My Fujifilm X-T30 Color Negative Film Simulation Recipe

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Evening Light On A Clearing Mountain – Riverdale, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 – “Color Negative”

Silly Putty was invented by accident. There was a shortage of rubber during the second world war, and as a result several companies worked hard to create a synthetic substitute. What we now know as Silly Putty was a failed attempt at synthetic rubber. Even though it didn’t turn out exactly like its inventor had hoped, it still became a useful product that has brought joy to many people across the world. This “Color Negative” film simulation recipe has a similar story to Silly Putty (minus the war and rubber).

I’ve been working on a number of different recipes, trying to mimic several different aesthetics that I’ve been asked to create. One of the films that I’ve been trying to recreate the look of is Fujifilm C200, but I’ve yet to crack the code. This recipe is one of the failed attempts at C200. I like how it looks, so I thought I’d share it, even though it’s not exactly what I was trying for. I hope it become useful and brings joy to someone.

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Cameras and Coffee – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 – “Color Negative”

I named this recipe “Color Negative” only because it has a general color negative aesthetic, and I didn’t know what else to call it. It’s in the general neighborhood of Fujifilm C200, but it’s not exactly right for that film. Perhaps there’s some generic film that looks similar to this. It doesn’t precisely mimic any one film that I’m aware of, but this recipe does have a film-like quality to it.

PRO Neg. Hi
Dynamic Range: DR400
Highlight: +2
Shadow: +2
Color: -2
Noise Reduction: -4
Sharpening: +1
Grain Effect: Weak
Color Chrome Effect: Off
White Balance: Daylight Fluorescent (1), -2 Red & +4 Blue
ISO: Auto, up to ISO 6400
Exposure Compensation: 0 to +2/3 (typically)

Note: There was some confusion on the white balance required for this recipe. It’s Fluorescent 1, also called Daylight Fluorescent or Neon 1. It’s the first option underneath Cloudy.

Example photographs, all camera-made JPEGs using my Color Negative Film Simulation recipe on a Fujifilm X-T30:

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Fallen Leaves – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Hanging Apple – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Leaf Hanging On – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Boy Unsure – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Joy’s Smile – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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White Stars – Roy, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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White Cloud Ridge – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Reserved Parking – South Ogden, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

See also: My Fujifilm Film Simulation Recipes

Asahi-Pentax Super-Takumar 135mm f/3.5 + Fujifilm X-T30

Fujifilm XT30 Blog Asahi Pentax Super Takumar 135mm f/3.5

Asahi-Pentax Super-Takumar 135mm f/3.5 Lens & Fujifilm X-T30.

The Super-Takumar 135mm f/3.5 lens was made by the Asahi Optical Company in Japan in the 1960’s and 1970’s for Pentax M42 screw mount cameras. There were a few nearly identical versions of the Asahi Takumar 135mm f/3.5 lens manufactured, each with a different coating applied to the glass, but otherwise identical. I love pairing my Fujifilm X-T30 with vintage lenses, such as this one. You will need an M42 to Fuji-X adapter to attach it to your Fujifilm X camera. The Asahi-Pentax Super-Takumar 135mm f/3.5 lens is a long telephoto prime that won’t break the bank, but is it any good?

This lens, unsurprisingly, is all manual (don’t let the “A” and “M” switch on the side fool you). You will have to manually focus it and manually adjust the aperture. There’s nothing automatic about it. If you are not used to lenses like this, it might take some practice to get comfortable using it. Also, being a longer lens without image stabilization, you’ll need to use faster shutter speeds or tripod to avoid blur.

As I stated in my Fujinon 90mm f/2 lens review, the 135mm focal length used to be very common. It was one of the first primes you’d add to your bag. It’s much less common nowadays. Because of the APS-C crop factor, this lens has a full-frame focal-length equivalency of about 202mm, which makes it a long telephoto option. Fujifilm only makes one prime lens this long, in fact, but it costs a heck-of-a-lot, so if you want a long telephoto prime, you have to look elsewhere, such as vintage glass like this one, or buy a telephoto zoom.

