The Fuji X Weekly Story

Hair & Lips – Ogden, UT – Fujifilm X100F – “Classic Chrome” recipe – 2017

“What exactly is Fuji X Weekly?”
“What is your website about?”
“What is it that you do?”

I get these questions often. People I meet ask them. Photographers just trying to understand what this thing they keep hearing about ask them. Family and friends ask them. While these are common and seemingly straightforward inquiries, giving a good answer has not been easy. I’ve struggled with this, and I’ve concluded that I haven’t considered enough what the Fuji X Weekly story is. Why did I create this website? What has it evolved into? Why do you come here? This article is my attempt at articulating answers to these questions.

In the very first post on the Fuji X Weekly blog I stated, “I love to photograph and I love to write. Those are two things that I truly enjoy. So I decided to do just that, without profit or self-promotion as a driving force. If nobody ever reads this, I’m OK with that. I’m not looking for money or attention. I’m publishing this because that’s what I want to do.” I then added, “I’ve called this blog Fuji X Weekly because I plan to publish one article per week. Sometimes I might write more than that, sometimes less. The topic of choice is Fujifilm X cameras, specifically my Fujifilm X100F that I purchased four weeks ago. I’ll be talking about one camera. I’ll be writing about my personal experiences with this one camera. And that’s it! However, I purposely left the name of this site, Fuji X Weekly, a little more ambiguous in case that I decide in the future to expand to include other cameras. I didn’t want to make something that might become too limiting or obsolete in a few years.” I did eventually change the website to be all-things-Fujifilm instead of just about the X100F.

That’s a good origin story description, even if it is a little lengthy. I would summarize it like this: “I started Fuji X Weekly because I love to photograph and write, and I desired to share my journey with whoever wanted to come along for the ride, even if that was no one. Originally it was exclusively about the Fujifilm X100F camera, but I was open to someday expand it to Fujifilm in general, which eventually did happen. I committed to publishing at least one article per week.”

That’s how it began, but what is Fuji X Weekly today? How did it get there? Where is it going?

Onaqui Horses – Dugway, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 – “Vintage Kodachrome” recipe – 2019

I started Fuji X Weekly more than four years ago, and a lot has happened in the meantime. Early on I began to publish film simulation recipes—the first two were Acros and Classic Chrome. I didn’t realize the significance of this—in fact, I don’t even remember why I called them “recipes” (Did I coin it? Did I see someone else use it first? Honestly, I have no idea. However it came to be, the term has unquestionably become a part of the Fujifilm lexicon!)—by far these were the articles that people came to the website for. People wanted JPEG settings for their Fujifilm cameras. My fifth film simulation recipe, which I published nearly four years ago, was Vintage Kodachrome. To this day it is a fan-favorite—so far it is the fourth most viewed recipe in 2021, and stands as the number one most viewed recipe of all-time. It was a breakthrough for me because I realized that I could mimic specific films and aesthetics by being more bold and creative with the settings. This recipe required some settings adjustments that most people would not have dared to try on their own because they were pretty extreme, but the results were interesting, similar to the first era of Kodachrome film.

I began more-and-more to model new recipes after specific films and development processes. I’ve now published over 175 film simulation recipes, many of them modeled after film stocks. How was I able to do this?

The Fuji X Weekly story actually goes all the way back to the summer of 1998—the summer between high school and college—when I travelled to Vermont with some friends. I borrowed my dad’s 35mm Sears SLR and shot a whole bunch of rolls of film. When I returned home, I excitedly dropped off the film at a one-hour lab, and, when they were developed, the pictures were… absolutely awful! Many were blurry, most were significantly overexposed or underexposed (a difficult feat considering the exposure latitude of many films), and poorly composed. I was so disappointed. That fall, when I enrolled in college, I chose Photography 101 as an elective, because I wanted to be able to capture a decent picture. It wasn’t for a love of the camera that I enrolled, but out of determination born from failure; however, I discovered very quickly that I loved photography.

For the next year-and-a-half you’d often find me in the darkroom, with the strong scent of photographic chemicals in the air, developing and printing my pictures. I remember one day heading into the lab before sunrise and not finishing until after sunset—I had missed the entire daylight portion of the day! If I wasn’t in the darkroom, or in class, or at one of my two jobs, or doing homework, I was out with my camera, a Canon AE-1. That was my favorite part of photography: out on some adventure in search of something interesting to photograph. When I didn’t have access to a darkroom, I most often shot slides, which I could send off to a lab and get consistent results back.

Night Train – Plano, TX – Canon AE-1 & Kodachrome 64 – 1999

As is common in life, I was thrown a couple of curve balls, and I didn’t pursue photography as a career. I had an opportunity to work for JCPenney as a catalog photographer, which I turned down because I lacked the confidence in my own abilities and didn’t have the courage to take the risk. I went a whole different direction with my career, and photography was “just a hobby” for a long time. I continued to shoot film, resisting the move to digital because I didn’t like how digital photographs looked. I remember very proudly being able to tell if a picture was captured on film or digitally just by looking at it. Slowly it became harder and harder to tell, but I could still tell. It wasn’t until 2009 that I got my first digital camera, and I felt like I had to learn photography all over again because it was so much different.

