Current Fujifilm Deals

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Almost all of the lens deals have expired, but the X-T2 and X-T20 are still discounted steeply. If I were in the market for a new Fujifilm body, I would take a long look at those two cameras, as they’re so cheap it’s hard to not buy one. GFX is still discounted, and if you’ve wanted to get into medium-format, $5,000 will get you a camera and lens, which was unfathomable just last year.

Fujifilm X Cameras:

Fujifilm X-T2 (Body Only) $800
Fujifilm X-T2 with 18-55mm lens $1,218
Fujifilm X-T20 (Body Only) $600
Fujifilm X-T20 w/16-50mm lens $700
Fujifilm X-T20 w/18-55mm lens $900
Fujifilm X-T30 (Body Only) $900
Fujifilm X-E3 (Body Only) $700
Fujifilm X-H1 (Body Only) w/power grip $1,300
Fujifilm XF10 $450

Fujifilm X Lenses:

Fujifilm 14mm f/2.8 $650
Rokinon 12mm f/2 $250
Rokinon 8mm f/2.8 Fisheye $270
Viltrox 85mm f/1.8 $400

Fujifilm GFX Cameras:

Fujifilm GFX 50R (Body Only) $4,000
Fujifilm GFX 50R w/63mm lens $5,000
Fujifilm GFX 50R w/32-64mm lens $5,800
Fujifilm GFX 50S (Body Only) $5,500

Fujifilm GFX Lenses:

Fujinon GFX 23mm f/4 $2,100
Fujinon GFX 32-64mm f/4 $1,800
Fujinon GFX 63mm f/2.8 $1,000
Fujinon GFX 100-200mm f/5.6 $1,500
Fujinon GFX 110mm f/2 $2,300
Fujinon GFX 250mm f/4 $2,800

As always, nobody pays me to write the articles that you find on Fuji X Weekly, so using my Amazon affiliate links is the only way to financially support this website. I would never ask you to buy something that you didn’t want, but if you were already planning to purchase something, it’s greatly appreciated if you did so using my links. It definitely helps! I want to give a special thank you to those who have done this already.

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Weekly Photo Project, Week 49

The first four photographs in this set are ones that I haven’t posted on Fuji X Weekly before. The bottom three pictures were in the Kodacolor film simulation recipe article, so you’ve probably seen them before, but I hope that you don’t mind seeing them again. Sunrise Over Lincoln Highway is a great example of how D-Range Priority can be a useful feature occasionally. In this case D-Range Priority Strong was selected in order to combat the extreme contrast of the scene.

Sunday, July 7, 2019

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Caged Flowers – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 & 35mm f/2 – 1/90, f/4, ISO 6400

Monday, July 8, 2019

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Empty Tables – Coalville, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 & 35mm f/2 – 1/125, f/5.6, ISO 800

Tuesday, July 9, 2019

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Green Field Fence – Coalville, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 & 35mm f/2 – 1/500, f/10, ISO 640

Wednesday, July 10, 2019

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Sunrise Over Lincoln Highway – Echo, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 & 35mm f/2 – 1/950, f/10, ISO 640

Thursday, July 11, 2019

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Renew or Replace – Riverdale, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 & 90mm f/2 – 1/3500, f/f.6, ISO 640

Friday, July 12, 2019

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Wearing Grandpa’s Hat – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 & 90mm f/2 – 1/350, f/4.5, ISO 640

Saturday, July 13, 2019

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Be The Light – Ogden, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 & 90mm f/2 – 1/80, f/2.8, ISO 6400

Week 48  Week 50

Fujifilm Full Frame Reflections

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Morning Coffee – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

As I was sitting on the coach, sipping my morning coffee, with Transatlantic’s epic Kaleidoscope album playing in the background, my thoughts drifted to Fujifilm and sensor sizes. This might seem like a strange line of thought for the environment that I was in, but sometimes that happens. You are probably aware that Fujifilm makes mirrorless cameras with APS-C sized sensors and medium-format sensors, but they skipped right over full-frame. I began to consider why this was and wasn’t a good strategy, and what the consequences might be for it. What should Fujifilm consider for future sensors? What can they do right now?

