Trans III)

Urban Palm Leaves – Sun City West, AZ – Fujifilm X-H1 – “Everyday Astia”

Part 1 Part 2

When should you use which Film Simulation Recipes on your Fujifilm X-Trans III camera? With so many recipes to choose from, it can be difficult to know what recipe you should select in a given situation, and this article is intended to help you with that. If you haven’t read Part 1, it’s important to do so because it explains what exactly we’re doing—the backstory—which is important to understand. There’s a video to watch in that article, too. Take a moment right now to hop on over to Part 1 (click here) before continuing on with this post, if you haven’t viewed it already. Also, check out Part 2 (click here) if you missed that.

Like Part 2, I set out to recommend seven recipes, one for each C1-C7 Custom Preset, that don’t share the same white balance type, because X-Trans III cameras—X-Pro2, X100F, X-E3, X-T2, X-T20 & X-H1—cannot remember a White Balance Shift within the C1-C7 Custom Presets. If two recipes share the same white balance type but not the same shift, then when you switch presets you must remember to adjust the shift, too. That can be inconvenient and frustrating, so my best solution is to program recipes that use different white balance types and/or share the same white balance type and shift. The user experience is much improved, but you might not be able to program all of your favorite recipe at the same time, which is the one downside to doing this. It was a difficult task, but I think I came up with a good set for you.

If you have a Fujifilm X-T3 or X-T30, you can use these recipes, too, by simply setting Color Chrome Effect to Off. Also, if you have a newer X-Trans IV camera (or X-Trans V), you can use these recipes by additionally setting Color Chrome FX Blue to Off, Clarity to 0, and choosing a Grain size (either Small or Large). 

C1 — Improved Velvia — Golden Hour

Lava Pond – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-H1 – “Improved Velvia”

For sunrise or sunset photography, this “Improved Velvia” Film Simulation Recipe is one of your best bets! It’s great anytime of the day or night when you need vibrant colors, so it has a lot of versatility, but it is especially nice during “golden hour” when the sun is low to the horizon. This recipe uses the Auto white balance type; if I wasn’t concerned about white balance type, I’d probably still choose this recipe.

Alternatives for “golden hour” photography:

Velvia
Kodak Ektachrome 100SW
Kodak Portra 400
Kodak Ektar 100

C2 — Kodak Gold 200 — Midday

Pear Blossom Day – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 – “Kodak Gold 200”

“Midday” is simply daylight conditions outside of when the sun is low to the horizon, and for this category I’m recommending Kodak Gold 200. Even though this is a recipe for the X-T3/X-T30, it is fully compatible with X-Trans III cameras. It’s great for sunny conditions—midday or otherwise—and is good for landscapes and portraits. If you have this programmed into your camera, you’re going to use it a lot, perhaps more than any of the others. It uses the Daylight white balance type; if I wasn’t concerned about white balance type, I’d still choose this one, although each in the alternatives list are excellent options, too.

Alternatives for “midday” photography:

Kodachrome II
Dramatic Classic Chrome
Everyday Astia

Kodak Ultramax

C3 — Ektachrome E100GX — Overcast

Pink Rose Blossom – Ogden, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 – “Ektachrome E100GX”

If it’s a rainy, overcast day, the Ektachrome E100GX is an excellent Film Simulation Recipe to try. It’s also great for many daylight situations, so it offers good versatility. This recipe uses the Fluorescent 2 white balance type; if I wasn’t concerned about white balance type I would choose Fujicolor Superia 800 instead, but this is a close second-best, and I feel good about recommending it anyway.

Alternatives for “overcast” photography:

Fujicolor Superia 800
Fujicolor Pro 160NS

PRO Neg. Hi
Kodak GT 800-5

C4 — Color Negative — Indoor

Cameras and Coffee – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 – “Color Negative”

For natural light indoor photography, I recommend the Color Negative Film Simulation Recipe, which is another one that’s intended for the X-T3/X-T30, but is fully compatible with X-Trans III cameras. It uses the Fluorescent 1 white balance type; if I wasn’t concerned about white balance type I would choose Agfa Optima 200 instead, but this is still a solid option.

Alternatives for “indoor” photography:

Agfa Optima 200
Fujicolor Pro 400H
“Eterna”
Eterna

C5 — Fujicolor NPL 160 Tungsten — Nighttime

Dusk Lamps – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-H1 – “Fujicolor NPL 160 Tungsten”

For nighttime or indoor artificial light situations, try the Fujicolor NPL 160 Tungsten Film Simulation Recipe. It does especially well for “blue hour” photography at dusk or dawn, when the sun is below the horizon. This recipe uses the Fluorescent 3 white balance type; if I wasn’t concerned about white balance type, I would choose CineStill 800T instead, but this is a good second-best.