Fujifilm XT30 blog Asahi Pentax Super Takumar 135mm f/3.5

Fujifilm XT30 Blog Asahi Pentax Super Takumar 135mm f/3.5

The Asahi Takumar 135mm lens is fairly small and lightweight for how long it is. At 0.75 pounds, it weighs noticeably less than the previously mentioned Fujinon 90mm lens. It’s made of metal and feels pretty sturdy. Asahi made quality lenses, so this is not surprising. Even though this lens is quite old, it seems like it has a lot of life left.

Sharpness is a tale of two lenses, with the focus distance being the key factor. At near and medium distances, the Asahi Takumar 135mm is quite sharp. There is perhaps some softness, particularly in the corners, at f/3.5 (the maximum aperture), but by f/5.6 it’s pretty sharp across the entire frame. Peak sharpness is around f/8 or f/11, with diffraction setting in at f/16, and f/22 (the minimum aperture) being only marginally usable. Beyond medium focus distances, the lens becomes less sharp as you move towards infinity, and has only mediocre sharpness when focused at infinity, about what one would expect from a cheap zoom and not a prime.

There’s quite a bit of chromatic aberrations in the corners no matter the aperture, but the smaller the aperture the worse it seems to get; there’s very little in the middle at all apertures. I haven’t noticed any vignetting. There’s a tiny amount of pincushion distortion that will only be noticed when photographing brick walls. This lens does not control flare well at all, producing a hazy-type flare that significantly reduces contrast. Sunstars are medicore. Bokeh is not especially good looking.

Fujifilm Blog Asahi Pentax Super Takumar 135mm f/3.5

Fujifilm Blog Asahi Pentax Super Takumar 135mm f/3.5

The lens functions well. The focus ring is smooth. The aperture clicks at the f-stops. I have had no problems pairing it with my Fujifilm X-T30. There are good and bad points to the image quality that the Asahi Takumar 135mm lens produces. In fact, I would say that this is the worst Takumar lens I’ve used, but it is still capable of capturing good images. You have to understand its strengths and weaknesses, and use it accordingly.

Despite the negative points, this lens can usually be found for less than $50, and sometimes for less than $25, which makes it a great bargain! You can find cheap M42 to Fuji-X adapters that will allow you to attach the lens to your camera; mine was about $10. Considering the price, if you want a 200mm equivalent focal-length lens, it’s worth taking a chance on this one.

Sample photographs, all captured using this Asahi-Pentax Super-Takumar 135mm f/3.5 lens attached to my Fujifilm X-T30:

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Flowing Fall – Bountiful, UT

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Apple, Hangin’ On – South Weber, UT

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Young Smile – South Weber, UT

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White Stars – Roy, UT

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I See Red – Riverdale, UT

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Plant Leaves – South Weber, UT

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Becoming Autumn Yellow – South Weber, UT

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Cold On Top – South Weber, UT

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Peaks & Ridges – South Weber, UT

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Last Light on the Clearing Mountain – South Weber, UT

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Sunset Red Peak – South Weber, UT

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White Cloud Over Black Mountain – South Weber, UT

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Mount Ogden #1 – Riverdale, UT

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Mount Ogden #2 – Riverdale, UT

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Coffee & Cameras – South Weber, UT

See also:
Industar 69 + Fujifilm X-T30
Fujifilm Gear

Announced: Fujifilm X-Pro3

Fujifilm X-Pro3 Blog

Fujifilm just announced the upcoming X-Pro3! It will be released on November 29 with an MSRP of $1,800 (body only), or December 13 for the Dura versions, which will have an MSRP of $2,000. This new iteration of the X-Pro camera is much different than the previous two, at least on the inside and back. There are a lot of changes and new features, so let’s take a look at those.

The Fujifilm X-Pro3 has an unusual tilt screen, which is mounted backwards and flips down for waist-level shooting. On the back of the screen, which faces out when the screen is closed, is a small screen that displays some exposure and film simulation information. The idea is that most X-Pro3 users will primarily use the viewfinder and not the LCD for composing. It’s also a way to further differentiate this camera from the X-T3. I think it’s either something you’ll love or hate, and I’m still on the fence with how I feel about it, but I’m leaning towards love. I haven’t had my hands on one to know for sure what I think about it.

