Ricoh Recipes App Now Available!

For those with a Ricoh GR camera, the Ricoh Recipes App is now available! If you have a GR, GR II, GR III, or GR IIIx camera, you’ll want to check this out. Visit Ritchie’s Ricoh Recipes to find out all of the details.

New: Fuji X Weekly Community Recipes!

Can’t get enough film simulation recipes? Have one you want to share? Want to see what others are doing with their Fujifilm cameras? The new Fuji X Weekly Community Recipes page is for you!

I’ve noticed that a lot of people are creating film simulation recipes and sharing them on their social media accounts, but they’re easily lost and forgotten. I wanted to create a place where you can share your recipes, and where you can find recipes created by others. That’s the idea behind the Fuji X Weekly Community Page—this is a library of film simulation recipes created by you and for you!

This project has been in the works for many months. It’s been a labor of love. Web developer and Fujifilm photographer Daniele Petrarolo (website, Instagram) partnered with me to make this a reality. He really put a lot of time and skill into this. Definitely, if you need a website built, visit his page and send him an email! He’s also talented with a camera, so be sure to check out his pictures! Without him, the community recipes page would still be a long ways off and not nearly as good. Marcel Fraij, Thomas Schwab, Julien Sorosac, and others (including my kids!) also had a hand in making this project come to fruition. I want to give a big “thank you” to everyone who participated in this.

If you want even more film simulation recipes for your Fujifilm camera, or if you’ve created a recipe that you want to share, or if you just want to check out some pictures captured by others, be sure to visit the Fuji X Weekly Community Recipes Page! My hope is that this will become a great resource for the Fujifilm community. Be sure to bookmark it and check it often!

Should Fujifilm Make One Body with Multiple Sensors?

Fujirumors suggested that Fujifilm is making a mistake by using the same sensor in multiple bodies, instead of what Sony does and offer multiple sensor options in one body. For example, Sony has the A7, A7S, A7R, which have nearly identical bodies, but each with a different sensor inside. Fujifilm does the opposite, and includes the same sensor inside a bunch of different bodies. For Sony, the differences between camera models is closely tied with the sensors inside, while the differences between Fujifilm models are largely external.

I think the reason this topic came up is that there are supposedly going to be two different X-H2 cameras coming out next year. It’s possible that it will be the same exact body for both, but two different sensors inside. Could Fujifilm be taking a similar approach to Sony? Nobody (outside of Fujifilm) knows.

If Fujifilm does this, I think it would make sense to have three options: a high resolution 40-megapixel sensor capable of 8K video, a 26 to 30-megapixel sensor that is the “all-around” option, and a lower resolution 16 to 20-megapixel sensor that maximizes high-ISO, dynamic range, and speed. Honestly, though, I hope that Fujifilm doesn’t do this, although admittedly I do like the idea of a lower resolution option to maximize high-ISO, dynamic range, and speed.

What I do appreciate about Fujifilm’s current approach is that, no matter the camera you have, if it has the same sensor, it will have the same image quality. You can have an X-T1, X100T, and X-T10, and the image quality will be identical between these models. You can have an X-Pro3, X-S10, and X-E4, and the image quality will be identical. The advantage of this uniformity cannot be understated! This is ideal for those wanting consistency across their kit.

On Sony models, image quality is certainly similar between the three nearly identical options, but definitely different. If you have an A7R IV and an A7S III and captured the same scene with identical settings, you’d be able to tell that two different cameras captured the pictures, if you compared them closely. If you did that same experiment with an X-T3 and X-T30, the pictures would look identical.

I’m sure that Fujifilm watches closely what Sony is doing, looking at both what is working and what isn’t. They’d be wise to find lessons that can be applied to their own products. With that said, Fujifilm should not lose sight of what makes their brand special, and why their current customers chose them. They can learn a lot from themselves. I can’t tell Fujifilm what to do, and I’m certainly not an expert at camera marketing, but I think they’d do better to differentiate themselves from the competition, and not copy what Sony is doing. Sony is Sony, and Fujifilm is Fujifilm. If someone wants a Sony camera, they’re not going to buy a Fujifilm camera. If someone wants a Fujifilm camera, they’re not going to buy a Sony. Fujifilm should do more to convince potential customers that they should want a Fujifilm camera, which means highlighting what makes them unique, and why that uniqueness might be better for one’s photography. This blog does a pretty good job of doing that on Fujifilm’s behalf—not because I’m paid to (I’m not), but because of how I feel about their products, and what their cameras mean to my photography. I hope that Fujifilm doesn’t lose sight of their uniqueness, and doesn’t try to copy what other brands are doing—that just doesn’t seem like the right move to me.

Fujifilm X-E4 (X-Trans IV) Film Simulation Recipe: Scanned Superia

Brownie on a Shelf – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4 – “Scanned Superia”

After Anders Lindborg shared with me his interesting discovery that D-Range Priority (DR-P) is essentially the same thing as Hypertone on Fujifilm Frontier scanners, I immediately went to work creating a couple film simulation recipes that use D-Range Priority, since I didn’t have any. Like many of you, I thought that DR-P was a feature reserved only for extreme situations, and not for everyday use, but (as it turns out) it doesn’t have to be—DR-P can be utilized all of the time if you want.