The reason why I believe Fujifilm jumped into the APS-C market to begin with was because, with the intended market and available technology ten years ago, APS-C made the most sense. There was a demand for high-quality, mid-budget, retro-styled mirrorless cameras intended for advanced enthusiasts. It was an under-tapped market, and Fujifilm even surprised themselves with the success of their X series. Fujifilm made the right products at the right time and sold them at the right price. Full-frame wasn’t practical for them at that time and they wouldn’t have experienced the same success if they had gone that route instead.

A lot of people were surprised when Fujifilm decided to skip full-frame and jump head-long into medium-format. The argument was that the full-frame market was overcrowded, and it was better to be #1 in a small market than #5 or #6 in a large market, because you can always grow the small market. That strategy seems to be working, as not only did Fujifilm quickly set themselves as the leader in the medium-format market, but they’ve been growing it at a rapid pace. By all indications, Fujifilm GFX has been a smashing success.

Should Fujifilm consider making a full-frame line? They’re well established in the APS-C market, they’re currently king of medium-format, so why not go full-frame? Wouldn’t they be successful there, too? There are a lot of questions that can be asked, and surely Fujifilm has asked themselves these questions, yet they insist that they will not make a full-frame camera line.

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Magic Beans – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

In my opinion, X-Trans IV (and even X-Trans III) cameras already deliver full-frame image quality, but in a smaller package. For example, the Nikon D700, which is a 10-year-old full-frame camera, doesn’t compare to the modern Fujifilm X camera, which produces better image quality pretty much across the board. If you compare it to a five-year-old full-frame Nikon D610, the two cameras are pretty close in image quality. If you compare it to a new full-frame camera, the full-frame camera wins. The big difference is resolution. There was a time not long ago that conventional wisdom stated 24-megapixels was overkill. Now if you’re not close to 50-megapixels, you don’t have enough. Sony just announced a 61-megapixel camera, and APS-C cannot compete with that. Full-frame also has a dynamic range and high ISO advantage, but that gap has narrowed, and it’s not nearly as big of a difference as it once was. It’s still an advantage for full-frame, but modern Fujifilm X camera aren’t far behind at all. To summarize, Fujifilm’s recent X cameras have better image quality than 10-year-old full-frame, as good as five-year-old full-frame, and not as good as the latest full-frame, which most significantly have a resolution advantage. Remember, it wasn’t very long ago that cameras like the D700 and D610 were touted as pro gear capable of capturing amazing pictures, and modern Fujifilm cameras are just as good as those, if not better.

Unless Fujifilm uncovers a need within full-frame that other brands are overlooking and they believe they can fulfill, I really don’t see them making a new line of cameras and lenses. Fujifilm is going to focus on X and GFX, both of which are doing pretty well. But there is a way that they can close the gap a little between the two systems. This wouldn’t require too much development or expense on Fujifilm’s part to create. What they can do to appease those who want full-frame but won’t go medium-format, without actually creating a new system, is to put a larger sensor, perhaps an APS-H sized sensor, in an already existing APS-C camera. Sigma did something like this with their Quattro cameras, so it’s not completely unheard of.

APS-H sensors are about 15% larger than APS-C. They fit in-between APS-C and full-frame. If Fujifilm took the X-Trans IV sensor and increased the size of it to APS-H, they would suddenly have a 30-megapixel camera with identical image quality to their 26-megapixel cameras. They could put it in an X-H1 or X-T3 body. My guess is that most Fujinon lenses would cover the bigger sensor, and only some of them won’t have full coverage, which isn’t a huge deal. For those lenses that don’t fully cover the sensor, the camera can be programmed to automatically crop it to 26-megapixels. By increasing the sensor size a little, Fujifilm could offer a higher megapixel option without sacrificing image quality and without creating a new system.