Fujifilm X-Pro3 Blog

Fujifilm X-Pro3 Blog

Fujifilm X-Pro3 Blog

Besides the unusual screen, Fujifilm did away with the four-way D-Pad on the back. They also re-arranged some of the buttons. The wonderful hybrid viewfinder has been improved. The camera is now made out of titanium. While the rear is clearly different, the front of the camera looks nearly identical to past models, and internally there are some big changes.

The X-Pro3 includes a new film simulation called Classic Negative. It’s supposed to mimic the look of Superia film. I’m pretty excited about Classic Negative, as I’m sure that I could create several great film simulation recipes using it. I think it might become one of my favorites, just looking at the sample images I’ve seen. There’s a good chance that it will be added to the X-T3 and X-T30 via a firmware update in the coming weeks or months, so I’m looking forward to that.

Fujifilm X-Pro3 Blog

There are a ton of other new features on the X-Pro3. The headline is improved auto-focus over the X-T3 and X-T30, although Fujifilm will likely give this new algorithm to the other two cameras soon. It’s supposed to be pretty darn excellent, but I already find the X-T30 to be excellent, so it’s hard to understand how much room for improvement there could be.

The X-Pro3 has a new HDR feature, which can combine and auto-align hand-held pictures. It has much more robust multiple-exposure options, for those who do double or triple (or now up to nine) exposures. There’s a new Clarity feature. There’s a new Curves option, but it’s my understanding that it’s simply a different way to see how Highlight and Shadow adjustments effect the image. B&W toning, instead of just the warm and cool slider found on the X-T3 and X-T30, is now more like white balance shift. On the X-Pro3 you can now change the size of the faux grain, not just the intensity. I hope that all of these new features will be added to the X-T3 and X-T30 in the future, but I don’t know if they will, or perhaps just some of them. It’s clear that the X-Pro3 has some great new options to help you achieve your desired look straight out of camera.

Fujifilm-X-Pro-3-Front

My opinion is that Fujifilm gave the X-Pro line a nice update with the X-Pro3. It’s essentially an X-T3, but better looking, tougher, and with some interesting new features. They’ve made it clear that this camera is about the experience of using it. If you enjoy composing through a viewfinder and not an LCD, and if you use camera-made JPEGs, the X-Pro3 was designed with you in mind. Thanks to the titanium body, it’s tough, and made to take a lickin’ and keep on tickin’ and not even get scratched (if you upgrade to one of the Dura models). It’s a camera you’ll want to buy and keep around for awhile, and not dump as soon as the next model comes out. It’s an old-school photographer’s tool, but it’s certainly not for everyone.

If you’d like to pre-order the X-Pro3, please use my affiliate links below. If you make a purchase using my links, I will be compensated a small amount for it. Nobody pays me to write the articles you find here, so using my affiliate links is a great way to support this website.

Fujifilm X-Pro3 Black:
B&H   Amazon
Fujifilm X-Pro3 Dura Black:
B&H   Amazon
Fujifilm X-Pro3 Dura Silver:
B&H   Amazon

New: Fuji X Weekly Development Page

Fujifilm Blog

I created a new Fuji X Weekly page called Development. You can find it by clicking on the top-left “hamburger” menu and then selecting Development. This new page has absolutely nothing to do with developing pictures, but instead has posts relating to personal development as a photographer. This is where you’ll find things like how-to articles and photography advice. So far it’s not a huge list of articles, but I hope to expand it greatly in the coming months. It’s small now, but it will be much larger soon enough. I’m hoping that it will be a wonderful resource for some of you. I encourage you to check it out, and to revisit it regularly to see what’s new.

