Creative Collective 040: FXW Zine — Issue 15 — February 2023

Here is the 15th issue of FXW Zine! If you are a Fuji X Weekly Creative Collective subscriber, you can download it today!

In the February issue, we take a look at 10 different Film Simulation Recipes for use on dreary, overcast days. If you aren’t sure which recipe to use when the sky is grey, this issue is intended to be helpful. Also, my wife, Amanda, contributed six pictures to this publication, including the cover image.

If you haven’t joined the Creative Collective, consider subscribing today to get access to bonus articles and the FXW Zine—not just this issue, but the first thirteen issues, too!

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Fujifilm Take Notice: Ricoh Just Did What You Won’t

Captured with the new “Negative Film” Picture Control Effect on my Ricoh GR III.

Fujifilm, pay close attention: Ricoh just did with their GR III and GR IIIx what you won’t do with your X-series cameras.

Fujifilm has stated that they’re moving away from Kaizen and to expect less of it going forward, but some other camera makers—including Ricoh—are embracing it. In fact, Ricoh just added a new Picture Control Effect, which is their Film Simulations equivalent, to their GR III and IIIx cameras. This new Effect is called Negative Film, and it looks pretty good so far to me. It’s not really like anything on Fujifilm exactly—perhaps it could be described as somewhat similar to a cross between Classic Negative and PRO Neg. Std—but it does produce an aesthetic that’s easy to appreciate.

I want to point out that the GR III was released almost at the same exact time as the Fujifilm X-T30. Since the release of the X-T30, Fujifilm has introduced three new Film Simulations—Classic Negative, Eterna Bleach Bypass, and Nostalgic Neg.—plus some other JPEG options like Color Chrome FX Blue, Clarity, and Grain size. None of it has trickled down to the X-T30 (or X-T3). Even the X-Pro3 and X100V—premium models, supposedly—weren’t given the Kaizen love that they (really, Fujifilm’s customers) deserve. Yet little ol’ Ricoh not only created a new Effect for apparently no reason other than the fun of it, and they gave it to the almost four-year-old GR III just because they wanted to make their customers happy.

Captured with the new “Negative Film” Picture Control Effect on my Ricoh GR III.

I have a ton of advice that I’d give to Fujifilm if they were ever interested in hearing my opinions. I mean, I have a pretty good pulse on a big chunk of their customer base, and I’ve done more than most to bring them new customers, whether directly or indirectly, so you’d think they would be interested in hearing what I have to say. The very first suggestion that I would have for them is to do more Kaizen and not less. I get that it costs time and money, but fostering a happy long-term repeat customer base is priceless, and well worth whatever it takes to do that. A lot of photographers go from brand-to-brand-to-brand, or they begrudgingly put up with a brand for a long time because they don’t want to endure the cost and headache of switching, and there is a surprisingly large amount of disloyalty among customers. Yes, there are the outspoken fanboys—I am one for Fujifilm—but while their voices are loud, their numbers are surprisingly small. So if a brand can actually make more of their customers loyal, which they do by showing them that they matter and are appreciated, it can have a significant long-term impact. Of course, if your customers don’t think you care about them, they’ll be more quick to leave when another brand offers something new and exciting, or if they think that another brand cares more about their customers than the one they’re currently using.

Ricoh just made sure that their customers know that they care. Fujifilm, make sure that your customers know you care!

Below are some examples of photos captured using the new Negative Film Picture Control Effect on my Ricoh GR III.

See also: Ritchie’s Ricoh Recipes

This post contains affiliate links, and if you make a purchase using my links I’ll be compensated a small amount for it.

Ricoh GR III  Amazon  B&H  Moment
Ricoh GR IIIx  Amazon  B&H  Moment

Vintage Cinema — Fujifilm X-T5 (X-Trans V) FXW App Patron Early-Access Film Simulation Recipe

Glimpse of a Fleeting Memory – Gilbert, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5 – “Vintage Cinema”

I recently binge-watched a number of classic movies from the 1950’s, and I was really inspired by their picture aesthetics. After some research, I discovered that Kodak ECN 5248 25T motion picture film was used in several of these flicks. The problem, of course, with trying to replicate the look of a motion picture film stock is that not only is the aesthetic dependent on the usual factors of how shot and developed, but also on the lighting and filters used, which can be different movie-to-movie and even scene-to-scene. Instead of attempting to mimic the look of any particular movie or cinema film stock, I wanted to create a certain feel or mood—a “memory color” reminiscent of color movies from the 1950’s.

This Vintage Cinema Film Simulation Recipe is a Fuji X Weekly App Patron Early-Access recipe, which means if you are an App Patron, you have access to it right now. The Fuji X Weekly App is free, yet becoming a Patron unlocks the best App experience! One benefit of being a Patron is you get early access to some new Film Simulation Recipes, such as this one. These Patron Early-Access Recipes will eventually become available free to everyone in time, including this new one. Patrons help support Fuji X Weekly and, really, without them there would be no App, so I want to give a special “thank you” to all of the Patrons!

Ball on a Wall – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5 – “Vintage Cinema”

The Vintage Cinema Film Simulation Recipe, which is the very first Patron Early-Access Recipe for X-Trans V, is only compatible with (as of this writing) the Fujifilm X-T5, X-H2, and X-H2S (and I’m sure the X-S20 when it’s released this spring). I assume that the GFX100S and GFX50S II can also use this recipe, but that it will render slightly different—I don’t have either of those cameras to test it to know for certain. This recipe is best for sunny daylight conditions, and seems especially well-suited for golden hour photography, but can sometimes produce interesting results in cloudy, shade, and indoor situations, too. I believe this recipe would pair especially well with vintage lenses and probably diffusion filters, but for these pictures I used Fujinon lenses, including the 27mm f/2.8, 35mm f/2, 90mm f/2, and 100-400mm, without any filters.

Example photographs, all camera-made JPEGs using this “Vintage Cinema” Film Simulation Recipe on my Fujifilm X-T5:

Birds of a Feather – Gilbert, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Flipped Reflection – Gilbert, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Three Ducks in a Lake – Gilbert, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Bougainvillea Blooms & Blue – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Bougainvillea Beams – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5 – Photo by Jonathan Roesch
Side Gate Cracked Open – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Bougainvillea Bush in Bloom – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Hanging Bougainvillea Blossom – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Desert Bunny – Gilbert, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Jo on a Dirt Path – Gilbert, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Jo on the Patio – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Late Autumn Yellow – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Leafless Tree – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5 – Photo by Jonathan Roesch
Do Not Enter When Flooded – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5 – Photo by Jonathan Roesch
Dry Leaves on a Patio Chair – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Pruner & Gloves – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Fruit – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5

Find this Film Simulation Recipe and over 250 more on the Fuji X Weekly — Film Recipes App!

This post contains affiliate links, and if you make a purchase using my links I’ll be compensated a small amount for it.

Fujifilm X-T5 in black:  Amazon  B&H  Moment
Fujifilm X-T5 in silver:  Amazon  B&H  Moment

Thoughts on the Upcoming X-S20

According to Fujirumors, who has a reputation for being quite accurate, the next Fujifilm model will be the X-S20, which will be announced at the X-Summit in April. What are my thoughts on this upcoming camera?

First of all, I want to state that I have zero inside information. Fujifilm doesn’t tell me anything. I haven’t spoken with anybody who has knowledge about upcoming cameras. What I state about the X-S20—or any unreleased model—is my opinion (nothing more) and should be consumed with a grain of salt.

The X-S10 was a successful model for Fujifilm, doing what it was intended to do: attract those unsatisfied with their Canikony camera who have an interest in Fujifilm but are intimidated by the traditional dials because they have only ever used PASM. I have no doubt that the X-S20 will be just as successful, if not more so.

I believe it will have the same 40-megapixel sensor as the X-H2 and X-T5. It won’t be weather-sealed. It will be 95% the same camera as the X-S10, just with the new sensor and processor. I would be surprised if there were any big surprises. If the X-H2 is too expensive for you, or if you have an X-H2 but want a smaller and cheaper second body, the X-S20 will be the one to consider.

What will separate the X-S20 from the X-S10? Megapixels. Autofocus. Improved IBIS algorithm. Nostalgic Neg. 6K video. I don’t expect the new version to be head-and-shoulders better, but an improvement nonetheless, but with some give-and-take, so an argument could be made that the X-S10 is actually “better” (subjectively, of course), just like the X-T4 might be considered better than the X-T5 by some.

I do wonder if Fujifilm has intentions of introducing a mid-level PASM model. The X-H2/X-H2S cameras are “flagship” cameras that are true “hybrid” models (excellent for both stills and video), but unfortunately those are PASM models, which means long-time Fujifilm photographers were left out in the cold—the X-T4 and X-H1 are the only “flagship hybrid” cameras for you to choose from (yes, an argument could be made for the X-T5, but it is clear Fujifilm intends it for those who primarily are still photographers, not videographers). The X-S10 and X-S20 are entry-level (as in the new entry-level, which used to be mid-level). What’s in-between the high-end X-H2 and the low-end X-S20? For the PASM shooter, nothing. I’m not certain if something is needed, but I wouldn’t be surprised if Fujifilm is exploring that possibility, or even in the process of creating it.

