Rumor: Ability to Save WB Shift on X-Pro3!!

Fujifilm X-Pro3 Blog

I received a message from a Fuji X Weekly reader who’s also a Fuji X Photographer, and he has a pre-production X-Pro3 that Fujifilm has given him to try. He wanted to tell me that the X-Pro3 has the ability to save white balance shifts with each custom preset! Hallelujah! Those who have written into Fujifilm to ask for this, well, apparently it worked, because they have given it to you–at least on the pre-production model of the X-Pro3. Hopefully it will come to other cameras soon.

For those who might be unaware of this issue, when you program my film simulation recipes into the custom settings for quick access through the Q Menu, you cannot save the white balance shift that’s required for the different looks. Most of my recipes require a white balance shift, and you have to manually set it each time that you change recipes. It’s kind of a hassle. It’s by far the number one complaint I receive about Fujifilm cameras. Well, apparently, beginning with the X-Pro3, this will no longer be a problem.

That’s great! I hope Fujifilm makes it available for other cameras through firmware updates. If they don’t, I have another solution that I’ll tell you about next week, so be sure to watch for that. If you’re not already, be sure to follow Fuji X Weekly (look at the bottom-right corner) so that you don’t miss the article when it’s published.

If you’d like to pre-order the X-Pro3, please use my affiliate links below. If you make a purchase using my links, I will be compensated a small amount for it. Nobody pays me to write the articles you find here, so using my affiliate links is a great way to support this website.

Fujifilm X-Pro3 Black:
B&H   Amazon
Fujifilm X-Pro3 Dura Black:
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Fujifilm X-Pro3 Dura Silver:
B&H   Amazon

My Fujifilm X-T30 Lomography Color 100 Film Simulation Setting


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Misty Mountain Sunset – Layton, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 – “Color 100”

Several different Fuji X Weekly readers have asked me to create a film simulation recipe based on Lomography Color 100 film. Lomography is essentially low-fi film photography, and it’s also the name of a company that sells cameras and film. One of their negative films is Color 100. It’s a popular film among lomographers, but even those who wouldn’t consider themselves a part of the lomography movement have taken notice of it. I’ve never used this particular film myself, as it didn’t exist when I shot a lot of film, so I only had the internet to assist me with creating this recipe.

Besides the fact that I don’t have any first-hand experience with this film, another big hurdle for creating these settings was the film itself. As I researched it, I discovered that Lomography Color 100 film isn’t one single emulsion. In fact, at least two, possibly three, and maybe even four different emulsions have been sold under the name Lomography Color 100! At least two of those, and maybe all of them, are Kodak films. Lomography bought these emulsions at a discount, either because too much was manufactured and the film was approaching its expiration, or because it didn’t pass quality control, and Kodak sold their unwanted film cheaply to Lomography. Which films, you ask? Gold 100 and Pro Image 100, for sure. Ektar 100 possibly. The fourth, if there is a fourth, would be a non-Kodak film, possibly Fujifilm Fujicolor 100, but there’s a good chance that a fourth emulsion for Color 100 never happened.

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Curious – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 – “Color 100”

Another hurdle with this film simulation recipe is that a lot of people use alternative techniques with Color 100, such as push-process. There’s a big variety with how it’s typically handled by photographers, which makes creating a look that resembles Color 100 quite difficult. Results may vary would be the best description of the film. Despite that, I do believe that this recipe is in the neighborhood of the film, and those looking for an aesthetic that’s close to Color 100 film will appreciate this facsimile of it.

Velvia
Dynamic Range: DR400
Highlight: +1
Shadow: +1
Color: -3
Noise Reduction: -4
Sharpening: +1
Grain Effect: Weak
Color Chrome Effect: Weak
White Balance: Cloudy/Shade, -3 Red & +7 Blue
ISO: Auto, up to ISO 6400
Exposure Compensation: +1/3 to +2/3

Example photographs, all camera-made JPEGs using this Color 100 film simulation recipe on my Fujifilm X-T30:

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Yellow Cottonwood – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Morning Yellow – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Cold Backyard Autumn – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Red Tree Snowfall – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Ball Hitter – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Girl In Bright Sunlight – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Red Autumn Leaves – Riverdale, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Backyard October Winter – South Weber, UT

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October Snow – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Ice Cold Leaf – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Camera Shelf – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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R Decor – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

See also: My Film Simulation Recipes

Help Fuji X Weekly

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Bargains: Fujifilm X-T2, X-T20 & X-E3

Fujifilm X-T20 Blog

For those looking for great deals on Fujifilm gear, X-Trans III sensor cameras have the best bargains currently. Cameras like the X-T2, X-T20 and X-E3 are priced pretty darn low, and they’re still excellent and worth owning. I know that the X-Pro3 has received much attention lately, but don’t overlook what’s available right now, and at such cheap prices, too!

Below are my affiliate links, and if you make a purchase using the links I will be compensated a small amount for it.

Fujifilm X-T2 (Body Only) $800   B&H   Amazon
Fujifilm X-T2 w/35mm lens $1,200   B&H

Fujifilm X-T20 (Body Only) $600   B&H   Amazon
Fujifilm X-T20 w/16-50mm lens $700   B&H   Amazon
Fujifilm X-T20 w/18-55mm lens $900   B&H   Amazon

Fujifilm X-E3 (Body Only) $600   B&H   Amazon
Fujifilm X-E3 w/23mm f/2 lens $850   B&H   Amazon
Fujifilm X-E3 w/18-55mm lens $900   B&H   Amazon

My Fujifilm X-T30 Color Negative Film Simulation Recipe


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Evening Light On A Clearing Mountain – Riverdale, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 – “Color Negative”

Silly Putty was invented by accident. There was a shortage of rubber during the second world war, and as a result several companies worked hard to create a synthetic substitute. What we now know as Silly Putty was a failed attempt at synthetic rubber. Even though it didn’t turn out exactly like its inventor had hoped, it still became a useful product that has brought joy to many people across the world. This “Color Negative” film simulation recipe has a similar story to Silly Putty (minus the war and rubber).