Alternatives for “nighttime” photography:

CineStill 800T
Classic Chrome
Melancholy Blue
Cine Teal

C6 — Xpro — Alternative Process

Suburban Abstract – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-H1 – “Xpro”

There aren’t very many options for this category, but the Xpro recipe is an excellent recipe, producing a cross-process aesthetic. It uses the Kelvin white balance type; if I wasn’t concerned about white balance type, I would probably choose the Cross Process recipe instead, but this is quite similar, so you can’t go wrong either way.

Alternatives for “alternative process” photography:

Cross Process
Vintage Kodachrome
Vintage Kodacolor
Vintage Agfacolor

C7 — Analog Monochrome — B&W

Doll – Bountiful, UT – Fujifilm X-H1 – “Analog Monochrome”

Last but certainly not least is black-and-white, and for that I recommend the Analog Monochrome Film Simulation Recipe. This recipe is really good for most situations. It uses the Incandescent white balance type; if I wasn’t concerned about white balance type, I would be happy with this recipe or any in the alternatives list below, which are all good.

Alternatives for “B&W” photography:

Acros
Agfa Scala
Ilford HP5 Plus
Kodak Tri-X Push Process

Stay tuned, because Part IV is coming soon!

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I Paid $1,700 for a Film Simulation?!?

I mentioned before that the main reason I’m buying the new Fujifilm X-T5 is for the Nostalgic Negative film simulation. That’s crazy, right? $1,700 is way too much money to spend on a new film simulation, isn’t it? Am I crazy or just plain stupid?

The Nostalgic Negative film simulation hasn’t received the fanfare of Classic Chrome or especially Classic Negative. Not even as much as Acros or Eterna. Maybe about as much as Eterna Bleach Bypass. Maybe. I think it’s because of poor marketing strategies by Fujifilm.

Nostalgic Negative was introduced by Fujifilm about a year-and-a-half ago on the GFX100S. I know that some people use film simulations and shoot straight-out-of-camera on GFX, but it is a much smaller percentage, I think, than the X system. I don’t know the numbers, but (just throwing something out there) if 20% of Fujifilm X owners use Film Simulation Recipes, the number of GFX owners is maybe 5%. So Nostalgic Negative is something that, for the most part, GFX owners don’t even care about. Besides, I’m pretty sure that GFX models sell a lot fewer copies than X series cameras, so the number of people actually using this film simulation on a GFX100S is pretty small. The next camera to get Nostalgic Negative was the GFX 50S II—kind of the same story. The first X camera to get Nostalgic Negative was the X-H2S, followed very quickly by the X-H2. Interestingly, this film simulation isn’t found anywhere in the promotional material for those two cameras. Yes, they have Nostalgic Negative, but it’s clear that Fujifilm didn’t think it would be a selling point for those two models. That makes sense, since these two “flagship” cameras aren’t intended for or marketed to long-time Fujifilm photographers, but for those with other camera systems (Canikony) looking to make a change. I suspect that many of those buying the X-H2S and X-H2 are generally less aware of, and less open to using, film simulations and recipes and such.

That brings us to the Fujifilm X-T5, the first X series camera where Fujifilm is actually promoting the Nostalgic Negative film simulation… barely. It’s mentioned in the promotional material, but without much fanfare, and not stated as a new feature, or with a good explanation of what it’s intended to resemble and what makes it special.

According to Fujifilm, the Nostalgic Negative film simulation is based on “American New Color” photography of the 1970’s. They studied photographs by William Eggleston, Stephen Shore, Joel Sternfeld and Richard Misrach in order to create it. Eggleston and Sternfeld largely shot on Kodachrome—II and X in the early 1970’s, 25 and 64 in the late ’70’s—while Shore shot mostly Kodacolor, and Misrach shot a lot of Vericolor. All of those are Kodak emulsions, but with different aesthetics. These four photographers had different styles and different darkroom processes, and they each had a unique look; the commonality that Fujifilm found was an “overall atmosphere based on amber.” That’s a basic explanation of what Nostalgic Negative is. While not mentioned by Fujifilm, I think this film simulation might be closer to aesthetic of Saul Leiter than the ones Fujifilm stated they studied. Saul Leiter used a whole bunch of different films over the years, including Kodachrome and Anscochrome, but apparently he didn’t mind using generic drug store brands, either. Nostalgic Negative is a divergent approach for Fujifilm, I think, in that it isn’t intended to mimic a certain emulsion (or the “memory color” of a specific film stock), but instead tries to mimic the “memory color” of a certain decade (the 1970’s), or perhaps elicit a nostalgic emotional response.

