Shrinking Camera Market: What Fujifilm Should Do In 2021 & Beyond

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Fujifilm X100V captured by a Fujifilm X-T1

It’s no secret that camera sales have been declining for several years. The global pandemic has unsurprisingly significantly impacted the camera industry. Some companies have had bigger declines than others, and I think over the coming couple of years we’ll see some camera makers restructure, put themselves up for sale, or go out of business altogether. What should Fujifilm do to minimize declines and maximize profits in these tough times?

I’m not an industry insider or business expert. There aren’t any good reasons why Fujifilm should listen to me on this topic (other than I’m one of their customers). Besides, they have a pretty darn good track record for dealing with change within the industry and economy. Fujifilm doesn’t need my help. This article is more for my own enjoyment and perhaps yours. It’s fun to consider and discuss this topic. I don’t expect anything else to come from this.

Camera sales have been declining since the collapse of the compact camera market. Cellphone camera technology has come a long ways, which has rendered point-and-shoot cameras obsolete. The casual amateur snap-shooter uses their phone now to capture pictures, and has no need or interest in another camera. Before cellphone cameras had decent image quality, camera manufacturers were selling cheap automatic cameras to these folks. Lots and lots of them. But now that market is all dried up.

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Captured with a Fujifilm X-T1. This camera is four models old but is still quite capable.

The more serious shooters are still buying cameras, but cameras have reached a point of diminishing returns. Digital technology changes quickly, but if a camera is already really good, these improvements have less of a practical application. For instance, if a photographer finds that his or her camera’s autofocus is already more than good enough for their photography, a quicker autofocus system won’t likely tempt that photographer to upgrade. If a photographer finds that his or her camera already has enough resolution for the size they print, more resolution won’t likely tempt that photographer to upgrade. In other words, photographers by-and-large are keeping and using their gear for longer than they did 10 years ago, or even five. Digital is still disposable, but it is becoming less so, or at least photographers are beginning to realize that they don’t need to “upgrade” as frequently as they used to.

The camera industry isn’t Fujifilm’s main business. After the film collapse, Fujifilm diversified, and now they’re a pharmaceutical and cosmetics company that also happens to sell cameras. Their camera arm, which is just a small part of their business model, is doing better than many other camera makers right now. Still, the current market is impacting Fujifilm, and will continue to do so, which means Fujifilm might need to consider some changes.

Fujifilm has several camera models that are essentially the same, but look different and have only small feature differences. Fujifilm should consider ways to either further differentiate their similar models or combine them into one. The X-T200 and the X-A7 have nearly identical features, and having both models seems redundant. The X-Pro3 was made more unique to further separate it from the X-T3, and that worked out well, I believe. I look at the X-E line, which I love. My first Fujifilm camera was an X-E1. The X-E3 is so similar to the X-T20, aside from camera body design, so what differentiates the two besides shape? Fujifilm should consider discontinuing the X-E line, or do something to the eventual X-T40 or X-E4 to better differentiate the models. For example, if Fujifilm added IBIS to the X-T40 or made the X-E4 a black-and-white only camera (the “X-E Acros” is what I’d call it), that would separate them, and Fujifilm would have unique models. I think, alternatively, the X-T40 could basically be transitioned into a higher-end model, and serve as the (eventual) X-T5 without IBIS. The X-H line, now that the X-T4 has IBIS, is also redundant, so the X-H2 would need something to make it stand out, such as 8K video. Since the X-T4 has been so well received, I’m not sure how much of a market there is for an X-H2, but Fujifilm insists that this camera is in the works. It will be interesting to see it when it comes out, perhaps next year, and how well it does.

Fujifilm has situated itself as the leader in digital medium-format. It seems like overnight they went from not-even-in-that-market to top-dog, thanks to the success of the GFX line. Still, it’s more of a niche market than anything mainstream. I think what’s missing is a “budget” rangefinder-style 100-megapixel camera without IBIS. Essentially a GFX-50R, but with the 100MP sensor of the GFX100 inside. Maybe Fujifilm should consider adding IBIS to whatever camera replaces the GFX-50S. I have no idea how profitable this line has been for Fujifilm, and if it will stand the test of time, but I think it was smart of Fujifilm to jump into a market that they could easily dominate.