I’ve been working on a number of different recipes, trying to mimic several different aesthetics that I’ve been asked to create. One of the films that I’ve been trying to recreate the look of is Fujifilm C200, but I’ve yet to crack the code. This recipe is one of the failed attempts at C200. I like how it looks, so I thought I’d share it, even though it’s not exactly what I was trying for. I hope it become useful and brings joy to someone.

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Cameras and Coffee – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 – “Color Negative”

I named this recipe “Color Negative” only because it has a general color negative aesthetic, and I didn’t know what else to call it. It’s in the general neighborhood of Fujifilm C200, but it’s not exactly right for that film. Perhaps there’s some generic film that looks similar to this. It doesn’t precisely mimic any one film that I’m aware of, but this recipe does have a film-like quality to it.

PRO Neg. Hi
Dynamic Range: DR400
Highlight: +2
Shadow: +2
Color: -2
Noise Reduction: -4
Sharpening: +1
Grain Effect: Weak
Color Chrome Effect: Off
White Balance: Daylight Fluorescent (1), -2 Red & +4 Blue
ISO: Auto, up to ISO 6400
Exposure Compensation: 0 to +2/3 (typically)

Note: There was some confusion on the white balance required for this recipe. It’s Fluorescent 1, also called Daylight Fluorescent or Neon 1. It’s the first option underneath Cloudy.

Example photographs, all camera-made JPEGs using my Color Negative Film Simulation recipe on a Fujifilm X-T30:

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Fallen Leaves – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Hanging Apple – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Leaf Hanging On – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Boy Unsure – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Joy’s Smile – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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White Stars – Roy, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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White Cloud Ridge – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Reserved Parking – South Ogden, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

See also: My Fujifilm Film Simulation Recipes

Help Fuji X Weekly

Nobody pays me to write the content found on fujixweekly.com. There's a real cost to operating and maintaining this site, not to mention all the time that I pour into it. If you appreciated this article, please consider making a one-time gift contribution. Thank you!

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Lens Review: Fujinon XF 23mm f/2 R WR


Fujifilm blog Fujinon 23mm f/2 Lens

The Fujinon Super EBC XF 23mm f/2 R WR is a wide-angle prime lens for Fujifilm X cameras. Because of the APS-C crop factor, it has a full-frame equivalent focal length of about 35mm, which makes it an excellent all-purpose walk-around lens. How good is it? Should you buy it? I hope that this review will help to answer those questions.

The Fujinon 23mm f/2 lens has 10 elements in six groups, with nine rounded blades. The maximum aperture is f/2 and the minimum aperture is f/16, with intermediate stops at 1/3 increments. It’s mostly made of metal. The lens is about 2.3″ long and weighs about 0.4 pounds, which means it’s small and lightweight. It accepts 43mm filters and comes with a plastic hood. This lens is weather sealed, which is great if your camera is also weather sealed.

Auto-focus with this lens is super quick and nearly silent. It’s one of Fujifilm’s best auto-focus lenses, in my opinion. Manual focus is via an electronic system, and the focus ring is pretty good and smooth overall. The minimum focus distance is about nine inches.

The Fujinon 23mm f/2 lens is quite sharp (although not quite as sharp as the 35mm f/2). There’s some noticeable softness when wide open and focused close to the end of the lens, but otherwise it’s corner-to-corner crisp across the frame. Diffraction sets in at f/11 but doesn’t really become noticeable until f/16. Peak sharpness is around f/5.6. There’s a tiny amount of vignetting at f/2 that quickly goes away as you stop down, as well as some chromatic aberrations. There’s a moderate amount of pincushion distortion, which only matters if you shoot brick walls. Bokeh is creamy and quite nice. Lens flare is well controlled, and this lens can create good sunstars at small apertures. Image quality produced by the Fujinon 23mm f/2 lens is overall very good.

Fujifilm blog Fujinon 23mm f/2 Lens

The Fujifilm X100F has a built-in 23mm f/2 lens, and you might think that it’s the same lens as this one, but it’s not, although image quality is quite similar between the two. I think, if you were to study test charts, the Fujinon 23mm f/2 lens would seem slightly superior to the lens on the X100F, but in practical use there’s just something magical about the lens on the X100F that makes it preferable in my opinion. If you can’t afford an X100F, attaching a Fujinon 23mm f/2 lens to your camera will give you the next best thing, and it’s almost like having an X100F.

Fujifilm also makes a 23mm f/1.4 lens, which I’ve never had the pleasure to own, but I’ve talked to some people who have used both lenses to get their opinions. The advantage of the f/1.4 version is the larger maximum aperture and marginally better image quality, while the advantage of the f/2 version is size, weight, quickness and price. Unless you just need the larger aperture, I would recommend this lens instead of the f/1.4 version, although you can’t go wrong with either.

The Fujinon Super EBC XF 23mm f/2 R WR lens retails for $450, making it one of the lesser expensive prime lenses for Fujifilm X cameras. If you can find it on sale, it’s an even better bargain! If you are looking for a quality walk-around lens, or a cheap alternative to buying an X100F, I’d recommend the Fujinon 23mm f/2 lens, as it has a lot of pros and very few cons.

My affiliate links for the Fujinon 23mm f/2 lens are here: B&H  Amazon. If you make a purchase using my links I will be compensated a small amount for it.

