Film Simulation Challenge –Roll 4: Classic Negative (with Ree Drummond)

Back in August I introduced the Film Simulation Challenge, which is where you pick one film simulation recipe and shoot either 24 or 36 frames before changing settings. It’s kind of like loading your camera with a roll of film, and you are stuck with whatever film you loaded until that roll is completely exposed. This challenge is the digital equivalent of that analog issue. I thought it would be a fun experiment to encourage photographic vision while sharing the joy of Fujifilm X cameras.

The “film” that I loaded into my Fujifilm X-T30 was a 36 exposure “roll” of my new “Classic Negative” film simulation recipe. This recipe is the closest that I could come to matching the new film simulation of the same name that’s on the X-Pro3, but I have to admit, it’s not a complete match. The Classic Negative film simulation changes depending on the light and how you expose it, which is different than the other film simulations. I don’t think it’s possible to create an exact match, but hopefully my “Classic Negative” recipe is at least in the general ballpark. Or, if it isn’t, I hope that some of you appreciate it nonetheless.

My wife, Amanda, is a big fan of Ree Drummond (also known as The Pioneer Woman). She’s a famous blogger, author and television personality best known for her cooking recipes. She has a store, restaurant and bakery in Oklahoma, which my wife and I visited two summers ago. Ree has a new cookbook, and she’s been traveling the country doing book signings. Amanda insisted that we go so that we could meet her, and so we did! We stood in line for almost an hour in order to have a thirty second conversation with her. It was a very quick meet-and-greet that seemed like it was over before it even began. What you might not know is that Ree’s a pretty good photographer, and I was able to suggest that she create a photojournal book of her ranch that features her black-and-white photographs. She replied that she needs to get the pictures off her SD Card first.

I made 36 exposures using my “Classic Negative” film simulation, and most were of this event, especially while waiting in line. The lighting inside the bookstore was terrible, with some crazy mixed artificial lights, and this recipe wasn’t a good choice for it. I did reprocess in-camera the RAW image of Ree Drummond, and I’ve included that at the bottom of this article. I used a Fujinon 35mm f/2 lens for these pictures. I hope that you enjoy!

49041878457_c6fc246382_c

Frame 1: Pink Sleeve – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 “Classic Negative”

49041663386_6baed30b57_c

Frame 2: Sunset 218 – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 “Classic Negative”

49041878517_260ab9636d_c

Frame 3: Changing Nature – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 “Classic Negative”

49041663526_5f2e268f5e_c

Frame 5: Sweetaly Gelato – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 “Classic Negative”

49041486731_111de768e7_c

Frame 7: King of Books – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 “Classic Negative”

49060498232_5a4602d62f_c

Frame 8: Waiting For The Bus – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 “Classic Negative”

49041812332_8d7db7fff9_c

Frame 9: 15th Street – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 “Classic Negative”

49041569901_62619856a8_c

Frame 15: Brick Chimney – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 “Classic Negative”

49041694087_2a0e66fdf8_c

Frame 18: A Roof – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 “Classic Negative”

49041778857_4b28b75ed3_c

Frame 19: Waiting In The Waning Sun – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 “Classic Negative”

49041570131_20b65fc11f_c

Frame 22: Rick – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 “Classic Negative”

49041183911_843f005dbc_c

Frame 24: No Trucks – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 “Classic Negative”

49041184891_c68a7aee68_c

Frame 26: Salt Lake Neighborhood – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 “Classic Negative”

49040673033_edbc461c11_c

Frame 28: Ree Drummond – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 “Classic Negative”

49040777728_c4c41cdbce_c

Frame 30: Open – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 “Classic Negative”

49040678358_079d09d5c3_c

Frame 31: Happy Amanda – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 “Classic Negative”

49041184001_eb46be71e2_c

Frame 32: Bank On It – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 “Classic Negative”

49040677043_85ebaec0fa_c

Frame 33: Brews – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 “Classic Negative”

Reprocess of frame 28:

49040675683_a41d4a627b_c

Ree Drummond – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 – PRO Neg. Hi

See also:
Roll 1: Kodachrome 64
Roll 2: Kodacolor
Roll 3: Eterna

Film Simulation Challenge – Roll 3: Eterna

For this third installment of the Film Simulation Challenge, where I use the same settings for 24 or 36 exposures, similar to shooting a roll of film, I chose my Eterna film simulation recipe. This particular recipe isn’t meant to mimic the look of any real film, but nonetheless it has a color negative aesthetic. I “loaded” this “film” into my Fujifilm X-T30, and exposed 36 frames. Sometimes I had a Fujinon 35mm f/2 lens attached to the front of the camera, and sometimes I had a Fujinon 90mm f/2. Both of these lenses are fantastic. I like the way this Eterna recipe looks, and I think Eterna in general is under appreciated. Only a few cameras have this film simulation, so perhaps that’s why it’s not discussed as much as it deserves, but I think it’s great, and I was glad to use it here.

