Fujifilm X-M1 (X-Trans I) FXW App Patron Early-Access Film Simulation Recipe: Reminiscent Print

Bougainvillea Day – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-M1 – “Reminiscent Print”

This Film Simulation Recipe came about as an experiment after reading that film photographers weren’t meant to like the Provia film simulation because they’d find it to be too hard. So, I thought, maybe that’s true, and perhaps I can make it less hard and more, something that film photographers might find to be “just right” (as Fujifilm put it). It took some trial-and-error, but I do believe that I have succeeded! This is a much, much better “standard” setting than default Provia, and, if you have a background in film photography, you’ll appreciate this recipe.

I find this new recipe to be reminiscent of cheap color negative film shot in point-‘n’-shoot cameras and printed at a one-hour lab, probably on Fujicolor Crystal Archive paper. It’s not intended to resemble that, but to me it does. I’m reminded of the 4″ x 6″ prints from 20+ years ago that are sitting in a box in the closet, or are carefully arranged in a photo album at my parent’s house. That’s why I call it Reminiscent Print.

Classic Car Denim – Goodyear, AZ – Fujifilm X-M1 – “Reminiscent Print”

This new Reminiscent Print Patron Early-Access recipe is compatible the Fujifilm X-Pro1, X-E1, and X-M1 cameras. Those with X-Trans II and Bayer cameras can also use it, although the results will be just a little different. If you are a Fuji X Weekly App Patron, it’s available to you right now on the App!

The Fuji X Weekly App is free, yet becoming a Fuji X Weekly Patron unlocks the best App experience! One benefit of being a Patron is you get early access to some new Film Simulation Recipes. These Early-Access Recipes will eventually become available free to everyone in time, including this new one. Patrons help support Fuji X Weekly and, really, without them there would be no App, so I want to give a special “thank you” to all of the Patrons!

Example photographs, all camera-made JPEGs captured using this “Reminiscent Print” Film Simulation Recipe on my Fujifilm X-M1:

Pier Post – Litchfield Park, AZ – Fujifilm X-M1 – Photo by Jonathan Roesch
Light & Water – Litchfield Park, AZ – Fujifilm X-M1 – Photo by Jonathan Roesch
Fine Morning for Fishing – Litchfield Park, AZ – Fujifilm X-M1 – Photo by Jonathan Roesch
Line in the Lake – Litchfield Park, AZ – Fujifilm X-M1 – Photo by Jonathan Roesch
Pier Reflections – Litchfield Park, AZ – Fujifilm X-M1 – Photo by Jonathan Roesch
Better Days Behind – Litchfield Park, AZ – Fujifilm X-M1
Church Bells – Litchfield Park, AZ – Fujifilm X-M1
Unlit Canopy – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-M1
Red Bougainvillea Blossoms – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-M1
Backyard Bougainvillea – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-M1
Autumn Orange – Litchfield Park, AZ – Fujifilm X-M1
Oranges – Litchfield Park, AZ – Fujifilm X-M1
Bucket Blossom – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-M1
Pink Rose Bud – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-M1
Peace & Minecraft – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-M1
Ball Toss – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-M1
All the World’s a Stage – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-M1
Steps – Litchfield Park, AZ – Fujifilm X-M1
Outside Tables – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-M1
Made With Passion – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-M1
Duster Headlamp – Goodyear, AZ – Fujifilm X-M1
Radial G/T – Goodyear, AZ – Fujifilm X-M1
Rear Duster – Goodyear, AZ – Fujifilm X-M1

Find this Film Simulation Recipe and over 250 more on the Fuji X Weekly — Film Recipes App!

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A $400 Alternative to the Fujifilm X100V, X-E4, and X70

Since the Fujifilm X100V is difficult to find and sometimes outrageously expensive, something that I inadvertently had a hand in, people have been asking for recommendations on alternatives. Of course, the X100F or any of the older X100-series versions would be a top substitute, but even those are going for a lot of money, more than they should be for how old they are. The Fujifilm X-E4 with a Fujinon 27mm f/2.8 could be a very nice consolation prize, but due to parts shortages, those can be difficult to find, too, but thankfully there doesn’t seem to be much price gouging on it (knock on wood). The Fujifilm X70 would be a solid alternative, but they are pretty pricy, often going for the same or more than the original MSRP, despite being almost seven-years-old. If you are really set on owning a Fujifilm X100V (as a proud X100V owner I can understand why), if you just exercise some patience and constantly stay on the lookout, you are sure to find one for a reasonable price. If you are not patient, a used X100F isn’t too difficult to get, or even consider an X-E3, which can still be found brand-new if you look hard enough.