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This is a camera-made JPEG from a Fujifilm X100V, but looks more like film.

Something else that I think Fujifilm should consider is replacing cameras less frequently. When they release a camera and then replace it with a new model one year later, that’s too soon. Two years is too soon. Three years should be a minimum between updated cameras, and four to five years is even better. I know this might sound counter to what consumers want, but X-Trans III cameras, such as the X100F, X-T2, X-T20 and X-E3, are still very excellent! The X-E3 hasn’t been replaced yet, and the X100F was only recently replaced after three years, but the X-T2 is three models old now, and there’s already “talk” of an upcoming X-T40, while the X-T30 isn’t even a year-and-a-half old yet. It’s better to get the most out of a model, then replace it with something that’s a significant improvement over the previous edition. There’s a latin phrase festina lente, which means “make haste slowly.” Fujifilm needs to keep pushing the envelope and strive to produce more technologically advanced cameras, but not be too eager to release new models that only have small improvements over previous versions. If Fujifilm were to update the firmware on the X-T3 and X-T30 to breathe new excitement into these models, these cameras could still be sold for another two years easily.

There’s one more important point that I’d like to make, and this relates to Fuji X Weekly. I think Fujifilm needs to focus even more on JPEGs. I’ve discovered that there’s a huge community of photographers who love the camera-made JPEGs produced by Fujifilm cameras, whether straight-out-of-camera or with X RAW Studio. The film simulations—a brilliant idea by Fujifilm—were just the tip of the iceberg, and now film simulation recipes are all the rage. There’s something big here, bigger than I think Fujifilm realizes. Yes, Fujifilm has demonstrated their commitment to the JPEG with the X100V, X-Pro3 and X-T4, but they need to continue their commitment on future models. This is a fairly unique angle that Fujifilm has. While other camera makers do, in fact, have some nice JPEGs, Fujifilm is perhaps the only brand with a cult following based on it. They should absolutely capitalize on that, more so than they have been.

I doubt that Fujifilm will read this article, and I’m even more doubtful that they’ll make any internal changes based on it. I think it’s sound advice, but what do I know? Whether or not Fujifilm does any of the things I suggest, I think they’ll be just fine and will weather this “storm” without too much trouble. The guys running the company seem pretty smart to me, and are doing just fine without my advice. It will be fascinating to see exactly what happens within the camera industry in 2021 and beyond, and what Fujifilm does to find success during these tough times.

Fujifilm X100V Film Simulation Recipe: Fujicolor Superia 800

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Flags of IKEA – Draper, UT – Fujifilm X100V – “Fujicolor Superia 800”

One of the earliest film simulation recipes I created that was intended to mimic a specific film was Fujicolor Superia 800, which I made on a Fujifilm X100F about two-and-a-half years ago. This is a recipe that I’ve used often; I especially like it on overcast days. When I published the Superia 800 recipe, I stated, “It’s not a 100% match [to the film], but I feel like it’s convincing enough….” I think that’s a true statement, but with the new tools available on the X100V, could I create a closer match, one that might be even more convincing?

Classic Negative needed to be the starting point for a new Fujicolor Superia 800 recipe since this new film simulation is “modeled after” Fujicolor Superia with “Superia-like” colors. I incorporated the new Clarity and Color Chrome Effect Blue features into this recipe. Unfortunately, Clarity slows down the camera considerably, so you’ll either have to accept the slow speed (which is what I do) or add Clarity later by reprocessing the RAW file. I think this new recipe is indeed a closer match to actual Superia 800—in fact, you could likely convince people that you shot film!

