Crossing the California Desert with Fujifilm X100V + Kodak Tri-X 400

Welcome to California… Maybe – Blythe, CA – Fujifilm X100V – “Kodak Tri-X 400”

For those keeping up with my move (from Utah to Arizona) and adventure: I’m on the road again. The long story is that we found a home in Arizona, but the moving company can’t deliver our stuff for a couple of weeks. The short story is that we’re off on a new adventure! Among some other stops, we’re enroute to the central California Coast—one of the most beautiful places in the world, in my opinion—while we wait for our furniture and such.

A lot of times I’m the driver on road trips, but as we crossed the Mojave Desert along Interstate 10 in California, I was in the passenger seat. Of course, as a photographer I took full advantage of it, and documented the trek in black-and-white; specifically, I photographed with my Fujifilm X100V using the Kodak Tri-X 400 Film Simulation Recipe. I’ve been using this camera as a monochrome-only model lately.

Shooting out a dirty window at 75 miles-per-hour isn’t ideal; however, in whatever situations that I find myself, I try to do the best I can with what I have. That’s all anyone can do. I’m not always successful, but I thought this series was decent enough to share. I hope that you enjoy!

Storm in the Mirror – Somewhere Along I-10, CA – Fujifilm X100V – “Kodak Tri-X 400”
Driving Backwards – Somewhere Along I-10, CA – Fujifilm X100V – “Kodak Tri-X 400”
Objects Are Closer – Somewhere Along I-10, CA – Fujifilm X100V – “Kodak Tri-X 400”
Freight Flight – Somewhere Along I-10, CA – Fujifilm X100V – “Kodak Tri-X 400”
Dash Cam – Somewhere Along I-10, CA – Fujifilm X100V – “Kodak Tri-X 400”
Desert Center 16 – Somewhere Along I-10, CA – Fujifilm X100V – “Kodak Tri-X 400”
Cars – Somewhere Along I-10, CA – Fujifilm X100V – “Kodak Tri-X 400”
Parked Truck – Somewhere Along I-10, CA – Fujifilm X100V – “Kodak Tri-X 400”
Fasten Seatbelt & Dead Palms – Somewhere Along I-10, CA – Fujifilm X100V – “Kodak Tri-X 400”
Life is a Highway – Somewhere Along I-10, CA – Fujifilm X100V – “Kodak Tri-X 400”
Exit 146 – Coachella, CA – Fujifilm X100V – “Kodak Tri-X 400”
Expensive Gas – Coachella, CA – Fujifilm X100V – “Kodak Tri-X 400”

My Favorite Fujifilm Film Simulations (The 1,000th Post!!!)

I captured this yesterday with my Fujifilm X-E4 using an upcoming recipe.

This is the 1,000th post!

I started the Fuji X Weekly blog on August 21, 2017, with the intention of writing one article per week. Initial this was a long-term review (or journal, as I called it) of the Fujifilm X100F, but (obviously) it morphed into something much different than that. Life has a way of taking you down roads you wouldn’t have considered or even thought possible. Here we are, four years and ten months later, and this website doesn’t much resemble its origins.

Firstly, Fuji X Weekly is no longer about one camera, but about all Fujifilm cameras. Secondly, its focus is no longer mere journalling; instead, the primary purpose of this page is JPEG camera settings, called Film Simulation Recipes, that allow you to achieve straight-out-of-camera results that look good—you don’t have to edit if you don’t want to. And, of course, there’s the Fuji X Weekly App, so you can take these recipes with you on the go—almost 250 of them!

Also captured yesterday with my X-E4 using an upcoming recipe.

I wanted to do something special for this important 1,000th article. I knew that it needed to be related to film simulations and recipes somehow, but I wasn’t sure how exactly. Like the time I didn’t know why the ball kept getting bigger, then it hit me (sorry for the bad joke…)—I figured it out: for this article, I would rate my favorite film simulations—from most liked to least liked—and also share my favorite Film Simulation Recipes for each. The new Nostalgic Negative film simulation isn’t in this list because I’ve never used it, so I have no idea how I would rank it, but I do believe it’s one that I would particularly appreciate.

Without further ado, here are my favorite Fujifilm film simulations, plus my favorite Film Simulation Recipes for each!

#1 Acros

Motel – Panguitch, UT – Fujifilm X100V – “Kodak Tri-X 400”

Love at first sight!

When I tried the Acros film simulation on my Fujifilm X100F for the first time, I was blown away by it, as it produced the most film-like results I’d ever seen straight-out-of-camera. It was a big reason why I decided to stop shooting RAW and rely on camera-made JPEGs instead. I’m a sucker for black-and-white (probably because I shot a lot of it in my early film days), and the Acros film simulation produces incredibly lovely monochrome pictures. Acros is found on all X-Trans III, IV & V cameras, as well as GFX.

Favorite recipes:

Kodak Tri-X 400
Agfa Scala
Acros Push-Process

#2 Classic Negative

Classic Mirror – Fort Worth, TX – Fujifilm X-E4 – “Fujicolor Natura 1600”

Modeled carefully after Superia film, Classic Negative is the closest film simulation to replicating the aesthetic of actual color negative film (albeit, Fujicolor film, not Kodak). It is programmed uniquely and beautifully—there’s so much to love about it! For color photography, I could shoot exclusively with Classic Negative and be happy. Unfortunately, this film simulation is only found on the X-Pro3, X100V, X-T4, X-S10, X-E4, and X-T30 II cameras, as well as X-Trans V and GFX.

Favorite recipes:

Fujicolor Natura 1600
Fujicolor Superia 800
Xpro ’62

#3 Classic Chrome

Two Caballeros – Culleoka, TX – Fujifilm X-E4 – “Kodachrome 64”

Prior to the introduction of Classic Negative, Classic Chrome was my favorite color film simulation, with its distinctive Kodak color palette. While it’s third on this list for me, I bet that it’s number one for many of you, since the most popular Film Simulation Recipes are those that use it. Fujifilm introduced it in 2014 with the X30, and retroactively gave it to some of their prior X-Trans II cameras (although not all) via firmware updates. Most Fujifilm models have Classic Chrome, and all since 2014 do.

Favorite recipes:

Kodachrome 64
Kodak Portra 400 v2
Vintage Kodachrome

#4 Eterna

Sentinel & Merced – Yosemite NP, CA – Fujifilm X100V – “Vintage Color”

The Eterna film simulation has a uniquely soft tonality; while it can be somewhat mimicked with PRO Neg. Std, there’s nothing that can completely faithfully replicate it. Because its beauty is in its subtleness, it can be easily overlooked. Some might think it’s only for video (which it is good for, too), but it is great for still photography. It was introduced on the X-H1, but that’s the only X-Trans III camera with it; otherwise, Eterna can be found on X-Trans IV, V, and GFX.

Favorite recipes:

Vintage Color
Kodak Vision3 250D
Negative Print

#5 Monochrome

Haystack Driftwood – Cannon Beach, OR – Fujifilm X100V – “Ilford HP5 Plus 400”

While the Acros film simulation grabs the headlines, the Monochrome film simulation is itself a solid black-and-white option; however, because I liked Acros so much I basically ignored it for years, which is unfortunate. Monochrome has a different tonality than Acros and doesn’t have the built-in Grain, but it is still an excellent film simulation—one of the best, in fact. All Fujifilm cameras have the Monochrome film simulation.

Favorite recipes:

Ilford HP5 Plus 400
Ilford Pan F 50 Plus
Dramatic Monochrome

#6 Eterna Bleach Bypass

Low Sun over Tetons – Grand Teton NP, WY – Fujifilm X-E4 – “Ferrania Solaris FG 400“

This is Fujifilm’s latest film simulation (aside from Nostalgic Negative, which is currently only found on one GFX camera, but soon on X-Trans V), and it’s basically the Eterna film simulation but with lots more contrast and even more muted colors. Eterna Bleach Bypass can deliver stunning results that are definitely different than what’s possible with the other options. This film simulation is only found on the X-T4, X-S10, X-E4, X-T30 II, X-Trans V, and the newest GFX models.

Favorite recipes:

Ferrania Solaris FG 400
Lomochrome Metropolis
Ektachrome 320T

#7 PRO Neg. Std

Lakeside House & Road – Culleoka, TX – Fujifilm X-E4 – “Fujicolor Superia 800”

PRO Neg. Std used to be my third favorite film simulation, behind Acros and Classic Chrome. It has a subtle beauty with muted tones and contrast—similar to Eterna (although not quite as pronounced) but with more of a color negative feel than cinematic. Even though Fujifilm has introduced new film simulations that I like better, I still very much appreciate this one. Most Fujifilm models (with the exception of a few really old ones) have PRO Neg. Std.

Favorite recipes:

Fujicolor Superia 800
Fujicolor 100 Industrial
CineStill 800T

#8 Velvia

Hoodoos – Bryce Canyon NP, UT – Fujifilm X-E4 – “Vibrant Velvia”

Velvia 50 was my favorite color transparency film for landscape photography. While the Velvia film simulation isn’t a close approximation of that film straight out of the box, it can be made to look pretty similar with some adjustments. For vibrant landscapes, this is the film simulation to choose. Velvia can be found on all Fujifilm cameras.