The Fujifilm X-T5 is the cheapest camera with Nostalgic Negative. It’s the 5th camera to get it, and at $1,700, it’s somehow the cheapest! I don’t think this film simulation will really “catch on” until it’s available on a more affordable body. And this is where I think Fujifilm goofed. If they had introduced Nostalgic Negative on the X-T5, and followed it up with an X-T40, X-S20, X100VI (or whatever it will be called), X-Pro4, and X-E5 in the coming couple of years, it would be a selling point. People would be super-excited about it right now. But because Fujifilm first put it on four models that are expensive and where the users aren’t as eager about film simulations, it lost a lot of its luster. Nobody’s really talking about Nostalgic Negative anymore. While I don’t think I’ll appreciate this film simulation as much as Classic Negative, Classic Chrome, Eterna, or Acros, I do believe it has the potential for some very interesting recipes. I look forward to trying it. Heck, I’m spending $1,700 just for Nostalgic Negative—that’s crazy! Or dumb. It could go either way.

What about you? Are you excited for Nostalgic Negative? How much would you spend for it? If Fujifilm offered it as a paid firmware update for your X-Trans IV camera, would you buy it? Let me know in the comments!

This post contains affiliate links, and if you make a purchase using my links I’ll be compensated a small amount for it.

Preorder your Fujifilm X-T5 in black:  Amazon  B&H
Preorder your Fujifilm X-T5 in silver:  Amazon  B&H

Interestingly, as a side note, if you look closely at the promotional statement by Fujifilm about film simulations on the X-T5, you’ll see this statement: “Reproduce the classic colors and tones that Fujifilm are known for, or add an artistic flair and start to Build Your Legacy.” First, I could be wrong, but I’m pretty sure it should be “is” and not “are”—after all, Fujifilm is known for reproducing classic colors and tones; for “are” to be correct, you’d need a conjunction, such as, “Reproduce the classic colors and tones that Fujifilm and Fuji X Weekly are known for….” Maybe they initially penciled that “and Fuji X Weekly” part in there, and erased it at the last minute, forgetting to change the “are” to “is” by accident. Second, Build Your Legacy seems to be Fujifilm’s new catchphrase for Film Simulation Recipes. It’s been a Fujifilm trademark for a few years, but I hadn’t seen it used in conjunction with film simulations. I wonder if Fujifilm has something up their sleeves that they’ll announce later. Perhaps it is even related to their upcoming app? I’m not sure, but it is definitely something to keep an eye on.

Fujifilm X-T1 Short-Term Project, Update 2

Blossomed Pink Rose – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T1 – “Classic Kodak Chrome” – Day 9

Part 1 Part 3

I had big plans for this project for these days, but life had other plans. Specifically, Covid. I know what you’re thinking: didn’t you just have the flu a few weeks ago? Yes, I did. Now I have Covid. Well, I’m almost recovered now, but I was very sick during the days that I captured these pictures, and I was limited to what I could capture in and around the house. Most of these photographs were taken in the backyard.

If you’re not sure what this short-term project is, the concept is simple: I’m photographing only with my Fujifilm X-T1 from the announcement day of the Fujifilm X-T5 (November 2) until the release date (November 17). Why? First, even though the Fujifilm X-T1 is eight-years-old (and approaching nine), it is still such a great little camera. It took three years for Fujifilm to bring this model to the market because they wanted to get it right, and it was one of their most important cameras ever released. The Fujifilm X-T1 was one of the first, if not the first, Fujifilm cameras that widely appealed to professional photographers. It was Fujifilm’s most successful model at the time—outselling all the previous cameras—and launched the extremely successful X-T line. The X-T5 is the latest iteration. This project will give me a better understanding of how the X-T5 has evolved from the original model. It also allows me to demonstrate that previous models, including the original X-T1, are still really good.

Hopefully, now that I’m not nearly so sick and my quarantine period has ended, I can do some of the photography that I was intending to do. I want to really see what the X-T1 is capable of, and with some luck I’ll be able to do that before this project comes to a close in the coming days. Once my X-T5 arrives in the mail, the X-T1 will be going back on the shelf, at least for a little while. I don’t expect the new camera to be wildly better than the first iteration, but soon enough I’ll know for sure just how much improved it is. And, of course, I’ll write all about it, so stay tuned!