What is DR-P? It’s basically a tone curve intended to maximize dynamic range. There are four options: Off, Auto, Weak, and Strong. When DR-P is Off, the camera uses DR (DR100, DR200, DR400) instead, and when DR-P is On (Auto, Weak, or Strong), DR is disabled. When DR-P is On, Highlight and Shadow are “greyed out” so those can’t be adjusted—the curve is built into DR-P. You get what you get. DR-P Weak is similar to using DR400 with both Highlight and Shadow -2, but with a very subtle mid-tone boost. This recipe calls for DR-P Auto, and the camera will usually select DR-P Weak unless there is a bright light source (such as the sun) in the frame, such as the picture below.

Big Grass Leaves – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4 – “Scanned Superia”

This recipe was inspired by pictures I found that were captured with Fujicolor Superia 100 film scanned with a Frontier SP-3000. Of course, how the film was shot, or even the scanner settings selected, can effect the exact aesthetic of an image. Even the same emulsion captured the same way and scanned on the same scanner can look a little different if the settings on the scanner are different (more on this in an upcoming article). I didn’t spend a lot of time trying to precisely match this recipe to those scans—it was more of a quick attempt, but I liked the results so I didn’t fine-tune it any further. It has a pretty good feel, I think, that produces pleasing results in many circumstances, although it isn’t the best for artificial light, and you might consider using Auto White Balance when not in natural light situations. This recipe is compatible with the Fujifilm X-Pro3, X100V, X-T4, X-S10, X-E4, and X-T30 II cameras.

Classic Negative
Dynamic Range: D-Range Priority Auto
Color: +3
Noise Reduction: -4
Sharpening: -3
Clarity: +3
Grain Effect: Weak, Small
Color Chrome Effect: Weak
Color Chrome Effect Blue: Weak
White Balance: Daylight, -2 Red & +3 Blue
ISO: Auto, up to ISO 6400
Exposure Compensation: -1/3 to +1/3 (typically)

Example photographs, all camera-made JPEGs using this “Scanned Superia” film simulation recipe on my Fujifilm X-E4:

RADAR Peak – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Colorful Blooms of Summer – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Last Red Rose – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
White Rose of Summer – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Yellow Country Flowers – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Little Yellow Flowers in the Wetlands – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Suburban Reeds – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
No Parking Any Time – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Morning Flag – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Succulent Shelf – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4

Find this film simulation recipe and many more on the Fuji X Weekly — Film Recipes App!

Help Fuji X Weekly

Nobody pays me to write the content found on fujixweekly.com. There’s a real cost to operating and maintaining this site, not to mention all the time that I pour into it. If you appreciated this article, please consider making a one-time gift contribution. Thank you!

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Introducing RitchieRoesch.com!

Because I now have JPEG recipes for both Fujifilm (fujixweekly.com) and Ricoh (ricohrecipes.com) cameras, my wife, Amanda, suggested that I should have an overarching website that joins the two together. Amanda is always right about these things, so I created RitchieRoesch.com, my new homepage! Of course, Fuji X Weekly still has its own homepage. Nothing has changed. But I can now direct people to RitchieRoesch.com for both Fujifilm and Ricoh—it doesn’t matter which brand you have. In fact, you might have both, because there’s quite a few people who do—there’s some overlap between these two brands of cameras thanks to their popularity among street, travel, and documentary photographers. You can access both Fuji X Weekly and Ritchie’s Ricoh Recipes from RitchieRoesch.com.

There’s not a lot of stuff on the new website. There’s a Photo Gallery that you might enjoy. Beyond that, it simply stands as a gateway to Fuji X Weekly and Ritchie’s Ricoh Recipes. So if you’d like, check it out! Also, stay tuned, because at least one big announcement is coming soon!

Fujifilm Frontier Scanners & Dynamic Range Priority

I received an email earlier this week from Anders Lindborg with an interesting discovery he made. You might remember that Anders is the creator of the Kodak Tri-X 400 film simulation recipe, as well as the Fujicolor Pro 160NS and Fujicolor Pro 400H recipes, which are actually much more than just recipes—they’re a new way to approach using recipes on your Fujifilm camera. Needless to say, I was intrigued!

“After reading the information on Fujifilm’s subsites about how they develop their film simulations for the 999th time,” Anders wrote, “I had a small revelation. The base for the simulations are professional photos scanned with their Frontier scanner with corrections applied, so apparently that scanner plays a major role in the final look. I googled around for a bit and found a PDF version of the software manual for the Frontier SP-3000. Here are the really interesting parts:
1) The image settings in Fuji’s cameras are more or less exactly the same as those found in the image correction settings in their Frontier scanner software;
2) There is a correction called Hypertone that turns out to be exactly the same thing as the dreaded D-Range Priority (DR-P) modes;
3) A bit of further research revealed that almost all Fujifilm associated photo labs used the Frontier scanner since the early 90’s and the recommended method was fully automatic mode which included both white balancing as well as Hypertone—both on auto.”

