Fujifilm X-T1 (X-Trans II) Film Simulation Recipe: Porto 200

Hidden House – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T1 – “Porto 200”

I was asked to make a film simulation recipe for Fujifilm X-Trans II cameras that mimics the aesthetic of photographer João Falcão (Instagram). I got pretty close to his look with this recipe, although perhaps not exact. Certainly if you like João’s aesthetic, you’ll appreciate these settings. It produces some really nice results! I call it Porto 200.

Why do I call this film simulation recipe Porto 200? After all, there’s no film called Porto 200. Well, Porto is the city in Portugal where João is from. While Porto means “port” I think it has a nice film-stock-like name, similar to “Portra” for example. So Porto 200 it is!

Moody Lake – Big Arm, MT – Fujifilm X-T1 – “Porto 200”

I really enjoy using this recipe on my X-T1! It has (at least for now) a permanent spot in the Q menu. It produces a look that might be kind of similar to ColorPlus 200. It’s not intended to be similar to that film, but to me it seems a little similar. Feel free to try it with +1 Color and/or Sharpness if you prefer, or -5 Blue if you think it’s too yellow. This recipe is intended for X-Trans II cameras, but it will work on X-Trans I and Bayer cameras, too, but with slightly different results.

PRO Neg. Std
Dynamic Range: DR400
Highlight: 0 (Std)
Shadow: +1 (Medium-Hard)
Color: 0 (Mid)
Sharpness: 0 (Std)
Noise Reduction: -2 (Low)

White Balance: Daylight/Fine, +2 Red & -6 Blue
ISO: Auto, up to ISO 3200
Exposure Compensation: -1/3 to +2/3 (typically)

Example photographs, all camera-made JPEGs using this Porto 200 recipe on my Fujifilm X-T1:

Holiday Rain – Big Arm, MT – Fujifilm X-T1
Forest Ivy – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T1
Fall Wall – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T1
Forest Fence – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T1
Dying Leaves – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T1
Tree Leaves – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T1
Hanging Leaves – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T1
Little Red Berries – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T1
Red Berries in a Tree – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T1
Treescape – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T1

See also: X-Trans II Film Simulation Recipes

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Review: Fujifilm X-T200 – Budget Camera, Beautiful Pictures

The Fujifilm X-T200 is a reasonably-priced mirrorless interchangeable-lens camera that has solid specs for both stills and video. I was actually quite surprised by this camera: it’s better than I thought it would be. Just because it’s a little less expensive, doesn’t mean it’s not good. The X-T200 is a budget camera that captures beautiful pictures!

This X-T200 isn’t actually mine. I’m just borrowing it to create some film simulation recipes for it. I would be happy to own one, though, and have considered picking one up, but most likely I won’t.

Fujifilm X-Trans cameras are solidly built. The X-T200 isn’t X-Trans, but instead has a 24-megapixel Bayer sensor. The camera feels cheaper than X-Trans cameras, but it still looks nice, and I’m sure the build-quality is good despite all of the plastic. It has a PASM dial (yuck) instead of the shutter speed dial that Fujifilm cameras typically have.

Despite being cheaper and feeling cheaper and looking cheaper, the X-T200 delivers the goods, which is what matters most. I was impressed by the image quality from this camera. The pictures look really nice! There’s no reason why someone couldn’t use the X-T200 for serious work, and I’m sure there are some who do.

The JPEG options on this camera are similar to X-Trans II, so to me it seems out of date and limited, even though this is the latest model. Don’t expect to have the full array of film simulations or other options that you’ll find on the latest X-Trans cameras. Like the XF10, you cannot save custom presets, which is really too bad. Despite the limitations, the X-T200 delivers lovely JPEGs; you might be disappointed by the options, but you won’t be disappointed by the results!

Hidden Church – North Salt Lake, UT – Fujifilm X-T200

The X-T200 has an interesting rear screen, which is the same flip screen found on the X-T4, or at least it’s nearly identical to it. It’s cool that you can move it all around to different angles, which can be useful sometimes, but my favorite aspect of it is that you can close it backwards, to where you can’t see the screen (in a sense, like the X-Pro3). You can shoot it like a classic film camera! Yes, you could just turn the screen off, but it’s more fun to not even see it at all. Yet, when you need the screen, it can bend to all sorts of different angles for you.