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Coffee Beans – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

While 30-megapixels doesn’t sound like a huge jump (because it’s not), it would allow slightly bigger prints or deeper crops. It’s not a large leap, but it is a leap nonetheless. Looking ahead to future sensors, which are likely to have more resolution while maintaining or improving image quality, it’s not improbable to think that a future X-Trans V APS-H sensor might have 36-megapixels, and that 40+ megapixels aren’t out of the question within the next five years. In this way those who are attracted to the high resolution offerings of full-frame, who can’t afford medium-format, might consider staying with Fujifilm instead of switching brands.

I’m not suggesting in the least that Fujifilm should abandon APS-C for APS-H. I’m merely suggesting that to close the gap a little (and it would definitely be a little) between APS-C and medium-format, where they hypothetically could have a full-frame camera but don’t, they should consider offering one or maybe a few camera models with a little larger sensor. It seems like they could add them to already existing models, such as the X-H1, X-T3, X-Pro3, X100V (the latter two cameras are coming soon), without too many modifications, and without increasing the cost all that much. Whatever would be the easiest camera to put it in, they should give it a try and see how it does. Heck, do it to the X-H1 and call it the X-H2. I think it would attract some who like the idea of Fujifilm X but wish the sensor was larger, and it might keep those itching for full-frame Fujifilm from jumping ship because it’s not happening.

The coffee was good but soon the cup was empty. The music ended with what’s probably the best Nights in White Satin cover I’ve had the pleasure to hear. I’m very happy with the Fujifilm X system as it stands today, yet I know that it will only get better as technology advances. Fujifilm has a history of making good business decisions, and whatever they decide to do or not do is probably going to work out well for them. As for me, I will be using the tools that I have to the best of my ability to create my art.

Fujifilm X-T30 vs Sony A6000 – A Camera Showdown With Vintage Glass

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Photo by Ritchie Roesch – Fujifilm X-T30 & Helios 44-2

My photography friend, Aaron Mashburn, and I recently went to Antelope Island State Park in Utah. He has a Sony A6000, and I have a Fujifilm X-T30. We both like to use vintage glass, and we both have several M42-mount lenses. We had the idea to go on a photography adventure and share lenses. I had the chance to borrow his glass and he had a chance to use mine, which worked out great. Our trip was a lot of fun!

This camera showdown–Fujifilm X-T30 vs. Sony A6000–is completely for amusement and nothing else. You will not find test charts, massive crops or a winner declared. We each like our cameras, both of which are good photographic tools, and we didn’t try to convince each other to switch brands. We had a good time, and it was great to see what we had captured. Interestingly, there were several pictures that were nearly identical, not because we were copying each other, but because we both happened to see the same thing. If there’s any lesson, it’s that vision is more important than gear, and most cameras are fully capable of fulfilling most photographer’s visions.

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Photo by Ritchie Roesch – Fujifilm X-T30 & Asahi Pentax Super-Takumar 50mm f/1.4

We each brought with us several lenses, but for the pictures in this article only three were used: Asahi Pentax Super-Takumar 50mm f/1.4, Asahi Pentax Auto-Takumar 55mm f/2.2, and Helios 44-2. We used other lenses, but none of those pictures were selected for this. All three of the lenses that I mentioned are great, but the 50mm f/1.4 really stands out as special. It has the “it” factor, for sure! The Helios 44-2 does magical things sometimes. The 55mm f/2.2 is consistently good. If there’s any winner to declare in this showdown, it would be the Asahi Pentax 50mm f/1.4 lens. This is a must-have vintage lens, in my opinion.

The pictures below are some examples of what we captured on our Antelope Island State Park photographic adventure. Even though different cameras and lenses were used, together these images tell a story. I hope that you enjoy the photographs from both cameras, as both cameras proved to be perfectly good for this purpose. I would like to give a special thank-you to Aaron for allowing me to use his pictures!