Exposure X5 – My Top 5 Favorite Features for Fujifilm Photographers

Exposure X5 is a solid option for editing RAW Fujifilm files. I shoot JPEGs, but for many years I used RAW. I tried a number of different software options to process my pictures, and by far my favorite was Exposure. This software company, until recently, was called Alien Skin, but with the latest version of Exposure they dropped that brand name, and are now known simply as Exposure. I suppose that it sounds more professional, but the Alien Skin title was fun, while Exposure is a bit bland. Whatever the name, what’s most important is whether or not the editing program is good, and Exposure X5 is indeed good!

Fuji X Weekly is known mostly for my film simulation recipes, which are JPEG settings. I found that oftentimes I can achieve my desired look for a photograph in-camera, and not having to edit my pictures saves me a ton of time. But not everyone is a JPEG shooter, and some of you who follow Fuji X Weekly use RAW, so this article is for those who need a RAW developer.

Below are my top five favorite Exposure X5 features for Fujifilm photographers! 

1. 500+ Presets

Exposure X5 Fujifilm

There are over 500 one-click presets on Exposure X5 to choose from. These presets will quickly give your photographs various looks, mostly based on actual film. Once you’ve discovered which presets you like best, you can “star” those for faster future access. You can heavily customize each preset, and save the customization for use on other pictures. You can make your own presets from scratch. You can batch edit with these presets. The idea is to save you time by speeding up your workflow. In fact, once you’re proficient at this software, it will likely speed up your workflow considerably. Exposure X5 allows you to more quickly achieve your desired look.

2. Retro Film Aesthetic

Fujifilm X-T30 Blog

Vibrant Nature – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 – RAW file edited with Exposure X5

What I love most about Exposure X5 are all the fantastic analog-like presets that faithfully mimic the look of many different films, including ones that have been long discontinued. Looking for Kodak Gold 400? They got it. Provia 100F? Got that, too. Neopan 1600? Yep. Polaroid SX-70? Yes sir. The first era of Kodachrome? They have that as well, and many more. They have alternate processes, too, such as push-process, cross-process, split-toning, infrared and others. This goes beyond merely creating a look that more-or-less resembles the different photographic films. The folks at Exposure meticulously studied actual film to ensure they got these settings right, including authentic grain effects. Exposure X5 allows you to more accurately achieve your desired look.

3. Fujifilm Film Simulations

Fujifilm Film Simulation Exposure X5

Fujifilm Film Simulations Exposure X5

All of the Fujifilm film simulations that you know and love, with the exception of Eterna, are found in Exposure X5. That’s not entirely unusual for a RAW editor, but you might notice that these Fujifilm film simulations are the only brand-specific camera looks found in this software. You won’t find any Canon or Nikon or Sony presets, only Fujifilm. That’s because the people behind Exposure X5 love these film simulations and wanted to ensure that you had them as an option, and so you do with this software.

4. They Are Fujifilm Fans

Fujifilm X-T30 Blog

Tree Star – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 – RAW file edited with Exposure X5

Finley Lee, the CEO of Exposure, said, “We are fans of Fujifilm cameras and are always keeping an eye out for ways to work with them better. I’m a photography hobbyist, and I love my X-T1 for photographing family and vacations.” It’s no surprise that, since the folks behind Exposure love Fujifilm cameras, they do their best to optimize their software for Fujifilm RAW files. By design, Exposure X5 is an especially good option for post-processing your Fujifilm photographs.

5. Adobe Alternative

Exposure X5 Fujifilm Blog

Exposure X5 can be used as a Lightroom or Photoshop plug-in if you’d like to integrate it into those popular programs that you might already have, allowing you to use the Exposure presets without disrupting your current workflow. However, Exposure X5 is a non-destructive, feature-rich RAW editor that can be used as a stand-alone software, which is how I run it. In other words, you could ditch Lightroom and Photoshop, and use Exposure X5 instead, as this software has many of the tools and options found in those other programs, along with the wonderful presets.