After reading this, I dug around the internet for articles on Fujifilm’s Frontier SP-3000 scanner. I immediately recognized Fujifilm’s “color science” in the photographs I found. There was a distinct similarity between the images that I was seeing, which were scanned negatives, and the pictures from my Fujifilm X cameras. Another tidbit I found was a remark that negatives scanned using the Frontier scanner have a similar aesthetic to negatives printed on Fujicolor paper, which makes sense, because you’d want the digital images to closely match the prints. All of this is to say that, based on these discoveries, I believe Fujifilm’s JPEG programming is heavily influenced by their scanner technology, which was heavily influenced by their photographic paper. This was a surprise to me, although it shouldn’t have been because it is very logical.

The similarities between Hypertone and D-Range Priority are interesting. I’ve written a couple articles that discuss D-Range Priority (here and here), but I’ve always thought of it as a “use only in extreme circumstances” kind of feature, and not a particularly useful tool for everyday photography. But if it was commonly used by photo labs around the world (as Hypertone), maybe it should be more commonly used now (as DR-P)?

It’s one thing to theorize about these things, and a whole other thing to put it into practice, so I created two different “recipes” that utilize D-Range Priority (which I will share in future articles). I wanted to see if this feature could be left on for extended shooting and produce good results, or would the results be flat and uninteresting? Here are a few pictures captured with each recipe:

Recipe 1

Tall Grass – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Peach Tree – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Summer Tree – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Northstar – Orem, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Arrow & Cones – Sandy, UT – Fujifilm X-E4

Recipe 2

Brownie on a Shelf – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
White Rose of Summer – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Last Red Rose – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Big Grass Leaves – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Suburban Reeds – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4

D-Range Priority Weak is very similar to using DR400 with Highlight and Shadow both set to -2. When you compare the highlights and shadows of pictures captured with D-Range Priority Weak and those captured with DR400 with Highlight and Shadow both set to -2, you’ll notice that they’re nearly identical. What is a little different—subtly different—are the mid-tones. Anders observed, “I noticed that DR-P, just like its predecessor Hypertone, also applies a slight mid-contrast boost.” There is an advantage to using D-Range Priority Weak over DR400 with Highlight and Shadow reduced to their lowest option, but it is subtle. Another note is that D-Range Priority Weak requires a minimum ISO of 320 while DR400 requires a minimum ISO of 640.

If you use D-Range Priority Auto, the camera will almost always select DR-P Weak, and only DR-P Strong if there is a bright light source, such as the sun, in the frame (like Big Grass Leaves above). D-Range Priority Strong produces a very flat image, and it only looks good if there is a lot of contrast in the scene. Anders noted that both Hypertone and DR-P can produce “weird” results if applied too strongly, but the camera seems to do a good job of knowing when to use which DR-P option. D-Range Priority Strong requires a minimum ISO of 640.

“You have to be really careful with the exposure compensation when using it,” Anders advised. “A bit too much or too little can quickly kill the whole photo. I tried to keep it at 0 most of the time and only use Fujis recommendations for correct exposure.” I found this to be true, too, and rarely needed to go beyond +1/3 or -1/3 exposure compensation.

D-Range Priority is only found in Fujifilm X-Trans IV cameras. Using D-Range Priority Weak or Auto seems to be an effective strategy; DR-P Strong is more useful in extreme circumstances. Those who created this feature (and the other JPEG options) were influenced by Frontier scanners, and the programmers likely intended D-Range Priority and White Balance to be set to Auto. Of course, there’s no “right” or “wrong” way to do anything, and I’m certainly not afraid of doing things outside-the-box (as you know). D-Range Priority is something that I shouldn’t have ignored so much, because it is more useful than I originally thought. I’ve created two film simulation recipes to take advantage of DR-P (and I’ll probably create more down the road), which I’ll publish very soon.

Thank you, Anders Lindborg, for making this discovery and sharing it with us!

Let me know in the comments which recipe—1 or 2—above you are most excited for.

Help Fuji X Weekly

Nobody pays me to write the content found on fujixweekly.com. There’s a real cost to operating and maintaining this site, not to mention all the time that I pour into it. If you appreciated this article, please consider making a one-time gift contribution. Thank you!

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SOOC Episode 03 – Viewer Images!

I want to give a big “Thank You” to everyone who tuned in to Episode 03 of SOOC, a collaboration between myself and Fuji X-Photographer Nathalie Boucry. This video series is live and interactive, so I’m especially grateful to all who participated! You are the ones who make these episodes great! In the video above are the viewer’s photographs, captured using the Fujicolor C200 film simulation recipe, that were shown during the show. It’s a short clip, so be sure to watch! I love seeing your pictures, and I’m honored that you submitted them for us to view.

The SOOC Episode 04 “recipe of the month” is Kodacolor. Start shooting with that recipe, and upload your pictures here to be featured in the next video! Episode 04 will be on October 14, so mark your calendars, and I look forward to seeing you then!

If you missed Episode 03, you can find it below. There were 7 minutes of sound issues in the original airing, which have been removed from the video, so if you didn’t catch the show for that reason, don’t worry, it’s no longer there. I appreciate those who have watched already (and who stuck through the tech problems!), and I appreciate all those who are watching now. Thank you!