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Photo by Ritchie Roesch – Fujifilm X-T30 & Asahi Pentax Auto-Takumar 55mm f/2.2

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Photo by Aaron Mashburn – Sony A6000 & Asahi Pentax Auto-Takumar 55mm f/2.2

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Photo by Ritchie Roesch – Fujifilm X-T30 & Asahi Pentax Super-Takumar 50mm f/1.4

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Photo by Aaron Mashburn – Sony A6000 & Asahi Pentax Auto-Takumar 55mm f/2.2

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Photo by Ritchie Roesch – Fujifilm X-T30 & Asahi Pentax Super-Takumar 50mm f/1.4

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Photo by Aaron Mashburn – Sony A6000 & Asahi Pentax Auto-Takumar 55mm f/2.2

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Photo by Ritchie Roesch – Fujifilm X-T30 & Asahi Pentax Super-Takumar 50mm f/1.4

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Photo by Aaron Mashburn – Sony A6000 & Asahi Pentax Auto-Takumar 55mm f/2.2

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Photo by Ritchie Roesch – Fujifilm X-T30 & Helios 44-2

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Photo by Aaron Mashburn – Sony A6000 & Asahi Pentax Auto-Takumar 55mm f/2.2

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Photo by Ritchie Roesch – Fujifilm X-T30 & Helios 44-2

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Photo by Aaron Mashburn – Sony A6000 & Asahi Pentax Super-Takumar 50mm f/1.4

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Photo by Ritchie Roesch – Fujifilm X-T30 & Asahi Pentax Auto-Takumar 55mm f/2.2

Weekly Photo Project, Week 48

Unsurprisingly, this week had a few photographically productive days and a few that weren’t. That’s been a common theme of this project, and if there’s one thing that I’d like to further work on regarding all this is ensuring that each day is productive. That’s not an easy task because life pulls in so many different directions all at once. I think finding and taking advantage of the small moments tucked among all of the distractions and responsibilities is an opportunity to succeed at this, but it will take being more diligent and deliberate.

Sunday, June 30, 2019

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Highland Cow – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 & 35mm f/2 – 1/280, f/8, ISO 640

Monday, July 1, 2019

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Waterfall Into The Ogden River – Ogden, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 & 35mm f/2 – 1/4000, f/8, ISO 640

Tuesday, July 2, 2019

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Rushing Light – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 & 90mm f/2 – 1/4000, f/6.4, ISO 640

Wednesday, July 3, 2019

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Garden Lily – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 & 35mm f/2 – 1/350, f/6.4, ISO 640

Thursday, July 4, 2019

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Breakfast – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 & 90mm f/2 – 1/110, f/4.5, ISO 6400

Friday, July 5, 2019

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Lakeshore Tree – Layton, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 & 90mm f/2 – 1/125, f/8, ISO 640

Saturday, July 6, 2019

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American Toyota – Syracuse, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 & 35mm f/2 – 1/125, f/4.5, ISO 2000

Week 47   Week 49

Comparing Film Simulation Recipes

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I shoot JPEGs, but it’s not uncommon for me to shoot RAW+JPEG, since it gives me the opportunity to reprocess the picture in-camera, which is helpful when developing different film simulation recipes. Because of this, I was able to process a single picture I captured recently on my Fujifilm X-T30 using many of my different recipes to compare the differences. I thought that this might be helpful to some of you. Perhaps there’s one recipe that stands out to you in the pictures below that you’ve never used. Obviously different settings look better in different situations, and in this article there’s just one picture to compare, so even though you might not like how one recipe looks in this article doesn’t mean that you wouldn’t like it with different subject and in a different light. The scope of this article is quite limited, but I hope that seeing the various film simulation recipes applied to a single exposure is helpful to someone.

Not every recipe was used for this post. Some of them require a specific parameter that was not available. For example, the picture at the top was made using my HP5 Plus Push-Process recipe, which requires an ultra-high ISO, so it wasn’t possible to apply it to the exposure below. Other recipes, such as my faded color and faded monochrome, require double exposures. There are other film simulation recipes that you could try not represented below, and I invite you to investigate the different options to see if there’s one or more that work well for your photography. Let me know in the comments which film simulation recipe is your favorite and which in your opinion fits the exposure below best.