I shot both film and digital for awhile. I preferred how film looked, but digital was more consistent, convenient, and cheaper (at least once the initial investment was made). I jumped from brand-to-brand, trying to find one that I liked, but was never completely happy with any. First I tried Pentax (because by this time I was shooting with a Pentax film camera, and those lenses were compatible with the digital camera), then Samsung (remember when they made interchangeable-lens mirrorless cameras?), then Sigma (oh, the much loved and hated Foveon sensor!), then Nikon, then Sony (with a Panasonic briefly thrown in for good measure), and finally Fujifilm. My first Fujifilm camera was an X-E1, which I loved, although a year later it was replaced by an X100F, which I loved even more!

When I setup my Fujifilm X-E1, I chose RAW+JPEG, but mostly used the RAW files. Occasionally I preferred the camera-made JPEGs. My JPEG settings were the factory defaults (I didn’t bother to adjust them), yet the results were sometimes quite nice. In those cases I’d use the JPEG over the RAW, and not bother with post-processing, or (perhaps more commonly) I would lightly edit the JPEGs. I began to realize during this time that Fujifilm’s JPEGs were higher quality than the other brands that I’d used, although I wasn’t completely convinced yet that I could rely on out-of-camera JPEGs. When I setup my X100F, I also chose RAW+JPEG, and I quickly discovered that the JPEGs were even better than those from the X-E1. The epiphany that I could rely on JPEGs (and not fiddle with RAW anymore) came after I edited some RAW files, and when I compared them to the straight-out-of-camera JPEGs they were very similar. My first thought was, “Why am I spending all this time editing RAW files only to get the same look as the JPEGs?” My second thought was, “If I adjust the JPEG settings, can I get even closer to my edited RAW files?” The first two recipes, Acros and Classic Chrome, came from this. They were my attempts to get my out-of-camera JPEGs to more closely match my edited RAW files.

Snake River Fog – Grand Teton NP, WY – Fujifilm X-E1 – Silver Efex – 2017

The advantages of shooting JPEGs are time, simplicity, and enjoyment. Because I was no longer editing RAW pictures, I suddenly had a lot more time. My rule-of-thumb was that every hour of photographing would require two-to-three hours of post-processing. With JPEGs I could “post-process” hours of photography in minutes. My workflow suddenly evolved into uploading the pictures from the camera to my iPhone, cropping and/or making very minor adjustments if needed (not usually needed) using the Photos App, and uploading the pictures to the Cloud for storage. That’s it. My production noticeably increased while simultaneously I had more time to spend with family and friends. It’s amazing how many hours and hours I had been spending for years in front of a computer monitor fiddling with pictures, and now I didn’t need to. This had a profound impact on my life, and that’s not hyperbole. The simplicity of this approach was freeing! I no longer needed RAW editing software, or any photo editing software, or even a computer if I didn’t want to have one. The process was more analog-like—more reminiscent of my film days—and I found it to be more enjoyable. Photography became even more fun for me! I began to realize that these JPEG settings were helping a lot of other people in the same ways that they were helping me. My recipes allowed them to save time, simplify their process, and make photography more enjoyable for them.

I would summarize this (very long) portion of the Fuji X Weekly story like this: “I used my experience as a film photographer to create JPEG settings, called film simulation recipes, that often mimic film stocks. These settings save time, simplify the photographic process, and make capturing pictures even more enjoyable.”

Photographers who were using these recipes began to spread the word—the popularity of Fuji X Weekly grew very organically. Experts would probably tell you that, from the very beginning, I did everything wrong to grow the audience. I did almost nothing—barely anything at all—for the first three years to promote the website. It was others, on their own accord, spreading the word to the photography community, because these recipes made a difference to their photography. There were just over one million page-views over the first two years combined, which I thought was a lot. Then Fujirumors picked up on the website, followed by Andrew & Denae, Vuhlandes, Omar Gonzalez, and many others, and traffic significantly jumped. The Fuji X Weekly audience continues to grow and grow, and much of that is still organic—just photographers telling other photographers about film simulation recipes, and how they’ve made a difference to their photography.

Rays Over Canyon Ferry – Townsend, MT – Fujifilm X100V – “Kodak Tri-X 400” recipe – 2020

About one year ago Sahand Nayebaziz, an app developer and photographer who shoots Fujifilm cameras and uses Fuji X Weekly recipes, reached out to me with a proposal: let’s make an app together. My wife, Amanda, had been telling me for awhile that these recipes needed to be in an app, but I didn’t have the knowledge, experience, or resources to do it. Sahand did, and he wanted to partner with me to make it happen. We worked very hard for a couple of months, and on December 1, 2020, the Fuji X Weekly App launched on iOS, and we continued to work hard, and on March 1, 2021 the app launched on Android. These were major accomplishments that just wouldn’t have happened without Sahand—frankly, there would be no Fuji X Weekly App without him.

There have been, of course, many other people who have helped Fuji X Weekly along the way: Thomas Schwab, Anders Lindborg, Daniele Petrarolo, Nathalie Boucry, Immanuel Sander, Luis Costa, Ryan, Piotr Skrzypek, K. Adam Christensen, George Coady, Manuel Sechi, Julien Jarry, and many, many others. My apologies for not including your name if you contributed something—I know that I’m forgetting several, as there have been so many over the years. This really has become a community, where we’re all helping each other, because we’re all journeying down this same path together. It’s a team effort, and you, the Fuji X Weekly reader, are a part of that team!