Fujifilm has marketed the X-T200 as a vlogger’s camera. Spec-wise, it’s very video-centric, and it’s clear that they thought YouTubers or aspiring YouTubers might be interested in buying it. It can do 4K 30 frames-per-second, which is great, and 120 frames-per-second slow-motion, which is also great. It has built-in digital image stabilization. It checks a lot of boxes on paper. Take a look at this test video:

Video quality on the X-T200 isn’t spectacular. It’s not terrible, either—just mediocre or maybe a tad better than mediocre. While it’s probably plenty good enough for most people and purposes, if you are serious about video, this camera will leave you disappointed. That’s too bad, because if the video quality was just a little better, the X-T200 would be a tempting option for those in need of a budget-friendly video-centric camera. If you are primarily interested in a camera for video, you might want to consider other options. If you want a camera primarily for stills but you might dabble in video occasionally, you’ll likely find this camera to be good enough for your needs.

This review isn’t about technical specs, but actual real-world use of the camera. My opinion is that the Fujifilm X-T200 does quite well for still photography and is decent-but-not-great for video. It’s a better camera than I thought it would be, but not as good as some other options, or as good as it seems like it could be on paper. The Fujifilm X-T30 isn’t all that much more expensive, yet it is a better option, and if you can afford it, I believe you’ll be happier with it. Another camera to consider, especially if you’re interested in video, is the upcoming Fujifilm X-S10, which has IBIS and an X-Trans sensor, but it is more expensive and possibly outside your budget. If you can’t afford either of those two options, the X-T200 is certainly a “good enough” choice, and you’re likely to be happy with it.

The X-T200 has an MSRP of $700 for the body or $800 when combined with the 15-45mm kit lens, but it can routinely be found for less than that, and sometimes much less. You get a lot for the price, especially if you can find it for $500 or less. For someone just starting out, and perhaps looking for their very first interchangeable-lens camera, the X-T200 is a great option. For those wanting to upgrade from an X-Trans I or II model but are on a tight budget, the X-T200 is worth considering. It’s a good camera for the price, and as long as your expectations aren’t too high, you’re sure to love it.

Example photographs, all camera-made JPEGs using the Fujifilm X-T200:

Setting Sun Behind Refinery – North Salt Lake, UT – Fujifilm X-T200
Nature Above City – North Salt Lake, UT – Fujifilm X-T200
Early Autumn Evening – North Salt Lake, UT – Fujifilm X-T200
Red Tree Fruit – Layton, UT – Fujifilm X-T200
Grocery – Layton, UT – Fujifilm X-T200
Targets – Layton, UT – Fujifilm X-T200
Another Brick – Layton, UT – Fujifilm X-T200
Diagonal Structure – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T200
Yellow Lamp – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T200
Summer Garage – Sunset, UT – Fujifilm X-T200
Leaves & Thistle – Fruit Heights, UT – Fujifilm X-T200
Squash Leaves – Sunset, UT – Fujifilm X-T200

This post contains affiliate links, and if you make a purchase using my links I’ll be compensated a small amount for it.

Fujifilm X-T200  Amazon  B&H

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Film Simulation Recipe Cards

There are almost 100 different film simulation recipes on Fuji X Weekly! One problem with having so many different recipes to choose from is that your Fujifilm camera can only save seven custom presets at a time. If there’s more than seven recipes that you regularly use, it can be inconvenient to keep track of your favorites, especially if you’re out-and-about photographing. One person’s solution is a recipe journal that’s kept in the camera bag for easy reference. A few people have created PDFs that can be accessed from a phone. But my favorite answer is this: Film Simulation Recipe Cards!

Fuji X Weekly reader Oleksii Prytuhin created credit-card-sized cards with his favorite film simulation recipes printed on them. They can be kept in a wallet for quick and easy reference. I love this! He printed them 86x54mm on thick paper with matte lamination. Really, I wish I had a box of Film Simulation Recipe Cards for every recipe, and I could pass them out to people who ask about my camera settings. Kind of like business cards. It’s such a neat idea!

The film simulation recipes that Oleksii created cards for are: Vintage Kodachrome (listed as Kodachrome 64, which is what the recipe is an early version of), Kodachrome II, Portra 400, Ilford HP5 Plus, Ilford Delta Push Process, Fujicolor Superia 800, Acros, CineStill 800T, Agfa Scala, Agfa Optima, Eterna, and Cine Teal. These are recipes that can be used on X-Trans III & X-Trans IV cameras. If you use any of these, there’s a Film Simulation Recipe Card for you!