I’ve had a few people ask me for a recommendation on an X100V-like alternative for under $500, and one even asked for under $400. At first I scoffed at the idea. Even the original 12-year-old X100 currently goes for more than that, as well as every iteration of that camera since. Fujifilm doesn’t make entry-level cameras anymore, but even when they did, they were more than $500. Then I looked at my camera case, and I noticed two things: a Fujifilm X-M1 and a TTArtisan 27mm f/2.8. Hmmm. Maybe it’s possible after all.

Fujifilm introduced the X-M1—the third and last X-Trans I model—nine years ago. It’s an unusual camera, because it has an X-Trans I sensor but the X-Trans II processor, and in the same body as the Bayer-sensor X-A1. I think Fujifilm had some spare X-Trans I sensors sitting around after moving onto X-Trans II, and this camera was their way to unload them. There was never a predecessor, so when the X-M1 was discontinued so was the line. I paid $210 for mine two years ago. More commonly they’re found for around $250, and I’ve seen them for under $200 a couple times.

I think the X-E1 is a better body than the X-M1, and you can find those sometimes for $250 or less, but more often they’re $300-$350. If you see a good deal on one, I’d choose that over the X-M1. The X-A1 is basically the same thing as the X-M1, but with a Bayer sensor instead of X-Trans, and those are often a little cheaper. It’s definitely easier to find one under $250, and it’s not uncommon to see one under $200; however, between the X-A1 and X-M1, I’d choose the X-M1, but the difference isn’t huge. The X-A2 often is found for $250, and is another option. Occasionally you might find a good deal on an X-A3 or X-E2 (or X-E2s), so it’s worth looking just to see if you can get lucky, because that would be even better. If your budget is $500, you certainly have more options, but if the ceiling is only $400, you are much more limited, and the X-M1 is probably your best bet.

Of course, there’s still the lens. Sometimes you can buy the body bundled with a kit lens for nearly the same price as body-only (my X-M1 was bundled with 16-50mm zoom, for example), but the cheap kit zoom isn’t going to give you an X100-like experience. You’ll need a prime, but it has to be compact and cheap. The options are pretty limited, and are even more limited if you expect an autofocus option—the TTArtisans 27mm f/2.8 pancake-ish autofocus lens is the only one I can think of that is both cheap and small. If you don’t mind manual-focus-only, there are a few other lenses that could work, but I think this TTArtisan option is your best bet, and it’s only $160.

So, yeah, add $210 and $160 and you’re under $400. Will the X-M1 with the TTArtisan 27mm really give an X100-like experience? No, not at all. But, for under $400, it’s surely as close as you’ll get. If your budget is $500, spring for an X-E1 instead of the X-M1 and you’ll be a little closer, but still not there. The X-M1 is not as good as any in the X100-series models (or X-E-series or the X70), but that doesn’t mean that it’s not a decent camera capable of capturing good photos, because it is!

So if you are looking for a low-budget alternative to the Fujifilm X100V, X-E4, or X70, I suggest to you the X-M1 with the TTArtisan 27mm lens attached to it. The X-M1 is smaller than the X100V and X-E4, and just a little bigger than the X70. Obviously the TTArtisan lens, despite being pancake-ish, is bigger than the lens attached to the X100V and is especially larger than the one on the X70. It’s also a little bigger than the Fujinon 27mm lens (a popular companion to the X-E4). The Fujifilm X-M1 with the TTArtisan lens is small enough to be in the same compact category as those cameras, but is much, much cheaper. If you can spend more, there are better options; however, if you don’t have much to spend or are looking for an inexpensive first-camera, this is my recommendation for under $400.

It would be easy for me to suggest this to you, and not use it myself. That would not be very genuine of me, so I did use the Fujifilm X-M1 with the TTArtisan 27mm f/2.8. I also let me 13-year-old son, Jonathan, use it a little, too. This combo is very capable of producing lovely pictures straight-out-of-camera that have character and some analog-like qualities. It’s also easy to use for those who want good results without much fuss.

