Fujifilm X-T1 (X-Trans II) Ektachrome 100SW Film Simulation Recipe


49540690163_2396eb784c_c

Windows & Reflections – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-T1 “Ektachrome 100SW”

What I love about my Ektachrome 100SW film simulation recipe is that it reminds me of a film that I used to use. Just like the original Ektachrome 100SW recipe, which is compatible with X-Trans III & IV cameras, this recipe is identical to my Kodachrome II recipe, except that it uses Velvia instead of Classic Chrome. This version of Ektachrome 100SW is compatible with X-Trans I & II cameras, as well as Fujifilm Bayer cameras.

Velvia
Dynamic Range: DR200
Highlight: +2 (High)
Shadow: +1 (Medium-High)
Color: -1 (Medium-Low)
Sharpness: 0 (Medium)
Noise Reduction: -2 (Low)
White Balance: Auto, +1 Red & -2 Blue
ISO: Auto up to ISO 3200

Example photographs, all camera-made JPEGs captured on my Fujifilm X-T1 using this Ektachrome 100SW film simulation recipe:

49535392126_f7bd6d2a68_c

Instamatic – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T1

49523150626_1c26e34b18_c

Throw Pillow – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T1

49535391971_5e4794d335_c

Striped Pillow – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T1

49513610448_133082aa17_c

Indoor Decor Near a Window – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T1

49485898996_436425a91f_c

Grass & Concrete – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T1

49535623947_41c74005fd_c

Little Steps – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T1

49501742508_ef82284f05_c

February Forest – Layton, UT – Fujifilm X-T1

49540671958_3a16960440_c

Lizard – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-T1

49541398337_861aa419ed_c

Penguins On A Rock – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-T1

49541398352_71ff660956_c

Swimming Penguins – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-T1

49540671983_bea0249fc3_c

Coral Fish – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-T1

See also: Film Simulation Recipes

Fujifilm X100F Review Blog

Help Fuji X Weekly

Nobody pays me to write the content found on fujixweekly.com. There's a real cost to operating and maintaining this site, not to mention all the time that I pour into it. If you appreciated this article, please consider making a one-time gift contribution. Thank you!

$2.00

10 Old Color Slides

48417328922_d68775cdd4_c

I opened up a box in the garage. I was looking for something, and I hoped that I would find it in there. The box had been packed for many years. It was loaded and closed up when I moved from Arizona to California in 2011. I guess whatever was in there wasn’t important, because it remained closed for many years. I commented about this box to my wife once, “Let’s just toss it, since we obviously don’t need whatever is in there.” I’m glad that I never followed through with that, because when I dug through the contents of the box I discovered some old slides that I had forgotten about.

It was fun to look at the old slides, most of which I had captured in 1999, but a few were from 1998, and some as recently as 2005. It was great to reminisce as I viewed the different pictures. Most of the exposures weren’t particularly good. Something that I have discovered over the years is that I was never as good of a photographer as I thought I was. Time has a way of humbling you, I think. While there are a few decent shots, some pictures that I really thought were worthwhile are actually cringe-worthy. Still, I separated the “best” slides from the rest and had them scanned. I never scan my old slides because it’s expensive to do so, but I thought it would be fun to do it in this case.

The Kodachromes appear to have a cool color cast, but in reality they don’t. That’s the difference between scanning them and viewing them through a projector or light table. I could have corrected that in software, but I chose not to. The Elite Chrome 200 shot is clearly fading, showing discoloration from age and inappropriate storage. Elite Chrome was a version of Ektachrome, and Ektachrome has been referred to as Fade-a-chrome for not having an especially long shelf life. It looks kind of neat, though, so I had it scanned. The actual slide seems a tad more red/purple than the digital version, but it’s close. In the early days, a lot of my photography had transportation themes, such as trains, trucks and airplanes, so you see that represented here (mostly trains). Even though these are old pictures, and despite the only Fujifilm connection being the singular Provia frame, I thought it might be worthwhile to share. I hope that you appreciate the ten slides below.

