New Fujifilm X-Trans I Patron Early-Access Film Simulation Recipe on the App: Color Negative Film

Pink Roses – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-Pro1 – “Color Negative Film”

The Fuji X Weekly app is free, yet becoming a Fuji X Weekly Patron unlocks the best app experience! One benefit of being a Patron is you get early access to some new film simulation recipes. These early-access recipes will eventually become available free to everyone in time, including this new one. In fact, a few of the original early-access recipes have been publicly published on this blog and the app, so everyone can now use them. Patrons help support Fuji X Weekly and, really, without them there would be no app. So I want to give a special “thank you” to all of the Patrons!

This new Patron early-access recipe is called “Color Negative Film” and it is perhaps the X-Trans I recipe that produces the most film-like results. It’s not modeled after any specific film, but it definitely has an analog aesthetic. In the right conditions it is simply beautiful! I think it will be many people’s go-to recipe for X-Trans I cameras.

If you are a Fuji X Weekly Patron, it’s available to you right now on the app!

Example photographs, all camera-made JPEGs captured using this “Color Negative Film” recipe:

Rising Up – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-Pro1
Red Leaves of Summer – Layton, UT – Fujifilm X-Pro1
Backlit White Blossom – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-Pro1
Yellow Bench – Layton, UT – Fujifilm X-Pro1
Log Bridge – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-Pro1

Fuji Features: Fujifilm X-Pro1 in 2021?

The Fujifilm X-Pro1 is nine-years-old. It was the very first interchangeable-lens X camera and also the first to have an X-Trans sensor. If it failed, this website and film simulation recipes probably wouldn’t exist. Thankfully, despite its shortcomings, people could see the potential, and the X-Pro1 was an instant hit.

My Fujifilm journey began with an X-E1, the X-Pro1’s little brother. I briefly shot with an X-Pro2, a camera that I loved. I never had an X-Pro1, but it’s a well-regarded camera, even today. The last Fuji Features article was entitled Fujifilm X-Pro3 in 2021, so I decided this week to find articles and videos about using the X-Pro1 in 2021.

Hopefully, you’ll find this post interesting, and it will help you get through another Hump Day. Maybe it will inspire you to add an old X-Pro1 to your camera collection. I did. More on that later.

The Phoblographer

The Inspired Eye

Daniel Ian

Fujifilm X-Trans IV Film Simulation Recipe: Fujicolor C200

Blooming Pink – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4 “Fujicolor C200”

I’ve been asked at least a dozen times—probably more—to create a Fujicolor C200 film simulation recipe. I’ve tried a few different times, but I never felt that I got close enough. A couple of recipes came out of those experiments, but a C200 recipe remained elusive. The good news is that George Coady (check out his Instagram) figured it out! Yea! George has a lot of experience shooting actual Fujicolor C200 film, and he experimented using X RAW Studio until he got the recipe right. I had a very small hand in tweaking it, but really George did all the work. He gave me permission to publish his recipe here. Thanks, George!

Fujifilm introduced Fujicolor C200 in 1990 as a low-budget, no frills color negative film. I’ve shot several rolls of it over the years, although it was never my go-to option. Fujifilm gave it a small refresh in 2017, and it’s still available today. Even though C200 is a cheap color film, it has a cult-like following, and many people enjoy its aesthetic and choose it over more expensive emulsions.

Red Chairs in a Yard – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4 – “Fujicolor C200”

This recipe looks great! In high-contrast situations DR400 does better to protect highlights than DR200, but in low-contrast situations DR200 produces better contrast. After awhile I decided to set my camera to DR400 and adjust it to DR200 when the situation calls for it. The pictures in this article are a mix of DR200 and DR400. The White Balance Shift can be set to -4 Blue, which can sometimes be more accurate to the film, or -2 Blue, which can sometimes be more accurate to the film, because one film can have many different looks depending on how it was shot, developed, and scanned or printed, but -3 Blue does well for all-around use. Because this recipe requires a half adjustment to Highlight & Shadow, it’s only compatible with the Fujifilm X-T4, X-S10 and X-E4, although if you use Highlight 0 and Shadow -1 it’s pretty close to the same, which opens it up for use on the X100V and X-Pro3.

Classic Negative
Dynamic Range: DR400 (DR200 in low contrast situations)
Highlight: +0.5
Shadow: -0.5
Color: +2
Noise Reduction: -4
Sharpeness: -3
Clarity: -3
Grain Effect: Weak, Large
Color Chrome Effect: Weak
Color Chrome Effect Blue: Off
White Balance: Daylight, 0 Red & -3 Blue
ISO: Auto, up to ISO 6400
Exposure Compensation: 0 to +2/3 (typically)

Example photographs, all camera-made JPEGs using this Fujicolor C200 film simulation recipe on my Fujifilm X-E4:

Red Palms – Centerville, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Red Chair – Layton, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Fairy & Elf – Layton, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Throw Pillows – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
R&R BBQ – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Restaurant Counter – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Standing Tall – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Sour Honey – Kaysville, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Large Leaf – Kaysville, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Blooming Branch – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Yellow Bush – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
If a Tree Falls Does Anyone Hear? – Kaysville, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Up The Trunk – Kaysville, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Trailers – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4

Find this film simulation recipe on the Fuji X Weekly — Film Recipes App!