The 15 pictures below are all unedited (aside from some cropping and straightening), captured with the Fujifilm X-M1 and TTArtisan 27mm f/2.8.

Fujifilm X-M1 + TTArtisan 27mm f/2.8 – Photo by Jonathan Roesch
Fujifilm X-M1 + TTArtisan 27mm f/2.8 – Photo by Jonathan Roesch
Fujifilm X-M1 + TTArtisan 27mm f/2.8 – Photo by Jonathan Roesch
Fujifilm X-M1 + TTArtisan 27mm f/2.8 – Photo by Jonathan Roesch
Fujifilm X-M1 + TTArtisan 27mm f/2.8 – Photo by Jonathan Roesch
Fujifilm X-M1 + TTArtisan 27mm f/2.8 – Photo by Ritchie Roesch
Fujifilm X-M1 + TTArtisan 27mm f/2.8 – Photo by Ritchie Roesch
Fujifilm X-M1 + TTArtisan 27mm f/2.8 – Photo by Ritchie Roesch
Fujifilm X-M1 + TTArtisan 27mm f/2.8 – Photo by Ritchie Roesch
Fujifilm X-M1 + TTArtisan 27mm f/2.8 – Photo by Ritchie Roesch
Fujifilm X-M1 + TTArtisan 27mm f/2.8 – Photo by Ritchie Roesch
Fujifilm X-M1 + TTArtisan 27mm f/2.8 – Photo by Ritchie Roesch
Fujifilm X-M1 + TTArtisan 27mm f/2.8 – Photo by Ritchie Roesch
Fujifilm X-M1 + TTArtisan 27mm f/2.8 – Photo by Ritchie Roesch
Fujifilm X-M1 + TTArtisan 27mm f/2.8 – Photo by Ritchie Roesch

Now, let me tell you about the Film Simulation Recipes, because otherwise I’ll get a whole bunch of inquiries—you all want to know, right?! The top picture (of the X-M1 by itself) was captured with a Fujifilm X-E4 and Fujinon 27mm using the Fujicolor Pro 400H recipe. The next four pictures (the X-M1 with other cameras) were captured with a Fujifilm X-T5 and Fujinon 90mm using an upcoming recipe that I’ll publish soon. The 15 pictures above were captured with a Fujifilm X-M1 and TTArtisan 27mm using an upcoming recipe that I’ll publish soon. So, for now, only the very top picture is a recipe that you can currently use—you’ll have to stay tuned for the others.

This post contains affiliate links, and if you make a purchase using my links I’ll be compensated a small amount for it.

TTArtisan 27mm f/2.8  Amazon

Fujifilm X-Trans I Film Simulation Recipe: Superia Xtra 400

Forest River – Layton, UT – Fujifilm X-M1 – “Superia Xtra 400” – Photo by Joy Roesch

I handed my Fujifilm X-M1 camera to my daughter, Joy, and told her that she could change the settings to whatever she wanted them to be—you might remember that she created the Winter Blue film simulation recipe. She used the camera to capture a bunch of pictures; afterwards, when I reviewed the images, I was very impressed with the look that she created. I asked her why she chose these settings, and she answered that she had hoped to capture some cherry blossoms, and it was initially overcast when she dialed in the settings, and she thought that it might work well for that.

These settings remind me of my X-Trans IV Superia Xtra 400 film simulation recipe. It’s definitely not an exact match—there’s no way that it could be because X-Trans I cameras don’t have many of the JPEG options that X-Trans IV cameras have, including the Classic Negative film simulation—but it’s surprisingly similar. I don’t imagine it’s possible to get closer. If you have an X-Pro1, X-E1 or X-M1, this is your best bet for a Superia Xtra 400 look. I think it’s also not far off from my Superia Premium 400 recipe, although, again, it’s not an exact match, just in the general ballpark. For some of you, I have no doubts that this will become your new favorite recipe.

Horsetail Reeds – Layton, UT – Fujifilm X-M1 – “Superia Xtra 400” – Photo by Joy Roesch

While this recipe is intended for X-Trans I cameras, it’s possible to use it on Fujifilm Bayer cameras, although it will look slightly different. You can also use it on X-Trans II cameras, but it will look fairly significantly different, although you might like the results anyway, so it might be worth a try.