I don’t think, in the current market, that it makes sense to have three entry-level models. That means either the X-E line or X-T00 line is likely on the way out. The X-T00 has historically been more popular, but the X-E line is beloved, and the X-E4 has been especially successful. I’m not sure what might get the ax or when, but it’s possible that the X-T30 II or X-E4 was the last in their respective series. Or maybe the X-T40 (or X-T50… they might skip using four because it is an unlucky number in Japan) or X-E5 will be the last. I hope I’m wrong about this, and both lines continue for years to come, but I don’t think that will be the case.

I’m disappointed that the X-S20 is the next camera to be announced. Six out of the last nine Fujifilm cameras will have been PASM models—X-S10, GFX100S, GFX50S II, X-H2S, X-H2, and X-S20—while one of the three non-PASM models—X-T30 II—wasn’t much more than a firmware update (so essentially 3/4 of Fujifilm’s latest releases have been PASM). I think it’s clear that Fujifilm is more interested in becoming a part of Canikony (Canikonyfilm?), which they see as their future growth potential, than to embrace and better communicate what makes them unique (and why that uniqueness is desirable). Shame. But, at the same time, the X-S line was due for an update, so I’m not too surprised that this is their next model. Still, I think with the current demand for the X100V, which Fujifilm cannot keep up with due to parts shortages, that they would expedite the X100Z (or whatever it will be called). To me, that would have made more sense.

This post contains affiliate links, and if you make a purchase using my links I’ll be compensated a small amount for it.

Fujifilm X-S10:  Amazon  B&H  Moment

Evergreen 35mm Film Canister Case

I used to shoot a lot of film. When I finally discovered the joy of Fujifilm cameras, with their incredible JPEG output, I practically stopped using analog cameras—not entirely, mind you, but almost. It was 25 years ago this upcoming fall (I cannot believe I’m that old…) that I began shooting film, yet I never once figured out a good storage system for my film canisters.

At the pinnacle of my analog adventures, you’d find a half-dozen or so unused film canisters in the refrigerator, another handful in the fridge exposed and waiting development, and another handful stuffed into various pockets of my camera bag, waiting for their chance in the camera. I wasn’t nearly prolific enough to have hundreds of rolls of film in the refrigerator or freezer, but I was a regular at my local lab, buying more film once every week or two. Despite all of the film coming and going for years, not once did I ever have a good system for it. My wife once complained about all of the film in the fridge because it was in the way of the food.

The good folks at Evergreen Cases, who happen to be big fans of Fujifilm cameras and Film Simulation Recipes, sent me a Seahorse X Waterproof 35mm Film Canister Case (with the Fuji X Weekly logo printed on it!). Where was this 25 years ago? If I had had two of these cases, my film could have been a lot more organized. I would have had one case for the refrigerator, where film-in-waiting (either to be exposed or developed) would be stored, and a case in my bag, for the film waiting for its turn in the camera. Now that I shoot a lot less film, one case is enough for me. Film is extremely expensive nowadays, so I’m glad that I use Fujifilm cameras for the vast majority of my photography.

This article doesn’t have much to do with the usual topics of this website, so—to bring it back home real quick—let me tell you a little about the two photographs above, which (admittedly) are nothing special. I used my Fujifilm X-T5 with the Kodak Portra 400 v2 Film Simulation Recipe to capture them. With Fujifilm cameras and recipes, I’m able to quickly and easily snap pictures that are ready to share—whether on social media or this website or with friends and family—the moment that they’re captured. No waiting for the lab. No sitting in front of a computer fiddling with files. Eliminating that second step is revolutionary—at least that’s what Ansel Adams said.

Superia Xtra 400 — Fujifilm X-T5 (X-Trans V) Film Simulation Recipe

Red & Green Bush – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5 – “Superia Xtra 400”

This is a simple update to the Superia Xtra 400 Film Simulation Recipe, which was originally made for X-Trans IV cameras. I discovered that a slight tweak is needed for X-Trans V models, because the new sensor renders blues just a little deeper on some film simulations, including Classic Negative. For this recipe, simply setting Color Chrome FX Blue from Strong to Weak makes it compatible with (as of this writing) the Fujifilm X-T5, X-H2, and X-H2S.

Thomas Schwab created the Superia Xtra 400 recipe by capturing a roll of actual Superia Xtra 400 film while also capturing identical exposures with his Fujifilm cameras, then, using X RAW Studio, he worked on the settings until he found a match. As you can imagine, he put a lot of time and effort into creating it! He shared with me some of his side-by-side pictures—comparing the film with his recipe—and it was tough to figure out which was which—they looked so close! Also, just recently another photographer shot a roll of Superia Xtra 400 film and used the Superia Xtra 400 recipe on his Fujifilm camera, and he shared with me the similar results he got between the two. Amazing! Of course, with film, so much depends on how it’s shot, developed, and scanned or printed, and the aesthetic of one emulsion can vary significantly.

Lemon Bowl – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5 – “Superia Xtra 400”

Fujifilm introduced Superia Xtra 400, a consumer-grade color negative film, in 1998, replacing Super G Plus 400. This film has been updated a couple of times, first in 2003 and again in 2006. It’s been widely used, thanks to its low cost and versatility. I’ve shot several rolls of this film over the years. This recipe is for Fujifilm X-Trans V cameras. Those with newer GFX models can use it, too, although it will likely render slightly differently.

Film Simulation: Classic Negative
Grain Effect: Strong, Small
Color Chrome Effect: Off
Color Chrome FX Blue: Weak
White Balance: Auto, +3 Red & -5 Blue
Dynamic Range: DR400
Highlight: 0
Shadow: -1
Color: +4
Sharpness: -1

High ISO NR: -4
Clarity: -2
ISO: Auto, up to ISO 6400
Exposure Compensation: 0 to +1 (typically)

Example photographs, all camera-made JPEGs using this “Superia Xtra 400” Film Simulation Recipe on my Fujifilm X-T5:

Forwards or Backwards – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Standing Tall – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Hiding Saguaro – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Don’t Touch – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Neighborhood Fog – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Dark Desert – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Misty Desert – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Clearing Clouds & Desert Mountain – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Ground Fall – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Wet Blossom – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Wet Rosebud – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Early Morning Lamp – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Night Blossoms – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Western Boots – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5

See also:
Fujifilm X-Trans V Film Simulation Recipes
Fujifilm X-Trans IV Film Simulation Recipes

This post contains affiliate links, and if you make a purchase using my links I’ll be compensated a small amount for it.

Fujifilm X-T5 in black:  Amazon  B&H
Fujifilm X-T5 in silver:  Amazon  B&H

Find this Film Simulation Recipe and over 250 more on the Fuji X Weekly — Film Recipes App!

Help Fuji X Weekly

Nobody pays me to write the content found on fujixweekly.com. There’s a real cost to operating and maintaining this site, not to mention all the time that I pour into it. If you appreciated this article, please consider making a one-time gift contribution. Thank you!

$2.00

Timeless Negative — Fujifilm X-T5 (X-Trans V) Film Simulation Recipe

Soft Rose – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5 – “Timeless Negative”

On February 3, 2021, Fujifilm shared the very first Nostalgic Neg. Film Simulation Recipe. As part of their promotion for the GFX100S, which was the first camera to have the new Nostalgic Neg. film sim, Fujifilm Japan shared a YouTube video, and hidden within was a recipe put together by the creators of Nostalgic Neg. “Nostalgic Negative is tuned for the best allrounder settings, but if you want to tweak it to get that classic American New Color look from the ’70’s, there are some adjustments you should make.” Fujifilm recommended, when using the Nostalgic Neg. film simulation, to set everything to 0, Off, or Auto, except for three things: shift Auto White Balance to +2 Red & -3 Blue, adjust Shadow to -2, and reduce Color to -2. Additional to that, I recommend using -4 High ISO NR.

I’m not a huge fan of Nostalgic Neg. set to factory defaults. It’s not bad, but it’s not what it purports to be, which is a vintage 1970’s aesthetic inspired by Eggleston, Shore, Sternfeld, and Misrach. I think Fujifilm should have had the courage to make their recipe the default, and not worry so much that it wasn’t the “best allrounder” film simulation. Fujifilm’s suggested adjustments do improve Nostalgic Neg. and bring it closer to a ’70’s vibe, but I felt I could improve it just a little more. Of course, that’s all subjective, and you might prefer factory default Nostalgic Neg., or Fujifilm’s recommended recipe, or something different altogether—in other words, when I say that this is “improved” it’s perfectly alright to disagree with that assessment, but hopefully many of you will agree that this is indeed better—at least a little, as my adjustments to Fujifilm’s recipe are pretty subtle. This particular recipe seems to be especially versatile, and can be used for many different genres of photography and in various light conditions—it looks good most anytime of the day or night.