I would summarize this portion of the Fuji X Weekly story like this: “Fuji X Weekly grew in popularity very organically, largely spreading by word of mouth. A lot of people have helped in various ways, and, because of that, this has become much more than a website—it is a community of photographers journeying down the same path.”

Over the summer I secretly worked on another project: recipes for Ricoh cameras. I made JPEG recipes for the Ricoh GR, GR II, GR III, and GR IIIx cameras, and just last month I lunched a new website, Ritchie’s Ricoh Recipes, and published a new App for Ricoh GR. My wife told me that I needed an overarching website to link Fuji X Weekly and Ritchie’s Ricoh Recipes together, so I created RitchieRoesch.com. The very first words on this website are: “Custom JPEG settings for cameras. Get the look you want straight-out-of-camera without the need to edit. Easy to use. Free.” That’s what I do. That’s what my websites are about. That’s my contribution to the photography continuum. Right now this is for Fujifilm X and Ricoh GR cameras, but perhaps someday it will expand beyond those brands—it’s hard to know what the future holds. Fujifilm is my preferred choice—no doubt about it—and I will continue to create recipes for X-series cameras for as long as I can. I immensely enjoy what I do, and I know for certain that I will continue to do it.

I would summarize this portion of the Fuji X Weekly story like this: “I immensely enjoy creating recipes, and I will continue to do so as long as I can.”

Sentinel & Merced – Yosemite NP, CA – Fujifilm X100V – “Vintage Color” recipe – 2021

That’s a pretty long story (which, by the way, could have been much longer, but I didn’t want to bore you too much), and I’m glad that you found it entertaining enough to get this far. Really, I’m honored and humbled that you would be this interested in what I do, and that you’re journeying with me on this adventure. If you did find it to be a little too wordy, here’s the Cliffs Notes version:

I started Fuji X Weekly because I love to photograph and write, and I desired to share my journey with whoever wanted to come along for the ride, even if that was no one. Originally it was exclusively about the Fujifilm X100F camera, but I was open to someday expand it to Fujifilm in general, which eventually did happen. I committed to publishing at least one article per week. I used my experience as a film photographer to create JPEG settings, called film simulation recipes, that often mimic film stocks. These settings save time, simplify the photographic process, and make capturing pictures even more enjoyable. Fuji X Weekly grew in popularity very organically, largely spreading by word of mouth. A lot of people have helped in various ways, and, because of that, this has become much more than a website—it is a community of photographers journeying down the same path. I immensely enjoy creating recipes, and I will continue to do so as long as I can.

Or, even more simply:

I create free and easy-to-use custom JPEG settings to achieve looks straight-out-of-camera without the need to edit.

Whether it’s the long version, short version, or super short version, this is the Fuji X Weekly story; however, this isn’t the end, it’s really just the beginning. I hope this is Chapter 1 of a much longer tale, and that you join me on this journey, wherever it leads.

Community Recipes

If you’ve never visited the Fuji X Weekly Community Recipes website—well, go on over right now and have a look around! It’s a place where you can view film simulation recipes created by the Fuji X Weekly audience, and submit your own!

I’ve noticed that a lot of people are creating film simulation recipes and sharing them on their social media accounts, but they’re easily lost and forgotten. I wanted to create a place where you can share your recipes, and where you can find recipes created by others. That’s the idea behind the Fuji X Weekly Community Page—this is a library of film simulation recipes created by you and for you!

If you want even more film simulation recipes for your Fujifilm camera than what I’ve published here, or if you’ve created a recipe that you want to share, or if you just want to check out some pictures captured by others, be sure to visit the Fuji X Weekly Community Recipes Page! My hope is that this will become a great resource for the Fujifilm community. Be sure to bookmark it and check it often!

I want to highlight some of the recipes that you’ll find on the Community page.

AstiAmore by Thomas Schwab

Photo by Thomas Schwab.

Kodacolor VR200 by Thomas Schwab

Photo by Thomas Schwab.

Cool Scala by Marcel Fraij

Photo by Marcel Fraij.

Saul Leiter by Marcel Fraij

Photo by Marcel Fraij.

These are just four of the (as of this writing) 17 recipes that you’ll find on the Community Recipes page. I’m sure more will be added in the coming days, weeks, and months. I want to thank everyone who has submitted a recipe—your participation is much appreciated by myself and the Fujifilm community! Also, a special “thank you” to Daniele Petrarolo (websiteInstagram), who partnered with me to make this website a reality. 

Introducing RitchieRoesch.com!

Because I now have JPEG recipes for both Fujifilm (fujixweekly.com) and Ricoh (ricohrecipes.com) cameras, my wife, Amanda, suggested that I should have an overarching website that joins the two together. Amanda is always right about these things, so I created RitchieRoesch.com, my new homepage! Of course, Fuji X Weekly still has its own homepage. Nothing has changed. But I can now direct people to RitchieRoesch.com for both Fujifilm and Ricoh—it doesn’t matter which brand you have. In fact, you might have both, because there’s quite a few people who do—there’s some overlap between these two brands of cameras thanks to their popularity among street, travel, and documentary photographers. You can access both Fuji X Weekly and Ritchie’s Ricoh Recipes from RitchieRoesch.com.

