Fujifilm X-Trans I Film Simulation Recipe: Faux Classic Chrome

Bougainvillea Color – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-Pro1 – “Faux Classic Chrome”

A little over two years ago I figured out how to replicate default Classic Chrome using the PRO Neg. Std film simulation. I published my findings in a blog post, to hopefully be helpful to those with cameras which don’t have the Classic Chrome film simulations, such as the X-Pro1, X-E1, X100, and X100S. I didn’t make this an official Film Simulation Recipe because it was just emulating Classic Chrome without adjustments (other than Noise Reduction), which I didn’t think was especially exciting; however, I recently found out that this recipe is being used and there’s a desire for it to be included in the Fuji X Weekly App. I’m simply turning those two-year-old settings into an official Fuji X Weekly Film Simulation Recipe.

If you want a recipe that resembles Classic Chrome with DR100, Highlight 0, Shadow 0, Color 0, Sharpness 0, and AWB (without a shift), this recipe is a good facsimile of that. It’s not possible to 100% faithfully mimic Classic Chrome without Classic Chrome, but these settings are pretty close, and as close as you’re likely going to get.

Laughing at a Joke – Goodyear, AZ – Fujifilm X-Pro1 – “Faux Classic Chrome”

I created these settings on an X-Trans II camera, but all of these images were captured on my Fujifilm X-Pro1. If you have an X-Trans I or X-Trans II sensor that doesn’t have Classic Chrome but does have PRO Neg. Std, you can use this recipe to approximate default Classic Chrome. The results are pretty decent; it’s a solid all-around recipe that’s good for a variety of subjects and situations.

PRO Neg. Std
Dynamic Range: DR200
Highlight: +1 (Medium-Hard)
Shadow: +1 (Medium-Hard)
Color: +1 (Medium-High)
Sharpness: 0 (Standard)
Noise Reduction: -2 (Low)
White Balance: Auto, 0 Red & -1 Blue

ISO: Auto, up to ISO 3200
Exposure Compensation: 0 to +1/3 (typically)

Example photographs, all camera-made JPEGs using this “Faux Classic Chrome” Film Simulation Recipe on a Fujifilm X-Pro1:

Midday Palm – Goodyear, AZ – Fujifilm X-Pro1
Building, Clouds – Goodyear, AZ – Fujifilm X-Pro1
Mostly Sunny Bougainvillea – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-Pro1
Garden Trumpets – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-Pro1
Reaching Garden – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-Pro1
Pergola Roof Design – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-Pro1
Pop of Pink – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-Pro1
Hiding Blooms – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-Pro1
Scraggly Bloom – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-Pro1
Josh Looking at Something – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-Pro1

Find this film simulation recipes and over 200 more on the Fuji X Weekly — Film Recipes App!

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Fujifilm X-Pro1 (X-Trans I) Film Simulation Recipe: Kodachrome I

Not Filed – Ogden, UT – Fujifilm X-Pro1 – “Kodachrome I”

This Kodachrome I film simulation recipe is an adaption of my Vintage Kodachrome recipe for the Fujifilm X-Pro1 and X-E1 cameras. Of course, those two cameras don’t have Classic Chrome, which makes recreating a Kodachrome look nearly impossible; however, Thomas Schwab figured it out! Thank you, Thomas! You might remember, he also figured out how to recreate Kodachrome II using the PRO Neg. Std film simulation. While this recipe isn’t quite as close of a match to the original recipe as Kodachrome II, it does manage to capture the feel of Vintage Kodachrome, and is as close as you’ll get to that aesthetic on X-Trans I. Because it doesn’t have PRO Neg. Std, this is not compatible with the X-M1.

You might recall that the Vintage Kodachrome recipe is mimicked after the first era of Kodachrome, which was from 1935 to 1960. This Kodachrome was the first film that produced reasonably accurate colors, and, because of that, was the first commercially successful color film. It became the standard film for color photography for a couple decades, and was even Ansel Adams’ preferred choice for color work. The December 1946 issue of Arizona Highways, which was the first all-color magazine in the world, featured Barry Goldwater’s Kodachrome images. While the most popular Kodachrome during this time was ISO 10, Kodak also produced an ISO 8 version, as well as a Tungsten option in the 1940s.