Evening Bougainvillea – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5 – “Timeless Negative”

This Timeless Negative Film Simulation Recipe is only compatible with (as of this writing) the Fujifilm X-T5, X-H2, and X-H2S. I assume that the GFX100S and GFX50S II can also use this recipe, but that it will render slightly different—I don’t have either of those cameras to test it to know for certain. Unless Fujifilm gives X-Trans IV cameras the Nostalgic Neg. film simulation, which I doubt they will do, this recipe is only for X-Trans V cameras, and maybe the latest GFX, too; however, Nostalgic Neg. isn’t too dissimilar from Eterna, so perhaps consider the Arizona Analog, SantaColor, Eterna V2, and Polaroid recipes as potential alternatives for those with X-Trans IV models.

Film Simulation: Nostalgic Neg.
Grain Effect: Weak, Small
Color Chrome Effect: Strong
Color Chrome FX Blue: Off
White Balance: Auto, +2 Red & -3 Blue
Dynamic Range: DR400
Highlight: +2
Shadow: -2
Color: -3
Sharpness: 0

High ISO NR: -4
Clarity: -2
ISO: Auto, up to ISO 6400
Exposure Compensation: -2/3 to +1/3 (typically)

Example photographs, all camera-made JPEGs using this “Timeless Negative” Film Simulation Recipe on my Fujifilm X-T5:

Dark Coffee – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Night Train – Williams, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Color Behind Frosted Glass – Williams, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Hot Hot Hot – Williams, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Sleigh Bell – Williams, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Round Trip Ticket – Williams, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Dusk Train – Williams, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Keep Off – Williams, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Please… Use RitchieCam – Williams, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Barricades – Williams, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
ATSF Caboose – Williams, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Route 66 Gift Shop – Williams, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Car Above, Coke Below – Williams, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
UnAmerican Experience – Williams, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Stop Route 66 – Williams, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Los Angeles, 1978 – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Looney Tune – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Backyard Trumpet Blossoms – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5

Comparison

Factory default Nostalgic Neg., except High ISO NR set to -4.
Nostalgic Neg. with Fujifilm’s suggested adjustments.
This new Timeless Negative Film Simulation Recipe.

This post contains affiliate links, and if you make a purchase using my links I’ll be compensated a small amount for it.

Fujifilm X-T5 in black:  Amazon  B&H
Fujifilm X-T5 in silver:  Amazon  B&H

Find this Film Simulation Recipe and over 250 more on the Fuji X Weekly — Film Recipes App!

Help Fuji X Weekly

Nobody pays me to write the content found on fujixweekly.com. There’s a real cost to operating and maintaining this site, not to mention all the time that I pour into it. If you appreciated this article, please consider making a one-time gift contribution. Thank you!

$2.00

I Have A Fujifilm X-T5!

Wow! It’s been crazy the last several days. Fujifilm released the X-T5 on the 17th. Not everyone got their orders.

Let’s back this up. Amazon apparently listed the X-T5 too early on announcement day. By contract, everyone is supposed to go live no earlier than a certain time, but Amazon jumped the gun. I preordered an X-T5 on Amazon because I had reward points that I wanted to use. When the 17th came around, some people received their preorders that day. For others it shipped that day, and arrived in the next day or two. For me? Nothing. Those who ordered on Amazon were left in the dark. What I didn’t know is that Fujifilm decided to punish Amazon for their sins and not give them any cameras to sell; sadly, only Fujifilm photographers who ordered through Amazon were actually punished. Is it Amazon’s fault? Yes. Is it Fujifilm’s fault? Sure—they could have done something else to teach Amazon a lesson, while still allowing people to receive the cameras they ordered. Is it my fault? No. Is it your fault? No. But you and I didn’t get our gear when others did. I know this is a first-world problem, and in the grand scheme of things it doesn’t matter, but it is something that many people have experienced.

Amazon is a huge company, and Fujifilm sales are a tiny drop in a massive bucket. If Fujifilm stopped selling to Amazon altogether, it wouldn’t hurt Amazon in any way, shape, or form. I get that Fujifilm has to hold them accountable. I get that it wasn’t fair to their other retail customers. But let’s be real: crap rolls down hill. Who ended up with the crap? Me. You, if you, too, ordered through Amazon. Fujifilm’s customers are who got punished, not Amazon. I’m sure Amazon gave two seconds to this situation, and hasn’t cared one iota since. When they get their cameras, they’ll sell every single copy, and it will have such a small impact on the bottom line that you need a powerful magnifying glass just to see it. Those trying to be patient with their Amazon preorders might have to be extremely patient—I’ve heard that it might be sometime in January before orders are shipped. I don’t know that for a fact, but it’s what I have heard, and it may or may not be true—I hope it isn’t true.

So how did I get my X-T5? I called around to local camera stores, and I found one in stock. Luckily, Foto Forum in Phoenix had a body-only copy, plus one bundled with the 18-55mm f/2.8-f/4 kit zoom. I purchased the one with the lens. If you are still waiting for yours to ship, maybe call around to local camera stores to see if they still have an X-T5 in stock, and if so purchase from them instead.

That’s my story. What about you? Did you buy a Fujifilm X-T5? Did it arrive or are you still waiting?

People have already begun asking me for my impressions on this camera. I think a number of you are waiting to learn a little more about it before spending so much money. It’s way too soon to provide you with anything valuable. I’ll tell you my way-too-soon initial impressions, but please take them with a large grain of salt. I’ve only barely begun to use the camera and really haven’t had a chance to properly test it. I’ll give a full review later.

First, let’s talk about megapixels. Do you need 40? If you crop deeply, print posters, or just love to pixel-peep, then maybe. But if you don’t crop deeply, don’t print posters, or don’t pixel-peep, then you definitely don’t need 40mp—it’s way overkill. Fortunately, it doesn’t seem to negatively affect the speed of the camera or even the file transfer speed when using the Fujifilm Cam Remote app. Unfortunately, it does take up more space on the SD Card, phone/computer, and storage, and uploads to my cloud storage are noticeably slower. There’s pluses and minuses to 40mp; I don’t anticipate the pluses coming in handy for me very often. For some of you, though, it is an important upgrade.

I haven’t put the autofocus improvements to the test whatsoever, but through three days of shooting, I haven’t noticed it being any more snappy than my X-E4. The only thing I noticed is that face detection locked onto a face that was far away, which I wouldn’t expect to happen on my X-E4. Since I wasn’t trying to photograph the person, it actually wasn’t a positive thing, but I can see this being an improvement. I haven’t even attempted continuous tracking or anything like that yet, so I can’t speak of it.

I was really excited for HEIF, but discovered that it disables Clarity. That’s disappointing. No HEIF for me, since I use Clarity a lot. Speaking of Clarity, I was also very disappointed that it isn’t any faster on the X-T5, and the Storing pause is identical to X-Trans IV. Fujifilm should have spent some time speeding this up, in my opinion. Oh, and somehow I keep bumping the drive switch, and accidentally switching to CL or HDR, both of which disable Clarity—I’ll have to figure out how to not bump that switch.

While the X-T5 is smaller than the X-T4, and just a little bigger than the X-T1 and X-T30, it is definitely heavy. Seems like a similar weight to the X-T4—not sure if it is or isn’t, but it’s hefty. I personally prefer the weight of the X-T1 or X-T30, but if you use large lenses a lot, you might appreciate the solid base of the X-T5.

The reason that I purchased the Fujifilm X-T5 is because this camera has the new Nostalgic Neg. film simulation. What do I think of it so far? If Eterna and Classic Chrome had a baby, it would be Nostalgic Negative. It has some similarities to both of those film simulations, with soft gradations in the shadows similar to Eterna and with some Eterna-like colors (particularly the warm colors), and with contrast, saturation, and an overall palette more similar to Classic Chrome. I’m not a huge fan of default straight-out-of-the-box Nostalgic Neg.—I was actually initially disappointed—but with some adjustments it can become magical. I love it! Nostalgic Neg. is another analog-esque film sim from Fujifilm that’s sure to become a classic. Expect some recipes soon!

I don’t have any other observations yet. I hope to do some more serious experimentations soon, and when I do I’ll share those impressions with you. In the meantime, here are some straight-out-of-camera Nostalgic Neg. pictures that I captured with my Fujifilm X-T5:

Two Ducks – Lynx Lake, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
311 – Lynx Lake, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Caution: Nature – Lynx Lake, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Believer – Lynx Lake, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Cat Clock – Prescott, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Dusk Blazer – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Spiderweb Rocks – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Don’t Shoot – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Warning – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Golden Light Chair – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Red & Gold – Prescott, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Going Out of Business – Prescott, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Hyundai – Prescott, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Short Train – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Around the Bend – Arlington, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Lakeview – Lynx Lake, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Log on the Lake – Lynx Lake, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Private Dock – Lynx Lake, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Can’t See the Forest – Lynx Lake, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Irrigation Mist – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5

This post contains affiliate links, and if you make a purchase using my links I’ll be compensated a small amount for it.