Example photos captured using the Fujinon Super EBC XF 23mm f/2 R WR lens attached to a Fujifilm X-Pro2:

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Starry Nites – Park City, UT – Fujifilm X-Pro2 & Fujinon 23mm f/2

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National Drink – Ogden, UT – Fujifilm X-Pro3 & Fujinon 23mm f/2

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Bike Flag – Uintah, UT – Fujifilm X-Pro2 & Fujinon 23mm f/2

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Empty Carts – Ogden, UT – Fujifilm X-Pro2 & Fujinon 23mm f/2

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Radius Lines – Park City, UT – Fujifilm X-Pro2 & Fujinon 23mm f/2

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Slow – Park City, UT – Fujifilm X-Pro2 & Fujinon 23mm f/2

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Button For Walking – Ogden, UT – Fujifilm X-Pro2 & Fujinon 23mm f/2

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Historic Beer – Ogden, UT – Fujifilm X-Pro2 & 23mm f/2

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Stair Vines – Ogden, UT – Fujifilm X-Pro2 & Fujinon 23mm f/2

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Yellow Pots – Park City, UT – Fujifilm X-Pro2 & Fujinon 23mm f/2

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Yellow Door – Uintah, UT – Fujifilm X-Pro2 & Fujinon 23mm f/2

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Yellow Circle Armor – Ogden, UT – Fujifilm X-Pro2 & Fujinon 23mm f/2

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Monochrome Bench – Ogden, UT – Fujifilm X-Pro2 & Fujinon 23mm f/2

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Famous Monster – Ogden, UT – Fujifilm X-Pro2 & Fujinon 23mm f/2

See also:
Fujifilm Gear
Fujinon 90mm f/2 Review
Fujinon 35mm f/2 Review

Help Fuji X Weekly

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Asahi-Pentax Super-Takumar 135mm f/3.5 + Fujifilm X-T30

Fujifilm XT30 Blog Asahi Pentax Super Takumar 135mm f/3.5

Asahi-Pentax Super-Takumar 135mm f/3.5 Lens & Fujifilm X-T30.

The Super-Takumar 135mm f/3.5 lens was made by the Asahi Optical Company in Japan in the 1960’s and 1970’s for Pentax M42 screw mount cameras. There were a few nearly identical versions of the Asahi Takumar 135mm f/3.5 lens manufactured, each with a different coating applied to the glass, but otherwise identical. I love pairing my Fujifilm X-T30 with vintage lenses, such as this one. You will need an M42 to Fuji-X adapter to attach it to your Fujifilm X camera. The Asahi-Pentax Super-Takumar 135mm f/3.5 lens is a long telephoto prime that won’t break the bank, but is it any good?

This lens, unsurprisingly, is all manual (don’t let the “A” and “M” switch on the side fool you). You will have to manually focus it and manually adjust the aperture. There’s nothing automatic about it. If you are not used to lenses like this, it might take some practice to get comfortable using it. Also, being a longer lens without image stabilization, you’ll need to use faster shutter speeds or tripod to avoid blur.

As I stated in my Fujinon 90mm f/2 lens review, the 135mm focal length used to be very common. It was one of the first primes you’d add to your bag. It’s much less common nowadays. Because of the APS-C crop factor, this lens has a full-frame focal-length equivalency of about 202mm, which makes it a long telephoto option. Fujifilm only makes one prime lens this long, in fact, but it costs a heck-of-a-lot, so if you want a long telephoto prime, you have to look elsewhere, such as vintage glass like this one, or buy a telephoto zoom.

Fujifilm XT30 blog Asahi Pentax Super Takumar 135mm f/3.5

Fujifilm XT30 Blog Asahi Pentax Super Takumar 135mm f/3.5

The Asahi Takumar 135mm lens is fairly small and lightweight for how long it is. At 0.75 pounds, it weighs noticeably less than the previously mentioned Fujinon 90mm lens. It’s made of metal and feels pretty sturdy. Asahi made quality lenses, so this is not surprising. Even though this lens is quite old, it seems like it has a lot of life left.

Sharpness is a tale of two lenses, with the focus distance being the key factor. At near and medium distances, the Asahi Takumar 135mm is quite sharp. There is perhaps some softness, particularly in the corners, at f/3.5 (the maximum aperture), but by f/5.6 it’s pretty sharp across the entire frame. Peak sharpness is around f/8 or f/11, with diffraction setting in at f/16, and f/22 (the minimum aperture) being only marginally usable. Beyond medium focus distances, the lens becomes less sharp as you move towards infinity, and has only mediocre sharpness when focused at infinity, about what one would expect from a cheap zoom and not a prime.

There’s quite a bit of chromatic aberrations in the corners no matter the aperture, but the smaller the aperture the worse it seems to get; there’s very little in the middle at all apertures. I haven’t noticed any vignetting. There’s a tiny amount of pincushion distortion that will only be noticed when photographing brick walls. This lens does not control flare well at all, producing a hazy-type flare that significantly reduces contrast. Sunstars are medicore. Bokeh is not especially good looking.

Fujifilm Blog Asahi Pentax Super Takumar 135mm f/3.5

Fujifilm Blog Asahi Pentax Super Takumar 135mm f/3.5

The lens functions well. The focus ring is smooth. The aperture clicks at the f-stops. I have had no problems pairing it with my Fujifilm X-T30. There are good and bad points to the image quality that the Asahi Takumar 135mm lens produces. In fact, I would say that this is the worst Takumar lens I’ve used, but it is still capable of capturing good images. You have to understand its strengths and weaknesses, and use it accordingly.

Despite the negative points, this lens can usually be found for less than $50, and sometimes for less than $25, which makes it a great bargain! You can find cheap M42 to Fuji-X adapters that will allow you to attach the lens to your camera; mine was about $10. Considering the price, if you want a 200mm equivalent focal-length lens, it’s worth taking a chance on this one.

Sample photographs, all captured using this Asahi-Pentax Super-Takumar 135mm f/3.5 lens attached to my Fujifilm X-T30:

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Flowing Fall – Bountiful, UT

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Apple, Hangin’ On – South Weber, UT

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Young Smile – South Weber, UT

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White Stars – Roy, UT

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I See Red – Riverdale, UT

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Plant Leaves – South Weber, UT

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Becoming Autumn Yellow – South Weber, UT

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Cold On Top – South Weber, UT

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Peaks & Ridges – South Weber, UT

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Last Light on the Clearing Mountain – South Weber, UT

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Sunset Red Peak – South Weber, UT

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White Cloud Over Black Mountain – South Weber, UT

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Mount Ogden #1 – Riverdale, UT

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Mount Ogden #2 – Riverdale, UT

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Coffee & Cameras – South Weber, UT

See also:
Industar 69 + Fujifilm X-T30
Fujifilm Gear

Announced: Fujifilm X-Pro3

Fujifilm X-Pro3 Blog

Fujifilm just announced the upcoming X-Pro3! It will be released on November 29 with an MSRP of $1,800 (body only), or December 13 for the Dura versions, which will have an MSRP of $2,000. This new iteration of the X-Pro camera is much different than the previous two, at least on the inside and back. There are a lot of changes and new features, so let’s take a look at those.