48746450172_49b3f84079_c

Night Train – Plano, TX – Canon AE-1 & Kodachrome 64 – 1999

48746453807_f56a432d4b_c

Sunrise Tracks – Floyd, TX – Canon AE-1 & Elite Chrome 100 –  1999

48746416248_efd478e37f_c

DGNO Locomotive – Dallas, TX – Canon AE-1 & Elite Chrome 200 – 1999

48746451967_d914c42a03_c

Moving Tracks – Palestine, TX – Canon AE-1 & Ektachrome E100VS – 1999

48745937073_7836a374cf_c

Colorful Circles – Greenville, TX – Canon AE-1 & Ektachrome E100VS – 1999

48746268506_724e2f72ac_c

Camaro & Caboose – Farmersville, TX – Canon AE-1 & Kodachrome 64 – 1999

48746450442_2703ed029a_c

Kansas City Southern – Plano, TX – Canon AE-1 & Kodachrome 64 – 1999

48746269931_b4c9d3b72e_c

Lake Michigan From Sears Tower – Chicago, IL – Promaster 2500PK & Provia 100F – 2005

48746269731_3983b1e729_c

Flat Ball – Surprise, AZ – Promaster 2500PK & Elite Chrome 100 – 2004

48746326401_dcd4f20a6a_c

Grand Canyon Summer – Grand Canyon NP, AZ – Canon AE-1 & Ektachrome E100SW – 2000

Kodachrome vs. Ektachrome – A Film Simulation Showdown

31766873157_e7f84bb774_c

I have two very similar film simulation recipes that both produce results quite close to their namesake slide films: Kodachrome II and Ektachrome 100SW. Even though the settings are nearly the same, the looks that they produce are quite different. As I was thinking about this, I was reminded of the old “Kodachrome vs. Ektachrome” debate from the days of film. There were people who preferred one over the other for various reasons. Kodachrome was more iconic. Ektachrome had more variations. Despite the fact that they were both color transparencies made by the same company, I could probably write a long article about the differences between the two films, but this blog is about Fujifilm X cameras and not Kodak film stocks.

What I wanted to do here is compare the two film simulation recipes side by side. I will show them both, and you can decide which is best for you. It’s kind of a revival of the old debate, but with a modern twist. Kodachrome or Ektachrome? You get to decide which is the better film simulation recipe!

Take a look at the pictures below:

46605950441_06347f4a2f_c

Welcome to Ogden – Ogden, UT – Fujifilm X-T20 “Kodachrome II”

32436121878_b140102a62_c

Winter Mountain – Ogden, UT – Fujifilm X-T20 “Ektachrome 100SW”

44178791370_0defd0b8f8_c

Desert Juniper – Zion NP, UT – Fujifilm X100F “Kodachrome II”

44301680280_3b9781af2b_c

Juniper – Zion NP, UT – Fujifilm X100F “Ektachrome 100SW”

43735834232_d8b6dd2f28_c

Pueblo de Taos – Taos, NM – Fujifilm X-Pro2 “Kodachrome II”

44301680450_f4d261dcf2_c

View From Mount Carmel Tunnel – Zion NP, UT – Fujifilm X100F “Ektachrome 100SW”

45983677334_fff371e3ac_c

Kodak Transparencies – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T20 “Kodachrome II”

45983677234_8cc01b2afb_c

Kodak Transparencies – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T20 “Ektachrome 100SW”

What I like about the Kodachrome II recipe is that it produces a vintage color look that reminds me of the images found on the pages of old magazines, such as National Geographic and Arizona Highways. As I look through my grandparent’s old slide collection (which I have at home), I can see this look in their old photographs from 50 or so years ago. It’s such a fantastic recipe for Fujifilm X cameras, and I just love it!

What I like about the Ektachrome 100SW recipe is that it produces a color look that reminds me of some images that I have captured with the actual film. The film was good for western landscapes or any situation where you needed some color saturation with a warm color cast. It wasn’t around for very long because it was only marginally commercially successful, but it was one of the better variations of Ektachrome film in my opinion.

What do you think, Kodachrome or Ektachrome? Let me know in the comments which film simulation recipe you like best!

My Fujifilm X-T20 Kodak Ektachrome 100SW Film Simulation Recipe


44330246970_7f6d629e2a_z

Ektachrome was a line of color transparency (slide) films made by Kodak that used the E-6 development process. Some people preferred it to Kodachrome because of the faster ISO (100 vs 64 or 25), more saturated colors and easier development (although Kodachrome had finer grain, a larger dynamic range and didn’t fade as easily). A lot of National Geographic photographs were shot on Ektachrome back in the day.