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Fuji X Weekly App Named a Top Camera App!

The Fuji X Weekly — Film Simulation Recipes App was named a “best Android camera app of 2021” by LeapDroid (read the article here)! Wow! I’m so surprised, and highly honored. Really, I’m shocked, as I never anticipated this kind of acclaim.

The article states that the apps in the list were selected for “exceptional performance” in one of three categories: User Experience, Core Functionality, or Innovated Solution. I’d be curious to know which category the app scored exceptionally well in. The article goes on to say that the list “is ranked based on a balance of review ratings, and number of reviews.” In other words, the Fuji X Weekly App made the “best Android camera app” list because of you! I’m grateful, and humbled by your kindness and support!

Of course the elephant in the room is that the Fuji X Weekly App isn’t a camera app (although it is definitely closely related to cameras and photography). Still, I’ll take it. A lot of work went into creating the app, and a lot of work continues to go into it, as some great improvements are in the works, which I hope to get out later this year.

I want to give a “thank you” to LeapDroid for including the Fuji X Weekly App in their list and an even bigger “thank you” to everyone who downloaded the app and gave it a review. You are appreciated! Also, I have to pause here for a moment and give a huge shout-out to Sahand Nayebaziz, who’s really the one that made this app (and the iOS version) happen. He’s the brains and skills behind the programming, and a talented photographer, too, who shoots a Fujifilm X-T4, often with the Kodak Portra 400 film simulation recipe. Thanks, Sahand!

New Patron Early-Access Film Simulation Recipe: Old Kodak

Wet Radio Flyer – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4 – “Old Kodak”

The Fuji X Weekly app is free, yet becoming a Fuji X Weekly Patron unlocks the best app experience! One benefit of being a Patron is you get early access to some new film simulation recipes. These early-access recipes will eventually become available free to everyone in time, including this new one. In fact, a few of the original early-access recipes have been publicly published on this blog and the app, so everyone can now use them. Patrons help support Fuji X Weekly and, really, without them there would be no app. So I want to give a special “thank you” to all of the Patrons!

This new recipe, called Old Kodak, is similar to Vintage Kodachrome and Kodachrome 1. I was recently viewing some old pictures captured on various Kodak films, and I was reminded of those two film simulation recipes. I thought that with some tweaks I could get closer to mimicking the aesthetic of the old Kodak pictures I was looking at. If you like the Vintage Kodachrome and Kodachrome 1 recipes, you’ll really appreciate this Old Kodak recipe, too! It’s compatible with the Fujifilm X-T4, X-S10 and X-E4 cameras.

If you are a Fuji X Weekly Patron, it’s available to you right now on the app!

Suburban Storm – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4 – “Old Kodak”
The Joy of Writing – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4 – “Old Kodak”
Gumby on a Table – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4 – “Old Kodak”
Sunset Light on Winter Mountain – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4 – “Old Kodak”

Video: Horseshoe Bend + Fujifilm X-E4 + Pergear 10mm

Check out this quick video where I use a Pergear 10mm f/8 Fisheye on my Fujifilm X-E4 at the Horseshoe Bend overlook near Page, Arizona. The film simulation recipe that I used was The Rockwell (find it on the app!).

While I’d passed this famous photographic landmark a handful of times, this was the first time that I’d actually stopped to take a look myself. It’s a part of the Glen Canyon National Recreation Area, and sits a little ways northeast of the Grand Canyon and just southwest of Lake Powell.

Despite visiting during the “off season” it was surprisingly crowded. There’s a small entrance fee, and it seems well maintained. A well-marked trail leads to an epic overlook of the Colorado River. The steep drop-off has railings at one spot but otherwise there’s nothing to keep visitors from falling except for good sense—it didn’t seem as though everyone was exercising good sense while I was there. The red rocks were dusted in red sand, making footing unsteady at times. Be careful if you should visit.

The reward is an incredibly amazing view! There’s a similarly amazing place in this region called Goosenecks State Park that’s much less crowded, which is briefly featured at the beginning of my Monument Valley video. If you have a chance to visit Horseshoe Bend or The Goosenecks, be sure to do so. Don’t wait until the seventh or eighth time passing by before finally getting out of the car and heading down the trail. It’s worth your time, and your photographic attention.

Fuji X Weekly — Film Recipes App

The Fuji X Weekly — Film Recipes App is now available for both Android and iOS!