Day 6

Bright Leaves – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T1 – “Fujichrome Slide
Trumpet Now & Trumpet Later – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T1 – “Classic Chrome
Triple Letter – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T1 – “Monochrome

Day 7

Flower Among Leaves – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T1 – “Classic Kodak Chrome
Spiderweb Rose – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T1 – “Classic Kodak Chrome”
Rosebud – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T1 – “Classic Kodak Chrome”

Day 8

Wet Tree Leaves – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T1 – “Classic Kodak Chrome”
Wet Blossom – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T1 – “Classic Kodak Chrome”
Water & Thorns – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T1 – “Classic Kodak Chrome”
Wet Rose – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T1 – “Classic Kodak Chrome”
Sadness – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T1 – “Monochrome”

Day 9

Bougainvillea Sage – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T1 – “Kodak Color Negative
Rays on Leaves – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T1 – “Kodak Color Negative”
Light Bulb Beams – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T1 – “Kodak Color Negative”
Garden Wall – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T1 – “Monochrome”

Day 10

Autumn Sky Blue – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T1 – “Classic Kodak Chrome”
The Colors of Fall – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T1 – “Classic Kodak Chrome”
The Beauty of Once Was – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T1 – “Classic Kodak Chrome”
Sage Bloom – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T1 – “Classic Kodak Chrome”
Warm Light Above a Wall – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T1 – “Classic Kodak Chrome”
Chalk – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T1 – “Classic Kodak Chrome”
Macro Rose – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T1 – “Classic Kodak Chrome”
Bougainvillea Red – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T1 – “Kodak Color Negative”

This post contains affiliate links, and if you make a purchase using my links I’ll be compensated a small amount for it.

Preorder your Fujifilm X-T5 in black:  Amazon  B&H
Preorder your Fujifilm X-T5 in silver:  Amazon  B&H

Recipes For Rain

Raindrops on a Branch – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V – “Elite Chrome 200

In my series, Which Film Simulation Recipes, When?, I’m trying to help out those who are unsure what Film Simulation Recipe to use in a given situation (after all, there are more than 250 to choose from). One of those situation is when you’re shooting in overcast conditions on a dreary day. I provide a recipe suggestion, plus five alternatives, to try. This topic was also discussed briefly in the last SOOC broadcast. The problem is that it’s all subjective; what I think might work well on a rainy day, you might disagree with. The aesthetic that I like you might not. Everyone has their own opinions.

What makes a Film Simulation Recipe work well on an overcast day? First, I think it needs to accentuate the mood. To me, that’s most important, although feelings are abstract and variable, so the task of saying “this recipe has the right mood” is difficult. Whether it should be punchy or muted, warm or cool, depends on the mood you want to convey. The recipe also needs to be able to handle the grey sky and not blow it out, while also dealing with low-contrast situations that you’re likely to encounter. It also has to look good at higher ISOs, because if it’s thick overcast, you’re likely dealing with higher ISOs (thankfully, most recipes do well at higher ISOs because of the X-Trans sensor and processing).

Fujifilm X-Photographer Nathalie Boucry published an excellent article today tackling this topic that I want to direct you to (click here—I promise that it is worth your time to do so). Obviously she doesn’t look at every recipe or even most recipes, but she does a comparison of a handful of them, and you can decide for yourself which one (or ones), if any, stand out to you as something to try. Since it is subjective, what she likes—or what I like—might be much different than what you like, and that’s perfectly ok—it’s about finding what works for you. Nathalie and I are both trying to take you on a path of discovery, so that you can find the recipes that work for you, and in the process you’re likely to find some that aren’t your style.

Comparison courtesy of Nathalie Boucry.

The best path to discovery involves action. You have to try a recipe in a given situation to figure out if it does well or not, and if you appreciate the results of it. You have to be willing to fail—by fail, I simply mean that you might find a recipe that you don’t like to use in a given situation while attempting to find one that you do like for that situation. In a way, it’s a little like playing the classic board game Clue. Was it Colonel Mustard in the Library with the Candlestick? Maybe. You have to suggest it to find out. Will the Elite Chrome 200 recipe work well for you on a rainy day? Maybe. I can suggest it, but you need to try it for yourself to find out. Nathalie’s article might be particularly helpful to you, because she did the hard work, and one of those recipes that she used might just stand out to you as one to try the next time you are photographing in the rain.

Now it’s your turn! What is your favorite Film Simulation Recipe to use on overcast, dreary, rainy days? Let me know in the comments!

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A Chance Encounter on a Rainy Day in May

Chuck Drummond – Pawhuska, OK – Fujifilm X100V – “Kodak Tri-X 400

I just learned that Chuck Drummond passed away this last Friday at 79-years-old. I met him once, and he was very kind. My deepest sympathies go out to the Drummond family, who I’m sure are still mourning.