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Horse Boarding – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X100V

I think this recipe might be my favorite of the Superia recipes that I’ve created thus far. If you like my Superia 100, Reala 100, and Superia 1600 recipes, you’ll certainly like this one, too! It has a great analog aesthetic. It’s pretty amazing that you can get this look straight out of camera. This Fujicolor Superia 800 recipe is (as of this writing) only compatible with the Fujifilm X100V, X-Pro3 and X-T4.

Classic Negative
Dynamic Range: DR400
Highlight: -1
Shadow: +1
Color: -1
Noise Reduction: -4
Sharpening: -1
Clarity: -4
Grain Effect: Strong, Large
Color Chrome Effect: Strong
Color Chrome Effect Blue: Weak
White Balance: Daylight, -1 Red & -3 Blue
ISO: Auto, up to ISO 6400
Exposure Compensation: +1/3 to +2/3 (typically)

Example photographs, all camera-made JPEGs using this Fujicolor Superia 800 film simulation recipe on my Fujifilm X100V:

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Line Begins Here – Draper, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Fire Suppression – Draper, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Trash – Draper, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Family Friendly Parking – Draper, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Waiting for Hope? – Draper, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Waiting to Enter – Draper, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Waiting Reflection – Draper, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Keeper of the Door – Draper, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Entrance – Draper, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Cloud Above Yellow Wall – Draper, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Two Flag Poles – Draper, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Home Furnishings – Draper, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Upplaga – Draper, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Track Closed – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Artificial – Draper, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Hanging Patio Lights – Draper, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Two Step – Draper, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Red Light – Draper, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Rainbow Spirit – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Chair Back – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Joshua Eating – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Brother & Sister on the Couch – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Balcony Railing – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Umbrella Unopened – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Sunlight Sky & Green Leaves – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Ripening Soon – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Fallen Log in the Forest – Monte Cristo, UT – Fujifilm X100V

See also: Film Simulation Recipes

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RAW vs JPEG? The Debate Needs To End

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Did I post-processed a RAW file or is this a camera-made JPEG? Does it matter?

There’s a debate in the photographic community that I get really tired of: RAW vs. JPEG. Most of the time, what I find is RAW shooters telling JPEG shooters that they shouldn’t shoot JPEGs for one reason or another. Usually there’s name-calling or a put-down thrown in or a condescending tone. Sometimes it’s the other way around, although I find that to be much more rare. Here’s my opinion: find what works best for you and your photography, and do that.

I wasn’t intending to write this post today, but over the last few days I’ve seen a number of articles and videos that tell me why RAW is really remarkable and JPEGs are just junk. Some make a reasonable argument, while others are absolutely ridiculous. Earlier today I watched a video that falls into the latter category, and that’s why I’m writing this.

Here’s the deal: it wasn’t very long ago that camera makers across all brands did a poor job at in-camera JPEGs. Some were better than others, but by-and-large none of them were great. RAW made sense, since you were going to be editing your pictures. But over the last decade every camera brand has improved their camera’s JPEGs, and some, like Fujifilm, have really made massive strides in this department. Today’s camera-made JPEGs are nothing like they were 10 years ago. Fujifilm’s JPEGs can look like post-processed RAW images, or even film-like. If you plan to edit your pictures, RAW is your best bet. If you don’t want to edit your pictures (or only lightly edit), you can achieve some great looks right out of camera. Neither option is the “right” or “wrong” way, just different means to an end, which is a finished photograph that you’re happy with.

Shoot RAW if that’s what you want to do. Shoot JPEG if that’s what you want to do. One method is not inherently better than the other. One way might be right for you, but wrong for another. You might find that you use both, just depending on the situation. While I almost always shoot JPEG, I do also still shoot RAW sometimes (it’s helpful for developing JPEG recipes). I used to shoot RAW exclusively once upon a time, but I don’t anymore.

RAW vs. JPEG is a tired debate. You don’t need to justify with strangers why you choose one over the other. I don’t want to hear why I’m “wrong” for shooting JPEGs. Don’t try to convince me that RAW is better. I won’t try to convince you to abandon RAW and shoot JPEG only. Both methods have their advantages and disadvantages, and there is a time and place for both. I would encourage you, if you are unsure whether to shoot RAW or JPEG, to try both for a time, and see which you prefer. There isn’t one right path. The debate needs to end—find what works best for you and your photography, and do that!