Find the Fujicolor C200 and Kodacolor film simulation recipes on the Fuji X Weekly — Film Recipes App!

SOOC – Season 01 Episode 03 – Fujicolor C200

I want to thank everyone who tuned into and participated in SOOC Episode 03! You are amazing! This really is the best community in photography. If you missed it, you can still watch it—I’ve included the video above. There were some technical difficulties, so I recommend skipping ahead to about the 7-minute mark.

SOOC is a monthly live video series, with each episode focused on a different film simulation recipe. It is a collaboration between Tame Your Fujifilm (Fujifilm X-Photographer Nathalie Boucry) and Fuji X Weekly (Ritchie Roesch). SOOC is a fun and educational experience where we will not only talk about Fujifilm camera settings, but also answer your questions. This is an interactive program, which means that we need your participation!

Episode 03 of this live interactive video series was today. We discussed the Fujicolor C200 film simulation recipe, and took a look at the photographs that you’ve submitted. The next episode, which will be October 14, will be all about my Kodacolor recipe, which is compatible with X-Trans III & IV cameras. I hope to see you then!

The Kodachrome 64 Moment!

Moment published an article, Why I Never Shoot RAW—Fujifilm Simulations, Recipes, and More!, that includes many of my photographs and even some of my words! I encourage you to check it out! Moment, you might remember, had partnered with me to give away CineBloom filters. I’m extraordinarily honored for the opportunity to collaborate with them on these projects, and I hope that we can work together even more in the future!

There is a mistake in the article that I’d like to point out. Check out the image below:

Caption reads: “Using Kodachrome 64 Recipe.”
This picture was captured using real Kodachrome 64 film.

The picture above was supposed to be an example photograph of the actual film, which I captured over 20 years ago using real Kodachrome 64 film shot on a Canon AE-1 camera. So it is film, and not a film simulation. A couple other mistakes are found in the recipe itself: Dynamic Range should be DR200, and Noise Reduction should be -4. But, you know, it’s always alright to “season to taste” a recipe, so maybe that is how they prefer those settings.

I’m super happy to have been included in this writeup! I’m stoked that Moment found this recipe to be a valuable resource to the photography community—so valuable, in fact, that they were eager to share it with their customers on their website. Honestly, I’m flattered. Thank you, Moment!

Why I Never Shoot RAW—Fujifilm Simulations, Recipes, and More!

Tip: How to Remember Which Film Simulation Recipe You Used

I get asked sometimes how I know which film simulation recipes I used for certain pictures. Especially when I take a road trip where I might use a number of different recipes, it can be difficult to remember which ones I used when. Honestly, I didn’t have a good method for this. I would limit myself to only a few recipes, and tried to avoid using similar-looking recipes on the same day. If I still didn’t remember, I would go back into the camera and display the picture information to give myself a clue. However, I recently became aware of a much better method.

In Episode 02 of SOOC, X-Photographer Nathalie Boucry shared her smart solution for this common problem. Whenever Nathalie is out shooting, when she switches to a new recipe, the very first exposure that she makes is a snap of her phone with the Fuji X Weekly App open and the recipe she’s using displayed. Then she knows that every picture after that (until she reaches the next image of her phone) was captured with that recipe. I began doing this myself, and it works very well. Yes, it takes an extra moment “in the field” to snap an image of your phone, and it does take a little extra space on the memory card, but it can definitely save you time (and sanity) later as you try to figure out what recipe you used for that picture.

First image captured after switching recipes is an image of the Fuji X Weekly App with the recipe displayed.
Now I know that I used the Positive Film recipe for this picture.

This is a tip that I know will be helpful to some of you, because it was helpful to me. These kinds of tips and tricks are what you’ll find in the SOOC live video series. Episode 03 is this Thursday, September 9. It’s an interactive program, and your participation makes the show even better, so I hope to see you then!

If you haven’t downloaded the Fuji X Weekly App, be sure to do so. It’s free, and available for both Android and Apple. If you are looking for a way to support Fuji X Weekly and all that I’m doing for the community plus unlock the best app experience, consider becoming a Fuji X Weekly Patron (available in the app)!

The Fuji X Weekly Moment CineBloom Giveaway Winners!

The Fuji X Weekly Moment CineBloom Giveaway has ended! I want to give a big “Thank You” to everyone who participated—there were over 400 submissions! The winners, who were randomly selected, are:
@alex_fricke_365
@stephen.wells
@bruce_martin_photographe
@fotografik_westphalen
@henrikbratt

Congratulations to these five winners! I know you will appreciate using the filters!

CineBloom diffusion filters are a great way to take the “digital edge” off of your photographs, giving them an analog-like feel. Diffusion filters have been popular in cinematography for awhile, and people are beginning to realize that they’re great for still photography, too. These filters pair especially well with my Film Simulation Recipes, and are a wonderful tool for the JPEG photographer.

I want to give a huge shout-out to Moment for teaming up with Fuji X Weekly to make this giveaway possible! They did it because they’re big fans of this website, Fujifilm cameras, film simulation recipes, and the Fujifilm community. Moment’s website (shopmoment.com) is definitely one of the better camera stores out there (yet, really, they are so very much more than just “a camera store”). If you’ve never visited Moment, be sure to do so—you can thank me later.

