Fujifilm X100V New Feature: HDR

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There’s a new feature on the Fujifilm X100V called HDR, which is an abbreviation for High Dynamic Range. You’ve probably heard of HDR photography. It was all the rage 10 years ago, but often looked terrible. Well, software has improved, and people are being more tasteful with their edits, and you likely see HDR pictures frequently and don’t even know it. I’ve never been a big fan of HDR photography, and I had very little interest in this new Fujifilm feature, but I thought that I’d try it anyway.

What is HDR? It’s the combination of a series of pictures, some overexposed and some underexposed, to maximize dynamic range. It prevents clipped highlights and blocked shadows. Fujifilm has other tools to deal with this: Highlight and Shadow adjustments, different Dynamic Range options, and D-Range Priority. HDR is now another option. You can select HDR 200, HDR 400, HDR 800 or HDR Plus.

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Bright Flowers – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V – HDR 800

On the X100V you have to go to the Drive menu to access HDR. One thing that I really appreciate about HDR on this camera is that you can select all of the different JPEG options except Dynamic Range (with HDR Plus you also cannot select Highlight, Shadow or Clarity). In other words, HDR becomes the Dynamic Range setting, and you still have everything else. You can also reprocess in-camera the RAW HDR file, but only as an HDR image. Cool!

Let’s take a closer look at the HDR options on the X100V, and also compare it to DR400 and D-Range Priority.

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DR400

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D-Range Priority Weak

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D-Range Priority Strong

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HDR 200

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HDR 400

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HDR 800

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HDR Plus

The only pictures where the shadows appear significantly different are D-Range Priority Strong and HDR Plus. Otherwise shadows are similar, and HDR doesn’t seem to affect it much. However, highlights are greatly affected by the different HDR settings. In the pictures above, there’s a big difference in how the sun is rendered.

You might also notice some similarities between some of these different settings. Let’s compare a few:

DR400 vs. HDR 400

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DR400

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HDR 400

D-Range Priority Weak vs. HDR 200

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D-Range Priority Weak

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HDR 200

D-Range Priority Strong vs. HDR Plus

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D-Range Priority Strong

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HDR Plus

You might notice that D-Range Priority Weak and HDR 200 look very similar, as does DR400 and HDR 400, as well as D-Range Priority Strong and HDR Plus. Why? D-Range Priority Weak and HDR 200 are both based on DR200, so it makes sense that they would appear similar to each other. HDR 400 is based on DR400, so it’s logical that they would seem similar, as well. HDR 800 is like DR800 if such a thing existed. Both D-Range Priority Strong and HDR Plus are basically the same as HDR 800 with lighter shadows.

I don’t see a benefit to using HDR 200 or HDR 400, as you can achieve the same thing with your different Dynamic Range options. I did find HDR 800 useful for maximizing the dynamic range of the camera in harsh-light situations. HDR Plus isn’t really any different than using D-Range Priority Strong, so you might as well use the D-Range Priority setting if you really need it.

Here’s another example of the different HDR settings:

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HDR 200

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HDR 400

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HDR 800

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HDR Plus

The picture above illustrates when HDR Plus could be beneficial, but you might as well use D-Range Priority Strong instead. You could achieve the same thing as HDR 200 and HDR 400  by using the Dynamic Range settings. HDR 800 is the only one that you cannot mimic by using other settings, but the difference is pretty small between it and HDR 400.

HDR Examples

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Light Flower – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V – HDR 800

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Tiny Library – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V – HDR 800

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Chopstix – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V – HDR 800

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Jurassic Park – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V – HDR 800

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Window Light on the Wall – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V – HDR 800

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Lunch – Layton, UT – Fujifilm X100V – HDR 800

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Health Parking – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V – HDR 800

Back in the day, HDR photographs were notorious for halos and cartoonish renderings, but I didn’t find any of those issue on the X100V. The camera does a decent job of aligning hand-held shots. The new HDR feature far exceeded my expectations (which were admittedly pretty low). However, it turns out that HDR on the X100V is not especially useful. It also slows down the camera considerably as it captures a series of pictures and combines them. Besides that, it doesn’t always work well.

HDR Bloopers

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How many legs?

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An extra wheel and no driver!