Favorite recipes:

Vibrant Velvia
The Rockwell
Velvia v2

#9 PRO Neg. Hi

Wet Glass Bokeh – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 – “Jeff Davenport Night”

At this point we’ve moved into the film simulations that use far less frequently. PRO Neg. Hi is basically PRO Neg. Std but with more contrast and saturation. It’s not bad at all, and it used to be my go-to film simulation for portraits (which I think it’s particularly good for). Most Fujifilm models (with the exception of a few really old ones) have PRO Neg. Hi.

Favorite recipes:

Jeff Davenport Night
Fujicolor Pro 400H
PRO Neg. Hi

#10 Provia

Abandoned Ice Chest – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-Pro3 – “Standard Provia”

Fujifilm calls the Provia film simulation their “standard” profile, but I’ve never really liked it. Because of that, I usually only shoot with it when I force myself to do so, and sometimes some interesting things come from that. All Fujifilm cameras have the Provia film simulation.

Favorite recipes:

Standard Provia
Provia 400
Cross Process

#11 Astia

Wind from the West – Hammond, OR – Fujifilm X-E4 – “CineStill 50D”

The Astia film simulation is pretty close to PRO Neg. Hi in terms of contrast and saturation (although Astia is a bit more vibrant), but with a different tint that I think you either like or don’t like. I used to shoot with it a lot more more than I do now. It’s a good alternative for landscapes when Velvia is just too strong. Every Fujifilm camera has the Astia film simulation.

Favorite recipes:

CineStill 50D
Super HG Astia
Redscale

#12 Sepia

No Credit Tires – Bountiful, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 – “Sepia”

Last and least is Sepia, the often forgotten film simulation. For some reason every camera has it and almost nobody uses it.

Favorite recipes:

Sepia

It’s your turn! Which film simulation is your favorite? Which Film Simulation Recipe do you use most? What on this list was most surprising to you? Let me know in the comments!

Creative Collective 026: Using Color for Dramatic Pictures

The Big Ocean Fort Stevens SP, ORFujifilm X-E4 – “Fujicolor Super HG

Want the subject in your picture to stand out? There are a few tricks: leading lines, composition, contrast, and color theory (an underutilized tool that seems to be used more often by accident than on purpose). Of course, the problem with color theory is that it can get complex and there are varying schools of thought. There are entire classes in college dedicated to this subject. I prefer simplicity, so we’ll take the easy route as we dive into color theory for photography.

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My Photowalk with YOUR Film Simulation Recipes

Fire Ready – Gilbert, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4 – “Soft Cinnamon”

Yesterday, I did a photowalk around Gilbert, Arizona, with my Fujifilm X-E4 and Fujinon 27mm f/2.8. Inspired by the Route 66: Sun n Sand Motel⁠ — Trying Recipes (That Are Not Mine…) article that I published a couple of days ago, I loaded five Film Simulation Recipes that I didn’t create into my camera to try out. This post is the result of that exercise.

I found these recipes at various places across the web. The first is “Classic Neg Fade” by Luis Costa, which can be found on his website, Life, Unintended. The second is “Chrome Urban” by Jamie Chance, which can be found on his website, Jamie Chance Travels. For his recipe, I set Color Chrome Effect & Color Chrome FX Blue to Off and Clarity to -2. Next is “Diffused Chrome” by Toqeer Sethi, which can be found on the Fuji X Weekly Community Recipe page. Then there’s “Soft Cinnamon” by Justin Gould, which can be found on his website, Film.Recipes. Finally, there’s “AstiAmore” by Thomas Schwab, which can be found on the Fuji X Weekly Community Recipe page. There are, of course, many other sources on the internet where you can find Film Simulation Recipes.

I chose these specific ones simply because they seemed interesting to me, so I wanted to try them out for myself. And they’re each good. I don’t know if I used them in the situations where they work best—for example, “Diffused Chrome” seems to be more intended for night photography (yet, in daylight, it produces a soft Kodak-negative-like aesthetic). I ended up using “Soft Cinnamon” the most, although not necessarily on-purpose. “AstiAmore” is one I’ve tried before, but wanted to use again.

Abandoned Cart – Gilbert, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4 – “AstiAmore”

I’ve been thinking about community a lot lately. Oxford Languages defines “community” as “a feeling of fellowship with others, as a result of sharing common interests….” Within the photographic realm, I do believe there’s no greater feeling of fellowship than that of those who share the common interest of Fujifilm X cameras. Yet we’re all strangers—perhaps you know a few other Fujifilm photographers, but most of us have never met. I want to do my part to foster this Fujifilm fellowship, but I’m not exactly sure what that means right now. Like a surfer who feels the wave building even before it can be seen, I feel that something is brewing, but I just can’t see it yet—I don’t have a clear vision of what it will look like.

All of this was in my mind as I received feedback from yesterday’s post, Is Fujifilm Losing Its Soul? Because that article got shared around the web (I wouldn’t call it “viral” but it did receive a lot of attention), there were non-Fuji X Weekly people commenting and messaging me. Some of it was good input, but some of it was just downright mean and nasty (you won’t find it because I deleted it). Websites like PetaPixel, DPReview, and even sadly Fujirumors, are crawling with trolls, yet this website has largely remained troll-free (yea!). Occasionally one comes along, but it’s pretty rare; however, when articles get shared to the general photographic community, sometimes nasty parasites come with that, unfortunately. I almost let that negativity stop me from sharing this article; thankfully, I didn’t. I’m privileged and honored to be part of this community, which is you guys and gals, because you are good people.

I hope that this “feeling of fellowship” can grow stronger. I think it has to go beyond the anonymity of the internet, beyond our phones and computers, and be more personal. I don’t have the “how” worked out, but perhaps that’s just around the corner. I feel the first step that I can take right now is this article, which is an impromptu casual collaboration with you. I’m always quite busy, but I hope to do more of this in the coming days, weeks, and months if I can. If there’s a particular Film Simulation Recipe that you’d like me to try, post a link to it in the comments.

Classic Neg Fade by Luis Costa

“The first recipe on my camera right now….” —Luis Costa

Whiskey Row – Gilbert, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4 – “Classic Neg Fade”
Spiderweb in Cacti – Gilbert, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4 – “Classic Neg Fade”
Bikes & Scooter – Gilbert, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4 – “Classic Neg Fade”
One Way Parking – Gilbert, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4 – “Classic Neg Fade”

Chrome Urban by Jamie Chance

“This setting has grown without doubt into my favorite, every day, go-to simulation.” —Jamie Chance

Beaver & Pine – Gilbert, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4 – “Chrome Urban”
Da Bayou – Gilbert, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4 – “Chrome Urban”
Page Ave Restaurant – Gilbert, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4 – “Chrome Urban”

Diffused Chrome by Toqeer Sethi

“This recipe has been created to be used with a fast prime to keep the noise level down….” —Toqeer Sethi

Unlit Lamp – Gilbert, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4 – “Diffused Chrome”
Plant 29 – Gilbert, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4 – “Diffused Chrome”
Collab – Gilbert, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4 – “Diffused Chrome”

Soft Cinnamon by Justin Gould

“A gentle recipe with a subtle cinnamon tone to the neutrals. Delicious!” —Justin Gould

Market – Gilbert AZ – Fujifilm X-E4 – “Soft Cinnamon”
Hale Theatre – Gilbert, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4 – “Soft Cinnamon”
Anti-Lawyer – Gilbert, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4 – “Soft Cinnamon”
Barbed X – Gilbert, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4 – “Soft Cinnamon”

AstiAmore by Thomas Schwab

“This recipe is a modification of Ritchie’s original Kodak Ektar 100 recipe.” —Thomas Schwab

Golden Cross on Top – Gilbert, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4 – “AstiAmore”
Gold Cross – Gilbert, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4 – “AstiAmore”
Suburban Desert Home – Gilbert, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4 – “AstiAmore”

If you don’t have the Fuji X Weekly App on your phone, download it for free today (Android, iOS)! For those who are Fuji X Weekly App Patrons, you can use the Blank Recipe Card feature to manually input recipes into the App, so if you like any or all of the ones above, you can save them to your phone and take them with you on the go. Also, if you have an iPhone, check out RitchieCam!

Is Fujifilm Losing Its Soul?

After the announcement of the Fujifilm X-H2S, which has a PASM dial instead of the traditional dials of the X-H1, many people asked, “Is Fujifilm losing its soul?” I’ve had a number of Fujifilm photographers tell me that they believe so, and some have inquired if I believe so, too. What’s my opinion? Is Fujifilm indeed losing its soul?

Fujifilm has already lost its soul. It’s done gone. Elvis left the building awhile ago. The design decisions during development of the X-H2S are simply the manifestation of that lost soul.

What was this “soul” that Fujifilm lost? How can a company even have a soul?