Fujifilm XQ1 (X-Trans II) Film Simulation Recipe: Lomography Color 100

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Backlit Backyard Leaves – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm XQ1 – “Lomography 100”

My second attempt at a film simulation recipe for the Fujifilm XQ1, which has an X-Trans II sensor, was Lomography Color 100. I have a recipe for this film for X-Trans IV cameras, such as my X-T30, and this is a conversion of that recipe for X-Trans II cameras. Honestly, this version isn’t quite as good as the X-Trans IV version (because the newer cameras have more JPEG options), but it’s still a good all-around, everyday film simulation recipe.

As I explained in my X-Trans IV recipe, there are three and perhaps four different emulsions that have been sold under the Lomography Color 100 name. Making a recipe that matches the film is impossible for that reason. Besides, people who use this film also often use alternative techniques, such as push-processing. Lomography Color 100 can have many, many different looks; despite that, this recipe is in the general ballpark of the film.

Velvia
Dynamic Range: DR400
Highlight: +2 (Hard)
Shadow: 0 (Standard)
Color: -2 (Low)
Sharpness: 0 (Standard)
Noise Reduction: -2 (Low)
White Balance: Cloudy/Shade, -3 Red & +7 Blue
ISO: Auto, up to ISO 1600
Exposure Compensation: 0 to +1/3 (typically)

Example photographs, all camera-made JPEGs made using this Lomography 100 film simulation recipe on a Fujifilm XQ1:

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Green Leaves & Blue Sky – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm XQ1

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Rooster Roof – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm XQ1

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Promenade – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm XQ1

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Towing – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm XQ1

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Yellow Hitch – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm XQ1

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Rusty Ford – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm XQ1

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Camper Special – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm XQ1

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Grate Airport Bus – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm XQ1

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Major Award – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm XQ1

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Abandoned Truck Trailers – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm XQ1

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Graffiti Truck – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm XQ1

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Yucca Leaves – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm XQ1

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Sunlight Through The Green Tree – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm XQ1

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Evening Tree & Reeds – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm XQ1

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Red Berries – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm XQ1

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Irrigation Cover – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm XQ1

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White Thistle – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm XQ1

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Rocky Landscape – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm XQ1

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Single Reed – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm XQ1

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Reeds Reaching To The Sky – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm XQ1

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Jonathan Outside – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm XQ1

See also:
Fujifilm XQ1 Cross Process Film Simulation Recipe
Film Simulation Recipes

Fujifilm X100F Review Blog

Help Fuji X Weekly

Nobody pays me to write the content found on fujixweekly.com. There's a real cost to operating and maintaining this site, not to mention all the time that I pour into it. If you appreciated this article, please consider making a one-time gift contribution. Thank you!

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Traveling With Fujifilm, Part 2: Dirty Jobs & Failed Dreams in Rexburg

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Grease Work – Rexburg, ID – Fujifilm X100V – “The Rockwell”

Part 1

These photographs were all captured at the same place: a Jack-in-the-Box in Rexburg, Idaho. On the very first day of the road trip we stopped in Rexburg for lunch. You just never know when photographic opportunities are going to present themselves, so it’s a good habit to have a camera within easy reach. For me, that was the Fujifilm X100V. Surprisingly, that Jack-in-the-Box in Rexburg provided the chance to create some interesting pictures.

Rexburg is perhaps best known for being underwater when a dam broke 1976, which flooded the area. The town recovered. It’s the last city before Yellowstone, and seems like a nice enough place. Like everywhere, hard working people are what keeps things moving forward. It’s the thankless jobs that often go unnoticed, yet they’re critical to a functioning society. It’s the premise of the television show Dirty Jobs hosted by Mike Rowe. I encountered a couple of those important yet invisible people while in Rexburg.