Conclusion

Cactus Fujifilm X-T30

Indoor Cactus – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 – RAW file edited with Exposure X5

What I appreciate about Exposure X5 is that it allows me to more quickly and accurately achieve my desired look for a picture. It saves me time, while simultaneously producing a result that I prefer. It’s still not as quick as camera-made JPEGs, but for the RAW shooter this is a great way to speed things up. I almost always use JPEGs, but sporadically RAW is better or necessary for fulling my photographic vision, so I have Exposure X5 on my computer at home for those occasions when it’s necessary.

Download your free 30-day trial of Exposure X5 by clicking here. You only have to supply them with your email address in order to download the software. Exposure X5 is fully-functioning during the trial, so you have unlimited access to all of the features. You can take your time, play around with it, and decide if it works for you or not. If you do decide to buy, it’s only $120 (or $150 if bundled with their other programs), which is a great bargain for what Exposure X5 does.

This post contains an affiliate link, and I will be compensated if you make a purchase after clicking through my link.

Sample Photographs

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Field of Bloom – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 – RAW file edited with Exposure X5

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Summer Blossoms – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 – RAW file edited with Exposure X5

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Autumn Begins – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 – RAW file edited with Exposure X5

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Light Thru The Fall Tree – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 – RAW file edited with Exposure X5

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Golden Forest – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 – RAW file edited with Exposure X5

B&H X-H1 Bundle Deal Was a Bust

Fujifilm X-H1

Sometimes, if something seems to good to be true, it is. That’s the case with the recent super deal that B&H had on their website yesterday. They listed the Fujifilm X-H1 bundled with some different lenses on sale for some ridiculously low prices. Turns out, it wasn’t a deal at all. The camera-lens bundle was mistakenly listed for those prices. The customers who purchased it, such as myself, are having their sales cancelled and a refund issued.

I understand that mistakes happen. I don’t want to see B&H go bankrupt from such a mistake. At the same time, it’s poor customer service for them to do this. They were just closed for Yom Kippur, so this seems a bit hypocritical, as well. In my opinion, they should have honored the deal for those who ordered, or at a minimum offered something for the inconvenience. It’s not my fault that B&H made a mistake, but now I have a hold on my card and wasted some of my precious time. I’m suffering the consequences of their mistake (I’m being overly theatrical to make a point). Honestly, I like B&H and they have a good track record overall, but this isn’t the first time that I’ve had a transaction with them end in disappointment.

Will I do business with B&H in the future? I’m sure that I will. Am I going to consider using one of their competitors instead? If all things are equal, I probably will, at least for awhile. I wish that they had handled this better. I can’t know for sure when something is legit or not, so I have to trust that the people at B&H are doing their job, and in this case they didn’t live up to that trust. That’s not what a company needs to do to keep their customers happy. Happy customers are repeat customers. Discontent customers go someplace else. That’s the way business works.

 

 

Your Websites on Fuji X Weekly

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Phone Conversation – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-E1

Last week I invited you to share your website in the comments of a post on Fuji X Weekly. I thought it would be great to see everyone else’s websites. The response was overwhelming, but in the best way possible! It was great fun to visit all the different pages that you shared. I hope you found it helpful, and perhaps you even found some new blogs to follow. I know I did!

To make things easier, I decided to put all of the links into a new post, so that you don’t have to dig through comments to find them. I hope that I didn’t miss any, and I apologize if I did. If you didn’t get a chance to take part in the previous opportunity, feel free to share your website in the comments of this post.

Here are the websites, in no particular order, that you all shared with Fuji X Weekly:

Best Light Photographic
Best Light Photo Blog
Visual Ohio
The Flying Kitty Monster
Island In The Net
Photo A Day
Find The Right Light Photography
Benoit Takes Photos
Fujitopraphy by Veijo Matikainen
Delatorre f/5.6
A Lens In The Landscape
Fragglerocking
Fraggle’s Other Place
Abijango Street Photography
Tintinburgh
Helen Fennell Photography
Earthponds
Ian Clavis Photography
The City Beautiful
Incrodato
James Posilero Photography
Doug & Abby Vinez
Sam and Steve Photography
Miro and Ira
Travelling Lens Blog
Joaquin Fernandez
Life, unintended
Moments & Moods
Nicolas Olonetzky Photography
Len Dobrucki Photographic Journeys
Dia Khalil Photography

Thank you once again to everyone who participated! Also, James Posilero published issue two of SOOC, and he invites you to check it out.