Astia
Dynamic Range: DR200
Highlight: -2 (Low)
Shadow: +1 (Medium-High)
Color: +2 (High)
Sharpness: 0 (Normal)
Noise Reduction: -2 (Low)
White Balance: Shade, +2 Red & +2 Blue
ISO: Auto, up to ISO 3200
Exposure Compensation: +2/3 to +1 (typically)

Example photographs, all camera-made JPEGs captured by Joy using her “Superia Xtra 400” film simulation recipe on a Fujifilm X-M1:

Dirt Cliff Forest – Layton, UT – Fujifilm X-M1 – Photo by Joy Roesch
Sideways Tree – Layton, UT – Fujifilm X-M1 – Photo by Joy Roesch
Photographer Hiding in the Forest – Layton, UT – Fujifilm X-M1 – Photo by Joy Roesch
Forest Creek – Layton, UT – Fujifilm X-M1 – Photo by Joy Roesch
Water in the Woods – Layton, UT – Fujifilm X-M1 – Photo by Joy Roesch
Johanna on a Bridge – Layton, UT – Fujifilm X-M1 – Photo by Joy Roesch
Path Through The Trees – Layton, UT – Fujifilm X-M1 – Photo by Joy Roesch
Small Flower – Layton, UT – Fujifilm X-M1 – Photo by Joy Roesch
Patch of Red – Layton, UT – Fujifilm X-M1 – Photo by Joy Roesch
White Tree – Layton, UT – Fujifilm X-M1 – Photo by Joy Roesch

Find this film simulation recipe on the Fuji X Weekly — Film Recipes App!

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Fujifilm X-M1 (X-Trans I) Film Simulation Recipe: Winter Blue

Fujifilm X-M1 – Farmington, UT – Photo by Joy Roesch – “Winter Blue”

I handed a Fujifilm X-M1 to my 13-year-old daughter, Joy—gave her a brief tutorial on how to use the camera, and let her have at it. Attached to the camera was a Pergear 10mm f/8 Fisheye lens, which is challenging to use, but can also be rewarding. I thought that maybe the lens would be too difficult for her, but it turns out that I had nothing to worry about, as she did great with it.

I had my Provia recipe programmed into the camera, but Joy changed the settings, making up her own film simulation recipe. I asked her why she chose her settings, and she answered that snow looks nice with lots of blue, so she wanted to create a blue-look. When I asked her what she would name the recipe, she replied, “Winter Blue.” It has sort of a Fujichrome 64T aesthetic, but really it’s too warm for that, so maybe it loosely resembles if you used that film in conjunction with a warming filter? I don’t know how well this recipe might do in other conditions, but it certainly looks good on a blue-sky winter day.

Fujifilm X-M1 – Farmington, UT – Photo by Joy Roesch – “Winter Blue”

Velvia
Dynamic Range: DR400
Highlight: -1 (Medium-Low)
Shadow: 0 (Normal)
Color: -2 (Low)
Sharpness: 0 (Normal)
Noise Reduction: -2 (Low)
White Balance: Daylight (“Fine”), 0 Red & +2 Blue
ISO: Auto, up to ISO 3200
Exposure Compensation: +2/3 (typically)

Example photographs, all camera-made JPEGs captured by Joy using her Winter Blue film simulation recipe on a Fujifilm X-M1:

Fujifilm X-M1 – Farmington, UT – Photo by Joy Roesch
Fujifilm X-M1 – Farmington, UT – Photo by Joy Roesch
Fujifilm X-M1 – Farmington, UT – Photo by Joy Roesch
Fujifilm X-M1 – Farmington, UT – Photo by Joy Roesch
Fujifilm X-M1 – Farmington, UT – Photo by Joy Roesch
Fujifilm X-M1 – Farmington, UT – Photo by Joy Roesch
Fujifilm X-M1 – Farmington, UT – Photo by Joy Roesch
Fujifilm X-M1 – Farmington, UT – Photo by Joy Roesch
Fujifilm X-M1 – Farmington, UT – Photo by Joy Roesch
Fujifilm X-M1 – Farmington, UT – Photo by Joy Roesch

See also: X-Trans I Film Simulation Recipes

Find Jon’s Classic Chrome film simulation recipe on the Fuji X Weekly app!

New X-Trans I Patron Early-Access Film Simulation Recipe on App!