There’s not a lot of stuff on the new website. There’s a Photo Gallery that you might enjoy. Beyond that, it simply stands as a gateway to Fuji X Weekly and Ritchie’s Ricoh Recipes. So if you’d like, check it out! Also, stay tuned, because at least one big announcement is coming soon!

The Fuji X Weekly Moment CineBloom Giveaway Winners!

The Fuji X Weekly Moment CineBloom Giveaway has ended! I want to give a big “Thank You” to everyone who participated—there were over 400 submissions! The winners, who were randomly selected, are:
@alex_fricke_365
@stephen.wells
@bruce_martin_photographe
@fotografik_westphalen
@henrikbratt

Congratulations to these five winners! I know you will appreciate using the filters!

CineBloom diffusion filters are a great way to take the “digital edge” off of your photographs, giving them an analog-like feel. Diffusion filters have been popular in cinematography for awhile, and people are beginning to realize that they’re great for still photography, too. These filters pair especially well with my Film Simulation Recipes, and are a wonderful tool for the JPEG photographer.

I want to give a huge shout-out to Moment for teaming up with Fuji X Weekly to make this giveaway possible! They did it because they’re big fans of this website, Fujifilm cameras, film simulation recipes, and the Fujifilm community. Moment’s website (shopmoment.com) is definitely one of the better camera stores out there (yet, really, they are so very much more than just “a camera store”). If you’ve never visited Moment, be sure to do so—you can thank me later.

Even though the Fuji X Weekly Moment giveaway has ended, please continue to use the #fujixweeklymoment hashtag on Instagram. I love seeing your Fuji X Weekly moments, and I hope you continue sharing them!

Also, while I’m here, if you haven’t downloaded the Fuji X Weekly App, be sure to do so. It’s free, and available for both Android and Apple. If you are looking for a way to support Fuji X Weekly and all that I’m doing for the community plus unlock the best app experience, consider becoming a Fuji X Weekly Patron (available in the app)!

The Fuji X Weekly Moment – Update 3

I’m giving away CineBloom filters to some of those who tell me their Fuji X Weekly moment on Instagram! Interested? Click here for all of the details and rules.

My favorite part of The Fuji X Weekly Moment giveaway is reading your great stories. For example, @snapsbybennett shared:

I love how the places at my dad’s have literally never changed since I was a kid. If you’re a Fuji shooter and haven’t used the Fuji X Weekly App yet… GO TRY IT OUT! Changed my whole look on my photography. Fujifilm XT3, 18-55mm, Portra 400 Sim.

@rockysgraphs shared:

Shot with Fujicolor Pro 160NS film simulation. I am loving the film simulation recipes from Fuji X Weekly. They add another level of creative control in camera that enhances my experience when shooting my Fujifilm X100F.

@azyrizaldi79 shared:

My Fuji X Weekly moment: Modeled a classic helmet this afternoon. Turn head right, left, up, that’s it…!!! In order for the color of this afternoon’s sun to get better, I’m using Fuji X Weekly’s Provia recipe in camera. A Provia standard color variation that is soft and suitable with the yellowish shine of the afternoon sun. No Grain in this recipe because it’s made for larger sensors. Whatever it is, the color looks cool on X-Trans III cameras. Find it on the Fuji X Weekly App!

And @patrickmichaelmckenna shared:

This is my Fuji X Weekly moment. Captured on my Fujifilm X100V with the Fuji X Weekly Kodak Portra v2 film simulation recipe, which I found on the Fuji X Weekly App. Image is of my granddaughter Sutton gripping her Mimi’s finger. First time I used an X100V—instead of a professional DSLR or my new Canon EOS R5. Sutton was 2 days old, and I wanted to “focus” on my new granddaughter and not my camera settings. The X100V did the trick.

There are, of course, so many more (almost 400!)! I encourage you to take a look at all of the #fujixweeklymoment submissions, and to submit your own! The giveaway closes on Saturday (September 4th), which is only a couple days away, so don’t procrastinate. I look forward to seeing your pictures and reading more of your stories!

The Fuji X Weekly Moment – Update 2

I’m giving away CineBloom filters to some of those who tell me their Fuji X Weekly moment on Instagram! Interested? Click here for all of the details and rules.

My favorite part of The Fuji X Weekly Moment giveaway is reading your great stories. For example, @thinkingrockphotography shared:

This is the first time I’ve used a film simulation recipe and really noticed how much it looks like film. I didn’t grow up shooting film, but there is a box of Kodachrome slides in the closet, and this photo looks EXACTLY like I remember those slides looking.

And @thaiphangram said:

This is my Fuji X Weekly moment, which was captured on my Fujifilm X-Pro3 with the Fuji X Weekly CineStill 800T film simulation recipe, which I found on the Fuji X Weekly App. What I love about film simulations is how easy they are to use which lets me shoot more and edit less since the straight out of camera picture is so good.

And @t_kuerten_photos stated:

I recently picked up a cheap little Fujifilm X-T10 after discovering the amazing film simulations by Fuji X Weekly that just make taking great JPEGs SOOC so easy. I used to shoot entirely 100% in RAW but after spending weeks getting bogged down editing after a trip to Portugal, I wanted to spend more time behind the camera and less time behind the computer. So for this trip to Barcelona to visit my parents, I decided I would shoot almost the entire trip in JPEG. And I have no regrets! So, without further ado, here is the first Fuji X Weekly moment of my trip (shot using the Kodacolor simulation slightly adjusted to taste).