Even though the Fuji X Weekly Moment giveaway has ended, please continue to use the #fujixweeklymoment hashtag on Instagram. I love seeing your Fuji X Weekly moments, and I hope you continue sharing them!

Also, while I’m here, if you haven’t downloaded the Fuji X Weekly App, be sure to do so. It’s free, and available for both Android and Apple. If you are looking for a way to support Fuji X Weekly and all that I’m doing for the community plus unlock the best app experience, consider becoming a Fuji X Weekly Patron (available in the app)!

The Fuji X Weekly Moment – Update 4

The Fuji X Weekly moment CineBloom giveaway is in its final hours. There’s not much time, so I hope that you participated for a chance to win one of five Cinebloom diffusion filters. The full rules and details are found here. So far, there have been over 400 submissions! Check out the #fujixweeklymoment hashtag on Instagram to see them all.

I want to give a huge “Thank You” to Moment for teaming up with Fuji X Weekly to make this giveaway possible! They did it because they’re big fans of this website, Fujifilm cameras, film simulation recipes, and the Fujifilm community. Moment’s website (shopmoment.com) is definitely one of the better camera stores out there (yet, really, they are so very much more than just “a camera store”). If you’ve never visited Moment, be sure to do so—you can thank me later.

I hope to announce the five Cinebloom diffusion filter winners on Monday (September 6th), so stay tuned!

Also, while I’m here, if you haven’t downloaded the Fuji X Weekly App, be sure to do so. It’s free, and available for both Android and Apple. If you are looking for a way to support Fuji X Weekly and all that I’m doing for the community plus unlock the best app experience, consider becoming a Fuji X Weekly Patron (available in the app)!

SOOC Episode 03 Is This Thursday!

SOOC is a monthly live video series, with each episode focused on a different film simulation recipe. It is a collaboration between Tame Your Fujifilm (Fujifilm X-Photographer Nathalie Boucry) and Fuji X Weekly (Ritchie Roesch). SOOC is a fun and educational experience where we will not only talk about Fujifilm camera settings, but also answer your questions. This is an interactive program, which means that we need your participation!

Episode 03 of this live interactive video series will be this Thursday, September 9, at 11 AM MST (10 AM Pacific, 1 PM Eastern)! We’ll discuss the Fujicolor C200 film simulation recipe, and take a look at the photographs that you’ve submitted. Click here to submit your photographs! We really would love to see your pictures captured with the Fujicolor C200 recipe, and when you submit a picture you are entered into a drawing to win a one-year Patron subscription to the Fuji X Weekly App. We’ll also be introducing the next recipe, among other things. I truly hope you’ll join us!

While you are waiting for Thursday to come around, let me share with you a wonderful article by Nathalie Boucry (click here) entitle Not Lost, Verloren, which includes many wonderful pictures captured with the Fujicolor C200 recipe on a Fujifilm X-S10. If you have a few moments today, go read the article, it’s well worth your time!

See you Thursday!

SOOC Season 01 Episode 01
SOOC Season 01 Episode 02

Additional Thoughts on the Fujifilm X-T30 II (& X-T3 WW)

Fujifilm officially announced the X-T30 II today. This “new” camera is just like the “old” camera (including the X-T30 nameplate on the front… it says “X-T30” and not “X-T30 II”), except for a few key things. The rear screen is higher resolution. The camera has some additional built-in memory. It has (basically) the same firmware as the X-T4, X-S10, and X-E4. Otherwise, the two models are identical.

In my article Thoughts on the Upcoming Fujifilm X-T30 II I basically blasted Fujifilm for not offering a firmware update to the X-T30, but selling that firmware update as a “new” camera. I also stated:

It is possible that the X-T30 doesn’t have the internal memory, processing power, or heat dispersion capacity to receive this firmware update. It is possible that there is a hardware limitation that prevents it.

It seems that “internal memory” was indeed an issue, although I believe that the memory issue has more to do with the video side of things than still pictures. That’s just my opinion, not anything I have any evidence for. So the X-T30 II firmware can’t just be uploaded onto the X-T30, but a scaled down version, perhaps without the improved video features, certain could, and definitely should! It’s long, long overdue.

Fujifilm, if you happen to read this, please visit the comments section of my previous article. These are your customers, and those are their opinions.

The X-T30 II will be available on October 21, and if you have been thinking about getting an X-T30, you are better off waiting until October and buying the X-T30 II. I assume that the “original” X-T30 will be discontinued and discounted around that time, so perhaps a good deal on that model will be coming soon.

Also announced was the X-T3 WW, which is an X-T3 without a battery charger, and a $100 cheaper price-tag. The X-T3 and X-T3 WW are 100% identical. If you don’t need a battery charger, this might be a good option to save a little money.

The Fuji X Weekly Moment – Update 3

I’m giving away CineBloom filters to some of those who tell me their Fuji X Weekly moment on Instagram! Interested? Click here for all of the details and rules.