This last summer my family and I embarked on an epic roadtrip that took us through Oklahoma. Pawhuska was a little out of the way, but we made sure to detour through it so that we could visit The Mercantile, the restaurant/coffee shop/bakery/gift store owned by Ree Drummond, who is also known as The Pioneer Woman.

For those unfamiliar, Ree Drummond became famous for her cooking blog, where she shared recipes used to feed her family and the hungry ranchmen, which turned into books, television shows, product lines, and The Mercantile, among other things. She lives on a large ranch in rural Oklahoma. Pawhuska was barely on the map before Ree became famous—now it’s still barely on the map, although it certainly has seen a significant resurgence, and it can become quite busy with tourists. Yes, for The Pioneer Woman fans, Pawhuska is a destination.

I’ve written about Pawhuska before, and I don’t want to rehash that; instead, I want to share a serendipitous encounter while in the small town, which I’ll remember for some time to come.

We awoke to steel grey sky and light rain. After getting ourselves put together, my family and I strolled around the small town of Pawhuska, which was almost deserted—the weather seemed to scare people off, or at least keep them indoors. We explored the streets, and I captured photographs with my Fujifilm X100V using the Kodak Tri-X 400 Film Simulation Recipe—black and white seemed especially appropriate for the weather. Eventually we made our way inside The Mercantile for breakfast, something that everyone should experience at least once in their lives—to say that it’s good is as big of an understatement as saying the Grand Canyon is big; both are true, but neither truly describe it.

Mercantile – Pawhuska, OK – Fujifilm X100V – “Kodak Tri-X 400”

While waiting for our food, an old man wearing a cowboy hat walked in by himself. He appeared weathered and worn, but in good spirits, with a smile on his face. My wife stated in a whisper just loud enough for our children to hear, “Look, there’s a real cowboy.” A true ranchman. An iconic stature of the American west. He sat at a small table near ours.

My wife knew right away who he was. This was Chuck. Ladd’s dad. Ree’s father-in-law. When the waitress came by, my wife asked if it would be alright to say hi to him. “Oh, sure,” she answered with a wink, “he loves the attention.” So my wife stood up, walked to his table, and introduced herself.

Chuck grinned, and he, too, stood up. He shook my wife’s hand, then he shook mine. He noticed my little girl’s cowboy boots, and made a comment to her about how nice they were and that he liked them. The waitress asked if she could take our picture, so with my wife’s phone she snapped one with Chuck, myself and my wife standing together. It was all very quick. Then we sat back down. Our food came, and we ate. His food came, and he ate alone, although other people also recognized him and he would pause to shake their hands and maybe take a picture. Chuck was a celebrity of sorts.

Our encounter was brief, but memorable. His kindness was obvious. His cheerfulness contagious. We met a genuine cowboy in rural Oklahoma. Just now I showed my daughter the picture I captured of Chuck Drummond (at the top of this article), and asked if she remembered him. “Oh, yeah,” she stated without hesitation, “that man said he liked my boots.” We’ll forever remember this chance encounter on a rainy day in May.

I’d yet to share any of these pictures, which were all captured on that drizzly morning in Pawhuska. I hope that you enjoy them!