There were a number of varieties of Ektachrome produced over the years, and I’ve used five of them myself. My favorite was Ektachrome 100VS (VS = “very saturated”), which was Kodak’s attempt at Fujifilm Velvia. Occasionally I used Ektachrome 100SW (SW = “saturated warm”), which was introduced in 1996 and produced vivid photographs with a warm color balance. Kodak stopped production of Ektachrome 100SW in 2002 and all Ektachrome film in 2012. Just a few months ago a brand new Kodak Ektachrome film was released, although I have not tried it yet.

A Fuji X Weekly reader, Ilya Struzhkov, took my Kodachrome II recipe and made a simple modification: he used Velvia instead of Classic Chrome. He shared the results on Instagram and I immediately felt like the images had a Kodak Ektachrome 100SW aesthetic. I had to try it out myself! Sure enough, the results looked a lot like the film: saturated colors (not as much as Velvia but more than most films), a warm color balance, and shadows that easily turned black. It’s amazing that this one change to the recipe could transform it from 1970’s Kodachrome to 1990’s Ektachrome.

31390732704_c462c12909_z

The title of this film simulation recipe says “Fujifilm X-T20” but it can be used on any X-Trans III or IV camera. In fact, at the bottom of this article you’ll find some Fujifilm X100F examples. The only other change I made (besides Velvia instead of Classic Chrome) is that I set sharpening to 0 instead of +1 on the X-T20, but it’s set to +1 on the X100F. That’s just how I set up the cameras, and there really isn’t much of a differences between 0 and +1 sharpening, so either one is fine. Because the settings are essentially the same as my Kodachrome II recipe, it’s super easy to toggle between the two when out shooting. Really, it’s just brilliant!

Velvia
Dynamic Range: DR200
Highlight: +1
Shadow: +2
Color: -1
Noise Reduction: -3
Sharpening: 0
Grain Effect: Weak
White Balance: Auto, +3 Red & -4 Blue
ISO: Auto up to ISO 6400
Exposure Compensation: +1/3 to +2/3 (typically)

Example photos, all camera-made JPEGs using my Fujifilm X-T20 Kodak Ektachrome 100SW Film Simulation recipe:

44316468570_54e918bbc7_z

Light Dust of Snow – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T20 “Ektachrome 100SW”

46111730401_dd67537573_z

Frozen Fall – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T20 “Ektachrome 100SW”

32240502018_af0ca04bd6_z

Frosty Leaf & Grass – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T20 “Ektachrome 100SW”

45200371695_01489ea382_z

Sandstone Peaks – Snow Canyon SP, UT – Fujifilm X-T20 “Ektachrome 100SW”

46111757691_3d8d09c977_z

Evening Moonrise – Snow Canyon SP, UT – Fujifilm X-T20 “Ektachrome 100SW”

46061844092_78d5baaa18_z

Zion Sun – Zion NP, UT – Fujifilm X-T20 “Ektachrome 100SW”

32240501898_78b0ab0b4f_z

Evening On The Cliffs – Snow Canyon SP, UT – Fujifilm X-T20 “Ektachrome 100SW”

45200368785_c27cb04038_z

Amanda & Ritchie – Antelope Island SP, UT – Fujifilm X-T20 “Ektachrome 100SW”

46111740361_30531d5ccd_z

Still Water & Rocky Shore – Antelope Island SP, UT – Fujifilm X-T20 “Ektachrome 100SW”

46083052472_1a37fb1372_z

Old Dry Lavender – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T20 “Ektachrome 100SW”

45206728965_65fe414491_z

Boots – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T20 “Ektachrome 100SW”

Fujifilm X100F:

32246866938_a49e7f5163_z

Autumn Tree Below Bridge Mountain – Zion NP, UT – Fujifilm X100F “Ektachrome 100SW”

44301680450_f4d261dcf2_z

View From Mount Carmel Tunnel – Zion NP, UT – Fujifilm X100F “Ektachrome 100SW”

44301680280_3b9781af2b_z

Juniper – Zion NP, UT – Fujifilm X100F “Ektachrome 100SW”

31130402817_ac131d591d_z

Sandstone Trees – Zion NP, UT – Fujifilm X100F “Ektachrome 100SW”

See also: My Fujifilm X-T20 Aged Color Film Simulation Recipe

Fujifilm X100F Review Blog

Help Fuji X Weekly

Nobody pays me to write the content found on fujixweekly.com. There's a real cost to operating and maintaining this site, not to mention all the time that I pour into it. If you appreciated this article, please consider making a one-time gift contribution. Thank you!

$2.00