Color

B&W

Weekly Photo Project, Week 47

As you can see, I’m pretty far behind getting these Weekly Photo Project posts out. I’m actually nearing completion of the project, as I have five more weeks after the one that these pictures represent. Two of those weeks have already happened, and the third will be finished tomorrow. That means, in reality, there are only two weeks left, which is just really difficult for me to imagine, yet I’m quite anxious for this to be done. The first two pictures below are textured pictures using the double-exposure feature of my Fujifilm X-T30. I included the third picture in my Diversity of Utah Landscapes article, so you’ve probably seen it before. The final four pictures are ones that I’ve yet to share.

Sunday, June 23, 2019

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Coffee Still Life – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 & 90mm f/2 – Double Exposure

Monday, June 24, 2019

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Bottle Still Life – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 & 90mm f/2 – Double Exposure

Tuesday, June 25, 2019

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Blue Sunset – Antelope Island SP, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 & 90mm f/2 – 1/125, f/4, ISO 5000

Wednesday, June 26, 2019

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Fake Dog In The Fake Grass – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 & 90mm f/2 – 1/1250, f/4, ISO 640

Thursday, June 27, 2019

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Boy On Couch – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 & 90mm f/2 – 1/125, f/5.6, ISO 2000

Friday, June 28, 2019

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Sunlight Over The Roof – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 & 90mm f/2 – 1/125, f/14, ISO 500

Saturday, June 29, 2019

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Suburban Fence Monochrome – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 & 90mm f/2 – 1/125, f/4.5, ISO 500

Week 46  Week 48

My Fujifilm X-T30 Kodacolor Film Simulation Recipe

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Summit Merc – Coalville, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 – Kodacolor

This is the film simulation recipe that you’ve been waiting for! Well, maybe that’s an exaggeration, but if you like my Kodachrome II or Portra 400 recipes, which are both very popular, you’ll likely also appreciate this one. It’s in the same neighborhood as those, producing a classic Kodak analog aesthetic. I think many of you will like this film simulation recipe.

Last week I was contacted by a Fuji X Weekly reader who wanted help creating an in-camera look that was similar to the pictures from this other photographer. It didn’t take me long to realize that the photographer in question was using a digital camera (Nikon D750) and applying a plugin preset (most likely VSCO) to achieve the desired look. If I had to take a guess, I would say that the preset is supposed to resemble Kodak Portra 400, although probably one of the alternative versions and not the straight Portra 400 preset. Anytime that I get one of these requests I always make an attempt to create it, although oftentimes my efforts are not successful and no recipe is made. This time, my first stab at it was pretty close, and a little refining made it even closer. I was able to quickly create a film simulation recipe that produces similar results in-camera to what that other photographer is getting with software.

The reason that I named this recipe Kodacolor and not Portra is that, to me, it looks more like Kodacolor VR than Portra, although the aesthetics of these two films are quite similar. Portra is the better film with improved grain, more tolerance to under and over exposure, and slightly more accurate skin tones, but overall the films produce very similar looks. Kodak originally developed Kodacolor VR film in the early 1980’s for their Disc cameras, which used a film cartridge resembling a computer floppy disc (or the “save icon”), allowing the camera to be small and easy to use. It made tiny exposures on the disc of film, and the film prior to Kodacolor VR, which was called Kodacolor II, was too grainy and not sharp enough for the small exposure to produce good results. Kodak’s solution was to create a sharper film with finer grain, which they originally named Kodacolor HR, and quickly renamed Kodacolor VR after making a small improvement. Kodacolor VR was available in ISO 100, 200, 400 and 1000 film speeds. This film simulation recipe most closely resembles Kodacolor VR 200, in my opinion. Kodacolor VR was replaced by Kodacolor VR-G in the mid 1980’s, which was later renamed Kodak Gold. Kodacolor VR was technically discontinued in 1986, but the ISO 200 version was renamed Kodacolor 200 and later ColorPlus 200, which is surprisingly still available today.