Fujifilm X-T5 in black:  Amazon  B&H
Fujifilm X-T5 in silver:  Amazon  B&H

Fujifilm X-T1 Short-Term Project, Update 3

Desert Sunset – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T1 – “Ektachrome 100SW” – Day 14

Part 1 Part 2

This is the third and final installment of this series. As a reminder, I photographed only with my Fujifilm X-T1 from the announcement day of the Fujifilm X-T5 (November 2) until the release date (November 17). Why? First, even though the Fujifilm X-T1 is eight-years-old (and approaching nine), it is still such a great little camera. It took three years for Fujifilm to bring this model to the market because they wanted to get it right, and it was one of their most important cameras ever released. The Fujifilm X-T1 was one of the first, if not the first, Fujifilm cameras that widely appealed to professional photographers. It was Fujifilm’s most successful model at the time—outselling all the previous cameras—and launched the extremely successful X-T line. The X-T5 is the latest iteration. This project was intended to give me a better understanding of how the X-T5 has evolved from the original model. It also allowed me to demonstrate that previous models, including the original X-T1, are still really good.

I wanted to try some things with the X-T1 that I wasn’t able to do in the first 10 days, including wildlife and low-light. I had been sick, which made this a much more difficult project than I had anticipated, so I tried to make the most of the last five days. In the end I didn’t do everything that I wanted, but I was able to do a lot, and I’m happy with how it all came together.

I was really impressed with the Fujifilm X-T1—even in 2022, it is an excellent body that’s quite capable of capturing beautiful photographs. I thoroughly enjoyed shooting with it, more than I thought I would. The only shortcoming that I encountered was in dim light, the autofocus tended to hunt. This didn’t prevent me from getting the pictures, but it did make me work a little harder to do it. Otherwise, the camera performed exceptionally well in a whole host of situations. If you have one, it’s definitely a keeper. If you are in the market for a used Fujifilm model, this is one that I have no problems recommending. Is the X-T5 better? Sure. Is the X-T4 better? Yeah. Is the X-T3 better? Affirmative. Is the X-T2 better? I’m certain that it is. But, the X-T1 is still really good, and the newer iterations aren’t miles ahead—each new model is marginally better than the previous, which means that the latest is only four small steps ahead; ahead indeed, but the ol’ X-T1 holds its own surprisingly well.

I hope that you enjoyed this short-term project as much as I did!

Day 11

Curling Leaves – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T1 – “Classic Kodak Chrome
Leaf Abstract – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T1 – “Color Negative Film
Monochromatic Leaf – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T1 – “Monochrome
Hanging Leaves – Buckeye. AZ – Fujifilm X-T1 – “Classic Kodak Chrome”

Day 12

Ka-Chow – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T1 – “Classic Kodak Chrome”
American 4×4 – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T1 – “Classic Kodak Chrome”
Bougainvillea Bunch – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T1 – “Classic Kodak Chrome”
Bougainvillea Palm – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T1 – “Classic Kodak Chrome”
Work Ahead – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T1 – “Classic Kodak Chrome”
Fallen Flags – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T1 – “Classic Kodak Chrome”
Fallen Signs – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T1 – “Classic Kodak Chrome”
It Better Not Flood – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T1 – “Classic Kodak Chrome”
Big Yellow Cat – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T1 – “Classic Kodak Chrome”
168 – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T1 – “Classic Kodak Chrome”
Golden Saguaro – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T1 – “Classic Kodak Chrome”
Bird Home – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T1 – “Classic Kodak Chrome”

Day 13

Evening Light Saguaro – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T1 – “Classic Kodak Chrome”
Desert Peak – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T1 – “Classic Kodak Chrome”
Bougainvillea Over Wall – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T1 – “Classic Kodak Chrome”
Twin Bulbs Hanging – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T1 – “Classic Kodak Chrome”
Pigeon Tiles – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T1 – “Classic Kodak Chrome”
Bird in a Tree – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T1 – “Kodak Portra 160”
Little Birdie – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T1 – “Kodak Portra 160”
Curious Birdie Hiding – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T1 – “Kodak Portra 160”
Vulture – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T1 – “Kodak Portra 160”

Day 14

Sunset Over a Desert Ridge – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T1 – “Ektachrome 100SW”
Purple Mountains – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T1 – “Classic Kodak Chrome”
Last Light on Desert Mountain – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T1 – “Classic Kodak Chrome”
It’s a Bird, It’s a Plane, It’s a… B2 – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T1 – “Classic Kodak Chrome”
Evening Light on a Desert Hill – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T1 – “Classic Kodak Chrome”
Deflating Rainbow – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T1 – “Classic Kodak Chrome”
Deflating Balloon – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T1 – “Classic Kodak Chrome”
Perched at the Top – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T1 – Buckeye, AZ – “Classic Kodak Chrome”
Waiting to Hum – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T1 – Classic Kodak Chrome”

Day 15

Carts – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T1 – “Monochrome”
Red, White, Blue – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T1 – “Classic Kodak Chrome”
CVS – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T1 – “Classic Kodak Chrome”
Lightning Rod Bird – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T1 – “Classic Kodak Chrome”
November Palm – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T1 – “Classic Kodak Chrome”
Waiting is the Hardest Part – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T1 – “Kodak Portra 160”
Urban Bloom – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T1 – “Kodak Portra 160”
Blossoms in the City – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T1 – “Classic Kodak Chrome”

Day 16

Bolsey – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T1 – “Classic Kodak Chrome”
X100V – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T1 – “Classic Kodak Chrome”
Piano Hands 1 – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T1 – “Monochrome”
Piano Hands 2 – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T1 – “Monochrome”
Singing – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T1 – “Monochrome”

Which Film Simulation Recipes, When? — Part III (X-Trans III)

Urban Palm Leaves – Sun City West, AZ – Fujifilm X-H1 – “Everyday Astia”

Part 1Part 2Part 4

When should you use which Film Simulation Recipes on your Fujifilm X-Trans III camera? With so many recipes to choose from, it can be difficult to know what recipe you should select in a given situation, and this article is intended to help you with that. If you haven’t read Part 1, it’s important to do so because it explains what exactly we’re doing—the backstory—which is important to understand. There’s a video to watch in that article, too. Take a moment right now to hop on over to Part 1 (click here) before continuing on with this post, if you haven’t viewed it already. Also, check out Part 2 (click here) if you missed that.

Like Part 2, I set out to recommend seven recipes, one for each C1-C7 Custom Preset, that don’t share the same white balance type, because X-Trans III cameras—X-Pro2, X100F, X-E3, X-T2, X-T20 & X-H1—cannot remember a White Balance Shift within the C1-C7 Custom Presets. If two recipes share the same white balance type but not the same shift, then when you switch presets you must remember to adjust the shift, too. That can be inconvenient and frustrating, so my best solution is to program recipes that use different white balance types and/or share the same white balance type and shift. The user experience is much improved, but you might not be able to program all of your favorite recipe at the same time, which is the one downside to doing this. It was a difficult task, but I think I came up with a good set for you.

If you have a Fujifilm X-T3 or X-T30, you can use these recipes, too, by simply setting Color Chrome Effect to Off. Also, if you have a newer X-Trans IV camera (or X-Trans V), you can use these recipes by additionally setting Color Chrome FX Blue to Off, Clarity to 0, and choosing a Grain size (either Small or Large). 

C1 — Improved Velvia — Golden Hour

Lava Pond – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-H1 – “Improved Velvia”

For sunrise or sunset photography, this “Improved Velvia” Film Simulation Recipe is one of your best bets! It’s great anytime of the day or night when you need vibrant colors, so it has a lot of versatility, but it is especially nice during “golden hour” when the sun is low to the horizon. This recipe uses the Auto white balance type; if I wasn’t concerned about white balance type, I’d probably still choose this recipe.

Alternatives for “golden hour” photography:

Velvia
Kodak Ektachrome 100SW
Kodak Portra 400
Kodak Ektar 100

C2 — Kodak Gold 200 — Midday

Pear Blossom Day – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 – “Kodak Gold 200”

“Midday” is simply daylight conditions outside of when the sun is low to the horizon, and for this category I’m recommending Kodak Gold 200. Even though this is a recipe for the X-T3/X-T30, it is fully compatible with X-Trans III cameras. It’s great for sunny conditions—midday or otherwise—and is good for landscapes and portraits. If you have this programmed into your camera, you’re going to use it a lot, perhaps more than any of the others. It uses the Daylight white balance type; if I wasn’t concerned about white balance type, I’d still choose this one, although each in the alternatives list are excellent options, too.

Alternatives for “midday” photography:

Kodachrome II
Dramatic Classic Chrome
Everyday Astia

Kodak Ultramax

C3 — Ektachrome E100GX — Overcast

Pink Rose Blossom – Ogden, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 – “Ektachrome E100GX”

If it’s a rainy, overcast day, the Ektachrome E100GX is an excellent Film Simulation Recipe to try. It’s also great for many daylight situations, so it offers good versatility. This recipe uses the Fluorescent 2 white balance type; if I wasn’t concerned about white balance type I would choose Fujicolor Superia 800 instead, but this is a close second-best, and I feel good about recommending it anyway.

