Fujifilm X-Pro3 (X-Trans IV) Film Simulation Recipe: Old Ektachrome

Approaching Mesa Arch – Canyonlands NP, UT – Fujifilm X-Pro3 – “Old Ektachrome”

I was asked to recreate the aesthetic from a frame of a classic movie. I don’t know which movie, but only that it was shot on “Eastmancolor” film, which is a brandname for many different motion picture films and processes going back to the 1950’s. In fact, Eastmancolor Negative, better known as ECN, is still the development process used for today’s motion picture film. It’s unknown which film was used for the frame I was shown, but I did my best to recreate it on a Fujifilm X-Pro3.

After using these settings for several days, I decided that it really reminds me of old Ektachrome color reversal film, perhaps from the 1970’s. Ektachrome was known for fading rather quickly, with some color shifts if not stored well. Aside from some faded slides from my grandparents, most of the Ektachrome I’ve seen from this era have been in classic photography magazines. I don’t know how faithfully this recipe mimics old Ektachrome film, but it definitely has the right “memory color” for me. I hope that you like it, too.

Abandoned Ferris Wheel – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-Pro3 – “Old Ektachrome”

This “Old Ektachrome” film simulation recipe is compatible with the Fujifilm X-Pro3, X100V, X-T4, X-S10, X-E4, and X-T30 II cameras. This recipe isn’t compatible with the X-T3 or X-T30, but if you disregard Color Chrome FX Blue, disregard Grain size, and use a diffusion filter in lieu of Clarity, you’ll get similar results.

Classic Chrome
Dynamic Range: DR400
Highlight: +2
Shadow: +1
Color: +3
Noise Reduction: -4
Sharpness: 0
Clarity: -4
Grain Effect: Strong, Large
Color Chrome Effect: Strong
Color Chrome Effect Blue: Weak
White Balance: Daylight, +3 Red & +2 Blue
ISO: Auto, up to ISO 6400
Exposure Compensation: 0 to +2/3 (typically)

Example photographs, all camera-made JPEGs using this “Old Ektachrome” film simulation recipe on a Fujifilm X-Pro3:

Blue Roof – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-Pro3
Old Carnaval Ride – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-Pro3
Too Late To Ride – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-Pro3
Early Blossoms – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-Pro3
Potted Plant – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-Pro3
Desert Snow – Canyonlands NP, UT – Fujifilm X-Pro3
Rock & Half Arch – Arches NP, UT – Fujifilm X-Pro3
Cave & Juniper – Arches NP, UT – Fujifilm X-Pro3
Snow in the Desert – Arches NP, UT – Fujifilm X-Pro3
Sign Stickers – Canyonlands NP, UT – Fujifilm X-Pro3
Red Rock Tree – Canyonlands NP, UT – Fujifilm X-Pro3
View Through Mesa Arch – Canyonlands NP, UT – Fujifilm X-Pro3

Find this film simulation recipes and over 200 more on the Fuji X Weekly — Film Recipes App!

Fujifilm X-Pro3 (X-Trans IV) Film Simulation Recipe: Vintage Color v2

February Reaching – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-Pro3 – “Vintage Color v2”

This “Vintage Color v2” recipe is a modification of the original Vintage Color Film Simulation Recipe. In the comments, Thomas Schumacher suggested using Classic Negative instead of Eterna. Sometimes when you try a different film simulation than what the recipe calls for, you discover interesting results. Well, I gave it a try and loved the results; however, I made a couple more modifications. Because Classic Negative has a lot more contrast built into it than Eterna, I chose DR400 (instead of DR200) to help prevent clipped highlights. Classic Negative also has more saturation than Eterna, so I set Color to -1 (instead of +1). I also changed Clarity to -3 (instead of -2) just to soften it a tad. The results produced by this “Vintage Color v2” recipe can be absolutely fantastic!

This recipe has almost two different looks, depending on the exposure. You can reduce exposure a little—go almost low-key—and get a wonderfully moody feel. You can also increase exposure a little—go almost high-key—and achieve something somewhat similar to overexposed Fujicolor Pro 400H. You can get beautiful pictures either way. Or split the difference and still get excellent results.

Pillars – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-Pro3 – “Vintage Color v2”

This “Vintage Color v2” recipe is compatible with the Fujifilm X-Pro3, X100V, X-T4, X-S10, X-E4, and X-T30 II cameras. As a reminder, Clarity causes the camera to pause for a moment after each shot. I use the pause to slow myself down, but if you need to be quick, and if you shoot RAW+JPEG, you can always set Clarity to 0, and add it later by reprocessing the RAW file in-camera.

Classic Negative
Dynamic Range: DR400
Highlight: +2
Shadow: +3
Color: -1
Noise Reduction: -4
Sharpness: -2
Clarity: -3
Grain Effect: Strong, Large
Color Chrome Effect: Strong
Color Chrome Effect Blue: Strong
White Balance: 7350K, -1 Red & -4 Blue
ISO: Auto, up to ISO 6400
Exposure Compensation: 0 to +1 (typically)

Example photographs captured using this “Vintage Color v2” film simulation recipe on a Fujifilm X-Pro3:

High Rise & Moon – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-Pro3
KeyBank – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-Pro3
Bronze Building – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-Pro3
Bank Above Macy’s – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-Pro3
Boy With Nerf Gun – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-Pro3
Fake Succulent on Table – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-Pro3
House At Last Light – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-Pro3
Winter Bloom Remnants – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-Pro3
Frozen Pond near Sunset – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-Pro3
Grass & Frozen Waterway – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-Pro3
Wild Gold – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-Pro3
Backlit Marsh Reed – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-Pro3

Find this Film Simulation Recipe and over 200 more on the Fuji X Weekly — Film Recipes App!

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X-Pro3 To Have New Film Simulation: Classic Negative

Fujifilm Classic Negative

The upcoming Fujifilm X-Pro3, which will feature an unusual rear screen, will have a new film simulation called Classic Negative, which is supposed to resemble Superia film, according to Fujifilm. I get a lot of requests for Superia, so I’m very happy to see this as a new film simulation. Yea!

Fujirumors stated that the X-Pro3 will have some additional adjustments for in-camera RAW processing, such as Clarity. I welcome this because the more tools that Fujifilm provides, the more easily I can achieve a desired look in-camera. Fujifilm is one of only a few companies that take camera-made JPEGs seriously, and is one of the big reasons why I appreciate their products. Shooting JPEGs saves me so much time, allowing my photography to be more productive while simultaneously allowing me to spend more time elsewhere, such as with my family.

I hope that Fujifilm makes these things–the Classic Negative film simulation and the additional tools–available to other cameras, such as the X-T3 and X-T30, which share the same sensor and processor as the upcoming X-Pro3. There is, according to Fujirumors, some big firmware updates on the horizon, and I hope that these are a part of that. Sometimes, when a new feature is included in a new camera, Fujifilm will update older cameras to include it as well, and sometimes they don’t. So it’s really hard to know. I will keep my fingers crossed.

Fujifilm Classic NegativeFujifilm X-Pro3Fujifilm X-Pro3Fujifilm X-Pro3