My Fujifilm Gear Page

Fujifilm Gear

Have you visited my Fujifilm Gear page? The intention of this new page is to make it more convenient to find camera and lens reviews, recommendations, and links to buy. Up until recently it has been difficult to find that information because you had to dig for it. The articles were on this blog, but you might have missed them when they were new and perhaps were unaware of their existence, or didn’t know how to locate them. Now it’s all in one easy-to-find place, which should improve the Fuji X Weekly experience, at least a little.

As I write more articles, I will expand the page, adding relevant material. As best as I can I will keep the links accurate so that you can see what gear is available and what’s on sale, which will hopefully make gear shopping a tad easier for you. I’m hoping that this will be a good resource, and it will be a page that you’ll return to often. I’ve made a few additions and changes since the page went live three weeks ago, and I plan to keep working on it over the coming weeks to improve it even more.

To get to Fujifilm Gear, simply click on the three bars (the “hamburger menu”) at the top-left of this page, and then click on Fujifilm Gear. Once there, I recommend bookmarking the page so that you can easily find it whenever you might want to access it. I also invite you to follow Fuji X Weekly, if you haven’t already done so. When you are at the top of this page, click “follow” on the bottom-right. Oh, and don’t forget to look me up on Instragram: @fujixweekly.

 

 

 

 

 

The Artist Photographer

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Dark Rose – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

Let’s talk about art and photography! Discussing art is kind of a dangerous proposition because it’s subjective, and you’re bound to step on someone’s toes. I think it’s important to talk about art, and I think, even if someone might be offended, it’s beneficial to define it and have some understanding of how it relates to photography and to you, the photographer.

Most pictures are not art. Most people who use a camera are not artists, just like most people who have a paintbrush in their hands are not artists. Most people who sing aren’t recording artists. Not all who whittle are wood-carvers. Those who draw letters are not always calligraphers. You get the idea. Just because something is similar to art, does not make it art. There is something that separates actual art from facsimile “art” that’s not really art at all.

Before jumping too deep into this, I want to clarify that it is perfectly fine that most photographs are not art. There are many different purposes for the photograph, and art is just one of them. There is nothing wrong with pictures that aren’t art, as they have their place, just as photographs as art also have their place. Just because one uses a camera doesn’t mean that person must be or should be an artist. You may have little to no interest in art at all, but you love to photograph, and there is nothing wrong with that whatsoever.

Webster defines art as “the conscious use of skill and creative imagination.” Oxford defines it as “the expression of human creative skill and imagination.” Both of these explanations are similar and describe the two critical components for determining if something is or is not art: skill and imagination. If something is created skillfully but not imaginatively, it’s not art. If something is created imaginatively but not skillfully, it’s not art. It must be both skillfully and imaginatively completed in order to be considered art.

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UP 4014 & UP 844 Racing West – Richardson Draw, WY – Fujifilm X-T30

People have different levels of skill and creativity. You might be very skillful but only marginally creative. You can be highly creative but only marginally skillful. Either way, you can still create art, and you can work to improve your shortcomings. You can become more proficient and increase your creativity with practice. Obviously the place you want to be if you wish to be an artist photographer is very skillful and highly creative. That’s a life-long process, and there are no easy one-size-fits-all instant answers. Just continue to work hard and be persistent.

Aside from knowing how to use your camera gear to achieve your desired results, and having imagination enough to know what you want the results to be in the first place, I think that there are a few more aspects to art that should be talked about. Look again at what Webster said of art, paying particular attention to the phrase, “conscious use of…” in the definition. You have to know what it is that you are creating. You have to be able to define it. You should be able to explain it to some extent. If you can’t, it’s not likely art that you’re creating.