Alternatives for “overcast” photography:

Fujicolor Superia 800
Fujicolor Pro 160NS

PRO Neg. Hi
Kodak GT 800-5

C4 — Color Negative — Indoor

Cameras and Coffee – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 – “Color Negative”

For natural light indoor photography, I recommend the Color Negative Film Simulation Recipe, which is another one that’s intended for the X-T3/X-T30, but is fully compatible with X-Trans III cameras. It uses the Fluorescent 1 white balance type; if I wasn’t concerned about white balance type I would choose Agfa Optima 200 instead, but this is still a solid option.

Alternatives for “indoor” photography:

Agfa Optima 200
Fujicolor Pro 400H
“Eterna”
Eterna

C5 — Fujicolor NPL 160 Tungsten — Nighttime

Dusk Lamps – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-H1 – “Fujicolor NPL 160 Tungsten”

For nighttime or indoor artificial light situations, try the Fujicolor NPL 160 Tungsten Film Simulation Recipe. It does especially well for “blue hour” photography at dusk or dawn, when the sun is below the horizon. This recipe uses the Fluorescent 3 white balance type; if I wasn’t concerned about white balance type, I would choose CineStill 800T instead, but this is a good second-best.

Alternatives for “nighttime” photography:

CineStill 800T
Classic Chrome
Melancholy Blue
Cine Teal

C6 — Xpro — Alternative Process

Suburban Abstract – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-H1 – “Xpro”

There aren’t very many options for this category, but the Xpro recipe is an excellent recipe, producing a cross-process aesthetic. It uses the Kelvin white balance type; if I wasn’t concerned about white balance type, I would probably choose the Cross Process recipe instead, but this is quite similar, so you can’t go wrong either way.

Alternatives for “alternative process” photography:

Cross Process
Vintage Kodachrome
Vintage Kodacolor
Vintage Agfacolor

C7 — Analog Monochrome — B&W

Doll – Bountiful, UT – Fujifilm X-H1 – “Analog Monochrome”

Last but certainly not least is black-and-white, and for that I recommend the Analog Monochrome Film Simulation Recipe. This recipe is really good for most situations. It uses the Incandescent white balance type; if I wasn’t concerned about white balance type, I would be happy with this recipe or any in the alternatives list below, which are all good.

Alternatives for “B&W” photography:

Acros
Agfa Scala
Ilford HP5 Plus
Kodak Tri-X Push Process

Part 4

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I Paid $1,700 for a Film Simulation?!?

I mentioned before that the main reason I’m buying the new Fujifilm X-T5 is for the Nostalgic Negative film simulation. That’s crazy, right? $1,700 is way too much money to spend on a new film simulation, isn’t it? Am I crazy or just plain stupid?

The Nostalgic Negative film simulation hasn’t received the fanfare of Classic Chrome or especially Classic Negative. Not even as much as Acros or Eterna. Maybe about as much as Eterna Bleach Bypass. Maybe. I think it’s because of poor marketing strategies by Fujifilm.

Nostalgic Negative was introduced by Fujifilm about a year-and-a-half ago on the GFX100S. I know that some people use film simulations and shoot straight-out-of-camera on GFX, but it is a much smaller percentage, I think, than the X system. I don’t know the numbers, but (just throwing something out there) if 20% of Fujifilm X owners use Film Simulation Recipes, the number of GFX owners is maybe 5%. So Nostalgic Negative is something that, for the most part, GFX owners don’t even care about. Besides, I’m pretty sure that GFX models sell a lot fewer copies than X series cameras, so the number of people actually using this film simulation on a GFX100S is pretty small. The next camera to get Nostalgic Negative was the GFX 50S II—kind of the same story. The first X camera to get Nostalgic Negative was the X-H2S, followed very quickly by the X-H2. Interestingly, this film simulation isn’t found anywhere in the promotional material for those two cameras. Yes, they have Nostalgic Negative, but it’s clear that Fujifilm didn’t think it would be a selling point for those two models. That makes sense, since these two “flagship” cameras aren’t intended for or marketed to long-time Fujifilm photographers, but for those with other camera systems (Canikony) looking to make a change. I suspect that many of those buying the X-H2S and X-H2 are generally less aware of, and less open to using, film simulations and recipes and such.

That brings us to the Fujifilm X-T5, the first X series camera where Fujifilm is actually promoting the Nostalgic Negative film simulation… barely. It’s mentioned in the promotional material, but without much fanfare, and not stated as a new feature, or with a good explanation of what it’s intended to resemble and what makes it special.

According to Fujifilm, the Nostalgic Negative film simulation is based on “American New Color” photography of the 1970’s. They studied photographs by William Eggleston, Stephen Shore, Joel Sternfeld and Richard Misrach in order to create it. Eggleston and Sternfeld largely shot on Kodachrome—II and X in the early 1970’s, 25 and 64 in the late ’70’s—while Shore shot mostly Kodacolor, and Misrach shot a lot of Vericolor. All of those are Kodak emulsions, but with different aesthetics. These four photographers had different styles and different darkroom processes, and they each had a unique look; the commonality that Fujifilm found was an “overall atmosphere based on amber.” That’s a basic explanation of what Nostalgic Negative is. While not mentioned by Fujifilm, I think this film simulation might be closer to aesthetic of Saul Leiter than the ones Fujifilm stated they studied. Saul Leiter used a whole bunch of different films over the years, including Kodachrome and Anscochrome, but apparently he didn’t mind using generic drug store brands, either. Nostalgic Negative is a divergent approach for Fujifilm, I think, in that it isn’t intended to mimic a certain emulsion (or the “memory color” of a specific film stock), but instead tries to mimic the “memory color” of a certain decade (the 1970’s), or perhaps elicit a nostalgic emotional response.

The Fujifilm X-T5 is the cheapest camera with Nostalgic Negative. It’s the 5th camera to get it, and at $1,700, it’s somehow the cheapest! I don’t think this film simulation will really “catch on” until it’s available on a more affordable body. And this is where I think Fujifilm goofed. If they had introduced Nostalgic Negative on the X-T5, and followed it up with an X-T40, X-S20, X100VI (or whatever it will be called), X-Pro4, and X-E5 in the coming couple of years, it would be a selling point. People would be super-excited about it right now. But because Fujifilm first put it on four models that are expensive and where the users aren’t as eager about film simulations, it lost a lot of its luster. Nobody’s really talking about Nostalgic Negative anymore. While I don’t think I’ll appreciate this film simulation as much as Classic Negative, Classic Chrome, Eterna, or Acros, I do believe it has the potential for some very interesting recipes. I look forward to trying it. Heck, I’m spending $1,700 just for Nostalgic Negative—that’s crazy! Or dumb. It could go either way.

What about you? Are you excited for Nostalgic Negative? How much would you spend for it? If Fujifilm offered it as a paid firmware update for your X-Trans IV camera, would you buy it? Let me know in the comments!

This post contains affiliate links, and if you make a purchase using my links I’ll be compensated a small amount for it.

Preorder your Fujifilm X-T5 in black:  Amazon  B&H
Preorder your Fujifilm X-T5 in silver:  Amazon  B&H

Interestingly, as a side note, if you look closely at the promotional statement by Fujifilm about film simulations on the X-T5, you’ll see this statement: “Reproduce the classic colors and tones that Fujifilm are known for, or add an artistic flair and start to Build Your Legacy.” First, I could be wrong, but I’m pretty sure it should be “is” and not “are”—after all, Fujifilm is known for reproducing classic colors and tones; for “are” to be correct, you’d need a conjunction, such as, “Reproduce the classic colors and tones that Fujifilm and Fuji X Weekly are known for….” Maybe they initially penciled that “and Fuji X Weekly” part in there, and erased it at the last minute, forgetting to change the “are” to “is” by accident. Second, Build Your Legacy seems to be Fujifilm’s new catchphrase for Film Simulation Recipes. It’s been a Fujifilm trademark for a few years, but I hadn’t seen it used in conjunction with film simulations. I wonder if Fujifilm has something up their sleeves that they’ll announce later. Perhaps it is even related to their upcoming app? I’m not sure, but it is definitely something to keep an eye on.

Fujifilm X-T1 Short-Term Project, Update 2

Blossomed Pink Rose – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T1 – “Classic Kodak Chrome” – Day 9

Part 1 Part 3

I had big plans for this project for these days, but life had other plans. Specifically, Covid. I know what you’re thinking: didn’t you just have the flu a few weeks ago? Yes, I did. Now I have Covid. Well, I’m almost recovered now, but I was very sick during the days that I captured these pictures, and I was limited to what I could capture in and around the house. Most of these photographs were taken in the backyard.

If you’re not sure what this short-term project is, the concept is simple: I’m photographing only with my Fujifilm X-T1 from the announcement day of the Fujifilm X-T5 (November 2) until the release date (November 17). Why? First, even though the Fujifilm X-T1 is eight-years-old (and approaching nine), it is still such a great little camera. It took three years for Fujifilm to bring this model to the market because they wanted to get it right, and it was one of their most important cameras ever released. The Fujifilm X-T1 was one of the first, if not the first, Fujifilm cameras that widely appealed to professional photographers. It was Fujifilm’s most successful model at the time—outselling all the previous cameras—and launched the extremely successful X-T line. The X-T5 is the latest iteration. This project will give me a better understanding of how the X-T5 has evolved from the original model. It also allows me to demonstrate that previous models, including the original X-T1, are still really good.