Oleksii gave me permission to share the PDF with you. If you’re interested in printing these cards for yourself, click the download button below (which will open up the file and you can download it), and print them! I want to give Oleksii a big “thank you” for creating these and sharing them. I appreciate it! If you download and print the cards, let me know in the comments. Or, if you simply think this is a great idea, leave a little feedback. Thanks!

Update:
Oleksii sent me the film simulation recipe cards as JPEGs, to make it easier for those who want to add them to their phone. You can download a Word document that contains the JPEGs below. If you want to print them, the file above is what you want. If you just want to view them without printing, the file below might be better. Thanks, Oleksii!

Welcome to the New Fuji X Weekly!

Fuji X Weekly has been revamped! I’ve made a bunch of changes to this website, hopefully good ones.

One thing that you might notice right away is there’s a brand-new homepage, which is where you land when you type fujixweekly.com into your browser. From there you can choose where you want to go. The “old” landing page, which is the blog, is now found at fujixweekly.com/blog.

Instead of all of the film simulation recipes being located on one page, I’ve now sorted them by sensor. Having them all in one place made sense when there wasn’t nearly so many. Now that we’re approaching the 100 recipe mark, it can be difficult to find the one that you’re looking for. It should be much easier now.

There’s been many other smaller changes here and there throughout the website. I’ve been working on this for awhile, but it’s hard to know if everything works well or is actually a good change until it’s online and is put through the paces. I appreciate any feedback. I’d love to know what you like and dislike about the new look. If you find something that doesn’t work right, let me know.

I’m very excited about the new Fuji X Weekly website! If you don’t follow this blog, be sure to do so. I think many good things are just around the corner. I appreciate you coming along for the ride!

Fujifilm X-M1 (X-Trans I) Film Simulation Recipe: Vivid Color

Vibrant Autumn – Fruit Heights, UT – Fujifilm X-M1 – “Vivid Color”

The Fujifilm X-M1 doesn’t have nearly as many JPEG options as newer X-Series cameras have; however, that doesn’t mean that this camera can’t produce great-looking images straight-out-of-camera. This film simulation recipe is proof of that, as it simply looks great!

Many of you don’t have X-Trans I cameras, since there were only three models made: the X-M1, X-E1 and X-Pro1. Fujifilm quickly moved on to the X-Trans II sensor. I know that some of you still have your old X-Trans I camera, or have purchased one second-hand for cheap. For a long time I neglected creating recipes for these cameras, but no more! This is the second one for X-Trans I, and expect several more to be published in the coming months.

Fall Forest – Flathead Lake, MT – Fujifilm X-M1 – “Vivid Color”

Even though this film simulation recipe is intended for the X-M1, X-E1 and X-Pro1, if you have an X-Trans II or Bayer model, feel free to try this recipe on your camera. It won’t be exactly the same, but it will produce very similar results.

Velvia
Dynamic Range: DR200
Highlight: +1 (Medium-Hard)
Shadow: +2 (Hard)
Color: +2 (High)
Sharpness: +1 (Medium-Hard)
Noise Reduction: -2 (Low)
White Balance: Fluorescent 1 (“Daylight Fluorescent”), -5 Red & +5 Blue
ISO: Auto, up to ISO 3200
Exposure Compensation: +1/3 to +2/3 (typically)

Example photographs, all camera-made JPEGs made using this Vivid Color film simulation recipe on a Fujifilm X-M1:

Stinker – Idaho Falls, ID – Fujifilm X-M1
Leave the Light On – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-M1
Sunlight Through the Curtain – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-M1
Business Hours – Idaho Falls, ID – Fujifilm X-M1
Thrifty Nickel – Idaho Falls, ID – Fujifilm X-M1
Clothes Hangers – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-M1
H&M – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-M1
Autumn Forest Sunlight – Fruit Heights, UT – Fujifilm X-M1
Bright Autumn Leaves – Fruit Heights, UT – Fujifilm X-M1
Red Berries & Orange Leaves – Fruit Heights, UT – Fujifilm X-M1
Early Autumn Leaves – Fruit Heights, UT – Fujifilm X-M1
October Leaves – Fruit Heights, UT – Fujifilm X-M1
Leaves in a Dark Forest – Fruit Heights, UT – Fujifilm X-M1
Lit Autumn Leaves – Fruit Heights, UT – Fujifilm X-M1
Slowly Dying – Fruit Heights, UT – Fujifilm X-M1
Autumn Leaves & Green Weed – Missoula, MT – Fujifilm X-M1
Misty Mountain Morning – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-M1