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Blue Truck Trailer – Rexburg, ID – Fujifilm X100V – “The Rockwell”

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Drive Thru – Rexburg, ID – Fujifilm X100V – “The Rockwell”

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Out of Order – Rexburg, ID – Fujifilm X100V – “The Rockwell”

Right next to Jack-in-the-Box in the same parking lot was a closed and abandoned Wingers. According to the sign, it had been opened for 13 years. I’m not sure why it closed: lazy employees, poor management, mediocre food, bad location, current economic times? I can only speculate, but I’ll never know the answer—it doesn’t matter, anyway. What I found interesting is that just a few steps separated hard working yet invisible people from an empty building that had similar people in it, but no more. They’re gone. Their jobs are gone. They’ve moved on. The dream that inspired its opening failed, leaving only ghosts of the past behind, a haunting reminder of the fragility of it all. Invisible People and Ghost Dreams would be my alternative title to this post. Maybe we’re all ghosts. Maybe invisibility is a super power. Maybe I just inspired the next album for some indie rock band somewhere.

For the top four photographs I used my new “The Rockwell” film simulation recipe. In fact, these were some of the very first pictures that I captured with this recipe. The bottom four photographs were captured using my Fujicolor Superia 100 film simulation recipe. These two recipes are pretty much opposites of each other: one is boldly vibrant, while the other is rather dull in comparison. Juxtaposed recipes for juxtaposed subjects. One mundane stop in a rather ordinary town. You just never know when photographic opportunities will present themselves, so be ready.

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Available Building – Rexburg, ID – Fujifilm X100V – “Fujicolor Superia 100”

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Available – Rexburg, ID – Fujifilm X100V – “Fujicolor Superia 100”

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Thistles In The City – Rexburg, ID – Fujifilm X100V – “Fujicolor Superia 100”

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This Restaurant is Closed – Rexburg, ID – Fujifilm X100V – “Fujicolor Superia 100”

Part 3

Traveling With Fujifilm, Part 1: Introduction

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Sunrise & Travel Trailer – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V – Fujicolor Superia 1600

I recently returned from a road trip across several U.S. states, which I photographed with a Fujifilm X100V and X-T30. The trip began in Farmington, Utah, which is where I live, and over a week-and-a-half my family and I pulled a travel trailer across Idaho, Wyoming (just a little), and Montana, and back to Utah. I visited two national parks. I saw incredible lakes and rivers. It was just a great road trip!

Upon returning, I was unsure how to best share the experience with you. I decided to break the trip into a series of articles called Traveling With Fujifilm. I’m not sure exactly how many parts there will be in all, but there will be many! This is Part 1. It won’t necessarily be in chronological order, but I hope in a logical order that makes some sort of sense.

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Rural Diner – Tremonton, UT – Fujifilm X100V – Fujicolor Superia 1600

The trip began on July 2nd right after sunrise. The trailer was already packed and ready, and already attached to the truck. We just had to load ourselves into the truck and leave. There are six of us: my wife and I, plus our four children. The truck seats six. It was a tight fit. We bonded (and occasionally not), as we spent significant stretches of time together on the open road.

The first day took us from our home in Utah to Island Park, Idaho. For the most part it’s rural country. We made a few stops for gas and food, but mostly pushed through to the destination. Island Park is amazingly beautiful! I’ll save that for another article, so you can look forward to it.

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Phillips 66 – Malad City, ID – Fujifilm X100V – Fujicolor Superia 100

The film simulation recipes that I used for these three pictures are Fujicolor Superia 100 and Fujicolor Superia 1600. I only used the Fujifilm X100V for this section of the trip. This camera is great for this type of photography. No need to carry a camera bag filled with lenses. One camera, one lens. In fact, I used the X100V for about 90% of the pictures on this trip. While this article has only a few photographs, most in this series will have many more.

Come along for the ride! Join me on this adventure by following this series. I hope that you’ll find it enjoyable, inspirational and perhaps even helpful to your photography.