I used to show my photographs to people and they’d say, “Oh, that looks nice!” Or, “What a pretty picture!” Then one day someone asked, “What does this picture mean? What is its purpose?” I had no answer because I had never thought of that before. I really didn’t know what to say, and it was kind of embarrassing. I realized that I needed to have an answer for all of my photographs–I needed to know the purpose and meaning of each–but the answer needed to be made prior to exposure, not after. If I’m trying to make it up after the fact, the answer will typically translate as artificial and weak.

If a photograph is art, the photographer should be able to give a clear and concise explanation of the image. It doesn’t necessarily have to be profound. It doesn’t necessarily have to be obvious to the viewer. But the photographer should know clearly in their mind why they created the image and what the meaning of it is. And it’s okay if the viewer doesn’t see it the same way that you see it, it only matters that you know the purpose.

If something is art I believe that it should communicate some message to the viewer. It might be a strong and obvious message, it might be a subtle concept, or it might be an emotion. There should be some kind of nonverbal communication, whether clear or vague, that is presented to the viewer. The photographer must decide what it is that the picture will convey, and then make decisions prior to exposure that will most strongly speak it. The stronger the communication, the stronger the image will be.

Fujifilm Blog

Winter Forest Impression – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T20

The Oxford explanation of art uses the word expression, which can be defined as making one’s thoughts and feelings known. When you are an artist photographer, that’s exactly what you are doing. You are expressing your thoughts and/or feelings to others through your pictures. You are giving the viewer a glimpse of yourself through your photographs. Art is self expression. How you do this is entirely up to you. What glimpses you give of yourself is entirely up to you. You have to make those decisions, then skillfully and imaginatively create something from it.

Not everyone will appreciate your art. Not everyone will get it. In fact, if you are truly expressing yourself, you should expect criticism. People have opinions that are different than yours. People have experiences that are different than yours. People see the world through different eyes than yours. Strangers will look at something that you think is great and they’ll think it’s terrible. That’s completely okay, and you may not realize it, but you do the exact same thing. Beauty is in the eye of the beholder.

If you are an artist photographer, you have to expect that criticism will come. Take it for what it’s worth, and, most likely, it’s not worth much. Listen to people who you trust, and take their criticism to heart. They mean well with what they say, and they’re just trying to help you. For everyone else, give the criticism a listen, but don’t put much stock into it, and don’t let it bother you. If you’re not getting any criticism at all, it’s most likely because you are not creating art, and you are not expressing yourself through your photographs enough.

Not everyone is an artist photographer, and not every artist photographer is always creating art. Photography as art happens when someone consciously expresses themselves in a masterful and creative fashion. It happens when the photographer communicates thoughts or emotions through pictures. I’m constantly striving to be an artist photographer. Sometimes I think I’ve succeeded, other times I feel like I’ve fallen short. But I keep at it, never giving up, always striving ahead.

The takeaway that I’d like to most impart is that you and I, if we are indeed artists, should continuously be working towards becoming more skilled with our gear and we should be practicing creativity daily. Constantly take baby steps to become a better and more artistic photographer. Even if things are slow developing or mistakes happen, don’t give up but instead keep moving forward. Be persistent. Tomorrow’s photographs can be better than today’s.

Share Your Website on Fuji X Weekly

Fujifilm X100F

What’s your website?

I thought it would be a fun idea to give you an opportunity to share your website with me and the Fuji X Weekly community. I know that many of you have a website. It would be great if you posted it, so that I or anyone else reading this could visit it. Even if it’s not photography related, please feel free to share your website. Simply, leave your website address in the comments section. Give your name, web address, and maybe a brief description of your website.

We’re all on this road together. The photography community has been incredibly helpful to me over the years, and I’m glad to be a part of this continuum. If we are all kind and helpful to each other, we’ll all be better photographers for it. I’m hoping that this post will benefit some of you, and maybe you’ll discover some good resource or inspiration. Perhaps you’ll find a website a two to follow, in addition to the others that you already follow (and don’t forget to follow Fuji X Weekly if you are not doing so already).

I look forward to seeing your website in the comments section. I encourage you to check back on this post after a few days and click the different websites that are shared in the comments, and see what others are up to.

This should be a fun!