The Fujifilm X-Pro3 has an unusual tilt screen, which is mounted backwards and flips down for waist-level shooting. On the back of the screen, which faces out when the screen is closed, is a small screen that displays some exposure and film simulation information. The idea is that most X-Pro3 users will primarily use the viewfinder and not the LCD for composing. It’s also a way to further differentiate this camera from the X-T3. I think it’s either something you’ll love or hate, and I’m still on the fence with how I feel about it, but I’m leaning towards love. I haven’t had my hands on one to know for sure what I think about it.

Fujifilm X-Pro3 Blog

Fujifilm X-Pro3 Blog

Fujifilm X-Pro3 Blog

Besides the unusual screen, Fujifilm did away with the four-way D-Pad on the back. They also re-arranged some of the buttons. The wonderful hybrid viewfinder has been improved. The camera is now made out of titanium. While the rear is clearly different, the front of the camera looks nearly identical to past models, and internally there are some big changes.

The X-Pro3 includes a new film simulation called Classic Negative. It’s supposed to mimic the look of Superia film. I’m pretty excited about Classic Negative, as I’m sure that I could create several great film simulation recipes using it. I think it might become one of my favorites, just looking at the sample images I’ve seen. There’s a good chance that it will be added to the X-T3 and X-T30 via a firmware update in the coming weeks or months, so I’m looking forward to that.

Fujifilm X-Pro3 Blog

There are a ton of other new features on the X-Pro3. The headline is improved auto-focus over the X-T3 and X-T30, although Fujifilm will likely give this new algorithm to the other two cameras soon. It’s supposed to be pretty darn excellent, but I already find the X-T30 to be excellent, so it’s hard to understand how much room for improvement there could be.

The X-Pro3 has a new HDR feature, which can combine and auto-align hand-held pictures. It has much more robust multiple-exposure options, for those who do double or triple (or now up to nine) exposures. There’s a new Clarity feature. There’s a new Curves option, but it’s my understanding that it’s simply a different way to see how Highlight and Shadow adjustments effect the image. B&W toning, instead of just the warm and cool slider found on the X-T3 and X-T30, is now more like white balance shift. On the X-Pro3 you can now change the size of the faux grain, not just the intensity. I hope that all of these new features will be added to the X-T3 and X-T30 in the future, but I don’t know if they will, or perhaps just some of them. It’s clear that the X-Pro3 has some great new options to help you achieve your desired look straight out of camera.

Fujifilm-X-Pro-3-Front

My opinion is that Fujifilm gave the X-Pro line a nice update with the X-Pro3. It’s essentially an X-T3, but better looking, tougher, and with some interesting new features. They’ve made it clear that this camera is about the experience of using it. If you enjoy composing through a viewfinder and not an LCD, and if you use camera-made JPEGs, the X-Pro3 was designed with you in mind. Thanks to the titanium body, it’s tough, and made to take a lickin’ and keep on tickin’ and not even get scratched (if you upgrade to one of the Dura models). It’s a camera you’ll want to buy and keep around for awhile, and not dump as soon as the next model comes out. It’s an old-school photographer’s tool, but it’s certainly not for everyone.

If you’d like to pre-order the X-Pro3, please use my affiliate links below. If you make a purchase using my links, I will be compensated a small amount for it. Nobody pays me to write the articles you find here, so using my affiliate links is a great way to support this website.

Fujifilm X-Pro3 Black:
B&H   Amazon
Fujifilm X-Pro3 Dura Black:
B&H   Amazon
Fujifilm X-Pro3 Dura Silver:
B&H   Amazon

Lens Review: Rokinon 12mm f/2 NCS CS


Fujifilm X-E1 Rokinon 12mm f/2 Photography Blog

The Rokinon 12mm f/2 NCS CS is a fairly inexpensive ultra-wide-angle lens for crop-sensor cameras, such as Fujifilm X. This same exact lens is also sold under the Samyang brand name. Is it any good? Is it worth buying? Is it for you? Those are questions that I hope to answer in this Rokinon 12mm lens review.

This Rokinon lens has a focal length of 12mm, which is a full-frame equivalent of 18mm when attached to your Fujifilm camera due to the APS-C crop factor. It has a maximum aperture of f/2, which is good, and a minimum aperture of f/22. There are 12 elements in 10 groups, with six curved blades. The lens is made mostly of plastic, but it still feels plenty sturdy. The Rokinon 12mm lens is quite small and lightweight, and overall well designed.

Fujifilm X-T20 Rokinon 12mm f/2 Lens Photography Blog

Rokinon 12mm f/2 Lens

This is a manual lens. You will have to manually focus it and manually control the aperture. The focus ring is slightly stiff but smooth. It does focus just past infinity, which can be annoying. The aperture ring clicks at the different f-stops and is overall pretty swell, as far as aperture rings go. If you are not used to using manual lenses, it will likely take some practice to feel comfortable using this lens.

The Rokinon 12mm is pretty sharp. It definitely fits in well with Fujinon glass. There is some corner softness when wide open, but it’s corner-to-corner sharp by f/4. The center is crisp at all apertures, and seems to reach peak sharpness around f/5.6. Diffraction begins around f/11, but isn’t really noticeable until f/16, and even then it’s not terrible, although I would avoid f/22. While not perfect, this lens is surprisingly sharp considering that it’s a relatively cheap third-party option.

Fujifilm Rokinon 12mm Lens

Fujifilm Rokinon 12mm Lens

This lens produces some barrel distortion, but that’s not surprising since this is such a wide-angle lens, and it’s not as much as you might think. If you photograph a brick wall or straight lines you will notice it, otherwise it won’t affect your pictures. Honestly, I expected it to be much worse than it is.

