Fujifilm X70 (X-Trans II) Film Simulation Recipe: Classic Kodak Chrome

Road Work Ahead – Glendale, AZ – Fujifilm X70 – “Classic Kodak Chrome”

Earlier this year I started a new Film Simulation Recipe series with the intention of customizing each film simulation to be optimized for the aesthetic that Fujifilm intended. In other words, make a nice-looking recipe that is similar to yet better than the stock look of a film simulation. The first recipe in this series is Standard Provia, the second is Improved Velvia, and the third is Everyday Astia. Now it’s time for Classic Chrome!

The problem with creating a Classic Chrome recipe for this series is there is already one that optimizes the aesthetic that Fujifilm intended. It already exists! So the challenge, of course, is to create something similar yet different, and hopefully every bit as good as the “old” recipe. Also, I thought to do it for X-Trans II cameras, which have thus far been left out of this series. I call this recipe “Classic Kodak Chrome” because the Classic Chrome film simulation is supposed to resemble a Kodak aesthetic, and this recipe definitely does. Fujifilm would never call the film simulation Kodak Chrome (even if they had the rights to use the brand name), but that doesn’t prevent me from including the Kodak name in my recipe.

Please, Dad—No More Pictures! – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X70 – “Classic Kodak Chrome”

Most X-Trans II cameras have the Classic Chrome film simulation, but not all; this “Classic Kodak Chrome” Film Simulation Recipe is only compatible with those X-Trans II cameras with Classic Chrome, such as the X100T, X-E2, X-E2S, X-T1, X-T10, X30, X70, and XQ2 . Unfortunately, this recipe is not compatible with the X100S, X20, and XQ1, even though they are X-Trans II. Those with Bayer models with Classic Chrome can also use this recipe, although it will render slightly different on those cameras.

Classic Chrome
Dynamic Range: DR200
Highlight: -1 (Medium-Soft)
Shadow: 0 (Standard)
Color: +1 (Medium-High)
Sharpness: 0 (Standard)
Noise Reduction: -2 (Low)
White Balance: Auto, +2 Red & -2 Blue
ISO: Auto up to ISO 3200

Exposure Compensation: 0 to +2/3 (typically)

Example photographs, all camera-made JPEGs captured on my Fujifilm X70 using this “Classic Kodak Chrome” Film Simulation Recipe:

R2-D2 Junkyard – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X70
Old School Diner – Glendale, AZ – Fujifilm X70
Three Scary Pumpkins – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X70
Big Intersection – Glendale, AZ – Fujifilm X70
In Step – Glendale, AZ – Fujifilm X70
Old Garage – Glendale, AZ – Fujifilm X70
Yellow Building Behind White Fence – Glendale, AZ – Fujifilm X70
Small Neighborhood Flowers – Glendale, AZ – Fujifilm X70
Autumn Window – Glendale, AZ – Fujifilm X70
Doll & Toy Museum – Glendale, AZ – Fujifilm X70
Brick, Tree, Sun – Glendale, AZ – Fujifilm X70
Trees & Glass – Glandale, AZ – Fujifilm X70
Tree Tops & Cyan Sky – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X70
Singular Garden Blossom – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X70
Pink Summer Blossom – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X70

Comparison

“Classic Kodak Chrome” recipe
Factory default Classic Chrome

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Fujifilm X70 (X-Trans II) Film Simulation Recipe: Monochrome Red

Houses, Reflected – Litchfield Park, AZ – Fujifilm X70 – “Monochrome Red”

Back when I shot black-and-white film, I usually used a color filter to manipulate the shades of grey, and for landscape photography the Red filter was my most-used option. You cannot use these filters on your Fujifilm camera, but Fujifilm does provide you with three faux filters: +Y, +R, & +G. These mimic the aesthetic of using a Yellow, Red, or Green filter (sort of). In my opinion, +R doesn’t actually replicate the use of a Red filter very well; it’s more like an Orange filter. This recipe is intended to produce a look more similar to a Red filter on black-and-white film, which means that it will darken blues and lighten reds.

I actually created this “Monochrome Red” Film Simulation Recipe several months back on my Fujifilm X-T1, but that camera has a dirty sensor in need of a cleaning, so I never shared the results. Then I moved, and the X-T1 got packed away for awhile. Just recently I purchased a different X-Trans II camera—an X70—so I plugged this recipe into it and began shooting. This is an excellent option if you are looking for a black-and-white recipe, and is especially good for landscape photography.

Sunlit Flowers – Litchfield Park, AZ – Fujifilm X70 – “Monochrome Red”

The “Monochrome Red” recipe is compatible with all X-Trans II cameras. If you have an X-Trans I or Bayer model, the results will be ever slightly different, but very similar, and you can definitely use it—if you have an X-Pro1 or X-T200 or anything like that, feel free to give this recipe a try.