The Fuji X Weekly app is a mobile film simulation recipe library containing over 100 recipes for Fujifilm cameras! The film simulation recipes in the app are the same ones that you know and love from this website, but now take them with you on the go, and have them at your fingertips wherever you are!

The Fuji X Weekly app is free! No annoying ads. Get access to 100+ film simulation recipes, which can be sorted alphabetically or chronologically. Each recipe contains an assortment of sample images, as well as a list of compatible cameras. Within each recipe there’s a place where you can keep notes, a useful feature for many of you, no doubt. The app will work offline, so if you don’t have internet access but need to find a certain recipe, no problem! The Fuji X Weekly app is a handy tool for Fujifilm photographers, an essential app to accompany your X-series camera. 

This app does have some advanced features that can be unlocked by becoming a Fuji X Weekly Patron! These advanced features include filtering by sensor or camera, as well as by film simulation or color/B&W, and the ability to favorite recipes for quick access. The best app experience is reserved for Patrons!

Fuji X Weekly Patrons also get early access to some new film simulation recipes. There are currently 9 brand-new film simulation recipes that only Patrons can view. These recipes will eventually be published on Fuji X Weekly—free to everyone—but right now they’re available only to Patrons. These recipes currently are: Kodak Portra 400 v2 (for X-T30 and X-T3), CineStill 800T (for X-Trans II), Fujicolor Negative (for X100V, X-Pro3, X-T4, X-S10 and X-E4), LomoChrome Metropolis (for X-T4, X-S10 and X-E4), Porto 200 (for X-Trans III + X-T3 and X-T30), Kodak Portra 400 Warm (for X100V, X-Pro3, X-T4, X-S10 and X-E4), Provia (for X-Trans I), Vintage Negative (for X100V, X-Pro3, X-T4, X-S10 and X-E4), and Fujicolor NPH (for X100V, X-Pro3, X-T4, X-S10 and X-E4). As new early-access recipes are cycled into the app for Patrons, the others will be made available on this website and on the app free to all, so no worries.

By becoming a Fuji X Weekly Patron, which is only $19.99 annually, you unlock the app’s full potential, you get early access to some new film simulation recipes, and you help support Fuji X Weekly! It’s a win-win!

The Fuji X Weekly App is Now Compatible With Android 9!

Just a quick update: the Fuji X Weekly — Film Recipes App for Android is now compatible with Android 9! Many of you who tried to download it but couldn’t (because it wasn’t available for your device) now can. Yea! We’re working on the possibility of making the app compatible with Android 8, but right now, if you have Android 9 or newer, you can download the app today. Google also made the app searchable in the Play Store, so you can simply search Fuji X Weekly, or follow the direct link.

Update: Fuji X Weekly Android App Compatibility

The Fuji X Weekly — Film Recipes App for Android was released yesterday, and I’ve been overwhelmed by the feedback (this is not a complaint). The number one message I’ve received is: why is my device not compatible? The Fuji X Weekly app requires Android 10 or newer, so if your operating system is Android 9 or older it won’t work; however, compatibility with Android 9 (a.k.a. Android Pie) is coming soon, just as soon as Google approves it, hopefully before the end of the week.

A couple of months ago I conducted a survey in an attempt to find out what Android operating system most of you are using. The vast majority answered either Android 10 or Android 11. As it turns out, the survey missed a large group of people. Thankfully, none of the app’s features require Android 10, and Android 9 has sufficient security, so it wasn’t too difficult to create an update to make the app compatible with the Android 9 operating system. I’ll let you know just as soon as Google approves it; if you have Android 9 you’ll be able to get the app soon.

Most Android phones released in the past two years are capable of running on Android 10, so if your phone isn’t old, yet the Google Play store states that your device isn’t compatible, updating the software might remedy the problem. Most Android devices released in the past four years (and some that are older than that) are capable of running on Android 9, so once the app update is released, most people should be able to download the Fuji X Weekly app. Just make sure the software on your device is up-to-date.

I want to apologize for the frustration some of you have experienced because the app isn’t compatible with your device. Hopefully the issue will be resolved quickly.

***Update***
The Fuji X Weekly — Film Recipes App is now compatible with Android 9 (a.k.a. Android Pie)!

Update: Fuji X Weekly App for Android Almost Finished!

The Android version of the Fuji X Weekly — Film Recipes app is almost finished! It will be in the Google Play app store very soon! I’m not sure exactly when (it depends on how quickly Google takes to review it), but for certain the wait is almost over. With any luck, it will available to those with Android phones within a few days, hopefully no more than a week. There could, of course, be some unforeseen delays. The moment I know, I will definitely let you know, so stay tuned!