There is pronounced vignetting at f/2 on the Rokinon 12mm, but it becomes less obvious as you stop down. It’s pretty minor by f/5.6, but I don’t think that it ever completely goes away. Chromatic aberrations can be found in the corners when wide open, but largely go away by f/4. Coma is well controlled, but slightly noticeable at f/2. The lens controls flare fairly well–not necessarily great but far from terrible. Sunstars are mediocre, as is bokeh, although you don’t buy a 12mm lens for the background blur. With a minimum focus distance of about eight inches, you can achieve some background blur when wide-open, but most likely you won’t be using the lens like that.

Fujifilm Rokinon 12mm f/2 Lens

Fujifilm Rokinon 12mm f/2 Lens

What I love about the 12mm focal length is that it is very dramatic. You can really make some interesting pictures with it, but at the same time it can be quite demanding. You have to stick the lens right into the scene, sometimes uncomfortably so. I love the challenge of using this lens, as it can be a lot of fun. It’s especially great for landscapes, street photography and astrophotography. I have used it for both still photography and video. If you want a lens that will help you create striking pictures, this is one to strongly consider, but know it’s not necessarily easy to use.

The Rokinon 12mm f/2 lens is a great ultra-wide-angle option for your Fujifilm X camera. It’s very easy to recommend. Although this lens does have some minor flaws, it’s pretty great overall, and it’s easy to overlook the shortcomings when you consider the price. It has an MSRP of $400, but can often be found for less than that, and sometimes for less than $300. While the 12mm focal length isn’t for everyone, and some people might be intimated by a manual lens, I do think this is one that most Fujifilm X shooters should consider having in their camera bag.

Fujifilm Rokinon 12mm f/2 Lens

Rokinon 12mm f/2 Lens Fujifilm

My affiliate links for this Rokinon 12mm lens are here: B&H  Amazon. If you make a purchase using my links I will be compensated a small amount for it.

Sample photographs, captured using a Rokinon 12mm f/2 lens with a Fujifilm X-E1 and a Fujifilm X-T30:

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Barn by the Tetons – Grand Teton NP, WY – Fujifilm X-E1 & Rokinon 12mm f/2

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Tree of Broken Glass – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 & Rokinon 12mm f/2

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Self – Bonneville Salt Flats, UT – Fujifilm X-E1 & Rokinon 12mm f/2

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Tulip Blossom Monochrome – Lehi, UT – Fujifilm X-E1 & Rokinon 12mm f/2

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Bike Jump – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-E1 & Rokinon 12mm f/2

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Hustle & Bustle – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-E1 & Rokinon 12mm f/2

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Storm Trooper – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-E1 & Rokinon 12mm f/2

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Cat Crossing – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-E1 & Rokinon 12mm f/2

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Lighthouse Lounge – Ogden, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 & Rokinon 12mm f/2

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Urban Flowers – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-E1 & Rokinon 12mm f/2

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Little Blooms, Big Blooms – Lehi, UT – Fujifilm X-E1 & Rokinon 12mm f/2

Fujifilm X-T30 Blog

Vibrant Nature – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 & Rokinon 12mm f/2

Fujifilm X-T30 Blog

Tree Stars – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 & Rokinon 12mm f/2

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Schwabacher Landing Beaver Dam – Grand Teton NP, WY – Fujifilm X-E1 & Rokinon 12mm f/2

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Hiding Rainbow – Coalville, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 & Rokinon 12mm f/2

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Stars & Salt – Bonneville Salt Flats, UT – Fujifilm X-E1 & Rokinon 12mm f/2

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Sidewalk Tricycle – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 & Rokinon 12mm f/2

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Evening Bike – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 & Rokinon 12mm f/2

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Nick – Layton, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 & Rokinon 12mm f/2

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Inside The Savage Bus – Delle, UT – Fujifilm X-E1 & Rokinon 12mm f/2

For more reviews, please visit my Gear page.

Help Fuji X Weekly

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DR-Auto Film Simulation Recipes

I thought it might be interesting to separate my film simulation recipes by Dynamic Range setting. There are a ton of different ways that one could organize these, so I thought it might be helpful to somebody to see them in various arrangements. Maybe you’ll see a recipe that you haven’t considered using before, or maybe a certain setting will stand out to you that never crossed your mind before. I don’t really know, but you never know, so I’m just going to do it. For this post I’m separating the film simulation recipes by DR setting. Below are all of my recipes that use DR-Auto:

Kodak Ektar 100

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Dramatic Classic Chrome

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Vintage Agfacolor

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Classic Chrome

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Velvia

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Monochrome

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See also:
DR400 Film Simulation Recipes
DR200 Film Simulation Recipes
DR100 Film Simulation Recipes

DR100 Film Simulation Recipes

I thought it might be interesting to separate my film simulation recipes by Dynamic Range setting. There are a ton of different ways that one could organize these, so I thought it might be helpful to somebody to see them in various arrangements. Maybe you’ll see a recipe that you haven’t considered using before, or maybe a certain setting will stand out to you that never crossed your mind before. I don’t really know, but you never know, so I’m just going to do it. For this post I’m separating the film simulation recipes by DR setting. Below are all of my recipes that use DR100:

Eterna

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Expired Eterna

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Faded Color

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Agfa Optima

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Agfa Scala

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Ilford HP5 Plus Push-Process

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Faded Monochrome

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See also:
DR400 Film Simulation Recipes
DR200 Film Simulation Recipes
DR-Auto Film Simulation Recipes

DR200 Film Simulation Recipes

I thought it might be interesting to separate my film simulation recipes by Dynamic Range setting. There are a ton of different ways that one could organize these, so I thought it might be helpful to somebody to see them in various arrangements. Maybe you’ll see a recipe that you haven’t considered using before, or maybe a certain setting will stand out to you that never crossed your mind before. I don’t really know, but you never know, so I’m just going to do it. For this post I’m separating the film simulation recipes by DR setting. Below are all of my recipes that use DR200:

Eterna Low-Contrast

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Elite Chrome 200 Color Fade

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“Warm Contrast”