Open All Year – Pawhuska, OK – Fujifilm X100V – “Kodak Tri-X 400”
Zoltar & Aliens – Pawhuska, OK – Fujifilm X100V – “Kodak Tri-X 400”
Empty Cup of Tea – Pawhuska, OK – Fujifilm X100V – “Kodak Tri-X 400”
Smoking Area – Pawhuska, OK – Fujifilm X100V – “Kodak Tri-X 400”
Do Not Lock – Pawhuska, OK – Fujifilm X100V – “Kodak Tri-X 400”
Gas Pipes – Pawhuska, OK – Fujifilm X100V – “Kodak Tri-X 400”
Rooftop Access – Pawhuska, OK – Fujifilm X100V – “Kodak Tri-X 400”
Now Open Windows – Pawhuska, OK – Fujifilm X100V – “Kodak Tri-X 400”
Reserved for Ree – Pawhuska, OK – Fujifilm X100V – “Kodak Tri-X 400”
Raindrop Windshield – Pawhuska, OK – Fujifilm X100V – “Kodak Tri-X 400”
Tree & Wet Seats – Pawhuska, OK – Fujifilm X100V – “Kodak Tri-X 400”
Empty Crosswalk – Pawhuska, OK – Fujifilm X100V – “Kodak Tri-X 400”
Mercantile Parking – Pawhuska, OK – Fujifilm X100V – “Kodak Tri-X 400”
Charlie’s – Pawhuska, OK – Fujifilm X100V – “Kodak Tri-X 400”
Inside Looking Out – Pawhuska, OK – Fujifilm X100V – “Kodak Tri-X 400”
5¢ Biscuit Co – Pawhuska, OK – Fujifilm X100V – “Kodak Tri-X 400”
Love Mugs – Pawhuska, OK – Fujifilm X100V – “Kodak Tri-X 400”
Coffee – Pawhuska, OK – Fujifilm X100V – “Kodak Tri-X 400”
Super Easy – Pawhuska, OK – Fujifilm X100V – “Kodak Tri-X 400”
Mercantile Shoppers – Pawhuska, OK – Fujifilm X100V – “Kodak Tri-X 400”
Jo & Charlie – Pawhuska, OK – Fujifilm X100V – “Kodak Tri-X 400”
Ranch Truck – Pawhuska, OK – Fujifilm X100V – “Kodak Tri-X 400”
Power Wagon – Pawhuska, OK – Fujifilm X100V – “Kodak Tri-X 400”
Bull – Pawhuska, OK – Fujifilm X100V – “Kodak Tri-X 400”
Dog & Table – Pawhuska, OK – Fujifilm X100V – “Kodak Tri-X 400”
Chair & White Table – Pawhuska, OK – Fujifilm X100V – “Kodak Tri-X 400”
Couch by Windows – Pawhuska, OK – Fujifilm X100V – “Kodak Tri-X 400”
MMM MMM MMM – Pawhuska, OK – Fujifilm X100V – “Kodak Tri-X 400”
Yum! – Pawhuska, OK – Fujifilm X100V – “Kodak Tri-X 400”
Yum, Too! – Pawhuska, OK – Fujifilm X100V – “Kodak Tri-X 400”
Jitter Juice – Pawhuska, OK – Fujifilm X100V – “Kodak Tri-X 400”
Breakfast – Pawhuska, OK – Fujifilm X100V – “Kodak Tri-X 400”

Load These Two Film Simulation Recipes Into Your Camera…

Evening Saguaro – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T30 – “Kodak Ektachrome 100SW”

For those who watch the monthly SOOC broadcast, the current recipe-of-the-month is Fujichrome Sensia 100. We introduced that Film Simulation Recipe in the last episode, and we will finish our discussion of it in the next show, which will be in one week, on Thursday, November 17th. I hope that you’ll join us! Don’t forget to upload your photos captured with the Fujichrome Sensia 100 Film Simulation Recipe (click here) by November 15th to be shown in the next broadcast.

Speaking of the next SOOC broadcast, after we finish our discussion of the Fujichrome Sensia 100 recipe, we’ll introduce the next recipe-of-the-month, which will be Kodak Ektachrome 100SW. It produces warm and vibrant colors, which I find especially well suited for landscape photography. Be sure to set a reminder, so that you don’t miss the episode!

For those who don’t know, SOOC is a monthly live video series, with each episode focused on a different Film Simulation Recipe. It is a collaboration between Tame Your Fujifilm (Fujifilm X-Photographer Nathalie Boucry) and Fuji X Weekly (Ritchie Roesch). SOOC is a fun and educational experience where we not only talk about Fujifilm camera settings, but also answer your questions and give tips and tricks. Basically, we’re trying to help you master your Fujifilm camera, with a focus on simplifying your photographic workflow. It’s also interactive, and your participation makes it great!

Even though I have my own photography projects going on and I’m always working on new Film Simulation Recipes, I also shoot with the recipes that we discuss in each episode (plus the upcoming episode). I have been using both the Fujichrome Sensia 100 and the Kodak Ektachrome 100SW recipes. I don’t just ask you to use the recipes, myself and Nathalie both use them, too—we’re doing it together as a community.

Flag Pole – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T30 – “Fujichrome Sensia 100”

If you have a Fujifilm X-Trans III or newer camera, I invite you to program and shoot with the Fujichrome Sensia 100 Film Simulation Recipe, and share with us your results. While you’re at it, load the Kodak Ektachrome 100SW recipe into your camera, too, and have it ready to go for next week.

If you missed the last SOOC broadcast, which really was a good one, you can watch it below. It’s a bit long (we have a little problem called “time management”… 🤣), but I believe you’ll find it worthwhile.

See you next Thursday!

Fujifilm X-T1 Short-Term Project, Update 1

Tiny Purple Blossoms – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T1 – “Classic Kodak Chrome” – Day 5

In my article, Did I Buy the Fujifilm X-T5? Should You?, I mentioned that I began a new short-term photography project: photographing only with my Fujifilm X-T1 from the announcement of the Fujifilm X-T5, which was November 2, until the release date, which will be November 17. I’m not using any other camera during this 16 day period, only the X-T1.