A whole book could be written on this topic, but to summarize in a short sentence, Fujifilm’s philosophy for their X-series cameras was analog-inspired innovations with a focus on the photographer’s experience (both while using the camera for photography, and as customers of the brand). This was their soul. That philosophy, which seemed to be clearly understood, is what drove the camera department of the company (remember, Fujifilm’s main business is not photography nowadays). From the design decisions to the Kaizen firmware updates and everything in-between, this philosophy oozed out—it was both obvious and attractive, and is why Fujifilm was suddenly successful, quickly overtaking other brands, including iconic Nikon.

Fujifilm didn’t need to have a photography department at all, but they decided that, even if it was a bust, they’d still fund it and keep it going, because photography had been such an important part of their company’s heritage, and had been an important aspect of Japanese culture. They were merely the caretakers of this thing that was bigger than themselves. That’s how they looked at it, anyway, and it was noticeable and refreshing.

Somewhere along the line, however, Fujifilm began to view this differently. The photography division needed to be built bigger. It must grow. It must become more profitable. It must gain more marketshare. It must become as big as—or bigger than—Canon and Sony. I think there are actually two competing sides within Fujifilm (and maybe this battle has been taking place for awhile now): one is profit-first driven, and the other is nurture-first driven. The side I would like to see win is the latter, but the side that seems to be winning is the former.

Where this lost-soul has most obviously manifested itself is Kaizen, or the lack of it. This is a word that I hadn’t heard of until I owned a Fujifilm camera. It’s something that attracted a lot of people to the brand. It means continuous improvement—making something better over time, even though it was already purchased. Why? Part of it is duty (what you are supposed to do), and another part of it is that it creates loyalty, because it shows the customer that you care about them, and not just their money. That care will cause the customer to overlook shortcomings, because the caring is more important to them in the whole scheme of things. And long-term loyalty is more valuable to the company than short-term gains. I don’t know the exact timeline of when Fujifilm stopped caring (or, more accurately, began caring less about their customers in favor of caring more about profits), but it seems to be during the development of X-Trans IV. That’s when the profit-first people seemed to first get an upper hand on the nurture-first people. I don’t know for sure, though. What I am confident in is that, as X-Trans V rolls out, the profit-first philosophy is the current mantra of Fujifilm’s photography division—it’s Fujifilm’s current soul, unfortunately.

Am I overreacting? After all, the X-H2S is just one camera, right? There are two points that I’d like to make. First, Fujifilm removed the traditional dials on the X-H line in favor of PASM. For Fujifilm, PASM cameras are intended to attract new customers who are not interested in or are otherwise intimated by the traditional controls of their other X models. They don’t put PASM on cameras that they intend to market to their current customer base. The X-H2S is their top-of-the-line “flagship” model, the first X-Trans V… and it’s not for you. It was never intended for you. Screw you! It’s for them. Those guys with their Sonys and Canons, that’s who it’s for. We give our best to them. Our current customers who have been so loyal over the years will have to be happy with the crumbs that fall from the table. Second, X-Trans V is rolling out, while the X-T3 (their all-time top-selling model) and X-T30 are still on an island, and the X-Pro3 and X100V (premium models) don’t have as good of JPEG features as the X-S10, X-E4, and X-T30 II (mid or lower tier models). That’s shameful, in my opinion. Take care of your current customers first before working so hard to bring in new customers. Fujifilm is making their customer base less loyal, which will only hurt them in the long run. Nurture first.

If you build it, they will come. Fujifilm built it and they came; however, not enough for the profit-first people. They want more, but they’re barking up the wrong tree. Instead of becoming Sony in order to attract current Sony users who are unhappy with their gear (how does this makes sense to anyone?), Fujifilm should double-down on what makes them unique. What’s special about Fujifilm? Analog-inspired innovation and the photographer’s experience—that’s what’s special, or at least it used to be. There’s one other thing that’s unique, and that’s community. Fujifilm didn’t build it—instead it was built around them; however, they have not done nearly enough to embrace it and engage it. In fact, at times they’ve been standoffish to it. That needs to end, because community is Fujifilm’s greatest asset, yet they seem unsure of how to engage it, so they do so halfheartedly and from a “safe” distance.

I didn’t mean to write a negative article. When I sat down at the computer, I had no intention of typing out this post; however, it’s something that has been circling inside my mind for a few weeks now, so I suppose that it was inevitable. I really hope that it doesn’t make you feel angry towards Fujifilm. This article’s aim is to, on the off chance that this is actually read by Fujifilm, inspire reflection and perhaps even change, and secondarily put into words something that maybe you have felt but weren’t sure how to express. Perhaps this is somehow therapeutic. For me it feels good to say, even though it is negative, and I hope that getting it out in the open will somehow produce something positive.

Route 66: Sun n Sand Motel⁠ — Trying Recipes (That Are Not Mine…)

Sun n Sand Motel – Santa Rosa, NM – Fujifilm X-E4 – “Kodak Portra 66”

The possible number of potential Film Simulation Recipes is almost unlimited. For example, on my Fujifilm X-E4, there are 750 different Kelvin White Balance options that could be selected, and 361 unique White Balance Shifts that could be assigned to each of those different Kelvin options, which means that, if all other settings were identical, you could create over 270,000 different recipes just by changing the White Balance and Shift. Granted, many would look extremely similar to others, but they’d be at least a little different. My point is that there can be millions and millions of potential recipes for Fujifilm cameras, particularly the newer cameras which have more JPEG options. I’ve “only” created just under 250 recipes for Fujifilm cameras⁠—I’ve barely scratched the surface!

Some of you have created your own Film Simulation Recipes. A handful of you have even had your recipes included on this website and in the Fuji X Weekly App. I love that you are diving into your camera settings, getting creative, and sharing the results with the community⁠—it’s all so wonderful! I’m very honored to be a part of all this, and to have a front-row seat.

I’ve shared before where you can find many of these Film Simulation Recipes that were created by others (recipes that are not by me), but today I want to point you to some specific ones: “C1 Classic Neg” by Luis Costa (Life, Unintended), “Aged Negative” by Justin Gould (Fuji X Weekly Community Recipes), and “Kodak Portra 66” by Justin Gould (Film.Recipes). Why these ones? They looked particularly interesting to me for the subject that I wanted to use them for.

The photographs in this article were not captured with these recipes, but instead were RAW files reprocessed in-camera to apply the recipes to exposures already captured. I used my Fujifilm X-E4 and Fujinon 27mm lens (originally with my Fujicolor Natura 1600 recipe) to photograph the burnt Sun n Sand motel in Santa Rosa, New Mexico. This hotel first opened along Route 66 in the 1950’s, had major renovations in the late-1990’s, and closed for good in 2013 after a severe storm caused major damaged. Apparently homeless moved in after it closed, and sometime later (although I couldn’t find exactly when) fire damaged much of the property. It seems to be in the process of being demolished, albeit slowly. The Sun n Sand motel has been left in a sad state, and the opportunities to photograph this somewhat-iconic site along The Mother Road are fleeting. I’m glad that I had the opportunity.

C1 Classic Neg by Luis Costa

“Ironically, I think it resembles Slide film much more than Negative film!” ⁠—Luis Costa

Motel Window Reflection – Santa Rosa, NM – Fujifilm X-E4 – “C1 Classic Neg”
Family Units – Santa Rosa, NM – Fujifilm X-E4 – “C1 Classic Neg”
Red Arrow – Santa Rosa, NM – Fujifilm X-E4 – “C1 Classic Neg”

Aged Negative by Justin Gould

“It reminds me of prints I made from 35mm film in the 1980s.”—Justin Gould

Historic Route 66 Motel – Santa Rosa, NM – Fujifilm X-E4 – “Aged Negative”
Burnt Junk in a Bathtub – Santa Rosa, NM – Fujifilm X-E4 – “Aged Negative”
Burnt Door – Santa Rosa, NM – Fujifilm X-E4 – “Aged Negative”

Kodak Portra 66 by Justin Gould

“Some things seem to be made to go together, and in our world of film simulations and recipes, it’s Kodak Portra and fading Americana.” ⁠—Justin Gould

Cheap Desk – Santa Rosa, NM – Fujifilm X-E4 – “Kodak Portra 66”
TV & Chair – Santa Rosa, NM – Fujifilm X-E4 – “Kodak Portra 66”
Oh, Deere! A flat tire – Santa Rosa, NM – Fujifilm X-E4 – “Kodak Portra 66”

If any (or all) of these Film Simulation Recipes look interesting to you, please visit Luis’ and Justin’s websites⁠—they have many more! I haven’t personally used most of them, but there are plenty that look pretty good to me, based off of the sample pictures. I’m sure many of you will appreciate them. If you have the Fuji X Weekly App, tap the circle-with-dots icon at the top-right, and you can manually add these (or any other recipes) into the App, if you want to take them with you on the go. Don’t have the Fuji X Weekly App? Download it for free today!