Fujifilm X-Trans IV Film Simulation Recipe: Creamy Color

Dark Sunset over Salt Lake – Antelope Island SP, UT – Fujifilm X100V – “Creamy Color”

There are some film simulation recipes that just have a special look—the “it factor”—and this “Creamy Color” recipe is definitely one of those! I didn’t make it; this one was created by Immanuel Sander, who also created the Nature Neon recipe. Immanuel was kind enough to allow me to publish his recipe on the Fuji X Weekly blog, and he also gave me permission to include some of his wonderful photographs in this article. Thank you, Immanuel, for creating and sharing this recipe! I encourage you to follow him Instagram.

Immanuel created a great YouTube video for this recipe that you should watch. It’s very inspirational—well done!

“It’s a rather emotional recipe for me,” Immanuel explained. “The recipe works very well in bad weather and dreary colors. Foggy weather or rainy days are perfect for such silent pictures.” I think it also works well around sunset and on partly-cloudy days. The results from this Creamy Color film simulation recipe can be fantastic! Because this recipe requires Classic Negative, Clarity and Color Chrome FX Blue, it’s only compatible with the Fujifilm X100V, X-Pro3, X-T4, X-S10 and the upcoming X-E4.

Classic Negative
Dynamic Range: DR400
Highlight: +4
Shadow: +4
Color: -4
Noise Reduction: -4
Sharpening: -4
Clarity: -5
Grain Effect: Strong, Large
Color Chrome Effect: Strong
Color Chrome Effect Blue: Strong
White Balance: 8700K, +4 Red & +6 Blue
ISO: up to ISO 5000
Exposure Compensation: +1/3 (typically)

Example photographs, all camera-made JPEGs captured with this Creamy Color film simulation recipe:

Immanuel Sander

Photo by Immanuel Sander
Photo by Immanuel Sander
Photo by Immanuel Sander
Photo by Immanuel Sander
Photo by Immanuel Sander
Photo by Immanuel Sander

Ritchie Roesch

Last Light on a Pine – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Suburban Winter – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V – “Creamy Color”
Winter Sky Over Warehouse – Uintah, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Riverdale – Unitah, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Dodge Truck – Weber Canyon, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Weber River – Weber Canyon, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Pet Area – Weber Canyon, UT -Fujifilm X100V
Winter Bison – Antelope Island SP, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Coyote Photography – Antelope Island SP, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Cold Stone – Antelope Island SP, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Reflection in the Puddle – Antelope Island SP, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Wasatch Front From Across the Lake – Antelope Island SP, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Approaching Storm – Antelope Island SP, UT – Fujifilm X100V

New Patron Early-Access Film Simulation Recipe: Fujicolor NPH

Winter Evergreens – Weber Canyon, UT – Fujifilm X100V – “Fujicolor NPH”

The Fuji X Weekly app is free, yet becoming a Fuji X Weekly Patron unlocks the best app experience! One benefit of being a Patron is you get early access to some new film simulation recipes. These early-access recipes will eventually become available free to everyone in time, including this new one. In fact, a couple of the original early-access recipes have been publicly published on this blog and the app, so everyone can use them now. Patrons help support Fuji X Weekly and, really, without them there would be no app. So I want to give a special “thank you” to all of the Patrons!

This new Patron early-access film simulation recipe is called “Fujicolor NPH” because it is inspired by that film. Actually, I was attempting a Fujicolor Pro 400H recipe. I have a couple already: Fujicolor Pro 400H for X-Trans III and Fujicolor Pro 400H Overexposed for X-Trans IV. I don’t think either are 100% accurate to the film; perhaps no recipe is, but some are closer than others. I really like this new version I made—I believe it’s closer than the X-Trans III recipe, but it’s not a perfect match. I actually think it’s closer to Fujicolor NPH 400 film, which was the predecessor to Pro 400H. Those two emulsions were nearly identical, with only some small differences, so this new recipe does well at mimicking both, but in my opinion it’s slightly closer to NPH 400.

If you are a Fuji X Weekly Patron, this new Fujicolor NPH film simulation recipe is already on the app!

Weber River in Winter – Weber Canyon, UT – Fujifilm X100V – “Fujicolor NPH”
Honey Salmon – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X100V – “Fujicolor NPH”
760 Sign – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V – “Fujicolor NPH”
Stepping Into the Night Circle – Sunset, UT – Fujifilm X100V – “Fujicolor NPH”

Two New (Yet Old) Film Simulation Recipes

I just added two new film simulation recipes to the Fuji X Weekly app!

These two recipes aren’t actually new, they’re just new to the app. I’ve created so many different film simulation recipes over the last few years, sometimes it’s hard to keep track of them all. Right now there are 135 different ones on the app! The two that I just added were somehow overlooked. By request, they’re now included on the app.

Let’s take a look at these two new (yet old) film simulation recipes!

Stephan Shore Kodacolor

Pointing Towards the Sky – Layton, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

My Kodacolor film simulation recipe is quite popular as it produces a great vintage-analog aesthetic that’s easy to love. Kodacolor film has been around for a long time—the name was first used by Kodak in 1942—and many different emulsions have had this brand name on it. Interestingly, Kodacolor was the first color negative film intended for making prints.