Green Oak Leaves – Layton, UT – Fujifilm X-Pro1 – “Kodachrome 1”

PRO Neg. Std
Dynamic Range: DR400
Highlight: +2 (Hard)
Shadow: -2 (Soft)
Color: +2 (High)
Sharpness: +1 (Medium-Hard)
Noise Reduction: -2 (Low)
White Balance: Auto, 0 Red & -3 Blue
ISO: Auto, up to ISO 3200
Exposure Compensation: -1/3 to -1 (typically)

Example photographs, all camera-made JPEGs captured using this “Kodachrome I” film simulation recipe on my Fujifilm X-Pro1:

Green Lake – Layton, UT – Fujifilm X-Pro1
Backlit Forest Leaves – Layton, UT – Fujifilm X-Pro1
Joshua – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-Pro1
Chicken Soup for the Soul – Ogden, UT – Fujifilm X-Pro1
Books in a Pew – Ogden, UT – Fujifilm X-Pro1
Church Pew Near a Window – Ogden, UT – Fujifilm X-Pro1
Red Carpet Stairs – Ogden, UT – Fujifilm X-Pro1
Window Light on Floor – Ogden, UT – Fujifilm X-Pro1
Old Window – Ogden, UT – Fujifilm X-Pro1
Arched Window – Ogden, UT – Fujifilm X-Pro1
Steeple View – Ogden, UT – Fujifilm X-Pro1
Brick Chimney – Ogden, UT – Fujifilm X-Pro1

Find these film simulation recipes and many more on the Fuji X Weekly — Film Recipes App!

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Fujifilm X-Trans I Film Simulation Recipe: Superia Xtra 400

Forest River – Layton, UT – Fujifilm X-M1 – “Superia Xtra 400” – Photo by Joy Roesch

I handed my Fujifilm X-M1 camera to my daughter, Joy, and told her that she could change the settings to whatever she wanted them to be—you might remember that she created the Winter Blue film simulation recipe. She used the camera to capture a bunch of pictures; afterwards, when I reviewed the images, I was very impressed with the look that she created. I asked her why she chose these settings, and she answered that she had hoped to capture some cherry blossoms, and it was initially overcast when she dialed in the settings, and she thought that it might work well for that.

These settings remind me of my X-Trans IV Superia Xtra 400 film simulation recipe. It’s definitely not an exact match—there’s no way that it could be because X-Trans I cameras don’t have many of the JPEG options that X-Trans IV cameras have, including the Classic Negative film simulation—but it’s surprisingly similar. I don’t imagine it’s possible to get closer. If you have an X-Pro1, X-E1 or X-M1, this is your best bet for a Superia Xtra 400 look. I think it’s also not far off from my Superia Premium 400 recipe, although, again, it’s not an exact match, just in the general ballpark. For some of you, I have no doubts that this will become your new favorite recipe.

Horsetail Reeds – Layton, UT – Fujifilm X-M1 – “Superia Xtra 400” – Photo by Joy Roesch

While this recipe is intended for X-Trans I cameras, it’s possible to use it on Fujifilm Bayer cameras, although it will look slightly different. You can also use it on X-Trans II cameras, but it will look fairly significantly different, although you might like the results anyway, so it might be worth a try.

Astia
Dynamic Range: DR200
Highlight: -2 (Low)
Shadow: +1 (Medium-High)
Color: +2 (High)
Sharpness: 0 (Normal)
Noise Reduction: -2 (Low)
White Balance: Shade, +2 Red & +2 Blue
ISO: Auto, up to ISO 3200
Exposure Compensation: +2/3 to +1 (typically)

Example photographs, all camera-made JPEGs captured by Joy using her “Superia Xtra 400” film simulation recipe on a Fujifilm X-M1:

Dirt Cliff Forest – Layton, UT – Fujifilm X-M1 – Photo by Joy Roesch
Sideways Tree – Layton, UT – Fujifilm X-M1 – Photo by Joy Roesch
Photographer Hiding in the Forest – Layton, UT – Fujifilm X-M1 – Photo by Joy Roesch
Forest Creek – Layton, UT – Fujifilm X-M1 – Photo by Joy Roesch
Water in the Woods – Layton, UT – Fujifilm X-M1 – Photo by Joy Roesch
Johanna on a Bridge – Layton, UT – Fujifilm X-M1 – Photo by Joy Roesch
Path Through The Trees – Layton, UT – Fujifilm X-M1 – Photo by Joy Roesch
Small Flower – Layton, UT – Fujifilm X-M1 – Photo by Joy Roesch
Patch of Red – Layton, UT – Fujifilm X-M1 – Photo by Joy Roesch
White Tree – Layton, UT – Fujifilm X-M1 – Photo by Joy Roesch

Find this film simulation recipe on the Fuji X Weekly — Film Recipes App!

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Nobody pays me to write the content found on fujixweekly.com. There’s a real cost to operating and maintaining this site, not to mention all the time that I pour into it. If you appreciated this article, please consider making a one-time gift contribution. Thank you!

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