5 Best Travel Cameras (2022)

It’s summer, and if you can afford to put gas in your car’s tank, you might go on an excursion someplace. If you do, you probably want to take a camera with you—one that’s particularly good for travel—to capture the experience.

What makes a camera good for travel? In my opinion, it has to be small and lightweight, so that there are no issues taking it with you wherever you go—it doesn’t get in the way—yet it has to be able to deliver good image quality, so that when you get back home you can hang a picture you’re proud of on your wall to remember your great adventure.

If you’re not sure which cameras are good for travel, I have five suggestions below. These are just my opinions—if you ask five photographers which cameras they recommend for travel, you might get five very different answers. My perspective is that I prefer simplicity—less is often more—and I don’t like to edit my photographs anymore (instead, I use Film Simulation Recipes), so it has to deliver solid results straight-out-of-camera. If that resonates with you, perhaps take this advice seriously, and if it doesn’t, take all of this with a grain of salt.

This post contains affiliate links, and if you make a purchase using my links I’ll be compensated a small amount for it.

1. Fujifilm X100V

Fujifilm X100V

The Fujifilm X100V (full review) is my top recommendation for travel photography. It’s my all-time favorite camera, but it’s especially great for travel, as if that’s its intended purpose. The X100V has a fixed 23mm (roughly 35mm full-frame-equivalent) focal-length lens, which is a very useful focal-length. You cannot change the lens (it’s permanently attached), which is a limitation that you have to be willing to embrace. While the X100V is pocketable, it’s only barely so, and more than likely you’ll carry it in a camera bag or around your neck and not in a pocket. If you don’t mind those things, this is the camera for travel photography, and you’ll definitely want to consider buying a Fujifilm X100V.

Fujifilm X100V Black    Amazon   B&H
Fujifilm X100V Silver   Amazon   B&H

Unfortunately, the X100V is nearly impossible to find, and you’re very lucky if you can get your hands on one. As alternatives, consider a used X100F, or even an X100T, which are easier to get ahold of and less expensive. If a used camera doesn’t interest you, perhaps consider the Ricoh GRIIIX, which is probably the X100V’s closest competitor.

Lower Falls – Multnomah Falls, OR – Fujifilm X100V – “Kodachrome 1

2. Fujifilm X-E4

Fujifilm X-E4

The Fujifilm X-E4 (full review) is very similar in size and design to the X100V, yet it’s an interchangeable-lens camera, which makes it more versatile. It’s a minimalistic model, and pairs especially well with the Fujinon 27mm pancake lens. If the X100V’s fixed-lens won’t work for you, the X-E4 might be the right alternative. This camera doesn’t have quite as many buttons, switches, and knobs as other Fujifilm cameras, which you might prefer or you might not appreciate, so keep that in mind. This is currently my most-used camera, travel or otherwise.

Fujifilm X-E4 Black    Amazon   B&H
Fujifilm X-E4 Silver   Amazon   B&H
Fujifilm X-E4 Black + 27mm f/2.8    Amazon   B&H
Fujifilm X-E4 Silver + 27mm f/2.8   Amazon   B&H

Like the X100V, the Fujifilm X-E4 can be very difficult to find. As alternatives, consider a used X-E3, or even an X-E2, which are easier to get ahold of and are less expensive. If a used camera doesn’t interest you, perhaps consider the slightly larger X-T30 II.

Ozark – Hot Springs, AR – Fujifilm X-E4 + Fujinon 27mm – “Magenta Negative

3. Ricoh GRIII

Ricoh GRIII

What’s great about the Ricoh GRIII is that it’s very small and pocketable, yet it delivers excellent image quality similar to bigger cameras. Oh, and like Fujifilm, I have JPEG recipes for it, too! If the X100V and X-E4 are too big, this is a must-try option—even if you own those Fujifilm models, you might consider adding this one, too, to take with you on your adventures. The GRIII has a fixed 18.3mm (28mm full-frame-equivalent) lens, which is a good wide-angle focal-length, but it also means you need to be close to the subject, which can be a challenge.

Ricoh GRIII    Amazon   B&H

If the Ricoh GRIII is too expensive, as alternatives you might consider a used Ricoh GRII, Ricoh GR, Fujifilm X70, or Fujifilm XF10.

Shop & Save – Fillmore, UT – Ricoh GRIII – “Americana Color

4. Instax Neo Classic Mini 90

Instax Neo Classic Mini 90

If you are looking for something different, the Fujifilm Instax Neo Classic Mini 90 is one to consider. Really, any Instax camera will do, as they’re a lot of fun, and you get rewarded with an immediate print. I only suggest this particular model because I own it and have experience with it. Of all the cameras recommended in this article, this is the largest, which means it is the least travel-friendly, but instant film photography brings so much joy, and is especially great if you have kids, so it might be worthwhile anyway.

Fujifilm Instax Neo Classic Mini 90    Amazon   B&H

If lugging around an Instax camera is just too much, as an alternative consider an Instax Mini Link Printer instead, which might actually be better than using an actual Instax camera.

Instax Mini picture captured at Goosenecks SP, Utah.

5. iPhone (or any cellphone)

iPhone 11 + Moment 58mm

Of course, the best camera is the one that’s available to you in the moment when you need it, and sometimes that’s your cellphone. I have an iPhone 11, which does the trick well enough. I also have my very own iPhone camera app, called RitchieCam—if you have an iPhone, download it from the Apple App Store today! If you don’t have an iPhone, I’m sure whichever make and model you do own is plenty good enough (although you can only use RitchieCam on an iPhone). I don’t recommend using only your cellphone for photography when you travel (although I’m sure many people do), but it’s a decent tool to supplement your other cameras while traveling, especially during those times when it’s what you have available to you in the moment you need a camera.

What alternative can I suggest to your cellphone? There’s a line in The Secret Life of Walter Mitty, where this photographer, Sean O’Connell, is in the Himalayas in Afghanistan waiting with his camera for a snow leopard to appear. When the cat finally shows itself, Sean O’Connell doesn’t do anything with his camera, so Walter Mitty asks, “When are you going to take it?” The photographer replies, “Sometimes I don’t. If I like a moment, for me, personally, I don’t like to have the distraction of the camera. I just want to stay in it.”

Natural Bridge Arch – Bryce Canyon NP, UT – iPhone 11 + RitchieCam + “Standard Film”

Review: Moment Tele 58mm Cellphone Lens

This review of the Moment Tele 58mm cellphone lens is long overdue. When I started developing the RitchieCam iPhone camera app about a year ago, I figured it would be a good idea to get some external lenses for my iPhone 11, which would come in handy when needing to capture the example pictures. While there are a number of companies that offer lenses that can be attached to your cellphone, the Moment offerings stood out to me as the “better” option, so that’s what I chose.

To use Moment’s lenses, you must also use their phone case, because that’s how the lenses mount to your phone. They have a case for many phone makes and models, so there’s a good chance there’s one available for your device. The case is good quality, and has survived nearly a year of heavy use and abuse. I cannot tell you how many times that I’ve dropped my phone and thought it was done for, yet it survived unscathed, without even a scratch! While I’m sure there are cases that offer more protection, I’m pretty darn impressed with how good the Moment case has been.

One cool thing about the Moment case is that it has the “MagSafe” stuff built-in. I have this tripod-mount accessory that attaches to the case (via magnetism), which has come in handy a number of times. It’s a really good method to mount your cellphone to a tripod, if that’s something you do. There are a number of other accessories that you can buy that also use magnets to attach to your case, but the only one that I personally have used is that tripod accessory.

I had never used an external lens before with a cellphone, so I was definitely a novice when I started—I didn’t really realize how it all worked. On my iPhone 11 case, the lens mounts only over the main camera. The iPhone 11 has two rear facing cameras: 1x (26mm full-frame-equivalent) and 0.5x (13mm full-frame-equivalent). The Moment lenses cannot mount over the 13mm lens, only over the 26mm lens.

I have two Moment lenses: 18mm and 58mm. The Moment lenses are actually “conversion” lenses, and the millimeter numbers don’t actually mean anything. The 18mm is a 0.5x wide conversion lens, and the 58mm is a 2x tele conversion lens. Using the 18mm lens on the 26mm camera actually makes it 13mm, which is the same focal length of the second camera. In other words, the 18mm lens is pointless for the iPhone 11; however, I’m sure it makes sense for other cellphones. The 58mm lens makes the main camera 52mm, which is a very useful focal-length. The focal-length that these lenses will be on your cellphone depends on the focal-length of the cameras on your cellphone (either times by .5 for the 18mm lens or times by 2 for the 58mm lens). Clear as mud? I think if Moment had simply called the one lens 2x teleconverter and the other .5x wide-converter (instead of using millimeter numbers) it would save a lot of confusion. As you can imagine, the Moment Tele 58mm lens is the one that I used by far the most.