There are, of course, so many more! I encourage you to take a look at all of the #fujixweeklymoment submissions, and to submit your own! There is just one week before the giveaway closes, so don’t procrastinate. I look forward to seeing your pictures and reading more of your stories!

SOOC Viewer Images!

This short video is about you! These are the viewer submitted pictures from Season 01 Episode 02 of the SOOC live video series. I want to give a special “Thank You” to everyone who participated! This whole video series is for you, and I appreciate all who tuned in. I hope that you’ve found it helpful and, at the very least, entertaining. Click here if you missed Episode 01, and click here if you missed Episode 02. Episode 03 will be on Thursday, September 9th, so mark your calendars! Click here if you’d like to submit a picture for Episode 03 captured with the Fujicolor C200 film simulation recipe. Those who submit photographs are entered into a drawing to win a year Patron subscription to the Fuji X Weekly App!

I hope to see you on September 9th!

The Fuji X Weekly Moment – Update 1

The Fuji X Weekly Moment CineBloom Giveaway on Instagram is off to a great start! Many of you have already entered. Click here if you want to know how to participate, how to enter to win a CineBloom filter, and to see all of the rules.

I love the great stories that I’m reading—your Fuji X Weekly moments! For example, @xisperience shared in his post:

I have been able to capture some beautiful memories for me and my family using the recipes found on Fuji X Weekly, coming to a point where I no longer have the need to edit anything, I can print the photographs directly from the camera and I know they come out fantastic. So, in a way, your recipes have provided me with the freedom to focus on what’s important, and that’s the photograph itself and what it means for my loved ones. This is my #fujixweeklymoment, which is every time I release the shutter button.

@xisperience

And @rodolfo.mdn.foto wrote in his post:

Definitely a very cherished #fujixweeklymoment captured on my Fujifilm X100V with the Kodachrome 64 film simulation recipe found on the Fuji X Weekly App, kindly provided by @fujixweekly. What makes a Fuji X Weekly moment special? For me, it starts when I fill in the adjustments on my X100V. The moment really goes on when I start using that film simulation enough to keep it in the custom settings for a while.

@rodolfo.mdn.foto

There are tons of other great moments being shared on Instagram by you, and I love seeing them all! I invite you to take a look yourself, and to add your own (if you haven’t done so already—or if you have, add some more!). I want to read your stories, as they are very encouraging and inspirational to me.

Oh, and you might just win one of five CineBloom filters that are being given away!


Don’t have the Fuji X Weekly App? Download it today!

The Fuji X Weekly Moment (Plus: CineBloom Diffusion Filter Giveaway!)

What is your Fuji X Weekly moment?

Which film simulation recipe is your favorite? What location did you last use it? How has it changed your photography? When is the Fuji X Weekly App most helpful to you? Share with me your Fuji X Weekly moment, and be entered to win a CineBloom diffusion filter (details below)!

Fuji X Weekly and Moment are teaming up to give away five CineBloom diffusion filters! Yes, that’s right—you could win one of five CineBloom filters!

CineBloom diffusion filters are a great way to take the “digital edge” off of your photographs, giving them an analog-like feel. Diffusion filters have been popular in cinematography for awhile, and people are beginning to realize that they’re great for still photography, too. These filters pair especially well with my Film Simulation Recipes, and are a wonderful tool for the JPEG photographer.

The Rules

These rules are pretty simple, but it is important that you follow each step.

  • First, if you don’t already, be sure to follow Fuji X Weekly and Moment on Instagram (here and here). This isn’t actually a requirement to win, but it would be great if you would do this (hey, we’re giving away free stuff!). While you’re at it, feel free to follow us on YouTube, too (here and here).
  • Next, on Instagram, share a picture that you’ve captured using a Fuji X Weekly film simulation recipe on your Fujifilm camera. Which recipe? Whichever one you want—there are over 150 to choose from! State in the post description that you used a Fuji X Weekly recipe and which recipe you used. It would be great if you could mention the Fuji X Weekly app, because I’m hoping to reach people who don’t yet know about recipes and the app. Maybe something like, “This is my Fuji X Weekly moment. Captured on my #Fujifilm #XPro2 with the @fujixweekly Kodachrome II film simulation recipe, which I found on the Fuji X Weekly App.” There are no rules for the exact wording, so don’t sweat it. Say what comes naturally to you, because I’d rather you say something authentic. Definitely let me know what your Fuji X Weekly moment is and why.
  • Third, tag a friend, especially if you think that friend might be interested in film simulation recipes or photography. If you don’t want to tag a friend, tag a photographer that you follow on Instagram. Or tag a famous photographer, such as @stevemccurryofficial, @petesouza, @chrisburkard, @seantuck, or someone else like that. Be sure to tag someone, or even several someones if you’d like.
  • Lastly—and this is highly important—use the hashtag #fujixweeklymoment when you post your picture. If you want, you can include this in the second-step statement (for example: “This is my #fujixweeklymoment.”). Then post your picture to Instagram!

That’s it! Well, sort of. There are actually several more rules, which you’ll find below.

The Fuji X Weekly Moment giveaway runs from from August 21, 2021 through September 4, 2021.