Why am I doing this? First, even though the Fujifilm X-T1 is eight-years-old (and approaching nine), it is still such a great little camera. It took three years for Fujifilm to bring this model to the market because they wanted to get it right, and it was one of their most important cameras ever released. The Fujifilm X-T1 was one of the first, if not the first, Fujifilm cameras that widely appealed to professional photographers. It was Fujifilm’s most successful model at the time—outselling all the previous cameras—and launched the extremely successful X-T line. The X-T5 is the latest iteration. This project will give me a better understanding of how the X-T5 has evolved from the original model.

More importantly than any of that, the Fujifilm X-T1 was a good camera on the day it was released, and is still a good camera in 2022. There’s no reason that it cannot be used today. The image quality is excellent. The camera is pretty quick overall (look at the sports pictures!). It has one advantage over all other X-T cameras: 16mp. The files are smaller, which means I can capture more pictures on an SD card, it takes less time to transfer the pictures from the camera to my phone, the pictures take up less space on my phone, the pictures upload more quickly to my cloud storage, the pictures use less cloud data, and the pictures download from cloud storage more quickly. Less is more sometimes. I’ve really appreciated this quickness lately. The Fujifilm X-T1 is a camera that I’ve thoroughly enjoyed shooting with over the last week, and I think I’ll be a little sad when I put it back on the shelf after my X-T5 arrives in the mail.

Day 1

Birdcage on a Wall – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T1 – “Classic Kodak Chrome” – Day 1
A Pink Rose in the Garden – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T1 – “Classic Kodak Chrome”
Autumn Colors – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T1 – “Classic Kodak Chrome”

Day 2

Hummingbird Feeder Along a Wall – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T1 – “Classic Kodak Chrome”
Running on Air – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T1 – “Classic Kodak Chrome”
Inflatable Obstacle – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T1 – “Classic Kodak Chrome”
Duck and Run – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T1 – “Classic Kodak Chrome”
Obstacle Athlete – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T1 – “Classic Kodak Chrome”

Day 3

Morning Roofline – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T1 – “Classic Kodak Chrome”
Bougainvillea Bush – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T1 – “Classic Kodak Chrome”
Green Tree Leaves – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T1 – “Classic Kodak Chrome”

Day 4

An Arizona Autumn – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T1 – “Kodak Portra 160
Lots of Pink Blossoms – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T1 – “Kodak Portra 160”
Bent Do Not Enter Sign – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T1 – “Kodak Portra 160”
Tower – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T1 – “Kodak Portra 160”
Backyard QB – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T1 – “Kodak Portra 160”
Football Catcher – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T1 – “Kodak Portra 160”

Day 5

Cranes – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T1 – “Kodak Portra 160”
Monkeys on the Bars – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T1 – “Kodak Portra 160”
Flower Among Flowers – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T1 – “Kodak Portra 160”
Hidden Logs – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T1 – “Kodak Portra 160”
Bones – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T1 – “Kodak Portra 160”
Saguaro Skeleton – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T1 – “Monochrome
Dead Saguaro – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T1 – “Monochrome”

This post contains affiliate links, and if you make a purchase using my links I’ll be compensated a small amount for it.

Preorder your Fujifilm X-T5 in black:  Amazon  B&H
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Part 2

Fujifilm X-T30 (+X-T3 & X-Trans III) Film Simulation Recipe: Classic Kodak

Colorful Flags – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T30 – “Classic Kodak”

As I was beginning to put together my recent article, Which Film Simulation Recipes, When? — Part 2 (X-T3 & X-T30), I realized that I didn’t have a lot of Film Simulation Recipes that use the Shade White Balance. Cameras that are older than the Fujifilm X-Pro3 cannot save a White Balance Shift with each C1-C7 Custom Preset; however, the camera will remember one shift with each white balance type, so if each C1-C7 Custom Preset uses a different white balance type, you won’t have to remember to adjust the shift, which improves the user experience. I realized that I needed another recipe that uses the Shade white balance type, so that’s where this recipe originated.

Specifically, I set out to create a Film Simulation Recipe that could make a good option for “golden hour” or “midday” daylight photography—potentially a solid choice for C1 or C2 in your camera. I wanted it to have a classic Kodak aesthetic—perhaps a bit nostalgic, like from the 1970’s or 1980’s, maybe somewhat similar to Kodacolor—but not modeled after any specific film. Something classic and warm and clearly Kodak-like. I really like what I came up with, and I think many of you will, too!

Saguaro Green – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T30 – “Classic Kodak”

This “Classic Kodak” Film Simulation Recipe is compatible with the X-T3 and X-T30 cameras, and, because it doesn’t use Color Chrome Effect, it’s also compatible with X-Trans III models. To use this recipe on newer X-Trans IV (and X-Trans V) cameras, simply set Color Chrome FX Blue to Off, Clarity to 0, and choose a Grain size (either Small or Large).