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Kodak Flying Disc – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 – Kodacolor

One characteristic of Kodacolor VR is that it’s not particularly tolerant to underexposure (for color negative film), so a common technique was to overexpose the film (to prevent accidental underexposure). The side-effect of this, which is a common side-effect of most Kodak color negative films, but it’s especially pronounced on this particular film, is cyan sky. Blues tend to become an unnatural lighter color. That’s what this film simulation recipe looks like: Kodacolor VR 200 that’s been overexposed. It’s also a close proximity to Portra 400 that’s been overexposed, although it’s not quite as strong of a match for that as Kodacolor VR.

Classic Chrome
Dynamic Range: DR400
Highlight: -1
Shadow: +2
Color: -2
Sharpening: +2
Noise Reduction: -4
Grain: Strong
Color Chrome Effect: Off
White Balance: 6300K, -1 Red & -4 Blue
ISO: Auto up to ISO 6400
Exposure Compensation: +2/3 to + 1-1/3 (typically)

Example photographs, all camera-made JPEGs captured using my Kodacolor film simulation recipe on my Fujifilm X-T30:

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Echo Canyon Morning – Echo, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 – Kodacolor

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Morning Light In Echo Canyon – Echo, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 – Kodacolor

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Tree On The Rocky Ledge – Echo, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 – Kodacolor

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Western Cliff – Echo, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 – Kodacolor

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Rock Bowl – Echo, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 – Kodacolor

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Echo Mesa – Echo, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 – Kodacolor

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Summer Witches – Echo, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 – Kodacolor

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Trees Dotting The Rock – Echo, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 – Kodacolor

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Blue Sky Rocks – Echo, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 – Kodacolor

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Weber River Thistle Blooms – Coalville, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 – Kodacolor

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Yucca Blossoms – South Ogden, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 – Kodacolor

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Sky Tree – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 – Kodacolor

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Sycamore Seeds – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 – Kodacolor

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Green Cottonwood Leaf – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 – Kodacolor

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Cottonwood Sun – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 – Kodacolor

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Vintage Sunset – Ogden, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 – Kodacolor

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Blue Hole – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 – Kodacolor

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Summer Clouds Behind The Green Hill – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 – Kodacolor

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Summer Blue & Green – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 – Kodacolor

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Big Cloud Behind The Mountain – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 – Kodacolor

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Grey Sky Hill – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 – Kodacolor

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Car Wash – South Ogden, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 – Kodacolor

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Burger Umbrellas – Ogden, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 – Kodacolor

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Renew or Replace – Riverdale, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 – Kodacolor

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Red Curve – Riverdale, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 – Kodacolor

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Red Corner – South Ogden, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 – Kodacolor

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Moore Motor – Coalville, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 – Kodacolor

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Better Days Behind – Coalville, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 – Kodacolor

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Building For Sale – Coalville, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 – Kodacolor

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Brick Angles – Coalville, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 – Kodacolor

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Suburban Garage – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 – Kodacolor

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Gas – Echo, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 – Kodacolor

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Gas Cafe – Echo, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 – Kodacolor

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Neighborhood Fence – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 – Kodacolor

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The Joy of Driving Rain – Layton, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 – Kodacolor

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Man of Steel – Coalville, UT – Fujifilm X-T30  – Kodacolor

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Bicycle Back Tire – South Weber, Utah – Fujifilm X-T30 – Kodacolor

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Chaos Wheel – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 – Kodacolor

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Hat On A Bed – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 – Kodacolor

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Couch Pillows – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 – Kodacolor

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Wall Curtain – Layton, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 – Kodacolor

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Intelligence Game – Layton, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 – Kodacolor

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The Trouble With Age – Layton, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 – Kodacolor

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Ketchup – Riverdale, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 – Kodacolor

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Orange – South Ogden, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 – Kodacolor