Hopefully, now that I’m not nearly so sick and my quarantine period has ended, I can do some of the photography that I was intending to do. I want to really see what the X-T1 is capable of, and with some luck I’ll be able to do that before this project comes to a close in the coming days. Once my X-T5 arrives in the mail, the X-T1 will be going back on the shelf, at least for a little while. I don’t expect the new camera to be wildly better than the first iteration, but soon enough I’ll know for sure just how much improved it is. And, of course, I’ll write all about it, so stay tuned!

Day 6

Bright Leaves – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T1 – “Fujichrome Slide
Trumpet Now & Trumpet Later – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T1 – “Classic Chrome
Triple Letter – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T1 – “Monochrome

Day 7

Flower Among Leaves – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T1 – “Classic Kodak Chrome
Spiderweb Rose – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T1 – “Classic Kodak Chrome”
Rosebud – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T1 – “Classic Kodak Chrome”

Day 8

Wet Tree Leaves – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T1 – “Classic Kodak Chrome”
Wet Blossom – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T1 – “Classic Kodak Chrome”
Water & Thorns – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T1 – “Classic Kodak Chrome”
Wet Rose – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T1 – “Classic Kodak Chrome”
Sadness – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T1 – “Monochrome”

Day 9

Bougainvillea Sage – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T1 – “Kodak Color Negative
Rays on Leaves – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T1 – “Kodak Color Negative”
Light Bulb Beams – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T1 – “Kodak Color Negative”
Garden Wall – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T1 – “Monochrome”

Day 10

Autumn Sky Blue – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T1 – “Classic Kodak Chrome”
The Colors of Fall – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T1 – “Classic Kodak Chrome”
The Beauty of Once Was – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T1 – “Classic Kodak Chrome”
Sage Bloom – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T1 – “Classic Kodak Chrome”
Warm Light Above a Wall – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T1 – “Classic Kodak Chrome”
Chalk – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T1 – “Classic Kodak Chrome”
Macro Rose – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T1 – “Classic Kodak Chrome”
Bougainvillea Red – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T1 – “Kodak Color Negative”

This post contains affiliate links, and if you make a purchase using my links I’ll be compensated a small amount for it.

Preorder your Fujifilm X-T5 in black:  Amazon  B&H
Preorder your Fujifilm X-T5 in silver:  Amazon  B&H

Fujifilm X-T1 Short-Term Project, Update 1

Tiny Purple Blossoms – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T1 – “Classic Kodak Chrome” – Day 5

In my article, Did I Buy the Fujifilm X-T5? Should You?, I mentioned that I began a new short-term photography project: photographing only with my Fujifilm X-T1 from the announcement of the Fujifilm X-T5, which was November 2, until the release date, which will be November 17. I’m not using any other camera during this 16 day period, only the X-T1.

Why am I doing this? First, even though the Fujifilm X-T1 is eight-years-old (and approaching nine), it is still such a great little camera. It took three years for Fujifilm to bring this model to the market because they wanted to get it right, and it was one of their most important cameras ever released. The Fujifilm X-T1 was one of the first, if not the first, Fujifilm cameras that widely appealed to professional photographers. It was Fujifilm’s most successful model at the time—outselling all the previous cameras—and launched the extremely successful X-T line. The X-T5 is the latest iteration. This project will give me a better understanding of how the X-T5 has evolved from the original model.

More importantly than any of that, the Fujifilm X-T1 was a good camera on the day it was released, and is still a good camera in 2022. There’s no reason that it cannot be used today. The image quality is excellent. The camera is pretty quick overall (look at the sports pictures!). It has one advantage over all other X-T cameras: 16mp. The files are smaller, which means I can capture more pictures on an SD card, it takes less time to transfer the pictures from the camera to my phone, the pictures take up less space on my phone, the pictures upload more quickly to my cloud storage, the pictures use less cloud data, and the pictures download from cloud storage more quickly. Less is more sometimes. I’ve really appreciated this quickness lately. The Fujifilm X-T1 is a camera that I’ve thoroughly enjoyed shooting with over the last week, and I think I’ll be a little sad when I put it back on the shelf after my X-T5 arrives in the mail.

Day 1

Birdcage on a Wall – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T1 – “Classic Kodak Chrome” – Day 1
A Pink Rose in the Garden – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T1 – “Classic Kodak Chrome”
Autumn Colors – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T1 – “Classic Kodak Chrome”

Day 2

Hummingbird Feeder Along a Wall – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T1 – “Classic Kodak Chrome”
Running on Air – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T1 – “Classic Kodak Chrome”
Inflatable Obstacle – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T1 – “Classic Kodak Chrome”
Duck and Run – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T1 – “Classic Kodak Chrome”
Obstacle Athlete – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T1 – “Classic Kodak Chrome”

Day 3

Morning Roofline – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T1 – “Classic Kodak Chrome”
Bougainvillea Bush – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T1 – “Classic Kodak Chrome”
Green Tree Leaves – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T1 – “Classic Kodak Chrome”

Day 4

An Arizona Autumn – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T1 – “Kodak Portra 160
Lots of Pink Blossoms – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T1 – “Kodak Portra 160”
Bent Do Not Enter Sign – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T1 – “Kodak Portra 160”
Tower – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T1 – “Kodak Portra 160”
Backyard QB – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T1 – “Kodak Portra 160”
Football Catcher – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T1 – “Kodak Portra 160”

Day 5

Cranes – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T1 – “Kodak Portra 160”
Monkeys on the Bars – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T1 – “Kodak Portra 160”
Flower Among Flowers – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T1 – “Kodak Portra 160”
Hidden Logs – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T1 – “Kodak Portra 160”
Bones – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T1 – “Kodak Portra 160”
Saguaro Skeleton – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T1 – “Monochrome
Dead Saguaro – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T1 – “Monochrome”

This post contains affiliate links, and if you make a purchase using my links I’ll be compensated a small amount for it.

Preorder your Fujifilm X-T5 in black:  Amazon  B&H
Preorder your Fujifilm X-T5 in silver:  Amazon  B&H

Part 2

Fujifilm X100V (X-Trans IV) Film Simulation Recipe: Fujichrome Provia 100F

Berry Behind the Baseball Diamond – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V – “Fujichrome Provia 100F”

This Film Simulation Recipe is called “Fujichrome Provia 100F” after the film that it is intended to mimic. Fujifilm introduced Provia 100, a color reversal film, in 1994, and replaced it with the much improved Provia 100F in 2001. I’ve only shot a couple of rolls of Provia 100F. I remember that it had a cool color cast (especially when compared to Kodak films), it had a fair amount of contrast, moderate saturation, and tended to render blues strongly. This recipe has been in the works for awhile, with a lot of failed attempts. I think it does pretty well at reproducing the aesthetic of the film, but there are definitely a few compromises—more of the “memory color” that Fujifilm talks about than perhaps a 100% accurate rendition. Still, I believe that it turned out pretty well overall.

You might be surprised that this recipe doesn’t use the Provia film simulation as its base, but instead uses Classic Chrome. The Provia film simulation doesn’t actually resemble very well the film that it was named after—Fujifilm used it more as a marketing name on the X series than anything else. Velvia was the Fuji slide film that I most often shot with, but Provia was probably their most popular because it wasn’t nearly as wild as Velvia, and produced more true-to-life (yet still fairly vibrant) colors.

Actual Fujicolor Provia 100F 35mm film. Chicago, 2005.

This Fujicolor Provia 100F Film Simulation Recipe has been a Patron Early-Access Recipe on the Fuji X Weekly App since January, but it has been replaced by a new Early-Access Recipe, so now it’s available to everyone. It’s compatible with the Fujifilm X-Pro3, X100V, X-T4, X-S10, X-E4, and X-T30 II cameras. It should be fully compatible with X-Trans V cameras, but I’ve yet to be able to test it to know if it renders the same or not. Those with newer GFX cameras can use this recipe, too, but it will render slightly different.

Classic Chrome
Dynamic Range: DR400
Highlight: -1
Shadow: +3
Color: +4
Noise Reduction: -4
Sharpening: -1
Clarity: -3
Grain Effect: Weak, Small
Color Chrome Effect: Strong
Color Chrome Effect Blue: Strong
White Balance: Daylight, -2 Red & +5 Blue
ISO: Auto, up to ISO 6400
Exposure Compensation: +1/3 to +1 (typically)

Example photographs captured using this “Fujichrome Provia 100F” film simulation recipe on my Fujifilm X100V and Fujifilm X-E4 cameras:

Mushos for 5$ – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4
Truck Dodging the Sunlight – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4
Sunlight Pouring on Leaves in Early Autumn – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4
Wasatch Front – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Blue Sky Reeds – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Branch Berries – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Baseball Sky – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Windsock – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Field 3 – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Skateboard & Runner – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Creek Under Branches – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Trail Through the Trees – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Fence Along Path – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Josh at the Court – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

Find this Film Simulation Recipe and over 250 more on the Fuji X Weekly — Film Recipes App!