My favorite part of The Fuji X Weekly Moment giveaway is reading your great stories. For example, @snapsbybennett shared:

I love how the places at my dad’s have literally never changed since I was a kid. If you’re a Fuji shooter and haven’t used the Fuji X Weekly App yet… GO TRY IT OUT! Changed my whole look on my photography. Fujifilm XT3, 18-55mm, Portra 400 Sim.

@rockysgraphs shared:

Shot with Fujicolor Pro 160NS film simulation. I am loving the film simulation recipes from Fuji X Weekly. They add another level of creative control in camera that enhances my experience when shooting my Fujifilm X100F.

@azyrizaldi79 shared:

My Fuji X Weekly moment: Modeled a classic helmet this afternoon. Turn head right, left, up, that’s it…!!! In order for the color of this afternoon’s sun to get better, I’m using Fuji X Weekly’s Provia recipe in camera. A Provia standard color variation that is soft and suitable with the yellowish shine of the afternoon sun. No Grain in this recipe because it’s made for larger sensors. Whatever it is, the color looks cool on X-Trans III cameras. Find it on the Fuji X Weekly App!

And @patrickmichaelmckenna shared:

This is my Fuji X Weekly moment. Captured on my Fujifilm X100V with the Fuji X Weekly Kodak Portra v2 film simulation recipe, which I found on the Fuji X Weekly App. Image is of my granddaughter Sutton gripping her Mimi’s finger. First time I used an X100V—instead of a professional DSLR or my new Canon EOS R5. Sutton was 2 days old, and I wanted to “focus” on my new granddaughter and not my camera settings. The X100V did the trick.

There are, of course, so many more (almost 400!)! I encourage you to take a look at all of the #fujixweeklymoment submissions, and to submit your own! The giveaway closes on Saturday (September 4th), which is only a couple days away, so don’t procrastinate. I look forward to seeing your pictures and reading more of your stories!

Introducing: Ritchie’s Ricoh Recipes!

I’m very exciting to announce a new project that I’ve been secretly working on for the last several months: Ritchie’s Ricoh Recipes! This is similar to Fuji X Weekly film simulation recipes, except for Ricoh GR cameras. Obviously, Ricoh and Fujifilm cameras are much different, so the recipes are much different, too; however, I’m very pleased with how these turned out. If you own a Ricoh GR, GR II, or GR III camera, you’ll want to check it out!

Why Ricoh GR? I often get requests to make recipes for other camera brands, but the top asked-for brand is Ricoh. At first this might seem strange, since Canon, Sony, and Nikon (and probably a few other brands, too) are much more popular than Ricoh, but there are three factors that make this seemingly unlikely camera a popular request. First, a surprisingly large number of Fujifilm photographers also own a Ricoh GR camera. Why? Because Fujifilm and Ricoh are both popular options for street, travel, and documentary photography, and Fujifilm doesn’t offer a great alternative to the GR (the X70 has long been discontinued, and the XF10 was a little underwhelming). Second, Ricoh GR photographers are more open to using straight-out-of-camera JPEGs due to the camera’s film heritage and the film-like experience of shooting JPEGs. Third, Ricoh has included many useful and creative JPEG options on the GR cameras—it’s easier to create recipes that you’d actually want to use than with some other brands.

I don’t know the percentage of Fujifilm photographers who also use a Ricoh GR, but it has to be a fairly significant number based on the requests that I’ve received. Many of the messages are to the effect of, “I love using your recipes on my X-Pro2, and I’d really like to do something similar on my Ricoh GR III.” While this project is for a different camera brand, I’m hoping that it is largely for the benefit of the Fujifilm community. I believe that many in this audience will find it a useful resource.

Ricoh Recipes are different than my Fujifilm Recipes, not only in how they look but in how they’re organized. Choose either GR/GR II or GR III. Within each camera category are four recipe Collections. Within each Collection are five recipes. In other words, there are 40 recipes, 20 for the GR/GR II and 20 for the GR III.

A Ricoh Recipes App (similar to the Fuji X Weekly App) is in the works for both iOS and Android, and should be available before the end of the month. With any luck, it could be available as early as the middle of September. On the app, for Ricoh Recipe Patrons, will be eight bonus recipes (one for each Collection). Be sure to check out Ritchie’s Ricoh Recipes Blog. Follow me on Instagram, too! Please be patient with the website (and app), as it is all still very much a work-in-progress, and far from finished.

I’ve been trying really hard to prevent this new project from interfering with Fuji X Weekly. I have a whole bunch of upcoming things for this website, which I think you’ll appreciate. There are many film simulation recipes in the works. If you don’t own a Ricoh GR camera, don’t worry, there’s a lot of great things happening for Fujifilm, so stay tuned. If you do own a Ricoh GR camera, I hope that you enjoy trying these new recipes for your camera!

Photoessay: Fujifilm X-Pro3 + 18mm f/1.4 + AgfaChrome RS 100 Recipe = A Photowalk To Remember

Rental boats at Lake Schluchsee. Photo by Thomas Schwab.