There will be five winners. Each winner will receive a code that can be redeemed from Moment for one CineBloom diffusion filter. Winners will be randomly selected (this is not a photography contest). Enter by using the #fujixweeklymoment hashtag on Instagram—each picture posted with that hashtag is one entry. You can enter up to five times; if you post more than five pictures, you’ll only be entered five times (but feel free to post as many pictures as you’d like!). Please keep the pictures family-friendly/safe-for-work. Each person can only win one prize. Winners will be announced between September 6th and 14th (hopefully on September 6th) and will be notified via an Instagram direct message (DM). Void where prohibited. By entering, you agree to all of these rules, Instagram’s policies, and all laws that may govern this giveaway. Fuji X Weekly and Moment are not responsible for any rule or law violations.

“Per Instagram rules, this promotion is in no way sponsored, administered, or associated with Instagram, Inc. By entering, entrants confirm that they are 13+ years of age, release Instagram of responsibility, and agree to Instagram’s terms of use.”

Don’t have the Fuji X Weekly — Film Recipes App? Find it in the Google Play and Apple App Stores!

Be sure to share this article on your social media channels to help get the word out! Thank you, have fun, and good luck!

Fuji Features: Fuji X Weekly App

You guys all know about the Fuji X Weekly App, and I’m sure many of you have it on your phone. I wanted to mention the app again because early work has begun on a big update coming (hopefully) later this year. It will take awhile to get ready, but it will add some great functionality and features that will make it even better, and I think you’ll really appreciate the changes. I can’t yet discuss the specifics—just know that some great improvements are in the works.

Below are some articles and videos that I found via Google and YouTube that mention the Fuji X Weekly App. I’m sure that I missed a few (if you know of one, feel fee to share it in the comments), but you’ll find quite a few if you need some material to help you get through another Monday.

Exibart Street
Fujirumors
PetaPixel
Island in the Net
Fujistas

***Edit: I missed this one from just today!***

Petapixel

Reminder: SOOC Episode 02 This Thursday!

As a reminder, Episode 02 of the live interactive video series SOOC will be this Thursday, August 12, at 11 AM MST (10 AM Pacific, 1 PM Eastern)!

SOOC is a collaboration between Tame Your Fujifilm (Fujifilm X Photographer Nathalie Boucry) and Fuji X Weekly (Ritchie Roesch). It is a monthly live video series, and each episode focuses on a different film simulation recipe. It’s a fun and educational experience where we will not only talk about Fujifilm camera settings, but also answer your questions. This is an interactive program, which means that we need your participation! Mark your calendar and be sure to tune in!

I’m really looking forward to Episode 02. Among other things, we’ll take a look at your pictures captured with the Kodachrome II film simulation recipe, and discuss the Fujicolor C200 recipe! I really hope you’ll tune in!

If you missed Episode 01, you’ll find it below:

Some Big Things Are Coming!

I can’t tell you the details yet, but a number of big things are in the works here at Fuji X Weekly! They’ll be announced in the coming days, weeks, and months. I’m extremely excited about all of these different “things” that are coming. I wish that I could provide you with more details, but just know that I am working very diligently behind the scenes to get them finished, and as soon as I’m able I will be making the announcements of what they are. Each will unfold differently, but I think you’ll really appreciate them, and they’ll be very beneficial to the Fujifilm and photographic community.

While I’m here, I want to say “thank you” to you! This community is something special. Really, the photographic continuum is being shaped by you, much more than you likely realize. I’m honored to be a part of it, and it’s really a privilege to be able to facilitate it whenever and however I can.

If you don’t already, I encourage you to follow Fuji X Weekly on Facebook, Instagram, and YouTube. Because I’m so busy, I don’t always get to post as frequently as I’d like, but I will definitely share these different new things with you when they’re ready—you won’t want to miss when they’re announced!

New Fujifilm X-Trans I Patron Early-Access Film Simulation Recipe on the App: Color Negative Film

Pink Roses – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-Pro1 – “Color Negative Film”

The Fuji X Weekly app is free, yet becoming a Fuji X Weekly Patron unlocks the best app experience! One benefit of being a Patron is you get early access to some new film simulation recipes. These early-access recipes will eventually become available free to everyone in time, including this new one. In fact, a few of the original early-access recipes have been publicly published on this blog and the app, so everyone can now use them. Patrons help support Fuji X Weekly and, really, without them there would be no app. So I want to give a special “thank you” to all of the Patrons!

This new Patron early-access recipe is called “Color Negative Film” and it is perhaps the X-Trans I recipe that produces the most film-like results. It’s not modeled after any specific film, but it definitely has an analog aesthetic. In the right conditions it is simply beautiful! I think it will be many people’s go-to recipe for X-Trans I cameras.

If you are a Fuji X Weekly Patron, it’s available to you right now on the app!

Example photographs, all camera-made JPEGs captured using this “Color Negative Film” recipe:

Rising Up – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-Pro1
Red Leaves of Summer – Layton, UT – Fujifilm X-Pro1
Backlit White Blossom – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-Pro1
Yellow Bench – Layton, UT – Fujifilm X-Pro1
Log Bridge – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-Pro1

Fuji Features: Fujifilm X-Pro1 in 2021?

The Fujifilm X-Pro1 is nine-years-old. It was the very first interchangeable-lens X camera and also the first to have an X-Trans sensor. If it failed, this website and film simulation recipes probably wouldn’t exist. Thankfully, despite its shortcomings, people could see the potential, and the X-Pro1 was an instant hit.