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My Favorite Fujifilm Film Simulations (The 1,000th Post!!!)

I captured this yesterday with my Fujifilm X-E4 using an upcoming recipe.

This is the 1,000th post!

I started the Fuji X Weekly blog on August 21, 2017, with the intention of writing one article per week. Initial this was a long-term review (or journal, as I called it) of the Fujifilm X100F, but (obviously) it morphed into something much different than that. Life has a way of taking you down roads you wouldn’t have considered or even thought possible. Here we are, four years and ten months later, and this website doesn’t much resemble its origins.

Firstly, Fuji X Weekly is no longer about one camera, but about all Fujifilm cameras. Secondly, its focus is no longer mere journalling; instead, the primary purpose of this page is JPEG camera settings, called Film Simulation Recipes, that allow you to achieve straight-out-of-camera results that look good—you don’t have to edit if you don’t want to. And, of course, there’s the Fuji X Weekly App, so you can take these recipes with you on the go—almost 250 of them!

Also captured yesterday with my X-E4 using an upcoming recipe.

I wanted to do something special for this important 1,000th article. I knew that it needed to be related to film simulations and recipes somehow, but I wasn’t sure how exactly. Like the time I didn’t know why the ball kept getting bigger, then it hit me (sorry for the bad joke…)—I figured it out: for this article, I would rate my favorite film simulations—from most liked to least liked—and also share my favorite Film Simulation Recipes for each. The new Nostalgic Negative film simulation isn’t in this list because I’ve never used it, so I have no idea how I would rank it, but I do believe it’s one that I would particularly appreciate.

Without further ado, here are my favorite Fujifilm film simulations, plus my favorite Film Simulation Recipes for each!

#1 Acros

Motel – Panguitch, UT – Fujifilm X100V – “Kodak Tri-X 400”

Love at first sight!

When I tried the Acros film simulation on my Fujifilm X100F for the first time, I was blown away by it, as it produced the most film-like results I’d ever seen straight-out-of-camera. It was a big reason why I decided to stop shooting RAW and rely on camera-made JPEGs instead. I’m a sucker for black-and-white (probably because I shot a lot of it in my early film days), and the Acros film simulation produces incredibly lovely monochrome pictures. Acros is found on all X-Trans III, IV & V cameras, as well as GFX.

Favorite recipes:

Kodak Tri-X 400
Agfa Scala
Acros Push-Process

#2 Classic Negative

Classic Mirror – Fort Worth, TX – Fujifilm X-E4 – “Fujicolor Natura 1600”

Modeled carefully after Superia film, Classic Negative is the closest film simulation to replicating the aesthetic of actual color negative film (albeit, Fujicolor film, not Kodak). It is programmed uniquely and beautifully—there’s so much to love about it! For color photography, I could shoot exclusively with Classic Negative and be happy. Unfortunately, this film simulation is only found on the X-Pro3, X100V, X-T4, X-S10, X-E4, and X-T30 II cameras, as well as X-Trans V and GFX.

Favorite recipes:

Fujicolor Natura 1600
Fujicolor Superia 800
Xpro ’62

#3 Classic Chrome

Two Caballeros – Culleoka, TX – Fujifilm X-E4 – “Kodachrome 64”

Prior to the introduction of Classic Negative, Classic Chrome was my favorite color film simulation, with its distinctive Kodak color palette. While it’s third on this list for me, I bet that it’s number one for many of you, since the most popular Film Simulation Recipes are those that use it. Fujifilm introduced it in 2014 with the X30, and retroactively gave it to some of their prior X-Trans II cameras (although not all) via firmware updates. Most Fujifilm models have Classic Chrome, and all since 2014 do.

Favorite recipes:

Kodachrome 64
Kodak Portra 400 v2
Vintage Kodachrome

#4 Eterna

Sentinel & Merced – Yosemite NP, CA – Fujifilm X100V – “Vintage Color”

The Eterna film simulation has a uniquely soft tonality; while it can be somewhat mimicked with PRO Neg. Std, there’s nothing that can completely faithfully replicate it. Because its beauty is in its subtleness, it can be easily overlooked. Some might think it’s only for video (which it is good for, too), but it is great for still photography. It was introduced on the X-H1, but that’s the only X-Trans III camera with it; otherwise, Eterna can be found on X-Trans IV, V, and GFX.

Favorite recipes:

Vintage Color
Kodak Vision3 250D
Negative Print

#5 Monochrome

Haystack Driftwood – Cannon Beach, OR – Fujifilm X100V – “Ilford HP5 Plus 400”

While the Acros film simulation grabs the headlines, the Monochrome film simulation is itself a solid black-and-white option; however, because I liked Acros so much I basically ignored it for years, which is unfortunate. Monochrome has a different tonality than Acros and doesn’t have the built-in Grain, but it is still an excellent film simulation—one of the best, in fact. All Fujifilm cameras have the Monochrome film simulation.

Favorite recipes:

Ilford HP5 Plus 400
Ilford Pan F 50 Plus
Dramatic Monochrome

#6 Eterna Bleach Bypass

Low Sun over Tetons – Grand Teton NP, WY – Fujifilm X-E4 – “Ferrania Solaris FG 400“

This is Fujifilm’s latest film simulation (aside from Nostalgic Negative, which is currently only found on one GFX camera, but soon on X-Trans V), and it’s basically the Eterna film simulation but with lots more contrast and even more muted colors. Eterna Bleach Bypass can deliver stunning results that are definitely different than what’s possible with the other options. This film simulation is only found on the X-T4, X-S10, X-E4, X-T30 II, X-Trans V, and the newest GFX models.

Favorite recipes:

Ferrania Solaris FG 400
Lomochrome Metropolis
Ektachrome 320T

#7 PRO Neg. Std

Lakeside House & Road – Culleoka, TX – Fujifilm X-E4 – “Fujicolor Superia 800”

PRO Neg. Std used to be my third favorite film simulation, behind Acros and Classic Chrome. It has a subtle beauty with muted tones and contrast—similar to Eterna (although not quite as pronounced) but with more of a color negative feel than cinematic. Even though Fujifilm has introduced new film simulations that I like better, I still very much appreciate this one. Most Fujifilm models (with the exception of a few really old ones) have PRO Neg. Std.

Favorite recipes:

Fujicolor Superia 800
Fujicolor 100 Industrial
CineStill 800T

#8 Velvia

Hoodoos – Bryce Canyon NP, UT – Fujifilm X-E4 – “Vibrant Velvia”

Velvia 50 was my favorite color transparency film for landscape photography. While the Velvia film simulation isn’t a close approximation of that film straight out of the box, it can be made to look pretty similar with some adjustments. For vibrant landscapes, this is the film simulation to choose. Velvia can be found on all Fujifilm cameras.

Favorite recipes:

Vibrant Velvia
The Rockwell
Velvia v2

#9 PRO Neg. Hi

Wet Glass Bokeh – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 – “Jeff Davenport Night”

At this point we’ve moved into the film simulations that use far less frequently. PRO Neg. Hi is basically PRO Neg. Std but with more contrast and saturation. It’s not bad at all, and it used to be my go-to film simulation for portraits (which I think it’s particularly good for). Most Fujifilm models (with the exception of a few really old ones) have PRO Neg. Hi.

Favorite recipes:

Jeff Davenport Night
Fujicolor Pro 400H
PRO Neg. Hi

#10 Provia

Abandoned Ice Chest – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-Pro3 – “Standard Provia”

Fujifilm calls the Provia film simulation their “standard” profile, but I’ve never really liked it. Because of that, I usually only shoot with it when I force myself to do so, and sometimes some interesting things come from that. All Fujifilm cameras have the Provia film simulation.

Favorite recipes:

Standard Provia
Provia 400
Cross Process

#11 Astia

Wind from the West – Hammond, OR – Fujifilm X-E4 – “CineStill 50D”

The Astia film simulation is pretty close to PRO Neg. Hi in terms of contrast and saturation (although Astia is a bit more vibrant), but with a different tint that I think you either like or don’t like. I used to shoot with it a lot more more than I do now. It’s a good alternative for landscapes when Velvia is just too strong. Every Fujifilm camera has the Astia film simulation.

Favorite recipes:

CineStill 50D
Super HG Astia
Redscale

#12 Sepia

No Credit Tires – Bountiful, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 – “Sepia”

Last and least is Sepia, the often forgotten film simulation. For some reason every camera has it and almost nobody uses it.

Favorite recipes:

Sepia

It’s your turn! Which film simulation is your favorite? Which Film Simulation Recipe do you use most? What on this list was most surprising to you? Let me know in the comments!

Goodbye Utah, Hello Adventures!

Denny’s Days – Beaver, UT – Fujifilm X-E4 & Fujinon 27mm – “Kodachrome 64

Goodbye, Utah.

I’ve called Utah home for six years, but now it’s time to move on. It’s bitter-sweet, as I will certainly miss the unbelievable natural beauty of the state, but I’m excited for the new adventures that await. Utah is a great place to live—I feel very lucky to have called it home.