Stephen Shore shot a lot of Kodacolor, mostly Kodacolor-X and Kodacolor II, but also likely the original Kodacolor, Kodacolor 400, and Kodacolor-VR. While Shore did shoot 35mm film, he is most known for his medium-format and large-format photographs. Something I learned is that medium and large format Kodacolor film is more saturated than the 35mm emulsion. The only difference between the original Kodacolor recipe and the Stephen Shore Kodacolor recipe is that Color is turned up a little, otherwise they’re identical.

Faux Eterna

Smiling Jonathan – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

When Fujifilm introduced the Eterna film simulation on the X-H1, I received several requests to create a recipe that mimics it for cameras that don’t have Eterna. At the time, there weren’t many example pictures captured with Eterna, yet I made an attempt anyway, but it turned out to be inaccurate. Once I had a chance to use Eterna, I created this Faux Eterna recipe, which is much closer to the film simulation.

Faux Eterna is intended to look like “stock” Eterna (Highlight, Shadow, and Color set to 0, plus auto-white-balance with no shift). It’s nothing fancy, but that doesn’t mean it’s not a good look. There are other fake Eterna recipes that I created for cameras that don’t have it, including one that mimics my X-Trans IV Eterna recipe for X-Trans III, one that mimics that Eterna recipe but for X-Trans II, and, if you look at the bottom of the Expired Eterna recipe for X-Trans IV, you’ll find a version of that for X-Trans III cameras.

The 5 Worst Fujifilm Cameras That You Should Never Own

There are five Fujifilm cameras that you should never, ever own. Don’t even think about it! These cameras have qualities that are downright awful. If you should buy one, you’ll certainly regret it. How do I know? Because I have personally used all five of these Fujifilm cameras, and trust me, you should never own one. Ever. They’re the worst!

What are these five foul Fujifilm cameras? What makes them so bad? Read on to find out!

#5 – Fujifilm X-E1

“…performance lags in its class.”

CNET

Never judge a book by its cover. The X-E1 might be one of the most stylish cameras ever made, but on the inside you’ll find sluggish low-light autofocus and an unbearably antiquated menu. Where’s the focus joystick? There isn’t one. You won’t find any film simulations with the name Classic in it, either. The camera is almost 10 years old, which in digital terms is ancient. It received plenty of criticism when it was brand-new, and cameras weren’t nearly as good back then as they are now, so it must be especially awful when judged by today’s standards.

Besides, are 16 megapixels really enough? I mean, we’ve got 100-megapixel cameras now! Nobody is making cameras nowadays with such low resolution. They’re all going to laugh at you with a measly 16; that’s barely enough for social media posts, and not nearly enough for pictures of fluffy the cat. If you’re serious about photography, you need more resolution than this camera has. Lot’s more.

It’s best to avoid the Fujifilm X-E1, even though you can find it sometimes for super cheap. You get what you pay for, so it’s better to spend as much money as possible on your gear. The more you spend, the more successful you’ll be, or at least the more successful other people will assume you are. Remember, perception is reality.

Barn by the Tetons – Grand Teton NP, WY – Fujifilm X-E1
Snake River Fog – Grand Teton NP, WY – Fujifilm X-E1

#4 – Fujifilm X-A3

“…the autofocus system is way too slow….”

PCMag

Fujifilm X-A cameras are essentially cheap X-E copycats. You can buy Lucky Charms or you can buy Marshmallow Mateys; they might look similar, but do they taste the same? No. The X-A3 might resemble an X-E3, but don’t be tricked! X-E is X-Trans, yet X-A is Bayer, which might as well be Sony, and Sony isn’t Fujifilm.

When you judge books by their covers you are usually right. The X-A3 has a lot of plastic on it, and plastic cameras are basically toy cameras. No serious photographer would ever use a toy camera, because toys are for kids. The X-A3 might as well be a Holga or Diana; unfortunately, the Fujifilm model doesn’t have any of that lo-fi sugary goodness that attracts lomographers. This camera sits in a weird spot: too cheap on the outside to be loved by real photographers, too good on the inside to be loved by hipsters.

Feeling Blue – Canyonlands NP, UT – Fujifilm X-A3
La Sal Through Mesa Arch – Canyonlands NP, UT – Fujifilm X-A3

#3 – Fujifilm X-M1

“…it just feels wrong….”

Photography Blog

The X-M1 is an X-E1 trapped inside the body of an X-A1.

What happens when you combine the worst parts of an X-E1 with the worst parts of an X-A1? You get this Frankenstein camera. Fujifilm took all of the bad points of #4 and #5 on this list and mixed them together in what can best be described as a mistake. There’s a reason why Fujifilm never made an X-M2.

Trust me, you’ll regret putting a charged battery inside this camera to bring it to life.