My Fujifilm journey began with an X-E1, the X-Pro1’s little brother. I briefly shot with an X-Pro2, a camera that I loved. I never had an X-Pro1, but it’s a well-regarded camera, even today. The last Fuji Features article was entitled Fujifilm X-Pro3 in 2021, so I decided this week to find articles and videos about using the X-Pro1 in 2021.

Hopefully, you’ll find this post interesting, and it will help you get through another Hump Day. Maybe it will inspire you to add an old X-Pro1 to your camera collection. I did. More on that later.

The Phoblographer

The Inspired Eye

Daniel Ian

Fujifilm X-Trans IV Film Simulation Recipe: Fujicolor C200

Blooming Pink – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4 “Fujicolor C200”

I’ve been asked at least a dozen times—probably more—to create a Fujicolor C200 film simulation recipe. I’ve tried a few different times, but I never felt that I got close enough. A couple of recipes came out of those experiments, but a C200 recipe remained elusive. The good news is that George Coady (check out his Instagram) figured it out! Yea! George has a lot of experience shooting actual Fujicolor C200 film, and he experimented using X RAW Studio until he got the recipe right. I had a very small hand in tweaking it, but really George did all the work. He gave me permission to publish his recipe here. Thanks, George!

Fujifilm introduced Fujicolor C200 in 1990 as a low-budget, no frills color negative film. I’ve shot several rolls of it over the years, although it was never my go-to option. Fujifilm gave it a small refresh in 2017, and it’s still available today. Even though C200 is a cheap color film, it has a cult-like following, and many people enjoy its aesthetic and choose it over more expensive emulsions.

Red Chairs in a Yard – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4 – “Fujicolor C200”

This recipe looks great! In high-contrast situations DR400 does better to protect highlights than DR200, but in low-contrast situations DR200 produces better contrast. After awhile I decided to set my camera to DR400 and adjust it to DR200 when the situation calls for it. The pictures in this article are a mix of DR200 and DR400. The White Balance Shift can be set to -4 Blue, which can sometimes be more accurate to the film, or -2 Blue, which can sometimes be more accurate to the film, because one film can have many different looks depending on how it was shot, developed, and scanned or printed, but -3 Blue does well for all-around use. Because this recipe requires a half adjustment to Highlight & Shadow, it’s only compatible with the Fujifilm X-T4, X-S10 and X-E4, although if you use Highlight 0 and Shadow -1 it’s pretty close to the same, which opens it up for use on the X100V and X-Pro3.

Classic Negative
Dynamic Range: DR400 (DR200 in low contrast situations)
Highlight: +0.5
Shadow: -0.5
Color: +2
Noise Reduction: -4
Sharpeness: -3
Clarity: -3
Grain Effect: Weak, Large
Color Chrome Effect: Weak
Color Chrome Effect Blue: Off
White Balance: Daylight, 0 Red & -3 Blue
ISO: Auto, up to ISO 6400
Exposure Compensation: 0 to +2/3 (typically)

Example photographs, all camera-made JPEGs using this Fujicolor C200 film simulation recipe on my Fujifilm X-E4:

Red Palms – Centerville, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Red Chair – Layton, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Fairy & Elf – Layton, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Throw Pillows – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
R&R BBQ – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Restaurant Counter – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Standing Tall – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Sour Honey – Kaysville, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Large Leaf – Kaysville, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Blooming Branch – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Yellow Bush – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
If a Tree Falls Does Anyone Hear? – Kaysville, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Up The Trunk – Kaysville, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Trailers – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4

Find this film simulation recipe on the Fuji X Weekly — Film Recipes App!

Help Fuji X Weekly

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Fuji X Weekly App Named a Top Camera App!

The Fuji X Weekly — Film Simulation Recipes App was named a “best Android camera app of 2021” by LeapDroid (read the article here)! Wow! I’m so surprised, and highly honored. Really, I’m shocked, as I never anticipated this kind of acclaim.

The article states that the apps in the list were selected for “exceptional performance” in one of three categories: User Experience, Core Functionality, or Innovated Solution. I’d be curious to know which category the app scored exceptionally well in. The article goes on to say that the list “is ranked based on a balance of review ratings, and number of reviews.” In other words, the Fuji X Weekly App made the “best Android camera app” list because of you! I’m grateful, and humbled by your kindness and support!

Of course the elephant in the room is that the Fuji X Weekly App isn’t a camera app (although it is definitely closely related to cameras and photography). Still, I’ll take it. A lot of work went into creating the app, and a lot of work continues to go into it, as some great improvements are in the works, which I hope to get out later this year.

I want to give a “thank you” to LeapDroid for including the Fuji X Weekly App in their list and an even bigger “thank you” to everyone who downloaded the app and gave it a review. You are appreciated! Also, I have to pause here for a moment and give a huge shout-out to Sahand Nayebaziz, who’s really the one that made this app (and the iOS version) happen. He’s the brains and skills behind the programming, and a talented photographer, too, who shoots a Fujifilm X-T4, often with the Kodak Portra 400 film simulation recipe. Thanks, Sahand!