Monochrome+R
Dynamic Range: DR400
Highlight: -1 (Medium-Soft)
Shadow: +2 (Hard)
Sharpness: +1 (Medium-Hard)
Noise Reduction: -2 (Low)
White Balance: Fluorescent 1, -4 Red & +7 Blue
ISO: Auto up to ISO 6400

Exposure Compensation: 0 to +1 (typically)

Example photographs, all camera-made JPEGs captured on my Fujifilm X70 using this “Monochrome Red” Film Simulation Recipe:

Josh Intently Gaming – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X70
Jonathan with a Smile – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X70
Backlit Jo – Litchfield Park, AZ – Fujifilm X70
Boy Fishing – Litchfield Park, AZ – Fujifilm X70
Dock Abstract – Litchfield Park, AZ – Fujifilm X70
Lock & Chain – Litchfield Park, AZ – Fujifilm X70
Pole & Chain – Litchfield Park, AZ – Fujifilm X70
Fishing Pole on Dock – Litchfield Park, AZ – Fujifilm X70
Young Boy Fishing – Litchfield Park, AZ – Fujifilm X70
Lakeside Tree – Litchfield Park, AZ – Fujifilm X70

Find this Film Simulation Recipe and nearly 250 more on the Fuji X Weekly — Film Recipes App!

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Fujifilm X70 (X-Trans II) Film Simulation Recipe: Kodak Color Negative

Bee on a Blossom – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X70 – “Kodak Color Negative”

I’ve wanted a Fujifilm X70 ever since I learned of its existence. For those who don’t know, the X70 was essentially a smaller, more wide-angle, and less expensive X100T. Introduced in January 2016 and discontinued in December of that same year, you might think that the camera was a flop, but it wasn’t. Unfortunately, to Fujifilm’s surprise, shortly after the camera launched, Sony suddenly discontinued the 16-megapixel APS-C sensor that the X70 used, and Fujifilm had no choice but to fully move on to X-Trans III as quickly as possible. The X70 was a casualty of that situation. No successor was ever made, supposedly because heat dispersion was an issue with higher resolution sensors that couldn’t be remedied. Even though the camera is six years old now, people love their X70’s—you don’t see very many for sale, and when you do it’s usually for a similar price to, or even higher than, the original MSRP. I was fortunate to find one in excellent condition for “only” $600.

I’ve had this camera for just a few days. After unboxing the X70, I quickly programmed into it the latest recipe that I had been working on with my X-T1 (which is in need of a sensor cleaning), and busily shot with it. Already I love this little camera—not only is it very practical to carry around everywhere, it is so much fun to use! Fujifilm really needs to work hard an its successor, the X80—this should be a top priority, in my opinion.

Fujifilm X70 — captured with a Fujifilm X100V + GAF 500 recipe

For this “Kodak Color Negative” Film Simulation Recipe, I wanted to use the Incandescent White Balance. Why? Because you cannot program a White Balance Shift into the C1-C7 Custom Presets (only on X-Pro3 and newer models); however, the camera will remember one shift per white balance type. If each of your presets uses a different white balance type, then you don’t have to remember to adjust the shift when switching presets. Incandescent is a white balance option that I’d not yet used on X-Trans II, so it seemed like a logical place to start.

The aesthetic that I was hoping to achieve with this recipe was Kodak Portra 400. I don’t believe that I succeeded in faithfully mimicking that (sometimes there’s a similarity); however, it does seem to produce a Kodak-like color negative film look, perhaps more like Ultramax, but not exactly that, either. Whatever it does or doesn’t resemble, I personally really like the aesthetic produced by this recipe, and I hope that you do, too.

Johanna in Evening Light – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X70 – “Kodak Color Negative”

This “Kodak Color Negative” recipe is compatible with all X-Trans II cameras that have Classic Chrome, including the X100T, X-E2, X-E2S, X-T10, X-T1, X30, X70, and XQ2. Unfortunately, the X100S, X20, and XQ1 don’t have Classic Chrome, despite being X-Trans II. Those with Bayer models that have Classic Chrome can also use this recipe, although it will render a little different on your camera.

Classic Chrome
Dynamic Range: DR200
Highlight: -2 (Soft)
Shadow: -1 (Medium-Soft)
Color: +2 (High)
Sharpness: -1 (Medium-Soft)
Noise Reduction: -2 (Low)
White Balance: Incandescent, +6 Red & -7 Blue
ISO: Auto up to ISO 3200

Exposure Compensation: 0 to +2/3 (typically)

Example photographs, all camera-made JPEGs captured on my Fujifilm X70 using this “Kodak Color Negative” Film Simulation Recipe:

Sunlight Through The Grapevine – Surprise, AZ – Fujifilm X70
Grape Leaves – Surprise, AZ – Fujifilm X70
Backlit Leaf & Lens Flare – Surprise, AZ – Fujifilm X70
Is It Already Fall Y’all? – Surprise, AZ – Fujifilm X70
Hummingbird – Surprise, AZ – Fujifilm X70
Burgers & Rainbows – Phoenix, AZ – Fujifilm X70
Corner Table – Phoenix, AZ – Fujifilm X70
Morning Coffee – Glendale, AZ – Fujifilm X70
Mary, Jesus & Stinky Pete – Surprise, AZ – Fujifilm X70
Yellow Hanging Trumpets – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X70
Backyard Blossoms – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X70
Orange Trumpets & Lens Flare – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X70
Singular Bougainvillea Branch – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X70
Yellow Wall Flowers – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X70
Garden Rose – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X70
Leaf on the Ground – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X70
Wet Suburbia Evening – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X70
Wet Concrete Reflecting Sunset – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X70
Sunset Veiled by House & Tree – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X70

Find this Film Simulation Recipe and nearly 250 more on the Fuji X Weekly — Film Recipes App!

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