Vibrant Autumn – Fruit Heights, UT – Fujifilm X-M1
Lit Autumn Leaves – Fruit Heights, UT – Fujifilm X-M1

#2 – Fujifilm XQ1

“…it has a number of problems.”

PhotographyLife

The XQ1 is a pocket zoom. Remember those? They were all the rage eight years ago. Were is the keyword. Nobody uses cameras like this anymore. It was trendy for a time (not necessarily this particular model), but they’re just not cool anymore.

Besides, it has a 2/3″ sensor. Yeah, yeah, I know it’s X-Trans II, and produces results similar to the much larger and heavier and more expensive X-T1, but the sensor is so itty bitty. A postage stamp looks large in comparison! Nobody will suspect you’re a photographer if you use it—they’ll just ignore you as an out-of-town tourist or an out-of-date amateur. What’s the point in being a photographer if nobody knows it just by looking at you?

Reaching Leaves – Mirror Lake, UT – Fujifilm XQ1
Logs in the Lake – Mirror Lake, UT – Fujifilm XQ1

#1 – Fujifilm AX350

 “Changing the film simulation is pretty much all you can do….”

Fuji X Weekly

The AX-what?! This pocket point-and-shoot is a camera you likely don’t remember, because it’s entirely forgettable. Intended for the tenderfoot, the AX350 was made obsolete by the cellphone. You might find one at a thrift store for the same price as a cup of coffee. Maybe a friend or relative has one in the back of some junk drawer or at the bottom of a storage box in the attic. If you find one, just leave it be. If someone offers to give you theirs for free, politely decline. Not even those who it was made for want it, and neither should you.

If you had to choose between this camera and your cellphone camera, you wouldn’t choose this one. I mean, what kind of image quality could you possibly get from such a cheap, amateurish, old, obsolete piece-of-junk? It’s best that the AX350 remains a forgotten relic of a time long past, the good ol’ days when only expensive DSLRs were capable of capturing good pictures, and you knew who was a pro (and who wasn’t) by the gear they carried.

Green Summer Leaf – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm AX350
Red Trike – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm AX350

This, of course, is satire. You probably figured that out awhile ago. I’m poking fun at negative articles and videos with titles like: The Absolute Worst Camera, Cameras You Should Never Own, Top Cameras To Avoid, The Most Hated Camera, Things I Hate About This Camera, Why I’m Disappointed With My Camera, Why I’m Selling My Gear, etc., etc.. Negativity is popular, and titles like those get views.

Any camera in the hands of a skilled photographer is a capable photographic tool. As Chase Jarvis coined, “The best camera is the one that’s with you.” Do the best you can with what you have, and you’ll be surprised at the results. It’s more important to have photographic vision than expensive gear. It’s better to invest in experiences than new things.

All five of the cameras mentioned above—the X-E1, X-A3, X-M1, XQ1 and AX350—are fully capable artistic tools. Even the AX350 can produce beautiful results. There’s nothing wrong with using any of them. No matter what your camera is, it’s plenty good enough. Spend less time worrying about the gear you own, and spend more time considering what you can create with it.

New Patron Early-Access Film Simulation Recipe: Vintage Negative

Vintage Berries – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V – “Vintage Negative”

There’s a new Patron early-access film simulation recipe on the Fuji X Weekly app! It’s called Vintage Negative and is based on some old photographs that someone shared with me. If you’re looking for an aged analog aesthetic, this recipe might be for you! It’s compatible with the Fujifilm X100V, X-Pro3, X-T4, X-S10 and the upcoming X-E4.

The Fuji X Weekly app is currently only available for iOS, but progress is being made on the Android version. I think it’s not that far from being finished. As long as there are no unforeseen delays, it will be available by March 1st, hopefully sooner. The app is free, and some features and functionality can be unlocked by becoming a Patron, which is a great way to support what’s going on here. There’s some wonderful stuff in the works, and I can’t do it without you. I want to give a big “Thank You” to all of the Patrons for your support!

One of the perks of being a Fuji X Weekly Patron is that you get early-access to some new film simulation recipes. This new Vintage Negative recipe is one of those Patron early-access ones. It will eventually become available to everyone once a new Patron early-access recipe replaces it. There were seven of these recipes on the app, but I’m increasing that to ten. So far, two of the original early-access recipes have been made available to everyone, but eventually they all will, including this one. My cameras’ custom presets are chocked full of upcoming recipes and various experiments.

If you have an iPhone or iPad, be sure to download the Fuji X Weekly app—it’s free! You can get early access to the Vintage Negative film simulation recipe by becoming a Patron.

Water Tower – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X100V – “Vintage Negative”
Troller Square – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X100V – “Vintage Negative”
Yellow House Evening – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V – “Vintage Negative”
Suburban Reed Evening – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V – “Vintage Negative”

Fujifilm GFX100S

Fujifilm recently announced the 102-megapixel medium-format GFX100S. This camera is already making big waves because of the the high-resolution sensor and because of the “small” price-tag of “only” $6,000 (body only). A lot of people are talking about this upcoming camera—in fact, I visited a local camera store, and the GFX100S was a hot topic that was being discussed by those in the store.