Part 2  Part 3

Fujifilm XQ1 (X-Trans II) Film Simulation Recipe: Cross Process

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A Fuji X Weekly reader sent me his camera, a Fujifilm XQ1, so that I might create some film simulation recipes for it. For those who don’t know, the XQ1 is a premium compact-zoom that Fujifilm made six or seven years ago, and it has a 2/3″ 12-megapixel X-Trans II sensor. While the sensor is much smaller than APS-C, it has the same processor and software as other X-Trans II cameras, although it is missing some options (Classic Chrome, PRO Neg. Hi and PRO Neg. Std, for instance). I discovered that some of the X-Trans II recipes I’ve created, such as Ektachrome 100SW, Agfa Optima, Velvia and Monochrome, all work great on the XQ1. My intentions are to create some more recipes that will work on this camera, and, really, all X-Trans II cameras.

The first film simulation recipe that I created for the XQ1 (and, again, it’s compatible with all X-Trans II cameras) is Cross Process. I have a couple Cross Process recipes that I’ve created for newer camera models (here and here), but never for older models. This one was rather easy to make, and so that’s why I started with it. While I set the maximum ISO to 1600, if you are using an APS-C X-Trans II camera, I’d go as high as ISO 3200. Feel free to try this recipe on X-Trans I or Bayer cameras, if you have one of those, and see how it turns out.

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Summer Evening Dream – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm XQ1 – “Cross Process”

Cross processing is a technique where you develop a film in chemicals intended for another film. For example, the most common cross process is to develop color transparencies, which require the E-6 process, using color negative film chemicals, which is known as C-41 process. For slide film, the photographs typically increase in contrast and grain and the colors shift dramatically. There are other types of cross processing, as well. I’ve done cross processing before, and the results can be fun. Different films will look different when they are cross processed. Overexposing or underexposing or even how the development is handled can effect how the image is rendered. The aesthetic can vary significantly, but usually you can spot a cross processed photograph when you see it.

Provia
Dynamic Range: DR200
Highlight: +2 (Hard)
Shadow: +2 (Hard)
Color: +2 (High)
Sharpness: -1 (Medium-Soft)
Noise Reduction: -2 (Low)
White Balance: Auto, -3 Red & -9 Blue
ISO: Auto, up to ISO 1600
Exposure Compensation: +1/3 (typically)

Example photographs, all camera-made JPEGs made using this Cross Process film simulation recipe on a Fujifilm XQ1:

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SkyWest Sunset – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm XQ1

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Eagle TT-12 – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm XQ1

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SkyWest Carts – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm XQ1

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Ford Truck – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm XQ1

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Ranger – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm XQ1

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Warehouse Deliveries – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm XQ1

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Stop! – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm XQ1

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Cross Process Red Roses – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm XQ1

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Yellow Stump – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm XQ1

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Sand Toys Without Sand – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm XQ1

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Spirit of Photography – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm XQ1

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Blessed – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm XQ1

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Message From Space – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm XQ1

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Green Leaves – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm XQ1

See also: Film Simulation Recipes

Fujifilm X100F Review Blog

Help Fuji X Weekly

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Creative Uses of Multiple Exposure Photography

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This picture is a combination of 8 toned B&W exposures. All done in-camera on a Fujifilm X100V.

There are many creative ways to use multiple-exposure photography on your Fujifilm camera. You can create pictures that might not at first glance appear to be multiple-exposure, yet using this tool opens up different aesthetics that aren’t otherwise possible to achieve in-camera. The multiple-exposure feature on your Fujifilm camera is often underutilized—there’s so much potential!

I’ve done a number of experiments with multiple-exposure photography, and written many articles on the topic. Below you’ll find links to some of those posts. If you missed them, or maybe you haven’t thought about multiple-exposure photography in awhile or at all, I invite you to give it a try!