Initially I was disappointed by these lenses. I think my expectations were significantly askew. I figured that I’d be impressed by the image quality when using these lenses vs. not using them; however, the image quality will never be greater than that of the lens permanently attached to your cellphone. These lenses won’t improve on what the manufacturer installed on your device. Instead, what you get is either a longer or more wide-angle focal length without a loss in image quality. It’s much better to use the 58mm lens than “zoom by cropping” (a.k.a. digital zoom). The image quality produced by these lenses is determined mostly by the image quality produced by your phone.

iPhone 11 + Moment 58mm – RitchieCam App – “Instant Color 3” – Arches NP, UT

The reason to use the Moment Tele 58mm lens is to double the reach of your built-in cellphone lens without degrading the image quality (or, if it does degrade the image quality, it’s extraordinarily minimal and not really noticeable). That’s what this lens does, and it does it well. It doesn’t do much else, so keep your expectations in check.

When I carry the 58mm lens with me, I get three focal-length options on my iPhone 11: 13mm (using the 0.5x camera), 26mm (using the 1x camera without the Moment lens), and 52mm (using the 1x camera with the 58mm lens). Those are all excellent focal-lengths to have available. While I prefer to use my Fujifilm cameras over my cellphone, as Chase Jarvis coined, the best camera is the one you have with you, which is sometimes my cellphone. When I do use my cellphone for photography, I appreciate having the Moment Tele 58mm lens, because it affords me additional flexibility.

I said two paragraphs ago that this lens “doesn’t do much else” which isn’t completely true. There’s a small amount of pincushion distortion, which, when combined with the distortion in the iPhone 11 camera, can do some weird things to straight lines when photographing brick walls. The solution: don’t photograph brick walls. There’s also some interesting lens flare that shows up sometimes (see picture below), which I personally like, but maybe you won’t, depending on how you feel about lens flare. The Moment lens is also softer in the corners than the 1x iPhone camera.

iPhone 11 + Moment 58mm – RitchieCam App – “Faded Film” – Canyonlands NP, UT

The build quality of the Moment Tele 58mm lens is excellent, made of metal and glass. It has six elements in four groups, and the glass has multi-layered anti-reflective coating. It comes with a lens cap and carrying bag. The lens is small enough that you can easily take it with you, although when attached to the phone, it’s unlikely that the phone will fit into your pocket (unless you have particularly large pockets).

I have used the Moment Tele 58mm lens for nearly a year now. It’s not an essential cellphone accessory, but it’s certainly nice to have around. I found the lens and the Moment case (that you are required to have in order to use the lens)—plus the tripod-mount accessory—to be useful to me. If you do a lot of cellphone photography, you might want to take a closer look at these Moment products, and consider if they might be useful to you, too. Like a lot of things in the photography world, these products are not cheap, but if you think you’ll use them regularly, they might very well be worth the cost. The best place to find these products is on Moment’s website.

This post contains affiliate links, and if you make a purchase using my links I’ll be compensated a small amount for it.

Moment Tele 58mm lens B&H
Moment MagSafe Tripod Mount B&H

Gallery:

iPhone 11 + Moment 58mm – RitchieCam App – “Vintage Kodak” – Arches NP, UT
iPhone 11 + Moment 58mm – RitchieCam App – “Sunny Day” – Canyonlands NP, UT
iPhone 11 + Moment 58mm – RitchieCam App – “Instant Color 3” – Canyonlands NP, UT
iPhone 11 + Moment 58mm – RitchieCam App – “Standard Film” – Canyonlands NP, UT
iPhone 11 + Moment 58mm – RitchieCam App – “B&W Fade” – Arches NP, UT

What is RitchieCam? It’s an easy-to-use streamlined camera app intended to bring one-step photography to the iPhone. You’ll find 18 analog-inspired filters so that you don’t have to edit your mobile pictures if you don’t want to. I think you will appreciate the app, yet it is designed for anyone and everyone with an iPhone, and not just photographers. You can read all about it at RitchieCam.com. The app is intended to be a useful free tool, yet for $9.99 (USD +Tax annually) you can unlock all of the filters and features for the best app experience.

Fujifilm X-Trans IV Film Simulation Recipe: Low Key

Cactus Spiderweb – Goodyear, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4 – “Low Key”

Fujifilm cameras have a feature in Advanced Filter Settings called “Low Key” that I recently discovered is based on the Provia film simulation, and can be mimicked. While this “Low Key” setting can produce nice-looking images, I felt that it could be better, so I set out to create a Film Simulation Recipe to serve as an alternative to it, with an aesthetic that I appreciate a little more. Specifically, I wanted a recipe based on the Classic Negative film simulation instead of Provia because I like Classic Negative better. My “Bright Kodak” recipe is an alternative to the “High Key” feature found in the Advanced Filter Settings.

Low Key photography is purposefully underexposing for a darker image. It works well when the subject is brightly lit, and the rest of the frame isn’t, so the image is predominately dark, and the brightly lit subject stands out in the otherwise dim frame. I hope this explanation makes sense. This “Low Key” Film Simulation Recipe and the Low Key feature in the Advanced Filter Settings work similarly, and produce nice results when used in the correct situations. While not for everyday use, some of you will certainly appreciate this recipe for when the light is right. I did not model this recipe after any specific emulsion.

Petersen’s Ice Cream – Gilbert, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4 – “Low Key”

This “Low Key” Film Simulation Recipe is fully compatible with newer X-Trans IV cameras: Fujifilm X-Pro3, X100V, X-T4, X-S10, X-E4, & X-T30 II. Because it uses Classic Negative, Color Chrome FX Blue, and Clarity, it is not compatible with the X-T3 and X-T30. Those with newer GFX cameras can likely use it, too, although results will be slightly different.

Classic Negative
Dynamic Range: DR200
Highlight: +1
Shadow: +2
Color: +4
Noise Reduction: -4
Sharpness: -1
Clarity: -2
Grain Effect: Weak, Small
Color Chrome Effect: Strong
Color Chrome Effect Blue: Weak
White Balance: Daylight, -2 Red & -4 Blue
ISO: Auto, up to ISO 6400
Exposure Compensation: -2/3 to -1 1/3 (typically)

Example photographs, all camera-made JPEGs using this “Low Key” Film Simulation Recipe on my Fujifilm X-E4:

Cactus & Palm Shadow – Goodyear, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4
Very Tiny Flowers – Goodyear, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4
Green Cactus Pads – Goodyear, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4
Spiky – Goodyear, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4
Blue Sky Cacti – Goodyear, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4
Bougainvillea Sky – Goodyear, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4
Light Bulb Evening – Gilbert, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4
Lit Leaves – Gilbert, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4
Cinderblock Wall Girl – Gilbert, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4
oyride – Gilbert, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4
The Queen’s – Gilbert, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4

Low Key Film Simulation Recipe vs. Low Key Advanced Filter Setting

Low Key Film Simulation Recipe
Low Key Advanced Filter Setting

This post contains affiliate links, and if you make a purchase using my links I’ll be compensated a small amount for it.

Fujifilm X-E4 Black    Amazon   B&H
Fujifilm X-E4 Silver   Amazon   B&H

Find this film simulation recipes and over 200 more on the Fuji X Weekly — Film Recipes App!

Help Fuji X Weekly

Nobody pays me to write the content found on fujixweekly.com. There’s a real cost to operating and maintaining this site, not to mention all the time that I pour into it. If you appreciated this article, please consider making a one-time gift contribution. Thank you!

$2.00

Have an iPhone? Be sure to download the RitchieCam camera app!

Random Recipe Challenge: 10 Frames with LomoChrome Metropolis

The Fuji X Weekly App has a brand-new feature that’s super fun: Random Recipe! When you tap the criss-crossed arrows at the top-right, the App will randomly select a Film Simulation Recipe for you.

If you are a Fuji X Weekly App Patron and you have various Filters selected (such as Filter by Camera, Filter by Film Simulation, Filter by B&W, etc.), the Random Recipe selector will only choose from the list of filtered recipes, so you can have it select from what is compatible with your camera. In my case, I chose “Filter by X-E4” prior to tapping the Random Recipe selector, so only the recipes compatible with the X-E4 were considered.

Here’s a fun way to use this new feature: the Random Recipe Challenge! The rules are 1) use the App to select a Random Recipe for you⁠—whatever it selects you have to use (if you are not a Patron and the App chooses a non-compatible recipe, you can try again until it lands on a recipe that is compatible with your camera)⁠—and 2) shoot with this recipe for 24 or 36 frames (your choice), like it’s a roll of film, before changing recipes. If you post to Instagram, use the hashtag #fxwrandomrecipechallenge. I hope that you have a lot of fun with the Random Recipe Challenge, and I can’t wait to see what you capture!

When I tapped the Random Recipe icon, the App chose for me the LomoChrome Metropils Film Simulation Recipe. I shot 36 frames with this recipe on my Fujifilm X-E4 with a Vivitar 135mm f/2.8 lens attached to it. Below are my favorite 10 pictures of the 36 frames. Enjoy!