Back in June I published an article, Shrinking Camera Market: What Fujifilm Should Do In 2021 & Beyond, and I suggested that Fujifilm should make a camera like the GFX100S (although I said it should be rangefinder-styled). I think it’s a good move for Fujifilm, and this camera will be highly successful. Already preorders have apparently exceeded expectations, and you might have to exercise some patience if you want to get your hands on one and you didn’t preorder on the day it was announced.

I don’t have a lot of experience with GFX cameras. Fujifilm recently loaned me a GFX-50S, which is four-years-old now and surely about to be discontinued. I’m grateful to have been give the opportunity to briefly try a GFX camera—a dream come true, really! For the most part the benefit of medium format is only truly realized if you crop really deeply or print very large. Still, I hope to one day try the GFX100S myself, although it won’t likely be anytime soon, and will likely only happen if Fujifilm lets me borrow one for a few weeks. The GFX100S, even though priced very low for what it is, is still significantly outside of my budget. I’m sure many of you can relate.

The GFX-50S that Fujifilm sent me has been used by so many other photographers. If you’ve read reviews of this camera or watched YouTube videos about it, you’ve probably seen this exact camera before. It’s difficult to know precisely who has used it—there are a lot of people who have reviewed it and probably a couple different bodies floating around—but I know for certain that Julien Jarry is one because he put a sticker on the bottom. Well played!

Julien is a talented photographer and videographer, and a friend of mine. I had the pleasure to photograph with him this last summer out at Antelope Island State Park, and you’ll notice him in a couple of pictures in the Kodak Portra 400 v2 film simulation recipe. It’s an honor to use the same gear that Julien used.

If someday Fujifilm loans me a GFX100S, you know that I’ll publish several articles about it on the Fuji X Weekly blog, and create some film simulation recipes, too! It might be a long time before that happens, if it ever happens. I hope it does, and I will be grateful for the opportunity, because I’m certain that the GFX100S is an amazing camera.

This post contains affiliate links, and if you make a purchase using my links I’ll be compensated a small amount for it.

Fujifilm GFX100S B&H

A.M. Flight — Cinematic Short Film with a Fujifilm X-T4 and Pergear 50mm f/1.8

I just uploaded a new video, entitled A.M. Flight, to the Fuji X Weekly YouTube channel! I hope you enjoy it!

The reason why we—and by “we” I mean mostly Amanda—created this short film was to test the Pergear 50mm f/1.8 lens for video. I already published a review of the Pergear lens for still photography, but I thought this lens might be a good inexpensive option for cinema. I needed to put it to the test.

Amanda recorded A.M. Flight on her Fujifilm X-T4 with a Pergear 50mm f/1.8. All of it was handheld, no tripod or gimbal was used. The 50mm focal-length, which is 75mm full-frame equivalent, is telephoto, and camera shake is exaggerated because of this. The X-T4 has in-body-image-stabilization (IBIS)—the X-S10 and X-H1 are the only other two Fujifilm X cameras with IBIS—and even with the stabilization there’s still a fair amount of shakiness to the clips. We recommend the use of a tripod or gimbal to help reduce shake; if your camera doesn’t have IBIS, a tripod or gimbal is a must with this lens.

The Pergear 50mm f/1.8 is all manual, which means you’ll have to manually focus. A.M. Flight has a lot of fast movements in the film, and nailing focus manually proved to be very difficult; this lens might be better suited for projects that don’t have quickly moving objects. The focus ring is smooth, a positive for sure! The aperture ring is click-less, which is great for video because you can change the aperture while recording a clip, either increasing or decreasing the depth-of-field.

The f/1.8 aperture is fast, but the depth-of-field is shallow (making nailing focus even more difficult) and image quality isn’t the best when wide-open. It was nice to have f/1.8 as an option when filming in dark locations, but it’s definitely better to stop down a little (at least f/4 is you can) to maximize image quality whenever you can.

When light hits the lens just right, there’s something special about the results. There’s a particularly nice quality to some of the video clips, thanks to the Pergear lens. There’s a certain character that you just won’t find in most modern lenses; if that’s something you want in your video, this lens is for you.

The Pergear 50mm f/1.8 lens is challenging to use for video because it is all manual and because it doesn’t have any stabilization. Cameras with IBIS, like the Fujifilm X-T4, make it a little easier to use, and it’s possible to get away with not having a tripod or gimbal, but if you don’t have IBIS you’re going to want to do something to stabilize the clips. This lens is not the most ideal option for video, but if you are on a tight budget or want the special character that this lens can give you, it’s a good one to consider.

This review contains affiliate links, and I will be compensated a small amount if you make a purchase using my links.
Amazon $79

I’m on the FujiLove Podcast!