See also: Film Simulation Recipes

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New: Fujifilm X-S10

It seems like everyone is talking about the newly announced Fujifilm X-S10, an upcoming mid-range interchangeable-lens mirrorless camera with in-body image stabilization (IBIS). This new camera will be released on November 19 for $1,000 for the body-only.

The X-S10 is a new line, not just a new camera. Fujifilm obviously didn’t listen to my advice (I highly doubt they ever saw it). Really, Fujifilm should have added IBIS to the X-T30 and called it the X-T40, at least that’s what I suggested. Instead they made a new camera from scratch (is that what the “S” stands for?). Internally, the X-S10 is an X-T4 (Fujifilm’s high-end model). Externally, this is an X-T200 (Fujifilm’s low-end model) with a grip (I assume the grip is for heat dispersion more than anything). It seems like they put a Porsche engine inside a VW Bug.

The X-S10 is the X-T4, except smaller, lighter, not weather sealed, with only one memory card slot, and in a body similar to the X-T200 (but with a hand-grip). You get a pretty darn solid camera for a pretty decent price. But, you also get a PASM dial instead of the shutter and ISO dials. It’s what’s on the inside that counts, right? On the inside the X-S10 is a great camera, no doubt about it!

I don’t like the name, though. Did Fujifilm put their hand in a Scrabble bag and pull out an S? What does the S stand for? When I think of S10, I think of cheap Chevy trucks with questionable reliability and presumably lots of rust. That’s not a good association! Of course, if you say the full name, it sounds like “Excess 10” which perhaps is appropriate but not necessarily great from a marketing point-of-view. Maybe the S stands for Sony-killer, which is what I think Fujifilm hopes that this camera becomes. It seems pretty obvious that the Fujifilm X-S10 and the Sony A6500 will be direct competitors. The A6500 is aesthetically uninspiring, so despite my misgivings about the X-S10’s body design, it still wins hands down over the Sony model, in my opinion. Most likely, the S stands for stabilized, as this camera joins a small list of Fujifilm cameras that have IBIS.

Interestingly, Fujifilm also announced a new 10-24mm f/4 lens, which is simply an update to a lens they’ve had for awhile. The new version is weather-sealed. There are a few other small improvements, but weather sealing is the big one. Apparently at some point you’ll be able to buy the X-S10 bundled with the new 10-24mm lens, but the X-S10 isn’t weather sealed, so you might be better off buying the old version of the lens instead, if you plan to use it with that camera.

This post contains affiliate links, and if you make a purchase using my links I’ll be compensated a small amount for it.

Fujifilm X-S10 Amazon B&H

Fuji X Weekly Update

Lakeshore & Dock – Flathead Lake, MT – Fujifilm X100V

It’s been very quiet here on Fuji X Weekly, but that doesn’t mean I haven’t been busy. In fact, the opposite is true. I wanted to give you a quick update so that you know what’s going on.

First, I’ve been revamping this website. It will have a new look pretty soon. I was hoping to finish it this week, but I’m running behind, so maybe by the end of this month it will be online. I think you’ll really appreciate the changes, and it will make things easier to find.

My review of the Fujifilm X-T200 will be published soon, probably next week. Gear reviews always take a long time to write. I’ve also been working on a review of the Fujinon 80mm f/2.8 Macro, but it’s still a ways off from being published (maybe in a couple weeks).

Time On Bridge – Big Fork, MT – Fujifilm X100V

I have two new film simulation recipes that will be posted in the coming days: one for X-Trans I and one for X-Trans II. At the bottom of this article you’ll find an example of each. I have a few in the works for X-Trans IV, but they’re not ready yet. I hope to create a new one for X-Trans III, too.

There’s plenty of great content coming, so stay tuned!

One other reason why it’s been quiet the last week is that I took a quick vacation to Montana. It was great to relax and reinvigorate my creativity! You’ll be seeing some of the pictures from that trip, too, such as the photographs in this article. I hope that you enjoy them!