New Patron Early-Access Film Simulation Recipe: Old Kodak

Wet Radio Flyer – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4 – “Old Kodak”

The Fuji X Weekly app is free, yet becoming a Fuji X Weekly Patron unlocks the best app experience! One benefit of being a Patron is you get early access to some new film simulation recipes. These early-access recipes will eventually become available free to everyone in time, including this new one. In fact, a few of the original early-access recipes have been publicly published on this blog and the app, so everyone can now use them. Patrons help support Fuji X Weekly and, really, without them there would be no app. So I want to give a special “thank you” to all of the Patrons!

This new recipe, called Old Kodak, is similar to Vintage Kodachrome and Kodachrome 1. I was recently viewing some old pictures captured on various Kodak films, and I was reminded of those two film simulation recipes. I thought that with some tweaks I could get closer to mimicking the aesthetic of the old Kodak pictures I was looking at. If you like the Vintage Kodachrome and Kodachrome 1 recipes, you’ll really appreciate this Old Kodak recipe, too! It’s compatible with the Fujifilm X-T4, X-S10 and X-E4 cameras.

If you are a Fuji X Weekly Patron, it’s available to you right now on the app!

Suburban Storm – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4 – “Old Kodak”
The Joy of Writing – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4 – “Old Kodak”
Gumby on a Table – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4 – “Old Kodak”
Sunset Light on Winter Mountain – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4 – “Old Kodak”

Video: Horseshoe Bend + Fujifilm X-E4 + Pergear 10mm

Check out this quick video where I use a Pergear 10mm f/8 Fisheye on my Fujifilm X-E4 at the Horseshoe Bend overlook near Page, Arizona. The film simulation recipe that I used was The Rockwell (find it on the app!).

While I’d passed this famous photographic landmark a handful of times, this was the first time that I’d actually stopped to take a look myself. It’s a part of the Glen Canyon National Recreation Area, and sits a little ways northeast of the Grand Canyon and just southwest of Lake Powell.

Despite visiting during the “off season” it was surprisingly crowded. There’s a small entrance fee, and it seems well maintained. A well-marked trail leads to an epic overlook of the Colorado River. The steep drop-off has railings at one spot but otherwise there’s nothing to keep visitors from falling except for good sense—it didn’t seem as though everyone was exercising good sense while I was there. The red rocks were dusted in red sand, making footing unsteady at times. Be careful if you should visit.

The reward is an incredibly amazing view! There’s a similarly amazing place in this region called Goosenecks State Park that’s much less crowded, which is briefly featured at the beginning of my Monument Valley video. If you have a chance to visit Horseshoe Bend or The Goosenecks, be sure to do so. Don’t wait until the seventh or eighth time passing by before finally getting out of the car and heading down the trail. It’s worth your time, and your photographic attention.

Fuji X Weekly — Film Recipes App

The Fuji X Weekly — Film Recipes App is now available for both Android and iOS!

The Fuji X Weekly app is a mobile film simulation recipe library containing over 100 recipes for Fujifilm cameras! The film simulation recipes in the app are the same ones that you know and love from this website, but now take them with you on the go, and have them at your fingertips wherever you are!

The Fuji X Weekly app is free! No annoying ads. Get access to 100+ film simulation recipes, which can be sorted alphabetically or chronologically. Each recipe contains an assortment of sample images, as well as a list of compatible cameras. Within each recipe there’s a place where you can keep notes, a useful feature for many of you, no doubt. The app will work offline, so if you don’t have internet access but need to find a certain recipe, no problem! The Fuji X Weekly app is a handy tool for Fujifilm photographers, an essential app to accompany your X-series camera. 

This app does have some advanced features that can be unlocked by becoming a Fuji X Weekly Patron! These advanced features include filtering by sensor or camera, as well as by film simulation or color/B&W, and the ability to favorite recipes for quick access. The best app experience is reserved for Patrons!

Fuji X Weekly Patrons also get early access to some new film simulation recipes. There are currently 9 brand-new film simulation recipes that only Patrons can view. These recipes will eventually be published on Fuji X Weekly—free to everyone—but right now they’re available only to Patrons. These recipes currently are: Kodak Portra 400 v2 (for X-T30 and X-T3), CineStill 800T (for X-Trans II), Fujicolor Negative (for X100V, X-Pro3, X-T4, X-S10 and X-E4), LomoChrome Metropolis (for X-T4, X-S10 and X-E4), Porto 200 (for X-Trans III + X-T3 and X-T30), Kodak Portra 400 Warm (for X100V, X-Pro3, X-T4, X-S10 and X-E4), Provia (for X-Trans I), Vintage Negative (for X100V, X-Pro3, X-T4, X-S10 and X-E4), and Fujicolor NPH (for X100V, X-Pro3, X-T4, X-S10 and X-E4). As new early-access recipes are cycled into the app for Patrons, the others will be made available on this website and on the app free to all, so no worries.

By becoming a Fuji X Weekly Patron, which is only $19.99 annually, you unlock the app’s full potential, you get early access to some new film simulation recipes, and you help support Fuji X Weekly! It’s a win-win!

The Fuji X Weekly App is Now Compatible With Android 9!

Just a quick update: the Fuji X Weekly — Film Recipes App for Android is now compatible with Android 9! Many of you who tried to download it but couldn’t (because it wasn’t available for your device) now can. Yea! We’re working on the possibility of making the app compatible with Android 8, but right now, if you have Android 9 or newer, you can download the app today. Google also made the app searchable in the Play Store, so you can simply search Fuji X Weekly, or follow the direct link.