Thomas Schwab, who has helped create (and downright created) a number of film simulation recipes on this website, recently went on a 12-mile photowalk through the Black Forest in the beautiful German mountainside between Hinterzarten and Lake Schluchsee. The weather was “Octobering” (as Thomas put it), which means that it was overcast and rainy. Thomas carried his Fujifilm X-Pro3 camera with the new Fujinon 18mm f/1.4 lens attached—both are weather-sealed, so a great combination for the conditions. He used the AgfaChrome RS 100 film simulation recipe, which Thomas said is “the best for color photography on rainy days.” He “seasoned to taste” the recipe with Sharpening set to 0 (instead of -2) and Grain Weak (instead of Strong). He used ISO 640 for all of the images.

The adventure began with a train ride to Hinterzarten, then a hike down the Emil-Thoma-Weg trail. After visiting Lake Mathisleweiher, Thomas trekked through Bärental (Bear Valley)—thankfully he didn’t encounter any bears—all the way to Lake Schluchsee, passing Lake Windgfällweiher and a small unnamed lake on the way. The adventure ended with a train ride back home. This really was a photowalk to remember, through some incredible rural scenery!

The pictures in this article were captured by Thomas Schwab while on his mountainside adventure. They aren’t in chronological order, but they do tell a story. Thank you, Thomas, for allowing me to share your wonderful photographs on Fuji X Weekly! Please follow Thomas on Instagram if you don’t already, and leave a kind note to him in the comments to let him know you appreciate his pictures!

Through Bärental. Photo by Thomas Schwab.
Houses in Hinterzarten. Photo by Thomas Schwab.
Traces of forest work. Photo by Thomas Schwab.
Forest work. Photo by Thomas Schwab.
Lonely Path. Photo by Thomas Schwab.
Stone steps in Bear Valley. Photo by Thomas Schwab.
Big equipment in Bear Valley. Photo by Thomas Schwab.
Between Bärental and Lake Schluchsee. Photo by Thomas Schwab.
Small nameless lake. Photo by Thomas Schwab.
Grass meadow. Photo by Thomas Schwab.
Little leaves. Photo by Thomas Schwab.
Raindrops on leaves. Photo by Thomas Schwab.
Bee on thistle flower. Photo by Thomas Schwab.
Leaf captured with large aperture. Photo by Thomas Schwab.
Water droplets, at Lake Mathisleweiher. Photo by Thomas Schwab.
Small blossoms at Lake Mathisleweiher. Photo by Thomas Schwab.
Pine branch at Lake Mathisleweiher. Photo by Thomas Schwab.
Umbrella at Lake Mathisleweiher. Photo by Thomas Schwab.
At Lake Mathisleweiher. Photo by Thomas Schwab.
Boat at Schluchsee village. Photo by Thomas Schwab.
Lake Schluchsee beach. Photo by Thomas Schwab.
Lake Schluchsee from the village. Photo by Thomas Schwab.
Blue boats on Lake Schluchsee. Photo by Thomas Schwab.
Boat dock at Lake Schluchsee. Photo by Thomas Schwab.
Dock on Lake Schluchsee. Photo by Thomas Schwab.
Lake Schluchsee. Photo by Thomas Schwab.
Glass bottle at Lake Schluchsee. Photo by Thomas Schwab.
Old hotel in Hinterzarten. Photo by Thomas Schwab.
Passing train. Photo by Thomas Schwab.
Train stop at Himmelreich Station. Photo by Thomas Schwab.

Thoughts on the Upcoming Fujifilm X-T30 II

I told you a couple weeks ago that Fujifilm was going to release one more X-series camera before the end of the year, and I speculated what it might be. Fujirumors has let the cat out of the bag, and now we know it will be the X-T30 II, which will be an X-T30 but with “firmware on steroids.” I have a lot of thoughts (and emotions) on this, which I’ll share below.

First, I do not think this is the smartest move by Fujifilm. Last year I said, “If Fujifilm were to update the firmware on the X-T3 and X-T30 to breathe new excitement into these models, these cameras could still be sold for another two years easily.” Some people are looking for an excuse to upgrade from the X-T10 or X-T20 (and maybe a few other models), and whether the camera is the X-T30 II or an X-T30 with a major firmware update doesn’t matter to them. They’ll buy either. Those with an X-T30 aren’t likely to upgrade to the X-T30 II (I know I won’t).

All this does to X-T30 owners is make unhappy customers. I know that Fujifilm has no obligation to offer firmware updates. I was very happy with the my X-T30 when I bought it almost two-and-a-half years ago, and I’m still happy with it. But when a company does a certain practice (such as Kaizen firmware updates) for so long, it becomes expected. It’s not only expected that Fujifilm would do this, it makes sense for them to do so, as it creates happy customers, which means they’re more likely to be repeat customers and even unofficial brand ambassadors. Offering a major Kaizen firmware update to the X-T30 would thrill X-T30 owners and make them very happy customers (a.k.a. repeat customers who tell their friends how awesome Fujifilm cameras are), and it would breathe new life of excitement into the X-T30, increasing sales from those looking to upgrade from older models. It’s a win-win!

Instead, X-T30 owners will have to shell out $900 (or whatever the X-T30 II will cost) to get the firmware update that they’ve been hoping for. They won’t—I won’t, anyway. It seems like a greedy move. Fujifilm painted themselves with a seemingly negative light. They did it to themselves, I’m just pointing out the obvious that everyone sees.