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Playing With Fire – South Ogden, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 – Kodacolor

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Mastrena – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 – Kodacolor

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Be The Light – Ogden, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 – Kodacolor

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Adidas – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 – Kodacolor

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Balloon Maker – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 – Kodacolor

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Standing In The Water Balloon Pool – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 – Kodacolor

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Water Balloon Fight – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 – Kodacolor

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Recording Summer Fun – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 – Kodacolor

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Wearing Grandpa’s Hat – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 – Kodacolor

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Johanna – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 – Kodacolor

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Echo Canyon Morning Freight – Echo, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 – Kodacolor

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Freight Train At Echo – Echo, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 – Kodacolor

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Eastbound Freight Through Echo Canyon – Echo, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 – Kodacolor

Top 10 Most Popular Film Simulation Recipes

Film simulation recipes are the number one most popular type of article on Fuji X Weekly. These posts are what most people come to this blog to read. In fact, so far this year, the top twenty most read articles are all film simulation recipes. I thought it would be fun to share which are the most popular recipes, based on how many times they’ve been viewed so far this year. The newest ones haven’t been around long enough to make this list, so maybe I’ll periodically revisit this topic.

Top 10 Most Popular Film Simulation Recipes:

#10. X100F Acros

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Walking Man – SLC, UT – Fujifilm X100F

I was surprised to learn that this recipe, which is my original Acros recipe and the second film simulation recipe that I created, is the only black-and-white settings to make this list. I guess B&W isn’t as popular as color.

#9. X100F Astia

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Zions Bank Building – SLC, UT – Fujifilm X100F

This was one of the early film simulation recipes that I created. Honestly, it’s not my favorite, even though I liked it when I created it. I think it requires the right light to be effective, and it certainly can be effective, but it’s a little flat (lacking contrast) for many situations. Still, as I stated in the article, it’s a better option than keeping the camera on Provia with everything set to 0.

#8. X100F Ektar

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Summer Boy – Layton, UT – Fujifilm X100F

This recipe uses Astia, as well, yet produces much different results. While the regular Astia recipe is rather flat and bland, this one is vibrant and bold–sometimes too vibrant and bold. It’s not for everyday photography, but it’s an especially good recipe for the right subject.

#7. X100F Velvia

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Trees, Rocks & Cliffs – Grand Canyon NP, AZ – Fujifilm X100F

This is another early film simulation recipe. It was one that I always had programmed into the Q menu, until I made a new Velvia recipe that I liked more. Still, these are good settings that I used regularly for many months.

#6. X100F Eterna

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Expedition Lodge – Moab, UT – Fujifilm X100F

This was my attempt to create something that resembles the Eterna film simulation for those who have a Fujifilm camera without Eterna. More recently I created an alternative Eterna recipe that I much prefer.

#5. X100F Fujicolor Superia 800

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Caramel Macchiato – Sandy, UT – Fujifilm X100F

What I appreciate about this recipe is that it produces a nice negative film aesthetic with a slightly green-ish color cast. Many of my recipes tend to lean warm, so this one is a reprieve from that. I think it delivers lovely results, and I can definitely understand why it’s a popular recipe.

#4. X100F Portra 400

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Jump – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X100F

What I don’t appreciate about this recipe is that it requires a tricky white balance setting that’s difficult to get right. If you can get the custom measurement correct, the results are great. I should revisit this recipe and attempt to create this look without requiring a vague custom white balance measurement.

#3. X100F Classic Chrome

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Closed Drive Thru Window – South Ogden, UT – Fujifilm X100F

This was the very first film simulation recipe that I created. It produces a look in the Ektachrome neighborhood. It looks nice and I’m not surprised that it’s so popular, but I have created other recipes that use Classic Chrome that I prefer more.

#2. X100F Vintage Kodachrome

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Old Log In Kolob Canyon – Zion NP, UT – Fujifilm X100F

Vintage Kodachrome is intended to mimic the look of the first generation of Kodachrome, which was used by photographers like Ansel Adams, Chuck Abbott, Barry Goldwater, and others. It’s a fun recipe, producing a vintage slide aesthetic.