Lather – Phoenix, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4 & Vivitar 135mm
Malnatis Pizzeria – Phoenix, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4 & Vivitar 135mm
Cheese ‘n Stuff – Phoenix, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4 & Vivitar 135mm
Local – Phoenix, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4 & Vivitar 135mm
Umbrella – Phoenix, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4 & Vivitar 135mm
Empty Hummingbird Feeder – Gilbert, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4 & Vivitar 135mm
Daylight Bulb – Gilbert, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4 & Vivitar 135mm
Tree Leaves – Gilbert, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4 & Vivitar 135mm
Spraying Water – Gilbert, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4 & Vivitar 135mm
Palm Tree Top – Gilbert, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4 & Vivitar 135mm

Find the LomoChrome Metropolis Film Simulation Recipe and over 200 others on the Fuji X Weekly App! Don’t have the App? Download it for free today! Become a Patron to unlock the best App experience.

This post contains affiliate links, and if you make a purchase using my links I’ll be compensated a small amount for it.

Fujifilm X-E4 Black    Amazon   B&H
Fujifilm X-E4 Silver   Amazon   B&H

Fujifilm X100V + X-Pro3 Film Simulation Recipe: Pushed CineStill

City Roses – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V – “Pushed CineStill 800T”

This “Pushed CineStill 800T” Film Simulation Recipe came about after I stumbled across an amazing picture that was captured on CineStill 800T film during daytime with an overcast sky. It turned out that the film was push-processed, but I never learned by how many stops (I’m guessing one-stop). After some extensive Googling, I was able to find several more examples of push-processed CineStill 800T film shot in overcast daytime light. I then set out to mimic that aesthetic on my Fujifilm camera, and I figured it out; however, my first recipe was only compatible with the X-T4, X-S10, X-E4, and X-T30 II cameras, so I made this alternative version that works on the X-Pro3 and X100V (you can use it on those “newer” cameras, too, if you’d like).

Interestingly enough, even though this recipe is intended for daytime photography, it does quite well at night, too; however, I do believe it more faithfully mimics the film in cloudy daytime conditions. It does produce nice results in daylight or night, so feel free to use it anytime. Film can look different depending on how it is shot, developed, or scanned (among many other things). This recipe doesn’t replicate pushed CineStill 800T film under all circumstances, but in certain conditions it’s a good facsimile. I really like how this one looks, and I think some of you will really appreciate it, too!

Cigarettes – Reno, NV – Fujifilm X100V – “Pushed CineStill 800T”

This was a Fuji X Weekly App Patron Early-Access Recipe, so App Patrons have had access to it since October, but now it’s available to everyone! A new Early-Access Recipe replaced it—find it in the Fuji X Weekly App!

Eterna
Dynamic Range: DR400
Highlight: +3
Shadow: +1
Color: -2
Noise Reduction: -4
Sharpness: 0
Clarity: -3
Grain Effect: Strong, Large
Color Chrome Effect: Strong
Color Chrome Effect Blue: Strong
White Balance: 7700K, -9 Red & +7 Blue
ISO: Auto, up to ISO 6400
Exposure Compensation: -1/3 to +2/3 (typically)

Example photographs, all camera-made JPEGs captured using this “Pushed CineStill 800T” film simulation recipe on my Fujifilm X100V & Fujifilm X-E4:

Gas Pumps at Night – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Nighttime Neighborhood – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Night Walkway – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Nighttime Flowerpot – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Potted Shrub – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Burger Boy – Reno, NV – Fujifilm X100V
Playground Girl – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Rose Garden – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Hoop – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4

Find this Film Simulation Recipes and over 200 more on the Fuji X Weekly — Film Recipes App!

Help Fuji X Weekly

Nobody pays me to write the content found on fujixweekly.com. There’s a real cost to operating and maintaining this site, not to mention all the time that I pour into it. If you appreciated this article, please consider making a one-time gift contribution. Thank you!

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New Fujifilm X-Trans IV FXW App Patron Early-Access Film Simulation Recipe: Magenta Negative

Flag & Dome – Hot Springs, AR – Fujifilm X-E4 – “Magenta Negative”

The Fuji X Weekly App is free, yet becoming a Fuji X Weekly Patron unlocks the best App experience! One benefit of being a Patron is you get early access to some new Film Simulation Recipes. These Early-Access Recipes will eventually become available free to everyone in time, including this new one. In fact, many Early-Access Recipes have already been publicly published on this Blog and the App, so now everyone can use them. Patrons help support Fuji X Weekly and, really, without them there would be no App. So I want to give a special “thank you” to all of the Patrons!

This Film Simulation Recipe is intended to mimic the use of a Magenta Color Correction Filter, such as the Tiffen CC30M, which reduces the intensity of green, and is used to combat green color casts. Back in the film days, using Color Correction Filters was common, but it is much less so now, since you can dial in very precise white balance adjustments for whatever the light is; however, you can still use these filters if you want to. Instead of using a magenta filter, you can use this recipe.

Because this recipe uses Classic Negative, it has a generic Fujicolor Superia aesthetic; however, it is not meant to precisely mimic any specific Superia emulsion. The inspiration actually came from a YouTube video by Cammackey, entitled Fujifilm X100V Recipes / Old Film Tricks. While this recipe is a little different than his, it is intended to produce similar results, just without the need of a Color Correction Filter, which his recipe requires. This “Magenta Negative” Film Simulation Recipe is compatible with the Fujifilm X-Pro3, X100V, X-T4, X-S10, X-E4, and X-T30 II cameras.

If you are a Fuji X Weekly App Patron, it’s available to you right now on the App! Don’t have the App? Download it for free today! Become a Patron to unlock the best App experience and gain early access to this recipe.

Example photographs, all camera-made JPEGs captured using this “Magenta Negative” Film Simulation Recipe on my Fujifilm X-E4:

Wet Red Rose – Ridgedale, MO – Fujifilm X-E4
Flowers by a Rock Wall – Ridgedale, MO – Fujifilm X-E4
Waterfall in the Ozarks – Ridgedale, MO – Fujifilm X-E4
Staircase Waterfall – Ridgedale, MO – Fujifilm X-E4
Unexpected Canyon – Ridgedale, MO – Fujifilm X-E4
Chapel & Cannon – Ridgedale, MO – Fujifilm X-E4
Pine Above Rooftop – Ridgedale, MO – Fujifilm X-E4
Magnolia Flag – Hot Springs, AR – Fujifilm X-E4
Ozark – Hot Springs, AR – Fujifilm X-E4
Little Cloud – Hot Springs, AR – Fujifilm X-E4
Plaza – Hot Springs, AR – Fujifilm X-E4
Window View – Hot Springs, AR – Fujifilm X-E4
Spiderweb on a Window – Hot Springs, AR – Fujifilm X-E4
Abandoned Porch Seats – Hot Springs, AR – Fujifilm X-E4
Tree Prism – Hot Springs, AR – Fujifilm X-E4
Ford & Tree Shadows – Hot Springs, AR – Fujifilm X-E4
Steampunk Art – Hot Springs, AR – Fujifilm X-E4

Fujifilm X-Trans IV Film Simulation Recipe: Reggie’s Portra

Dr Pepper Closed – Childress, TX – Fujifilm X-E4 – “Reggie’s Portra”

Reggie Ballesteros (website, YouTube, Instagram, Instagram), also known as Reggie B Photo, is an official Fujifilm X-Photographer based in San Fransisco, California. He shoots both film and digital, and on his Fujifilm cameras he likes to use both RAW and JPEG. For his JPEGs, Reggie developed a Film Simulation Recipe that’s a close match to the Kodak Portra 400 film that he shoots and has developed and scanned (on a Noritsu) at Richard Photo Lab. He was very kind to allow me to share his Portra recipe with you on this website and the Fuji X Weekly App. Thanks, Reggie!

Portra 400 was introduced by Kodak in 1998. It used to come in two varieties: “NC” (Neutral Color, which had less saturation) and “VC” (Vivid Color, which had more saturation). I shot a little of both Kodak Portra 400NC and Kodak Portra 400VC back in the day, and I preferred the more colorful version. The film was redesigned in 2006 to improve grain and scanning. It was again redesigned in 2010, with the NC and VC emulsions dropped, replaced by a new mid-saturation version (simply called Portra 400), with more improvements to scanning.

I’m Your Huckleberry – Ridgedale, MO – Fujifilm X100V – “Reggie’s Portra”

As the name implies, Kodak Portra 400 is intended for portrait photography, but can be used for many other genres of photography. It’s similar to Portra 160, but with more contrast, saturation and grain. Believe it or not, ISO 400 was considered “high ISO” by many photographers back in the film days, and Portra 400 was one of the absolute best “high ISO” color films ever made. It’s still available today, and is very popular among film photographers.

When developing his Portra recipe, Reggie used the Kodak Portra 400 Film Simulation Recipe from this website as his starting point, and he tweaked it to more closely match his Portra scans and to better suit his photography. One film can have many different aesthetics, depending on how it’s shot, developed, scanned, and a whole host of other factors, so it’s great that Reggie made this alternative version, which might be closer to the exact look that you are after. Also, because this recipe uses Auto White Balance and doesn’t use Clarity, you might find that this one is more versatile than some other recipes. Oh, and take a look at the Kodak Portra 400 v2 and Kodak Portra 400 Warm recipes, which could potentially produce your desired aesthetic.