Classic Chrome
Dynamic Range: DR400
Highlight: -2
Shadow: +1
Color: +4
Noise Reduction: -4
Sharpness: -1
Grain Effect: Strong
Color Chrome Effect: Off
White Balance: Shade, -1 Red & +2 Blue
ISO: Auto up to ISO 6400

Exposure Compensation: +1/3 to +1

Below are all camera-made JPEGs captured using this “Classic Kodak” Film Simulation Recipe on my Fujifilm X-T30:

Clocktower – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T30
Center on Main – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T30
5 & 6 – Goodyear, AZ – Fujifilm X-T30
Water Fountain – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T30
Circle Around the Roofline – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T30
Old Doll Head For Sale – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T30
Unlit Bulbs and Rainbow – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T30
Rainbow Hidden in the Trees – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T30
Small Yellow Leaves – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T30
Dressed in Pink – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T30
Green Garden Leaves – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T30
Palm Branches in the Sky – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T30
Sonoran Desert Mountains – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T30
Split Saguaro – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T30

Find this Film Simulation Recipe and over 250 more on the Fuji X Weekly — Film Recipes App!

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$2.00

How I Inadvertently Made The Fujifilm X100V So Expensive

Let’s be clear: the Fujifilm X100V has skyrocketed in price because Fujifilm cannot make enough copies due to the global parts shortage. But, when you combine that shortage with an increased demand, you get ridiculously inflated prices. Supply and demand. But what caused the demand to increase?

A few people shared with me a recent Petapixel article entitled Used Fujifilm X100 Series Camera Prices Are Surging Thanks to TikTok. This article is based off of a Fujiaddict article entitled TikTokers Drive Up Fujifilm X100 Prices Across The Lineup. Both are interesting reads and basically say the same thing: social media influencers, particularly those on TikTok (by the way, you can find me on TikTok…), are causing an increased interest in (and demand for) the X100—from the original to the latest version—by raving about the camera. It should be noted that the X100-series is a gateway into the Fujifilm world for a lot of people—it’s easier to dip your toes with a fixed-lens than to dive into a whole interchangeable-lens system. Many people have told me that an X100-series camera was their first Fujifilm, sometimes their very first camera, period.

Sentinel & Merced – Yosemite NP, CA – Fujifilm X100V – “Vintage Color

There are quotes in the article describing what’s great about the X100V, including “zero editing” and “digital camera that mimics film” and “shoot photos that need no editing.” That made me wonder if these social media influencers are using Film Simulation Recipes. Makes sense, right? I mean, it kind of sounds like they do, and the photographs seem to confirm it, but I’m not really sure. I reached out to a couple of those mentioned in the article, but have yet to receive a response, which is not surprising because I’m sure they’re absolutely inundated with messages—I get a ton, and I’m nowhere near as popular as they are. I saw in the comments on one of the videos that it was just default Classic Chrome and not a recipe. Oh, well. Then I searched #fujifilmx100v on both TikTok and Instagram (follow me on Instagram, if you don’t already), and I found a bunch of similar videos and posts by others that do, in fact, mention specifically using Film Simulation Recipes. I think it’s quite plausible—perhaps probable—that the recipes are a significant factor in the rise in popularity of the X100V and other X100-series cameras, and maybe Fujifilm in general. So while I’m not directly responsible, it appears that I might be indirectly responsible for the rise in cost of the X100V, at least partially and to a small extent. If you’re trying to purchase an X100-series camera and you’re finding it overpriced, I’m sorry. I didn’t mean for that to happen, and I apologize for my part in it.

Putting the humor aside, I am incredibly honored that so many are using my Film Simulation Recipes and that they’re helping lots of people achieve the looks they’re after without fussing with editing—from those just getting started with their first “real” camera to recognizable names doing pro work, and all sorts of people in-between. You’re having more fun, potentially increasing your productivity, and spending more time doing what’s important to you, because you’re spending less time in front of a computer. That’s all so wonderful! It’s unreal to me that I’m having such a large impact on photography, something that I never imagined would ever happen. I’m incredibly grateful and appreciative to all of you for visiting this website and trying the recipes and being a part of this great community. Thank you!

And, I suppose, that makes you accomplices in the rise in cost of the X100, too….

Edit: The moment that I published this, I received a message from Edward Lee Films (who is mentioned in the articles), and he does in fact have the Fuji X Weekly App on his phone and uses Film Simulation Recipes. Check him out on Instagram and TikTok!