#1. X-Pro2 Kodachrome II

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Pueblo de Taos – Taos, NM – Fujifilm X-Pro2

Classic Chrome is a popular film simulation, so it shouldn’t be too surprising that the top four recipes are all based on it. Kodachrome II is the only recipe in this list not developed on the X100F, although it can (like all of these recipes) be used on any X-Trans III or IV camera. This recipe is intended to mimic the look of the second generation of Kodachrome, which was used by photographers like Ernst Haas, Luigi Ghirri, William Eggleston and others. It’s one of my absolute favorite recipes that I’ve created.

Now it’s your turn. Which of these 10 recipes do you like most? Which recipe not on this list is your favorite? Let me know in the comments!

The Diversity of Utah Landscapes in Color, Part 1: Water

Utah is a beautiful state with a diverse environment. There are snow-capped mountain peaks, green forests, extensive lakes, snaking rivers, vast red deserts and pretty much everything in-between. This photoessay series is intended to exhibit that diversity through my photographs, and each part will have a specific theme. This article, which is Part 1 of The Diversity of Utah Landscapes in Color, is about water.

Utah is the second driest state in America based on annual rainfall, but there are massive bodies of water and many miles of rivers. The Great Salt Lake is the largest salt lake and the sixth largest overall lake in America. Lake Powell, which is on the boarder of Utah and Arizona, is the 23rd largest lake in the country. Utah Lake is the 36th largest lake in America, and Bear Lake is the 47th largest. There are thousands of miles of rivers and streams throughout the state. Despite the lack of rainfall, there’s a surprisingly large amount of water in Utah, and it has been the subject of my photography numerous times.

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Great Salt Lake Evening – Layton, UT – Fujifilm X-T20 – 12/26/2018

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Low Sun Over The Salt Lake – Antelope Island SP, UT – Fujifilm X-T20 – 3/11/2019

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Afterglow – Antelope Island SP, UT – Fujifilm X-T20 – 3/11/2019

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Blue Sunset – Antelope Island SP, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 – 6/25/2019

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Blue Umbrella At The Lake – Antelope Island SP, UT – Fujifilm X-E1 – 8/2/2016

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Salt Lake Water – Antelope Island SP, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 – 6/25/2019

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East Canyon Reservoir – East Canyon SP, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 – 6/13/2019

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Logs In A Pond – Wasatch-Cache NF, UT – Fujifilm X-Pro2 – 7/18/2018

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Waterfall Into The Ogden River – Ogden Canyon, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 – 7/1/2019

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White Duck – Ogden, UT – Fujifilm X-T20 – 11/15/2018

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Kids At The Lake – East Canyon SP, UT – Fujifilm XF10 – 9/26/2018

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Virgin River From Canyon Junction – Zion NP, UT – Fujifilm X100F – 11/20/2018

Processed with RNI Films. Preset 'Agfa Optima 200 Faded'

River Through Zion – Zion NP, UT – Fujifilm XF10 – 11/20/2018

Processed with RNI Films. Preset 'Kodak Ektar 100'

Autumn Along The Virgin River – Zion NP, UT – Fujifilm XF10 – 11/20/2018

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Virgin River In November – Zion NP, UT – Fujifilm XF10 – 11/20/2018

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Winter Pond & Tree Trunk – Bountiful, UT – Fujifilm XF10 – 1/19/2019

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Flaming Gorge – Flaming Gorge, UT – Fujifilm X-E1 – 7/13/2017

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Mirrored Mountain – Mirror Lake, UT – Fujifilm X-E1 – 9/4/2016

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Sunset Kayak – Willard Bay SP, UT – Fujifilm X-E1 – 6/13/2017

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Clouds At Night – Bear Lake, UT – Fujifilm X-E1 – 9/17/2016

Part 2 – Flowers   Part 3 – Trees