Color Pictures From Toned Black-And-White
Texture
Faded Color
Vintage Color Fade
Faded Monochrome
Faded Monochrome (X-Trans II)
Split-Toned B&W
Bleach Bypass
Double-Exposure
The Treachery of Images

Fujifilm X100V Film Simulation Recipe: The Rockwell (Velvia)

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Abandoned Dream – Red Rock Lakes NWR, MT – Fujifilm X100V – “The Rockwell”

Ken Rockwell likes to say that Fujifilm cameras aren’t good for landscape photography because the JPEG colors aren’t “wild” enough for him. Even on his review of the X100V, he says, “The as-shot JPG color palette and contrasts are quite sedate,” and, “the X100V won’t amp-up colors if they aren’t strong to begin with.” He adds, “The Velvia film simulation modes don’t look any better; certainly not like real Velvia.” He’s entitled to his opinion, but I think he just hasn’t used the “right” recipe, and he might change his mind if he did. This recipe is one that Ken Rockwell might approve of, as it’s inspired by him, and that’s why I call it The Rockwell.

Ken mentions that the Velvia film simulation isn’t like real Velvia, and he means Velvia 50. There are, in fact, a few different films that share the Velvia name. Straight out of the box, the film simulation differs a little from the film. My X-T30 Velvia recipe is intended to get the film simulation closer to actual Velvia 50 film. “The Rockwell” recipe is also in the ballpark of Velvia 50 film, although it might actually exceed it. I’ve heard it said that Fujifilm’s short lived Fortia film (which Color Chrome Effect and Color Chrome Effect Blue are inspired by), which is like Velvia 50 on steroids, was a mistake. Supposedly it (or at least the original Fortia 50) was a botched Velvia run, but instead of trashing it Fujifilm sold it as a new film. This recipe isn’t as crazy as Fortia, but it’s every bit as crazy as Velvia 50 and perhaps slightly more. Another film that is in the general vicinity of this aesthetic is Kodak’s Ektachrome 100VS, which was essentially Kodak’s closest film to Velvia, but this recipe is a little off from that film. No, “The Rockwell” isn’t an exact match to any film, it’s just a recipe that Ken might use on his X100V if he ever read this article.

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Gibbon Falls – Yellowstone NP, WY – Fujifilm X100V – “The Rockwell”

This film simulation recipe is definitely not for everyone. Just like the person it was named after, it’s bold yet sometimes over-the-top. Many of you will find it to be much too much for your photography. But some of you are going to love it. In the right situations, this recipe is stunning! It uses Clarity, which slows down the camera considerably, but this is a recipe that you might want to work slow with anyway, so it should be alright. This recipe is only compatible (as if this writing) with the X100V, X-Pro3 and X-T4.

Velvia
Dynamic Range: DR200
Highlight: -1
Shadow: -1
Color: +4
Noise Reduction: -4
Sharpening: +4
Clarity: +5
Grain Effect: Weak, Small
Color Chrome Effect: Strong
Color Chrome Effect Blue: Strong
White Balance: Auto, +1 Red & -1 Blue
ISO: Auto, up to ISO 6400
Exposure Compensation: +1/3 to +2/3 (typically)

Example photographs, all camera-made JPEGs using this “The Rockwell” film simulation recipe on my Fujifilm X100V:

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Lake McDonald Shore Trees – Glacier National Park, MT – Fujifilm X100V

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Driftwood Shore – Glacier National Park, MT – Fujifilm X100V

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McDonald Lake & Rocks – Glacier National Park, MT – Fujifilm X100V

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Lake McDonald – Glacier National Park, MT – Fujifilm X100V

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Flathead Lake – Flathead Lake, MT – Fujifilm X100V

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Clear Blue Water – Glacier National Park, MT – Fujifilm X100V

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Tree & Snake River – Idaho Falls, ID – Fujifilm X100V

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McDonald Creek Behind Pines – Glacier National Park, MT – Fujifilm X100V

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Trees Obscuring the River – Glacier National Park, MT – Fujifilm X100V

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McDonald Creek – Glacier National Park, MT – Fujifilm X100V

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Green Trees – Glacier National Park, MT – Fujifilm X100V

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Forest Flowers – Glacier National Park, MT – Fujifilm X100V

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Lake Daisies – Flathead Lake, MT – Fujifilm X100V