FujiLove Magazine has a podcast, and on their latest episode I’m the special guest! If you have 45 minutes to spare and want to listen to a conversation about Fujifilm, film simulation recipes, and the Fuji X Weekly App, be sure to check it out!

This is a big deal because they’ve had some really big names, not just in the Fujifilm community, but the photography community, on their show. You’ll find episodes with Pete Souza, Kevin Mullins, Jack Graham, Adam Gibbs, and many, many more. I’m very honored and humbled. Thank you, FujiLove, for having me on your show!

New X-Trans I Patron Early-Access Film Simulation Recipe on App!

Cradle Tree Branch – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-M1 – “Provia”

There’s a new Fuji X Weekly Patron early-access film simulation recipe available now on the Fuji X Weekly app! If you are a Patron, you can use it today! This new recipe is for X-Trans I cameras (X-E1, X-Pro1 and X-M1), and it replaces the Classic Analog recipe, which was a Patron early-access recipe, but is now available to everyone. Yea!

Below are a few examples of this new recipe, which is simply called Provia, captured with a Fujifilm X-M1. Bricks in the Wall (below) was captured by my daughter, Joy, who I let use the camera.

Sun over Country Horses – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-M1
Target – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-M1
Bricks in the Wall – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-M1 – Photo by Joy Roesch
Strollin’ Jo – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-M1

Top 20 Most Popular Film Simulation Recipes of 2020

Here are the Top 20 most popular film simulation recipes of 2020! I used page views to rank these recipes. Those with Kodak, Kodachrome or Portra in the name are quite popular. More than half of these use Classic Chrome as the base. It’s interesting to compare these to the 12 most popular recipes of December 2020. Only one black-and-white recipe made this list, which isn’t too surprising because color is more popular than monochrome. No Bayer, X-Trans I or X-Trans II recipes found their way into the top 20, only X-Trans III and X-Trans IV.

Without further ado, here are the Top 20 most popular film simulation recipes of 2020:

#1: Fujifilm X-T30 Kodachrome 64

Traffic Lamp – Bountiful, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 – “Kodachrome 64”

#2: Fujifilm X100V Kodachrome 64

Spring Snow – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V – “Kodachrome 64”

#3: Fujifilm X100F Kodak Portra 400

May Clouds Over Wasatch – Layton, UT – Fujifilm X100F – “Kodak Portra 400”

#4: Fujifilm X-Pro2 Kodachrome II

From Dust to Dust – Great Sand Dunes NP, CO – Fujifilm X-Pro2 – “Kodachrome II”

#5: Fujifilm X100F Vintage Kodachrome

Weber River Autumn – Uintah, UT – Fujifilm X100F – “Vintage Kodachrome”

#6: Fujifilm X100V Kodak Portra 400

Journal – North Salt Lake, UT – Fujifilm X100V – “Kodak Portra 400”

#7: Fujifilm X-T30 Eterna

Neon Reflection – Ogden, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 – “Eterna”

#8: Fujifilm X100F Classic Chrome

Closed Drive Thru Window – South Ogden, UT – Fujifilm X100F – “Classic Chrome”

#9: Fujifilm X-T30 Kodak Portra 160

Goosenecks – Goosenecks SP, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 – “Kodak Portra 160”

#10: Fujifilm X-T30 Kodak Portra 400

Pink Tree Bloom – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 – “Kodak Portra 400”

#11: Fujifilm X100F Fujicolor Superia 800

Goodyear – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 – “Fujicolor Superia 800”

#12: Fujifilm X100F CineStill 800T

Where Was Your Head That Day? – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100F – “CineStill 800T”

#13: “Classic Negative” for X-Trans III

November Morning – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T20 – “‘Classic Negative’ for X-Trans III”

#14: Fujifilm X100V Cine Teal

Sunlit Tree Leaves – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V – “Cine Teal”

#15: Fujifilm X100F Kodak Ektar 100

Open Fountain – Brigham City, UT – Fujifilm X100F – “Kodak Ektar 100”

#16: Fujifilm X-T30 Kodacolor

Vintage Sunset – Ogden, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 – “Kodacolor”

#17: Fujifilm X-T30 Kodak Gold 200

Outside 7-Eleven – Layton, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 – “Kodak Gold 200”

#18: Fujifilm X100V Classic Negative

Boy in the Window Light – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V – “Classic Negative”

#19: Fujifilm X100V Kodak Tri-X 400

Wrong Way – Centerville, UT – Fujifilm X100V – “Kodak Tri-X 400”

#20: Fujifilm X100V Fujicolor Superia 100

Grandmother & Grandson – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V – “Fujicolor Superia 100”

You can find these film simulation recipes and many more on the Fuji X Weekly app!

Which one of these 20 recipes is your favorite? Which recipe do you use that didn’t make this list? Let me know in the comments!