If there’s anything more than very minor movements within the frame, you’ll get weird artifacts from the combination of pictures. Even if there’s no movement, but you are not very still when you capture the pictures, you can get blur from poor alignment. I had just as many busts as I had successes when using HDR because of alignment problems and artifacts from movement. Maybe there’s a way to artistically use this?

Conclusion

HDR was not a feature that I was especially excited about on the Fujifilm X100V, yet it turned out to be a lot more fun than I expected. After playing around with it for a few days, I concluded that it’s not an especially useful tool. HDR 800 is the only selection that has a practical application, and the conditions have to be pretty extreme for it to be beneficial. While you can get good hand-held shots, you’re better off using a tripod, and don’t even think about using HDR if there’s anything more than very slow movement in the scene. While I think Fujifilm did a descent job in the programming, there’s plenty of room for improvement, and it’ll need to be made better before it’s a feature that will be used frequently. It’s good to have HDR as an option on the X100V, but I’m confident that I’ll rarely use it.

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14 comments

  1. Khürt Williams · June 6

    These are decent in camera HDR images. I never given up on HDR. I’ve just learned how to do it tastefully.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Ritchie Roesch · June 6

      It’s come a long ways. Most HDR pictures nowadays you can’t even tell they’re HDR.

      Like

  2. Vernon Szalacha · June 6

    Nice article. I was really excited for the HDR RAF files after seeing all the sample JPEGs people got on sites like Fuji Rumors. One of the uses I can see for it over the Dynamic Range Priority is that you can use that HDR Plus option at ISO 160. Meaning that if you’re willing to use it on a tripod at night, you can preserve a ton of detail in the highlights and shadows. That flat file might not look exciting at first but you can always add back contrast without worrying about extra noise. For really bring situations where shutter is something like 1/500 or so, the three images get taken (on my X-Pro3) really quickly so I’m not worried about motion blur. From my understanding there aren’t any raw converters than can utilize these files. A rep at Capture One confirmed that for me about them. So you just end up with this big 150MB RAF file that is no better than a normal RAF file. The potential is there I’m told but no one can utilize it.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Ritchie Roesch · June 6

      It will certainly be interesting if someone (Capture One, perhaps) made developing these files possible. That’s got to be a part of the plan, I would think.

      Like

  3. Mark C · 29 Days Ago

    Hi Ritchie, I am really enjoying following all the fun you are having with the X100V, seems you really like it. I am seriously considering picking one up sometime this year. I’m just not sure I can convince my wife what a great idea it is to spend $1400 on a new camera after I spent $1600 last October on a new X-T3. I really like the simplicity of a single lens camera. Reminds me of all the years I spent with my FG and the 50mm lens.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Ritchie Roesch · 29 Days Ago

      I love the simplicity of one-camera, one-lens. Most of the time that’s all you need. The X100V is indeed a fun camera, I’m having a blast with it. Money is always the limiting factor. Maybe find an X100F for a good price. It’s 90% the same exact camera. The X100V is indeed “better” but not necessarily be a huge margin.

      Like

  4. Bill Chance · 29 Days Ago

    Nice summary – love the idea of in-camera HDR.

    Thanks for sharing.

    Liked by 1 person

  5. walker · 29 Days Ago

    I would love to own a X100V and for sure will be my next camera. Alas my XE2 does not want to die yet. Most of the shots are really lovely!

    Liked by 1 person

    • Ritchie Roesch · 28 Days Ago

      The X-E2 is a good camera. I do hope to create some more X-Trans II recipes.

      Like

  6. James Symmonds · 27 Days Ago

    Oh good! So I’m not going crazy. I’ve tried to use the HDR settings a few times and didn’t see much of a difference with a photo taken without it. Thought I had lost my mind or something was broken.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Ritchie Roesch · 27 Days Ago

      Yeah, I expected the results to be more pronounced. I do think HDR 800 in high-contrast, bright highlight situations can be useful, but outside of that it isn’t anything I’ll use.

      Like

  7. Pingback: Fujifilm X100V New Feature: B&W Toning | Fuji X Weekly
  8. Pingback: Fujifilm X100V New Feature: Color Chrome Effect Blue | Fuji X Weekly

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