What you don’t know is that (quite literally) as soon as the last episode of SOOC ended, I began packing. And loading. And everything else that goes along with moving. I’ve been extraordinarily busy, to say the least! I apologize for not being very responsive to comments and emails and such over the last couple of weeks. I’m definitely behind on that, but I hope to catch up soon. I appreciate your patience!

Leaving the Neighborhood – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4 & Fujinon 90mm – Upcoming Recipe

What now? Where am I going?

The family and I started out on an epic all-American road-trip. We’ll be traveling for five weeks (!!!), which will allow for some awesome picture opportunities (and probably a few new Film Simulation Recipes). My goal is to keep up with Fuji X Weekly and all the other projects that I have going on, including SOOC, which will be live on May 12. I think some days will be particularly productive, and some days will be especially not, but with some luck it will all work out. I just ask for a little patience during those less-productive periods.

After the road trip is complete, we will end up in Arizona. We’re saying goodbye to mountains and trees and snow and hello to deserts and cacti and sunshine. We’ll get there just in time for the heat of summer, and I hope that we survive (I mean that humorously)—my wife and I used to live there years ago (it’s where we met and got married), so in a way it is a homecoming.

Utah was very good and will be greatly missed; however, many wonderful new experiences are just around the corner, and we’re very excited for that. Be sure to follow my journey on this blog and on Instagram!

Criticisms & Curation

Low Sun over Tetons Grand Teton NP, WY – Fujifilm X-E4 & 90mm – “Ferrania Solaris FG 400

I receive a lot of feedback—while most of it is positive, some of it is negative. Negative feedback isn’t inherently bad—in fact, it can be extraordinarily valuable—so I’m happy to receive it; however, not all of it is equal: there’s constructive criticism and destructive criticism.

Just guessing, about 70% of the negative feedback could be classified as destructive criticism, which is simply a put-down. It’s negativity for the sake of negativity. It’s meant to make the person saying it feel better about themselves by way of making someone else (me in this case) feel worse about themselves. People are mean sometimes, and that’s just the way it is. The world needs less destructive criticism and more kindness—the antidote is to be the kindness that the world desperately needs.

Constructive criticism is negative feedback that is meant well and is given with the intention of being helpful. Roughly 30% of negative feedback is constructive criticism. Within this, there are two sources: those who you should listen to and those who you shouldn’t. Just because someone has a complaint about something and they mean well doesn’t mean that you should listen to them. Do you trust them? Are they an authority or have some specific experience that makes them particularly qualified to offer quality advice? I would estimate that it is fifty-fifty on whether the constructive criticism is something valuable or not. That 15% of negative feedback that is constructive and from a trustworthy source is pure gold and much appreciated—well worth weeding through the 85% that isn’t.

Sometimes there are grey areas. Sometimes it’s not clear if the criticism is constructive or destructive, or whether the source is someone I should listen to or not. I tend to spend a lot of energy on these criticisms because I’m trying to figure out if there is value in it. So I have to process it. One such “grey area” criticism that I recently received is this: the pictures in one of my articles were not good enough for the words and subject—the article demanded better pictures to illustrate the point, and because the pictures weren’t good enough, I shouldn’t have published the article. Ouch!

Teton Blue – Grand Teton NP, WY – Fujifilm X-E4 & 90mm – “Velvia v2

One thing that I’ve always struggled with is curation. Advice that I’ve received over and over and over again is that I should only show the best of the best photographs. If you only show the absolute cream-of-the-crop pictures, people will think you’re a better photographer. Perception is reality, right? People will think you’re a great photographer if all of the photographs of yours that they view are great. But if they start seeing mediocre images, they’ll think you are a mediocre photographer. The truth is that everyone—even the greatest photographers—captures “lesser” pictures sometimes, but some people don’t share those pictures, so nobody knows.

I think sometimes showing these mediocre pictures is more authentic and honest. I’m not sure where the line should drawn when trying to balance perception with vulnerability. Obviously you want people to think the best of you; however, if what you let them see is too carefully curated then you’ll come across as fake, or you’ll leave people disappointed if they do ever find out the truth. I find this to be a tough balancing act. I share more of my frames than most people do, and perhaps I do show too many “lesser” pictures, and that might not be good.

Because I share some of my mediocre pictures with you on this website, I’m able to publish more content. If I waited until I had 12 or more great photographs before publishing a Film Simulation Recipe, I’d have far, far fewer recipes. That’s always a struggle: quality vs. quantity. I have a large quantity of material, but have I not focused enough on quality? Have I sacrificed quality too often for the sake of quantity? Does the quality make the content relatable? These are questions that I ask myself, but I don’t have good answers to them. I hope that I can continuously review and refine what I do, and hopefully this website becomes better and better with time.

Am I not curating enough? I’m I publishing too much content too quickly? What is the right balance? I have to really consider these things. Perhaps these are questions you, too, are pondering. I’d love to hear what you think, especially if this is something you are working through yourself or have had to work through in the past. If you have criticisms, please try to make them constructive and not destructive, but I definitely want to hear your feedback, so leave me a note in the comments!

How To Navigate Fuji X Weekly

When I created the Fuji X Weekly website, I wanted it to be clean and simple. I took a minimalistic approach to its design. For awhile it was clean and simple, but as the website grew and things evolved over time, it became less and less so.

The Blog used to be the Homepage, but now they’re separate—while the Blog is still pretty minimalistic, the Homepage is fairly busy. The two screenshots below show the cluttered Homepage compared to the clean Blog. The original design philosophy still serves a purpose, but in many ways Fuji X Weekly has outgrown it. I will likely at some point revamp the design, which would be a lot of work, but for now it remains as it gets the job done.

Because the Homepage is so busy, it’s easy to overlook things on there. For example, you might have missed that the 10 most recent blog posts can be accessed from it. Or that if you keep scrolling down, there’s an option to “Follow by Email” or even search the website. Because the Blog is so clean, it’s easy to miss much of the available material. The point of this article is to shed some light on how to navigate this website so that you don’t miss anything. There’s much more content than many might realize.

Specifically, I want to talk about the Menus that some people might not even know exist. Before going into that, though, I want to mention that clicking on “Fuji X Weekly” over the camera (see the top picture in this article) will take you to the Homepage. No matter where you are, it’s easy to get back home. To the left and right of “Fuji X Weekly” at the top are what’s called Hamburger Menus. The top-left Hamburger Menu has three horizontal lines, and the top-right Hamburger Menu has four horizontal lines. The left menu will bring up a list of pages. The Homepage and the Blog are just two of 17 standalone pages on Fuji X Weekly. At the bottom is a search bar, which is helpful if you are searching for something specific. The right menu will bring up a list of recent blog posts, an archive of blog posts (you can browse through specific months, going all the way back to the beginning), and a search bar is on top. This is the easiest place to find specific articles, either by searching or browsing. The best way to think about it is: Pages are accessed via the left menu, Posts are accessed through the right menu.

Let’s talk briefly about those 17 standalone pages, accessed through the top-left menu.

The Homepage you already know. Next is About—there’s a short biography (and a link to an article that dives a little deeper into it), but most importantly there’s a “Contact Me” form, if you want to shoot me a message. Then there is the Blog, which, again, you already know. After that is the Creative Collective Corner, which is where you’ll find bonus articles for Creative Collective subscribers. Next is Development, which is simply a list of How-To and Photographic Advice type articles that I’ve published. The Film Simulation Recipes page is next. This is actually a redundant page that originally served a very different purpose. You see, for awhile all of the film simulation recipes were listed there, but then, as I made more-and-more, it just made more sense to separate them into different groups, and not all on one page. I didn’t want to delete the page because there were so many links to it. Now it serves as a launching platform (identical to what’s on the Homepage) to the different recipe groups. If you are not sure which sensor generation your camera has, there’s a list at the bottom of the page. After that is Film Simulation Reviews, which is a list of articles that demonstrate various recipes in different situations. Then there’s the Fuji X Weekly App page, which is everything you need to know about the App. The next six pages are where you’ll find all of the recipes: Bayer, GFX, X-Trans I, X-Trans II, X-Trans III, and X-Trans IV. After that is the Gear page, which is where you’ll find my camera and lens reviews. Next is SOOC Live, which is where you’ll find all of the SOOC episodes. Last but not least is the Video page, which is where you’ll find my YouTube videos.

All of that is accessed through that top-left menu!

The content in the top-right menu is more dynamic, and is always evolving as more articles are published. I want to mention one more time the search bar, which is such a great way to find things—especially if you are unsure where exactly it is located. If you can remember what the article was titled or about, the search feature can help you quickly find it.

Fuji X Weekly has been around for over four years, and I’ve published a lot of articles during that time. Most people come for the film simulation recipes, yet there’s lots of other great stuff to explore; however, it’s not always obvious what there is and where exactly it’s at on the website. The intention of this post is to help you find it. The top-left menu will take you to the various pages, the top-right menu will take you to various posts, and the “Fuji X Weekly” in-between will take you home.