Pines – Lake Catherine SP, AR – Fujifilm X100V – “Reggie’s Portra”

One special note: Reggie has a 5% CineBloom diffusion filter attached to his lens whenever he shoots with this particular recipe. I have been using my Fujifilm X100V as a monochrome-only camera, but because I, too, have a 5% CineBloom filter attached to it, I made an exception so that I could test this recipe on that camera with the diffusion filter. For the shots captured on my X-E4, I did not use a diffusion filter; however, I do like how the 5% CineBloom subtly affects the image, and I recommend pairing it with this recipe if you can.

This Film Simulation Recipe is compatible with the Fujifilm X-Pro3, X100V, X-T4, X-S10, X-E4, & X-T30 II cameras. To use it on the X-T3 and X-T30, simply ignore Grain size and Color Chrome FX Blue, since your camera doesn’t have those options⁠—the results will be slightly different, but nearly identical. More than likely this recipe is compatible with GFX and X-Trans V, but I haven’t tested it to know for sure.

Abandoned Long John Silver’s – Elk City, OK – Fujifilm X100V – “Reggie’s Portra”

Classic Chrome
Dynamic Range: DR-Auto
Highlight: -1
Shadow: -1
Color: +2
Noise Reduction: -4
Sharpening: -2
Clarity: 0
Grain Effect: Weak, Small
Color Chrome Effect: Strong
Color Chrome Effect Blue: Weak
White Balance: Auto, +2 Red & -4 Blue
ISO: Auto, up to ISO 6400
Exposure Compensation: +1/3 to +1 (typically)

Example photographs, all camera-made JPEGs using “Reggie’s Portra” Film Simulation Recipe on my Fujifilm X-E4 and Fujifilm X100V cameras:

Abandoned in Childress

Brick Building – Childress, TX – Fujifilm X-E4 – “Reggie’s Portra”
Interior Junk – Childress, TX – Fujifilm X-E4 – “Reggie’s Portra”
Inside Mess – Childress, TX – Fujifilm X-E4 – “Reggie’s Portra”
Glass Door – Childress, TX – Fujifilm X-E4 – “Reggie’s Portra”

A Walk in the Ozarks

Chapel – Ridgedale, MO – Fujifilm X100V – “Reggie’s Portra”
Dark Clouds Over Lake – Ridgedale, MO – Fujifilm X100V – “Reggie’s Portra”
Fishing Trail – Ridgedale, MO – Fujifilm X100V – “Reggie’s Portra”
Ducks by a Pond – Ridgedale, MO – Fujifilm X100V – “Reggie’s Portra”

Cadillac Ranch

Classic Drivers – Amarillo, TX – Fujifilm X-E4 – “Reggie’s Portra”
Krylon – Amarillo, TX – Fujifilm X-E4 – “Reggie’s Portra”
Spray Artists – Amarillo, TX – Fujifilm X-E4 – “Reggie’s Portra”
Love Spray Paint – Amarillo, TX – Fujifilm X-E4 – “Reggie’s Portra”

Below is a video that Reggie made which illustrates his Portra recipe quite well (he notes that the Shadow setting is incorrect in the video⁠—it should say -1, not -2). Be sure to like and subscribe and all that stuff. Enjoy!

This post contains affiliate links, and if you make a purchase using my links I’ll be compensated a small amount for it.

Fujifilm X100V Black    Amazon   B&H
Fujifilm X100V Silver   Amazon   B&H
Fujifilm X-E4 Black    Amazon   B&H
Fujifilm X-E4 Silver   Amazon   B&H
CineBloom 5% Filter Amazon B&H

Find this film simulation recipes and over 200 more on the Fuji X Weekly — Film Recipes App!

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Viewer’s Images from Today’s SOOC Broadcast!

This video is the viewer submitted photographs from SOOC Season 02 Episode 04. Yes, your pictures! The recipe-of-the-month was Fujicolor Superia 800. I hope that you enjoyed shooting with it! Thank you to everyone who shared their images, to everyone who participated, and to everyone who tuned in!

For those who don’t know, SOOC is a monthly live video series, with each episode focused on a different Film Simulation Recipe. It is a collaboration between Tame Your Fujifilm (Fujifilm X-Photographer Nathalie Boucry) and Fuji X Weekly (Ritchie Roesch). SOOC is a fun and educational experience where we not only talk about Fujifilm camera settings, but also answer your questions and give tips and tricks. Basically, we’re trying to help you master your Fujifilm camera, with a focus on simplifying your photographic workflow.

If you missed Episode 04 when it was live, you can watch it now (below).

Fujifilm X-Trans IV Film Simulation Recipe: Bright Kodak

Stringed Lights – Gilbert, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4 – “Bright Kodak”

Fujifilm cameras have a feature in Advanced Settings called “High Key” that I recently discovered is based on the Provia film simulation, and can be mimicked. While this “High Key” setting can produce nice-looking images, it’s not really my style, so I set out to create a Film Simulation Recipe to serve as an alternative to it, with an aesthetic that I appreciate a little more. Specifically, I wanted a generic overexposed Kodak color negative film aesthetic, perhaps Portra-like (or at least Portra-inspired), which is why I call this recipe Bright Kodak.

Bright Kodak might look familiar. It’s actually similar to a couple of other recipes, namely Bright Summer (a.k.a. “Preetra 400”) and Kodak Portra 400 Warm. If you like those recipes, you’ll certainly like this one, too. The key to using this Bright Kodak recipe is to increase the exposure⁠—almost overexpose⁠—to make the pictures nice and bright.

Palm – Goodyear, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4 – “Bright Kodak”

This Film Simulation Recipe is fully compatible with newer X-Trans IV cameras: Fujifilm X-Pro3, X100V, X-T4, X-S10, X-E4, & X-T30 II. If you have an X-T3, X-T30, or X-Trans III camera, you can get similar results by ignoring Grain size and using a diffusion filter (such as 10% CineBloom) in lieu of Clarity. This recipe is also likely compatible with newer GFX cameras, although the results won’t be completely identical.

Classic Chrome
Dynamic Range: DR400
Highlight: -2
Shadow: -2
Color: +4
Noise Reduction: -4
Sharpening: -2
Clarity: -3
Grain Effect: Strong, Large
Color Chrome Effect: Off
Color Chrome Effect Blue: Off
White Balance: Daylight, +3 Red & -7 Blue
ISO: Auto, up to ISO 6400
Exposure Compensation: +1 to +1 2/3 (typically)

Example photographs, all camera-made JPEGs using this “Bright Kodak” Film Simulation Recipe on my Fujifilm X-E4:

Cactus Evening – Goodyear, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4
3 Tall Cacti – Goodyear, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4
Cacti Reaching to the Moon – Goodyear, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4
Palm & Flowers – Goodyear, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4
Pink – Goodyear, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4
Bougainvillea – Goodyear, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4
Palm Moon – Goodyear, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4
Neighborhood Palms – Goodyear, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4
If You Know, You Know… – Gilbert, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4
Red Stripe – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4

Compared to “High Key”:

“High Key”
“Bright Kodak”

Compared to “Bright Summer” & “Kodak Portra 400 Warm”:

“Bright Summer”
“Kodak Portra 400 Warm”
“Bright Kodak”

Find this film simulation recipes and over 200 more on the Fuji X Weekly — Film Recipes App!

Help Fuji X Weekly

Nobody pays me to write the content found on fujixweekly.com. There’s a real cost to operating and maintaining this site, not to mention all the time that I pour into it. If you appreciated this article, please consider making a one-time gift contribution. Thank you!

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Join me LIVE Tomorrow!

The next episode of SOOC will be live tomorrow, Thursday, June 9th, at 10 AM Pacific Time, 1 PM Eastern! Please join us if you can⁠—it’s an interactive program, so the more who tune in and participate (invite a friend!), the better the broadcast will be. Don’t forget, the PreShow, which includes an informal chat and the viewer’s images slideshow, begins 30 minutes before the broadcast, so it’s great if you can arrive early. Don’t miss it!

In Season 02 Episode 04, we’ll conclude our discussion of the Fujicolor Superia 800 Film Simulation Recipe, and introduce the next recipe-of-the-month: Eterna Bleach Bypass. I’ve shot a little with both of these recipes over the last few weeks, and I’m super excited to see what you capture with them!

For those who don’t know, SOOC is a monthly live video series, with each episode focused on a different Film Simulation Recipe. It is a collaboration between Tame Your Fujifilm (Fujifilm X-Photographer Nathalie Boucry) and Fuji X Weekly (Ritchie Roesch). SOOC is a fun and educational experience where we not only talk about Fujifilm camera settings, but also answer your questions and give tips and tricks. Basically, we’re trying to help you master your Fujifilm camera, with a focus on simplifying your photographic workflow.