That is, if indeed the X-T30 II is an X-T30 with nothing more than a firmware update. It is possible that the X-T30 doesn’t have the internal memory, processing power, or heat dispersion capacity to receive this firmware update. It is possible that there is a hardware limitation that prevents it. Maybe Fujifilm was attempting to do this firmware update when they realized they couldn’t, and thus the X-T30 II was born. I have no idea if this is the case or not. Emotionally I hope it is (because it means that Fujifilm isn’t driven by mere greed). Logically I hope it is not (because it means that a firmware update is still possible for the X-T30, although that seems unlikely at this point). Internally the X-T30 II might not be 100% identical to the X-T30—it’s impossible to know right now, but either way there’s a negative aspect to it for Fujifilm customers.

The X-T30 II is actually a much-needed camera in the Fujifilm lineup. Really, the X-T30 with a Kaizen firmware update is what was needed, but since that’s apparently not happening, X-T30 II will serve as a stop-gap between the X-T30 and future X-T40. You see, there are people who don’t want the X-S10 because of the PASM dial and non-retro design, who don’t want the X-E4 because it doesn’t have enough dials, switches and knobs, who don’t want an X-T4 because it is too big and expensive, and who don’t want the X-T30 because it doesn’t have all of the JPEG options that those newer cameras have. The X-T30 II will be the camera of choice for those people.

There’s also an implication here for the X-T3. Those who have an X-T3, like those with an X-T30, have been hoping for a Kaizen update for nearly two years. Since the X-T30 isn’t getting one, the X-T3 isn’t likely to get one, either. Want a firmware update for the X-T30? Buy an X-T30 II! Want a firmware update for the X-T3? Buy an X-T4! That’s the message, unfortunately.

The Fujifilm X-T30 II will be announced on September 2, the same day that the Fujinon 33mm f/1.4 will be announced.

I don’t think that Fujifilm regularly reads this website. I don’t think they were even aware of Fuji X Weekly until a little over a year ago. I do believe that they have mixed feelings about this blog, because I often use a competitor’s brand name (Kodak, Kodachrome, Portra, etc.), which seems silly to me as Kodak hasn’t been a major player in photography in awhile, yet I bring them a lot of new customers due to the film simulation recipes. They also don’t like articles where I mention yet-to-be-announced products (such as this one). I don’t have a voice at the company, but I wish that I did because I do believe I have a pretty good pulse of their customers—thanks to you, the greatest community in all of photography! In the off chance that Fujifilm reads this article, I would like your opinions to be included. If you’d like Fujifilm to release a firmware update for the X-T30 and X-T3, let them know by commenting. They might not ever read your thoughts and ideas, but they might, so please let them know, and maybe—just maybe—it will make a difference.

See also: Additional Thoughts on the Fujifilm X-T30 II

The Fuji X Weekly Moment – Update 2

I’m giving away CineBloom filters to some of those who tell me their Fuji X Weekly moment on Instagram! Interested? Click here for all of the details and rules.

My favorite part of The Fuji X Weekly Moment giveaway is reading your great stories. For example, @thinkingrockphotography shared:

This is the first time I’ve used a film simulation recipe and really noticed how much it looks like film. I didn’t grow up shooting film, but there is a box of Kodachrome slides in the closet, and this photo looks EXACTLY like I remember those slides looking.

And @thaiphangram said:

This is my Fuji X Weekly moment, which was captured on my Fujifilm X-Pro3 with the Fuji X Weekly CineStill 800T film simulation recipe, which I found on the Fuji X Weekly App. What I love about film simulations is how easy they are to use which lets me shoot more and edit less since the straight out of camera picture is so good.

And @t_kuerten_photos stated:

I recently picked up a cheap little Fujifilm X-T10 after discovering the amazing film simulations by Fuji X Weekly that just make taking great JPEGs SOOC so easy. I used to shoot entirely 100% in RAW but after spending weeks getting bogged down editing after a trip to Portugal, I wanted to spend more time behind the camera and less time behind the computer. So for this trip to Barcelona to visit my parents, I decided I would shoot almost the entire trip in JPEG. And I have no regrets! So, without further ado, here is the first Fuji X Weekly moment of my trip (shot using the Kodacolor simulation slightly adjusted to taste).

There are, of course, so many more! I encourage you to take a look at all of the #fujixweeklymoment submissions, and to submit your own! There is just one week before the giveaway closes, so don’t procrastinate. I look forward to seeing your pictures and reading more of your stories!

SOOC Viewer Images!

This short video is about you! These are the viewer submitted pictures from Season 01 Episode 02 of the SOOC live video series. I want to give a special “Thank You” to everyone who participated! This whole video series is for you, and I appreciate all who tuned in. I hope that you’ve found it helpful and, at the very least, entertaining. Click here if you missed Episode 01, and click here if you missed Episode 02. Episode 03 will be on Thursday, September 9th, so mark your calendars! Click here if you’d like to submit a picture for Episode 03 captured with the Fujicolor C200 film simulation recipe. Those who submit photographs are entered into a drawing to win a year Patron subscription to the Fuji X Weekly App!

I hope to see you on September 9th!