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Urban Vintage Chrome

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Redscale

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Velvia

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Astia

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Classic Chrome

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Vintage Kodachrome

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PRO Neg. Hi

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Fujicolor Superia 800

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CineStill 800T

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Cross Process

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Kodachrome II

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Kodak Ektachrome 100SW

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Fujicolor Pro 400H

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Acros

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Acros Push-Process

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Ilford HP5 Plus

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Tri-X Push-Process

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See also:
DR400 Film Simulation Recipes
DR100 Film Simulation Recipes
DR-Auto Film Simulation Recipes

DR400 Film Simulation Recipes

I thought it might be interesting to separate my film simulation recipes by Dynamic Range setting. There are a ton of different ways that one could organize these, so I thought it might be helpful to somebody to see them in various arrangements. Maybe you’ll see one that you haven’t considered using before, or maybe a certain setting will stand out to you that never crossed your mind before. I don’t really know, but you never know, so I’m just going to do it. To start with, I’m separating the film simulation recipes by DR setting. Below are all of my recipes that use DR400:

Kodachrome 64

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Kodacolor

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Fujicolor 100 Industrial

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“Eterna”

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Kodak Portra 400

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Aged Color

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Acros

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See also:
DR200 Film Simulation Recipes
DR100 Film Simulation Recipes
DR-Auto Film Simulation Recipes

Video: Street Photography with a Fujifilm X-T30 & Eterna

Take a look at Street Photography with a Fujifilm X-T30 & Eterna, which is the latest video from Fuji X Weekly! Last Sunday I shared with you the first video that Amanda and I worked on together, which featured footage and photographs captured using my Kodacolor film simulation recipe. This new video features footage and photographs captured using my Eterna film simulation recipe. The point of this video series is to demonstrate different film simulation recipes for video and still photography, but in a way that’s hopefully entertaining and perhaps even inspirational.

Unlike the last video, which had Amanda behind the video camera, I captured all of the footage for this one. While I was doing it, I did my best to think, “How would Amanda record this shot?” I didn’t do a particularly good job, though, but I did record a lot of content in hopes that there would be something usable. I employed my Fujifilm X-T30 with a Rokinon 12mm lens for both the video and stills. Amanda took all of it into editing software and somehow made this great video. Honestly, I don’t know how she did it. She really did an incredible job!

If you haven’t done so already, please visit the Fuji X Weekly YouTube channel. I invite you to subscribe. Feel free to like, comment and share. Over the coming weeks and months you can expect more video content to be added, thanks to the talents of my wonderful wife, Amanda.

If you are interested in purchasing the gear used for this video, you’ll find my affiliate links below. If you make a purchase using my links I will be compensated a small amount for it.

Fujifilm X-T30 (Body Only)   B&H   Amazon
Fujifilm X-T30 w/15-45mm lens   B&H   Amazon
Fujifilm X-T30 w/18-55mm lens   B&H   Amazon
Rokinon 12mm f/2   B&H   Amazon

Industar 69 Lens + Fujifilm X-T30

Fujifilm Blog

Fujifilm X-T30 with an Industar 69 lens.

The Industar 69 is a terribly great lens! What I mean is that it is a terrible lens and a great lens at the same time. If you judge it simply on charts and technical qualities, it’s clearly a dud, not worthy of attaching to your camera. If you judge it on the It-Factor, the Industar 69 transcends common rationality and produces a difficult-to-define yet highly appealing quality. This lens is full of flaws, but it’s the flaws that make it especially interesting.

The Industar 69 f/2.8 is a Soviet Union 28mm pancake lens designed for Russian Chaika half-frame cameras. It was produced from the mid-1960’s through the mid-1970’s. It’s an M39 screw-mount lens, and is a Zeiss Tessar copycat. To attach it to my Fujifilm X-T30, I used a cheap M39-to-Fuji-X adapter that I’ve had for several years and paid about $10 for. This particular Industar 69 lens was loaned to me from a friend, but my copy is already ordered and currently en route, costing me only $35, including shipping.

One peculiarity of the Industar 69 is that it can’t focus to infinity (or even all that close to it), because it sits too far from the sensor. It can be modified to focus to infinity, and I plan to make that modification with my lens when it arrives, but unmodified it has a limited window of focus. The aperture is controlled by a thin ring around the glass that doesn’t click at f-stops. The focus ring is smooth. The lens is made of metal and feels solid. The Industar 69 is small and lightweight and might seem like a budget alternative to the Fujinon 27mm f/2.8 pancake lens.

Industar 69 Lens Fujifilm X-T30 Camera

Those who judge lenses based on corner softness and vignetting will not like this lens, as there is noticeable softness in the corners and pronounced vignetting, especially when wide-open, but also when stopped down. There’s also some obvious distortion. Lens flare is not controlled particularly well. The Industar 69 is pretty much the opposite of perfect from a technical point-of-view.

What I love about this lens is how it renders pictures. It produces glowing highlights, similar to (but not exactly like) an Orton effect. While the corners are soft, the center is quite sharp. The Industar 69 has nice bokeh; specifically it has swirly bokeh when wide open. It infuses an analog character into the images captured through its glass, made possible by its flaws, which is not achievable from finely-engineered modern lenses.

The Industar 69 is an interesting vintage pancake option for your Fujifilm camera. It could be considered a low-budget alternative to the Fujinon 27mm f/2.8, but I see them as different lenses for particular purposes. They will render pictures much differently, and you’ll likely use them much differently. But if you simply cannot afford the Fujinon lens and want a pancake option, this Russian lens might be your best bet. With that said, the reason to get the Industar 69 is for how it makes pictures look, because there aren’t too many lenses that will do what this one does, which is something you’ll either really appreciate or you won’t. This lens is incredibly inexpensive, so it might be worth trying out for yourself to see whether or not you find it to be terrible or great.