I hope to see you tomorrow!

Creative Collective 025: Highs & Lows (Key)

Golden Palms – Goodyear, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4 – “High Key”

I pretty much know Fujifilm cameras backwards and forwards. I’ve got to admit, though, that there are a few features that I never⁠—or almost never⁠—use. I recently rediscovered two of these tools that I tried once, didn’t like the results, and so I never used them again… until now. I didn’t realize that I was actually missing out on something kind of cool! I’ve had a lot of fun with these over the last few days, and I bet some of you will, too⁠—and I also bet that you don’t use these features, and perhaps have never even tried them.

What are they? High Key and Low Key.

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Vintage Lens: Vivitar 135mm F/2.8

I picked up a vintage Vivitar 135mm f/2.8 lens at an antique store in Texas for $15. It was not well taken care of, with scratches on the glass and dust inside of it, but definitely still in usable condition. My copy of this lens is M42-mount, and I just so happen to have an M42-to-Fuji-X adapter that I’ve owned for several years now, which allows me to attach this lens to my Fujifilm X-E4.

Vivitar lenses are interesting because Vivitar didn’t actual make lenses. They contracted with other manufacturers (most you’ve probably never heard of, but a few you have) to produce lenses for them. My copy was made in 1978 by Komine (as indicated by the serial number), which has been regarded as one of the “better” Vivitar manufacturers. Unfortunately, there’s a lot of inconsistency with Vivitar lenses, but they’re generally regarded as decent, and sometimes good. My copy of the 135mm f/2.8 seems to be good, despite the wear.

One thing that’s surprising is how small the Vivitar 135mm f/2.8 lens is despite its long telephoto reach. With the adapter attached to it, it’s still smaller than the Fujinon 90mm f/2. Fujifilm doesn’t have a prime lens that’s longer than the 90mm, except for the really big and expensive 200mm f/2, so the 135mm fills a gap in the Fujinon lineup. Really, Fujifilm should consider adding a prime lens that’s longer than 90mm, such as a 135mm f/2.8. Because of the crop-factor, this lens is full-frame equivalent to 202.5mm on my X-E4, which makes it great for wildlife or headshots, but challenging for other types of photography. Because of the focal length, unless your camera has IBIS, I recommend using a minimum shutter speed of 1/250 to ensure sharp photographs.

On my copy, the aperture ring, which has 1/2 stop clicks (that used to be common, but nowadays 1/3 intermediate stops are most common), works perfect, and the minimum aperture is f/22. The focus ring is smooth—a dream to use—and the minimum focus distance is about five feet.

The image quality produced by this lens is interesting. I’m not sure if it is the scratches and dust, or if it is simply the design of the lens, but there’s a slight “romantic softness” to the pictures. It seems to have slightly less micro-contrast compared to many of the lenses that I’ve used. It’s very reminiscent of what you get when you use a diffusion filter. I actually really like it, except for when the sun is near the frame, because the glare can be intense. I read that chromatic aberrations can be quite pronounced, but my copy doesn’t appear to be prone to it… or else the camera is automatically taking care of it behind the scenes.

I love going to antique stores and flea markets to find cheap treasures like the Vivitar 135mm f/2.8 lens. It’s not for use all of the time, but this lens can be a lot of fun and highly rewarding⁠—I’m so glad that I found it and took a chance on it. For $15, I really couldn’t be happier⁠—probably the best $15 I’ve ever spent on photography!

Some pictures that I captured with the Vivitar 135mm f/2.8 lens on my Fujifilm X-E4:

Urban Cycling – Fort Worth, TX – Fujifilm X-E4 & Vivitar 135mm – “Fujicolor Natura 1600
Chevy Mirror – Fort Worth, TX – Fujifilm X-E4 & Vivitar 135mm – “Fujicolor Natura 1600”
Classic Mirror – Fort Worth, TX – Fujifilm X-E4 & Vivitar 135mm – “Fujicolor Natura 1600”
Green – Fort Worth, TX – Fujifilm X-E4 & Vivitar 135mm – “Fujicolor Natura 1600”
Concrete Steps – Fort Worth, TX – Fujifilm X-E4 & Vivitar 135mm – “Fujicolor Natura 1600”
Urbanscaped – Fort Worth, TX – Fujifilm X-E4 & Vivitar 135mm – “Fujicolor Natura 1600”
High Rise – Fort Worth, TX – Fujifilm X-E4 & Vivitar 135mm – “Fujicolor Natura 1600”
3 Lamps – Vernon, TX – Fujifilm X-E4 & Vivitar 135mm – “Fujicolor Natura 1600”
Old House Roofline – McKinney, TX – Fujifilm X-E4 & Vivitar 135mm – “Fujicolor Natura 1600”
Ballyhoo – Childress, TX – Fujifilm X-E4 & Vivitar 135mm – “Fujicolor Natura 1600”
Golden Lake – Culleoka, TX – Fujifilm X-E4 + Vivitar 135mm – “Fujicolor Natura 1600”
Lake Sunset – Culleoka, TX – Fujifilm X-E4 + Vivitar 135mm – “Fujicolor Natura 1600”

Help Fuji X Weekly

Nobody pays me to write the content found on fujixweekly.com. There’s a real cost to operating and maintaining this site, not to mention all the time that I pour into it. If you appreciated this article, please consider making a one-time gift contribution. Thank you!

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New: Fuji X Weekly App Update!!

I just published an update to the Fuji X Weekly App! If your device didn’t update the App automatically, be sure to manually do so right now.

What’s in this update?

First is Search. You now have the ability to search for Film Simulation Recipes! This new feature allows you to search for recipes by name to more quickly locate the exact one that you are looking for. If you are a Fuji X Weekly App Patron, the search feature works in conjunction with Filter, so (for example) if you Filter By Camera, only those recipes compatible with your camera will appear when you Search. In other words, all App users get Search, but this feature is even better for Patrons. The ability to search for recipes is a significant improvement⁠—it definitely makes the App more user friendly. On Apple, simply scroll up (drag the recipe list down) and Search will appear towards the top. On Android, tap the magnify glass icon at the top-right and Search will appear.

Next is Random Recipe selector. Not sure which Film Simulation Recipe to use? Let the Fuji X Weekly App decide for you! Tap the crossing arrows icon at the top-right, and the App will randomly select one for you to use. The Random Recipe selector also works in conjunction with Filter, so even though it’s available to everyone, it’s even better if you are an App Patron. This fun new feature is addicting! If you’re in a photographic rut, this might help you get out of it. If there are a couple of you out photographing together, you can make a game out of it. I personally have really enjoyed using the Random Recipe selector, and I think you will, too!

Last but not least, the recipe parameter order has been improved. Unfortunately, the order of settings is different depending on your camera model, and even on the same model the order can be different within the IQ menu vs Custom Settings menu, so it’s not possible for it to be perfect; however, I do believe that the new order will make it a bit easier to program recipes into your camera.

This Fuji X Weekly App update is intended to make recipes easier to find and program, plus add a little fun to the experience. I hope that you find it useful and enjoyable!

Don’t have the Fuji X Weekly App? Download it today!

Not a Fuji X Weekly App Patron? Consider subscribing to unlock the best App experience! Within the App, tap the Gear icon, then select Become A Patron.

Next SOOC is Live this Thursday!

The next episode of SOOC will be live this Thursday, June 9th, at 10 AM Pacific Time, 1 PM Eastern! Please join us if you can⁠—it’s an interactive program, so the more who tune in and participate, the better the broadcast will be. Don’t forget, the PreShow begins 30 minutes before the show, so it’s great if you can arrive early. Don’t miss it!

In Season 02 Episode 04, we’ll conclude our discussion of the Fujicolor Superia 800 Film Simulation Recipe, and introduce the next recipe-of-the-month: Eterna Bleach Bypass. I’ve shot a little with both of these recipes over the last few weeks, and I’m super excited to see what you capture with them. Be sure to upload your pictures captured with the Fujicolor Superia 800 recipe (click here) by June 7th to be featured in the next episode!

For those who don’t know, SOOC is a monthly live video series, with each episode focused on a different Film Simulation Recipe. It is a collaboration between Tame Your Fujifilm (Fujifilm X-Photographer Nathalie Boucry) and Fuji X Weekly (Ritchie Roesch). SOOC is a fun and educational experience where we not only talk about Fujifilm camera settings, but also answer your questions and give tips and tricks. Basically, we’re trying to help you master your Fujifilm camera, with a focus on simplifying your photographic workflow.

Here are a few of the pictures I’ve captured recently using these recipes:

Lakeside House & Road – Culleoka, TX – Fujifilm X-E4 – “Fujicolor Superia 800”
Purple Flowers by Lake – Culleoka, TX – Fujifilm X-E4 – “Fujicolor Superia 800”
Red Flower Blooms – Allen, TX – Fujifilm X-E4 – “Eterna Bleach Bypass”
Pigeons on the Patio – Allen, TX – Fujifilm X-E4 – “Eterna Bleach Bypass”