Fall Forest – Flathead Lake, MT – Fujifilm X-M1
Rain at the Lake – Flathead Lake, MT – Fujifilm X-T1

Fujifilm X-M1 (X-Trans I) Film Simulation Recipe: Monochrome

Broken View – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-M1

Fujifilm introduced the world to the X-Trans sensor in January of 2012 with the announcement of the X-Pro1 camera. Later that same year the X-E1 became the second camera with this new sensor, and a year later the X-M1 became the third and final camera to have the original X-Trans sensor. Even before the X-M1 was released, Fujifilm had begun selling cameras with the X-Trans II sensor, so the original sensor was already old news by the time the camera was released. It seems that, more-or-less, Fujifilm had some spare X-Trans I sensors laying around, so they put them inside of the X-A1, a Bayer sensor camera, and renamed it X-M1. There never was an X-M2.

Even though only three cameras have an X-Trans I sensor, I’ve had many requests for film simulation recipes that are compatible with the X-Pro1, X-E1 and X-M1. I used to own an X-E1 (two, actually), but I mostly shot RAW with it and never developed any film simulation recipes for it. Some X-Trans II and Bayer recipes are technically compatible, but produce slightly different results. I purchased a cheap, gently used X-M1 to create some recipes with, and this is the very first one!

White Trees – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-M1

The X-M1 only has one black-and-white option. There’s no B+Y, B+R and B+G. There’s just standard B, which is the abbreviation for the Monochrome film simulation. I wanted to create a B&W recipe that produces dramatic results, but the JPEG options are limited on this camera compared to the newer models, so I had to get creative with the white balance to get the look that I wanted. This recipe is intended for X-Trans I cameras, but those with Bayer and X-Trans II cameras can use it, too, but the results will be slightly different.

Monochrome
Dynamic Range: DR200
Highlight: +2 (Hard)
Shadow: +2 (Hard)
Sharpness: +1 (Medium-Hard)
Noise Reduction: -2 (Low)
White Balance: Incandescent, -5 Red & +9 Blue
ISO: Auto, up to ISO 3200
Exposure Compensation: +1/3 to +2/3 (typically)

Example photographs, all camera-made JPEGs made using this Monochrome film simulation recipe on a Fujifilm X-M1:

Old Phone – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-M1
Dark Chocolate – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-M1
Ice Cream Bowl – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-M1
Countertop – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-M1
Steel Deck – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-M1
Good Sam – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-M1
Tool Ghosts – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-M1
Timesaver – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-M1
Saw Table – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-M1
Abandoned Workshop – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-M1
Buy American – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-M1
Anchor Screw Drawer – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-M1
Open Drawers – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-M1
Indoor Hoop – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-M1
Window with Broken Glass – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-M1
Abandoned Garage – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-M1

See also: Film Simulation Recipes

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Help Fuji X Weekly

Nobody pays me to write the content found on fujixweekly.com. There’s a real cost to operating and maintaining this site, not to mention all the time that I pour into it. If you appreciated this article, please consider making a one-time gift contribution. Thank you!

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Fujifilm X100V Film Simulation Recipe: CineStill 800T

Suburban Night – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

I created my original CineStill 800T film simulation recipe about two-and-a-half years ago. That recipe has remained quite popular. It’s received a lot of positive feedback and I remain quite proud of it. That recipe was created for X-Trans III cameras, but newer models have more JPEG options. I’ve been asked a few times if that recipe can be improved using the new features that weren’t around when I created it.

This new version is something that I’ve been working on for months and months. My CineTeal recipe is actually one of the failed attempts. I’ve been trying to achieve either an accurate CineStill 800T or Kodak Vision3 500T look straight-out-of-camera. These two films are actually the same film, but the CineStill version has the RemJet layer removed, which means that it is more prone to halation and can be processed in C-41 chemistry. Vision3 500T is meant to be developed using the ECN-2 process. With either CineStill 800T or Vision3 500T, how the film is shot, developed, and scanned and/or printed can significantly effect the aesthetic.

Lone Light – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V – “CineStill 800T”

I’m not 100% satisfied with this recipe. I think in some situations and in certain lighting, it looks pretty darn accurate to the film. In other situations and in other lighting, it’s a little off. There’s a lot of variation in how the film can look, and it’s just not possible to encapsulate it all in one recipe. In any event, if you are looking for a recipe that produces results similar to Tungsten film, this is one to consider. It is only compatible (as of this writing) with the Fujifilm X100V, X-Pro3 and X-T4.