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Glowing Cross – Layton, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 & Industar 69

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Backyard Afternoon – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 & Industar 69

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Weber Canyon Morning – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 & Industar 69

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Early Autumn Sycamore – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 & Industar 69

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Josh Throwing Leaves – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 & Industar 69

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Smilin’ Jon – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 & Industar 69

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Refill Please – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 & Industar 69

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Sitting Joy – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 & Industar 69

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Glass Window Bottles – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 & Industar 69

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Light Stripes – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 & Industar 69

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Corner Seat – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 & Industar 69

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Jo Cool In Her Carseat – Layton, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 & Industar 69

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Sunlit Tree Monochrome – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 & Industar 69

See also:
Using M42 Lenses on Fujifilm X Cameras
Fujifilm X-T30 vs. Sony A6000 – A Showdown With Vintage Glass
Fujifilm Gear

New: Fuji X Weekly Development Page

Fujifilm Blog

I created a new Fuji X Weekly page called Development. You can find it by clicking on the top-left “hamburger” menu and then selecting Development. This new page has absolutely nothing to do with developing pictures, but instead has posts relating to personal development as a photographer. This is where you’ll find things like how-to articles and photography advice. So far it’s not a huge list of articles, but I hope to expand it greatly in the coming months. It’s small now, but it will be much larger soon enough. I’m hoping that it will be a wonderful resource for some of you. I encourage you to check it out, and to revisit it regularly to see what’s new.

Fuji X Weekly Featured on Fujirumors

Fujifilm Blog Fujirumors

Did any of you see this? Yesterday, Fujirumors featured Fuji X Weekly on their website! Specifically, Fujirumors shared my film simulation recipes! I didn’t expect that. It was such a nice surprise, and I’m quite appreciative. I’m happy to make these settings more well-known to the Fujifilm community, and hopefully some people find them useful for their own pictures. It really is my pleasure to be helpful to the community at large, as many people within the photography continuum have been helpful to me over the years.

If you found yourself on Fuji X Weekly because of the Fujirumors article, I want to welcome you, and encourage you to look around. There’s a lot more here than just film simulation recipes, although the camera settings are the hallmark of this photography blog. There are other articles that might be beneficial to you, so be sure to check them out. Also, I will be publishing more film simulation recipes in the coming weeks and months, so please follow Fuji X Weekly (look in the bottom right corner) so that you don’t miss out on it.

Fujirumors is a great website that I regularly visit. It’s a great place to see what’s upcoming and to know what’s currently happening with regards to Fujifilm products. If you don’t already follow them, I would encourage you to take a look at their website. In case you missed it, here are some of the websites of Fuji X Weekly readers, which I also encourage you to visit if you haven’t done so already.

Vintage Market Days with Kodacolor

My wife, Amanda, and I created a new video! Well, Amanda created the video. She was the cinematographer and the editor. I submitted the photographers. Amanda loves to create videos, and she’s a great storyteller. She’s encouraged me for some time now to include more video content on the Fuji X Weekly blog. I’m not especially good at making videos, so I was thrilled when she offered to help. This will be the first of many videos that we will collaborate on together, but they’re mostly Amanda’s creations, which is wonderful. If you like this video, please let her know in the comments!

The idea behind the Vintage Market Days video, and the many others that will be forthcoming, is that we will use one film simulation recipe for the footage and photographs. For this particular video we chose the Kodacolor recipe. In retrospect that might not have been the best recipe for this situation, as it produces a yellow cast under artificial light, but when we decided to do this we didn’t know that it mostly an indoor event. It’s still pretty interesting to see what happens when you use Kodacolor.

Did you know that you can use most of the different film simulation recipes for video? I know many of you aren’t videographers, but some of you are. Using the recipes for video saves time in editing because you already have your “look” and don’t need to adjust it with software. This will be a game-changer for some of you! Some of you might be already doing this.

I used a Fujifilm X-T30 with a Fujinon 90mm lens for the photographs. Amanda used a Fujifilm X-T20 with a Rokinon 12mm lens for the video footage.

Click here to visit the Fuji X Weekly YouTube channel! Don’t forget to subscribe, like, comment and share!

Exposure X5 – My Top 5 Favorite Features for Fujifilm Photographers

Exposure X5 is a solid option for editing RAW Fujifilm files. I shoot JPEGs, but for many years I used RAW. I tried a number of different software options to process my pictures, and by far my favorite was Exposure. This software company, until recently, was called Alien Skin, but with the latest version of Exposure they dropped that brand name, and are now known simply as Exposure. I suppose that it sounds more professional, but the Alien Skin title was fun, while Exposure is a bit bland. Whatever the name, what’s most important is whether or not the editing program is good, and Exposure X5 is indeed good!

Fuji X Weekly is known mostly for my film simulation recipes, which are JPEG settings. I found that oftentimes I can achieve my desired look for a photograph in-camera, and not having to edit my pictures saves me a ton of time. But not everyone is a JPEG shooter, and some of you who follow Fuji X Weekly use RAW, so this article is for those who need a RAW developer.

Below are my top five favorite Exposure X5 features for Fujifilm photographers! 

1. 500+ Presets

Exposure X5 Fujifilm

There are over 500 one-click presets on Exposure X5 to choose from. These presets will quickly give your photographs various looks, mostly based on actual film. Once you’ve discovered which presets you like best, you can “star” those for faster future access. You can heavily customize each preset, and save the customization for use on other pictures. You can make your own presets from scratch. You can batch edit with these presets. The idea is to save you time by speeding up your workflow. In fact, once you’re proficient at this software, it will likely speed up your workflow considerably. Exposure X5 allows you to more quickly achieve your desired look.

2. Retro Film Aesthetic

Fujifilm X-T30 Blog

Vibrant Nature – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 – RAW file edited with Exposure X5

What I love most about Exposure X5 are all the fantastic analog-like presets that faithfully mimic the look of many different films, including ones that have been long discontinued. Looking for Kodak Gold 400? They got it. Provia 100F? Got that, too. Neopan 1600? Yep. Polaroid SX-70? Yes sir. The first era of Kodachrome? They have that as well, and many more. They have alternate processes, too, such as push-process, cross-process, split-toning, infrared and others. This goes beyond merely creating a look that more-or-less resembles the different photographic films. The folks at Exposure meticulously studied actual film to ensure they got these settings right, including authentic grain effects. Exposure X5 allows you to more accurately achieve your desired look.