Cradle Tree Branch – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-M1 – “Provia”

There’s a new Fuji X Weekly Patron early-access film simulation recipe available now on the Fuji X Weekly app! If you are a Patron, you can use it today! This new recipe is for X-Trans I cameras (X-E1, X-Pro1 and X-M1), and it replaces the Classic Analog recipe, which was a Patron early-access recipe, but is now available to everyone. Yea!

Below are a few examples of this new recipe, which is simply called Provia, captured with a Fujifilm X-M1. Bricks in the Wall (below) was captured by my daughter, Joy, who I let use the camera.

Sun over Country Horses – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-M1
Target – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-M1
Bricks in the Wall – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-M1 – Photo by Joy Roesch
Strollin’ Jo – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-M1

Fujifilm X-M1 (X-Trans I) Film Simulation Recipe: Classic Analog

Sticks & Dry Leaves – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-M1 – “Classic Analog”

I wanted to create a Portra recipe for X-Trans I cameras, such as the Fujifilm X-M1. All of my Portra recipes are based on the Classic Chrome film simulation, but X-Trans I cameras don’t have Classic Chrome. I did create a recipe for mimicking Kodachrome without Classic Chrome, but that’s intended for X-Trans II cameras, and, while the results are similar, it doesn’t look exactly the same on X-Trans I. This recipe was my attempt at Portra without Classic Chrome, but it’s not quite Portra enough for me to name it Portra. It’s close but no cigar, but it does look nice nonetheless, and I like how it renders pictures on my X-M1.

This was a Patron early-access recipe on the Fuji X Weekly app. Fuji X Weekly Patrons have had the opportunity to use it since December 1st, but now it’s available to everyone! There’s a new Patron early-access recipe for X-Trans I on the app in its place. If you have the app, go check it out!

E.T. – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-M1 – “Classic Analog”

This recipe also marks the first one that includes a photograph captured by my 11-year-old son, Jonathan. I let him use my X-M1, and I liked one of the pictures he made, which you’ll find further down this article, entitled Frozen Pond Scum. The Fujifilm X-M1 can be found for cheap, and would make a great “first real camera” for a kid. Maybe I’ll give him mine at some point in the future.

Provia/STD
Dynamic Range: DR400
Highlight: -2
Shadow: -1
Color: -2
Sharpness: 0
Noise Reduction: -2
White Balance: Daylight/Fine, +1 Red & -6 Blue
ISO: Auto, up to ISO 3200
Exposure Compensation: +1/3 to +2/3 (typically)

Example photographs, all camera-made JPEGs made using this Classic Analog film simulation recipe on a Fujifilm X-M1:

Thin Ice – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-M1
Falling Water – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-M1
Autumn Overcast – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-M1
Night at the Lake – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-M1
Frozen Drain – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-M1
Frozen Pond Scum – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-M1 – Photo by Jonathan Roesch
Irrigation Cover – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-M1
Quadruple U’s – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-M1
Improbable – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-M1
Evening Euonymus – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-M1
Blue Sky Reeds – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-M1
Yellow, Lamp – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-M1
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Fujifilm X-M1 (X-Trans I) Film Simulation Recipe: Vivid Color

Vibrant Autumn – Fruit Heights, UT – Fujifilm X-M1 – “Vivid Color”

The Fujifilm X-M1 doesn’t have nearly as many JPEG options as newer X-Series cameras have; however, that doesn’t mean that this camera can’t produce great-looking images straight-out-of-camera. This film simulation recipe is proof of that, as it simply looks great!

Many of you don’t have X-Trans I cameras, since there were only three models made: the X-M1, X-E1 and X-Pro1. Fujifilm quickly moved on to the X-Trans II sensor. I know that some of you still have your old X-Trans I camera, or have purchased one second-hand for cheap. For a long time I neglected creating recipes for these cameras, but no more! This is the second one for X-Trans I, and expect several more to be published in the coming months.

Fall Forest – Flathead Lake, MT – Fujifilm X-M1 – “Vivid Color”

Even though this film simulation recipe is intended for the X-M1, X-E1 and X-Pro1, if you have an X-Trans II or Bayer model, feel free to try this recipe on your camera. It won’t be exactly the same, but it will produce very similar results.