Eterna
Dynamic Range: DR400
Highlight: 0
Shadow: +2
Color: +4
Noise Reduction: -4
Sharpening: -3
Clarity: -5
Grain Effect: Strong, Large
Color Chrome Effect: Strong
Color Chrome Effect Blue: Strong
White Balance: Fluorescent 3 (Cool White Fluorescent), -6 Red & -4 Blue
ISO: Auto, up to ISO 6400
Exposure Compensation: -1/3 to +2/3 (typically)

Example photographs, all camera-made JPEGs using this new CineStill 800T film simulation recipe on my Fujifilm X100V:

Garage Door Light – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Inside Looking Out – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Fuel Stop – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Quick Quack Centerville, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Old Navy – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Brick at Night – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Empty Bench – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
40% Off – Centerville, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Hi – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Navy Surplus Baskets – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Ghost Shoppers – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Remodel – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Red Cotton – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Lit Corner – Centerville, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Chillin’ in the Drive Thru – Centerville, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Tree Leaves at Night – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Night Rose – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Hot Beans – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Kitchen Ornament – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Book Table – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
End Table – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Girl in Window Light – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Home Umbrella Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

This post contains affiliate links, and if you make a purchase using my links I’ll be compensated a small amount for it.

Fujifilm X100V Black    Amazon   B&H
Fujifilm X100V Silver   Amazon   B&H

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Help Fuji X Weekly

Nobody pays me to write the content found on fujixweekly.com. There’s a real cost to operating and maintaining this site, not to mention all the time that I pour into it. If you appreciated this article, please consider making a one-time gift contribution. Thank you!

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Fujifilm X100V Film Simulation Recipe: B&W Superia

White House – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V – “B&W Superia”

Sometimes it’s fun to experiment with the settings on different film simulation recipes—make small changes and see what the results are. My Ektachrome 100SW recipe come about because someone took my Kodachrome II recipe and used Velvia instead of Classic Chrome. I did a similar experiment recently with my Kodachrome 64 recipe. This B&W Superia film simulation recipe came about that same way.

Fuji X Weekly reader Thomas Schwab took my Fujicolor Superia 1600 recipe and made a few changes, most notably Acros instead of Classic Negative. There are a few other differences, such as Grain and White Balance, but it’s mostly the Superia 1600 recipe, yet in monochrome instead of color. There never was a black-and-white Superia film, but it is possible to develop Superia in black-and-white chemistry as a monochrome film (technically, this is cross-processing). While there might be some similarities to Superia film developed as B&W and this recipe, they’re completely coincidental, as these settings aren’t intended to mimic anything specific.

Lamp Shadow – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V – “B&W Superia”

Even though this B&W Superia recipe isn’t intended to look like any particular film, it nonetheless produces very nice results. It calls for a little Toning, which resembles a quick Sepia bath, a common archival technique in monochrome printing, but that’s optional. The Clarity setting will slow down the camera considerably, so be aware of that. This recipe is only compatible (as of this writing) with the Fujifilm X100V, X-Pro3 and X-T4 cameras.

Acros (+Y, +R, +G)
Dynamic Range: DR400
Highlight: 0
Shadow: +2
Noise Reduction: -4
Sharpening: -1
Clarity: -4
Grain Effect: Weak, Large
Color Chrome Effect: Strong
Color Chrome Effect Blue: Strong
White Balance: Auto, 0 Red & 0 Blue
ISO: Auto, up to ISO 12800
Exposure Compensation: +1/3 to +2/3 (typically)

Example photographs, all camera-made JPEGs using this B&W Superia film simulation recipe on my Fujifilm X100V:

Sunlight & Structure – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Urban Canopy – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Bakery Thriftshop – Ogden, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Curved Corner – Ogden, UT – Fujifilm X100V
We’re Open! – Ogden, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Oct 09 – Ogden, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Window Vase – Ogden, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Monochrome Leaf – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

This post contains affiliate links, and if you make a purchase using my links I’ll be compensated a small amount for it.

Fujifilm X100V Black    Amazon   B&H
Fujifilm X100V Silver   Amazon   B&H

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