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Blossomed Bush by the Lake – Flathead Lake, MT – Fujifilm X100V

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Upper Red Rock Lake – Red Rock Lakes NWR, MT – Fujifilm X100V

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Red Lake Light – Flathead Lake, MT – Fujifilm X100V

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Morning Rays – Canyon Ferry Lake, MT – Fujifilm X100V

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Sunset Through The Trees – Island Park, ID – Fujifilm X100V

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Aspen Sunstar – Island Park, ID – Fujifilm X100V

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Johnny Sack Cabin – Island Park, ID – Fujifilm X100V

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Hanging Flower Pot – Big Sky, MT – Fujifilm X100V

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Mountain Wildflowers 1 – Red Rock Lakes NWR, MT – Fujifilm X100V

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Mountain Wildflowers 2 – Red Rock Lakes NWR, MT – Fujifilm X100V

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Rural Blossoms – Island Park, ID – Fujifilm X100V

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Mountain Springtime – Island Park, ID – Fujifilm X100V

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Blossom by the River – Island Park, ID – Fujifilm X100V

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River Grass – Island Park, ID – Fujifilm X100V

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Grassy Hills – Wild Horse Island State Park, MT – Fujifilm X100V

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Pine in the Field – Wild Horse Island State Park, MT – Fujifilm X100V

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Abandoned Rural Building – Wild Horse Island State Park, MT – Fujifilm X100V

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Pop of Color Cabin – Polebridge, MT – Fujifilm X100V

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Birdhouse Fence – Island Park, ID – Fujifilm X100V

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Playground at the Edge of Nowhere – Island Park, ID – Fujifilm X100V

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Hot Water – Yellowstone National Park, WY – Fujifilm X100V

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Blue Eye – Yellowstone National Park, WY – Fujifilm X100V

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Red Rock Turtle – Island Park, ID – Fujifilm X100V

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Colorful Pallets – Bozeman, MT – Fujifilm X100V

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Westfield – Idaho Falls, ID – Fujifilm X100V

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Pink – Island Park, ID – Fujifilm X100V

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Stop for the Pink Bus – Silos, MT – Fujifilm X100V

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18 – Silos, MT – Fujifilm X100V

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Stop Here – Yellowstone National Park, WY – Fujifilm X100V

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Blue Trailer – Rexburg, ID – Fujifilm X100V

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Grease Work – Rexburg, ID – Fujifilm X100V

See also: Film Simulation Recipes

This post contains affiliate links, and if you make a purchase using my links I’ll be compensated a small amount for it.

Fujifilm X100V Black    Amazon   B&H
Fujifilm X100V Silver   Amazon   B&H

Fujifilm X100F Review Blog

Help Fuji X Weekly

Nobody pays me to write the content found on fujixweekly.com. There's a real cost to operating and maintaining this site, not to mention all the time that I pour into it. If you appreciated this article, please consider making a one-time gift contribution. Thank you!

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Fuji X Weekly is Back!

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Blue Mountain Lake  – Flathead Lake, MT – Fujifilm X-T30 & Fujinon 100-400mm

I was on vacation, but now I’m back!

I visited some great places, including Yellowstone and Glacier National Parks, but my favorite spot was Flathead Lake in Montana. It was absolutely beautiful! Flathead Lake is the largest freshwater lake (in America) west of the Missouri River. It’s unbelievably clean and clear. I used to live (many, many years ago when I was a kid) in the Puget Sound area of Washington, and Flathead Lake reminded me of that. Instead of the Pacific Ocean it’s a huge lake, with interesting little towns and communities found along its shore. There’s an island that’s a state park, only accessible by boat, and we saw more wildlife on that island than the two national parks combined. Flathead was fun!

Now that I’m back, I’m going to try to catch up on all the comments, messages and emails that I’ve not responded to. There are so many! It might take me a couple days to answer everyone back. I appreciate your patience and understanding.

I have so many photographs and articles to share. I have a number of videos to make. There’s a lot of content coming, so stay tuned!