Velvia
Dynamic Range: DR200
Highlight: +1 (Medium-Hard)
Shadow: +2 (Hard)
Color: +2 (High)
Sharpness: +1 (Medium-Hard)
Noise Reduction: -2 (Low)
White Balance: Fluorescent 1 (“Daylight Fluorescent”), -5 Red & +5 Blue
ISO: Auto, up to ISO 3200
Exposure Compensation: +1/3 to +2/3 (typically)

Example photographs, all camera-made JPEGs made using this Vivid Color film simulation recipe on a Fujifilm X-M1:

Stinker – Idaho Falls, ID – Fujifilm X-M1
Leave the Light On – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-M1
Sunlight Through the Curtain – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-M1
Business Hours – Idaho Falls, ID – Fujifilm X-M1
Thrifty Nickel – Idaho Falls, ID – Fujifilm X-M1
Clothes Hangers – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-M1
H&M – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-M1
Autumn Forest Sunlight – Fruit Heights, UT – Fujifilm X-M1
Bright Autumn Leaves – Fruit Heights, UT – Fujifilm X-M1
Red Berries & Orange Leaves – Fruit Heights, UT – Fujifilm X-M1
Early Autumn Leaves – Fruit Heights, UT – Fujifilm X-M1
October Leaves – Fruit Heights, UT – Fujifilm X-M1
Leaves in a Dark Forest – Fruit Heights, UT – Fujifilm X-M1
Lit Autumn Leaves – Fruit Heights, UT – Fujifilm X-M1
Slowly Dying – Fruit Heights, UT – Fujifilm X-M1
Autumn Leaves & Green Weed – Missoula, MT – Fujifilm X-M1
Misty Mountain Morning – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-M1

See also: Film Simulation Recipes

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Nobody pays me to write the content found on fujixweekly.com. There’s a real cost to operating and maintaining this site, not to mention all the time that I pour into it. If you appreciated this article, please consider making a one-time gift contribution. Thank you!

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Fujifilm X-M1 (X-Trans I) Film Simulation Recipe: Monochrome

Broken View – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-M1

Fujifilm introduced the world to the X-Trans sensor in January of 2012 with the announcement of the X-Pro1 camera. Later that same year the X-E1 became the second camera with this new sensor, and a year later the X-M1 became the third and final camera to have the original X-Trans sensor. Even before the X-M1 was released, Fujifilm had begun selling cameras with the X-Trans II sensor, so the original sensor was already old news by the time the camera was released. It seems that, more-or-less, Fujifilm had some spare X-Trans I sensors laying around, so they put them inside of the X-A1, a Bayer sensor camera, and renamed it X-M1. There never was an X-M2.

Even though only three cameras have an X-Trans I sensor, I’ve had many requests for film simulation recipes that are compatible with the X-Pro1, X-E1 and X-M1. I used to own an X-E1 (two, actually), but I mostly shot RAW with it and never developed any film simulation recipes for it. Some X-Trans II and Bayer recipes are technically compatible, but produce slightly different results. I purchased a cheap, gently used X-M1 to create some recipes with, and this is the very first one!

White Trees – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-M1

The X-M1 only has one black-and-white option. There’s no B+Y, B+R and B+G. There’s just standard B, which is the abbreviation for the Monochrome film simulation. I wanted to create a B&W recipe that produces dramatic results, but the JPEG options are limited on this camera compared to the newer models, so I had to get creative with the white balance to get the look that I wanted. This recipe is intended for X-Trans I cameras, but those with Bayer and X-Trans II cameras can use it, too, but the results will be slightly different.

Monochrome
Dynamic Range: DR200
Highlight: +2 (Hard)
Shadow: +2 (Hard)
Sharpness: +1 (Medium-Hard)
Noise Reduction: -2 (Low)
White Balance: Incandescent, -5 Red & +9 Blue
ISO: Auto, up to ISO 3200
Exposure Compensation: +1/3 to +2/3 (typically)

Example photographs, all camera-made JPEGs made using this Monochrome film simulation recipe on a Fujifilm X-M1:

Old Phone – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-M1
Dark Chocolate – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-M1
Ice Cream Bowl – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-M1
Countertop – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-M1
Steel Deck – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-M1
Good Sam – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-M1
Tool Ghosts – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-M1
Timesaver – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-M1
Saw Table – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-M1
Abandoned Workshop – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-M1
Buy American – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-M1
Anchor Screw Drawer – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-M1
Open Drawers – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-M1
Indoor Hoop – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-M1
Window with Broken Glass – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-M1
Abandoned Garage – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-M1

See also: Film Simulation Recipes

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