3. Fujifilm Film Simulations

Fujifilm Film Simulation Exposure X5

Fujifilm Film Simulations Exposure X5

All of the Fujifilm film simulations that you know and love, with the exception of Eterna, are found in Exposure X5. That’s not entirely unusual for a RAW editor, but you might notice that these Fujifilm film simulations are the only brand-specific camera looks found in this software. You won’t find any Canon or Nikon or Sony presets, only Fujifilm. That’s because the people behind Exposure X5 love these film simulations and wanted to ensure that you had them as an option, and so you do with this software.

4. They Are Fujifilm Fans

Fujifilm X-T30 Blog

Tree Star – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 – RAW file edited with Exposure X5

Finley Lee, the CEO of Exposure, said, “We are fans of Fujifilm cameras and are always keeping an eye out for ways to work with them better. I’m a photography hobbyist, and I love my X-T1 for photographing family and vacations.” It’s no surprise that, since the folks behind Exposure love Fujifilm cameras, they do their best to optimize their software for Fujifilm RAW files. By design, Exposure X5 is an especially good option for post-processing your Fujifilm photographs.

5. Adobe Alternative

Exposure X5 Fujifilm Blog

Exposure X5 can be used as a Lightroom or Photoshop plug-in if you’d like to integrate it into those popular programs that you might already have, allowing you to use the Exposure presets without disrupting your current workflow. However, Exposure X5 is a non-destructive, feature-rich RAW editor that can be used as a stand-alone software, which is how I run it. In other words, you could ditch Lightroom and Photoshop, and use Exposure X5 instead, as this software has many of the tools and options found in those other programs, along with the wonderful presets.

Conclusion

Cactus Fujifilm X-T30

Indoor Cactus – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 – RAW file edited with Exposure X5

What I appreciate about Exposure X5 is that it allows me to more quickly and accurately achieve my desired look for a picture. It saves me time, while simultaneously producing a result that I prefer. It’s still not as quick as camera-made JPEGs, but for the RAW shooter this is a great way to speed things up. I almost always use JPEGs, but sporadically RAW is better or necessary for fulling my photographic vision, so I have Exposure X5 on my computer at home for those occasions when it’s necessary.

Download your free 30-day trial of Exposure X5 by clicking here. You only have to supply them with your email address in order to download the software. Exposure X5 is fully-functioning during the trial, so you have unlimited access to all of the features. You can take your time, play around with it, and decide if it works for you or not. If you do decide to buy, it’s only $120 (or $150 if bundled with their other programs), which is a great bargain for what Exposure X5 does.

This post contains an affiliate link, and I will be compensated if you make a purchase after clicking through my link.

Sample Photographs

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Field of Bloom – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 – RAW file edited with Exposure X5

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Summer Blossoms – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 – RAW file edited with Exposure X5

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Autumn Begins – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 – RAW file edited with Exposure X5

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Light Thru The Fall Tree – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 – RAW file edited with Exposure X5

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Golden Forest – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 – RAW file edited with Exposure X5

B&H X-H1 Bundle Deal Was a Bust

Fujifilm X-H1

Sometimes, if something seems to good to be true, it is. That’s the case with the recent super deal that B&H had on their website yesterday. They listed the Fujifilm X-H1 bundled with some different lenses on sale for some ridiculously low prices. Turns out, it wasn’t a deal at all. The camera-lens bundle was mistakenly listed for those prices. The customers who purchased it, such as myself, are having their sales cancelled and a refund issued.

I understand that mistakes happen. I don’t want to see B&H go bankrupt from such a mistake. At the same time, it’s poor customer service for them to do this. They were just closed for Yom Kippur, so this seems a bit hypocritical, as well. In my opinion, they should have honored the deal for those who ordered, or at a minimum offered something for the inconvenience. It’s not my fault that B&H made a mistake, but now I have a hold on my card and wasted some of my precious time. I’m suffering the consequences of their mistake (I’m being overly theatrical to make a point). Honestly, I like B&H and they have a good track record overall, but this isn’t the first time that I’ve had a transaction with them end in disappointment.

Will I do business with B&H in the future? I’m sure that I will. Am I going to consider using one of their competitors instead? If all things are equal, I probably will, at least for awhile. I wish that they had handled this better. I can’t know for sure when something is legit or not, so I have to trust that the people at B&H are doing their job, and in this case they didn’t live up to that trust. That’s not what a company needs to do to keep their customers happy. Happy customers are repeat customers. Discontent customers go someplace else. That’s the way business works.

 

 

Crazy Fujifilm X-H1 Bundle Deals!

Fujifilm X-H1

At B&H there are some crazy Fujifilm X-H1 deals right now that I just have to share with you. The Fujifilm X-H1 with the battery grip is already an exception bargain at just $1,000, but you can add one or more lenses for a huge discount! You can bundle with the camera a Fujinon 16-55mm f/2.8, which is normally $1,200, for only an additional $200 over the cost of the camera ($1,000 off!). Or the Fujinon 18-135mm, which is normally $900, for only an additional $200 ($700 off!). Or the Fujinon 90mm f/2, which is normally $950, for only an additional $150 ($800 off!). Or the Fujinon 8-16mm f/2.8, which is normally $2,000, for only an additional $800 ($1,200 off!). Whoa!

To do this, click here, which will take you to the Fujifilm X-H1 body-only with battery grip page at B&H. Scroll down just a little to where it says “Build Bundle” and click on that. You will see all the different options to choose from.

There’s another bundle deal at B&H that’s worth pointing out. This one isn’t quite as amazing, but pretty good nonetheless. You can bundle with the Fujifilm X-T3 one (or more) of three $1,000 lenses for only $400 more than the cost of the camera ($600 off!). The lens choices are the Fujinon 16mm f/1.4, the Fujinon 56mm f/1.2 or the Fujinon 10-24mm f/4.

To do this, click here, which will take you to the Fujifilm X-T3 body-only page at B&H. Scroll down just a little to where it says “Build Bundle” and click on that. You will see all the different options to choose from.

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