48514783887_bda69fd305_c

Frame 2: Can’t See The Forest #1 – Ogden, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 & 35mm

48514587851_e83231e6b2_c

Frame 4: Can’t See The Forest #2 – Ogden, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 & 35mm

48514603986_9754abe865_c

Frame 8: Trying To Understand – Ogden, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 & 35mm

48514784352_e2937875ea_c

Frame 9: Unsure Smile – Ogden, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 & 35mm

48511783782_ccc0544d7a_c

Frame 10: Peeking White Clouds – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 & 90mm

48511602906_273a66c913_c

Frame 12: Cotton Cloud Above The Ridge – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 & 90mm

48511579571_82d91fcd3b_c

Frame 14: Summer’s Summit – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 & 90mm

48511783037_23a117de1b_c

Frame 15: Old Wheelbarrow Tire – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 & 90mm

48511579391_15e313dabd_c

Frame 16: Red Shed Roofline – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 & 90mm

48511773162_1345984e83_c

Frame 17: Rose Remains – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 & 90mm

48511783687_fb1f59b410_c

Frame 19: Purple Bloom Flower – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 & 90mm

48511760837_7a778ecb45_c

Frame 22: Line of Clouds over the Ridge – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 & 90mm

48515582237_3077844e30_c

Frame 25: Junk Trailer – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 & 35mm

48515404981_2c98a431ff_c

Frame 26: Eastern Sky – South Weber, Utah – Fujifilm X-T30 & 35mm

48515577472_dc1257669b_c

Frame 27: Outdoor Toilet – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 & 35mm

48515580277_4437a9b979_c

Frame 28: Brothers – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 & 35mm

48515405151_ae3e8ea661_c

Frame 30: Summer Evening Light On The Wasatch – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 & 35mm

48515404451_da85d91fdf_c

Frame 34: Quarrel – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 & 35mm

48515405131_c33c1a4c08_c

Frame 35: Superhero Juice – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 & 35mm

48515572517_b981f2a8e7_c

Frame 36: Coffee Beans In A Jar – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 & 35mm

Roll 1: Kodachrome 64   Roll 2: Kodacolor

Film Simulation Challenge – Roll 2: Kodacolor

My first “roll of film” for the Film Simulation Challenge was Kodachrome 64. For my second “roll of film” I choose my Kodacolor film simulation recipe. I “loaded” the “Kodacolor film” into my Fujifilm X-T30 camera, which had a Fujinon 35mm f/2 lens attached to it, and exposed 36 frames. The Film Simulation Challenge is where you capture 24 or 36 exposures using the same settings much like shooting a roll of film. It can be a fun (and educational) experiment to use your digital camera similarly to an analog camera.

48490406926_260c824231_c

Frame 1: Taco – Layton, UT

48490577517_689fe52723_c

Frame 3: Sweet Job – South Weber, UT

48490577282_ecaa06b3f5_c

Frame 6: Smooths – South Weber, UT

48490568952_6969f3e63e_c

Frame 10: Big League – South Weber, UT

48498403137_57239c3910_c

Frame 11: Illuminated Top – South Weber, UT

48490398906_e886340d10_c

Frame 13: Setting Sun Over Suburban Street – South Weber, UT

48490398601_bba9c4996a_c

Frame 18: Users Own Risk – South Weber, UT

48490398536_8fdbc3c371_c

Frame 23: Stop Voting Only One Way – South Weber, UT

48490568727_1012f15edc_c

Frame 24: Red Stripe – South Weber, UT

48490555757_623e1cddf1_c

Frame 26: Hiding Behind The Tree Branches – Farmington, UT

48490556062_769d010e36_c

Frame 28: Colorful Urban Nature – Farmington, UT

48490386086_133b8baa3b_c

Frame 32: Not A Clock – Farmington, UT

48490386246_56faec3ee4_c

Frame 34: Moon Beyond The Maverik – South Weber, UT

48490555452_321cde1770_c

Frame 35: Gas At Night – South Weber, UT

48490555127_acc935758b_c

Frame 36: Night Pumps – South Weber, UT

Roll 3: Eterna

Film Simulation Challenge – 1st Roll: Kodachrome 64

Last week I introduced the Film Simulation Challenge, which is where you pick one film simulation recipe and shoot either 24 or 36 frames before changing settings. It’s kind of like loading your camera with a roll of film, and you are stuck with whatever film you loaded until that roll is completely exposed. This challenge is the digital equivalent of that analog issue. I thought it would be a fun experiment to encourage photographic vision while sharing the joy of Fujifilm X cameras.

For my first attempt at the Film Simulation Challenge, I chose my Kodachrome 64 recipe. I “loaded a roll” of “Kodachrome” into my Fujifilm X-T30, which had a Fujinon 35mm f/2 lens attached to it, and shot 36 exposures at a park in Layton, Utah. I did this in the late morning, and unsurprisingly the light was quite harsh, which wasn’t the best match for this particular film simulation recipe. But I stuck with it, just like I would have done in the film days. I used quite a few of the middle frames attempting hand-held slow-shutter exposures to blur moving water, making a number of tries, and ending up with a few frames that were sharp and a bunch that weren’t. I didn’t capture any spectacular pictures, but sometimes that happens with a roll of film, too. I will try another day in a different light and hopefully get better results.

48476123097_5812eb981f_c

Frame 1: Sprinkler Rainbow #1

48476122892_26764ef5d4_c

Frame 2: Sprinkler Rainbow #2

48475977506_1a18f6b1d7_c

Frame 5: Sun Tree

48476121147_e4f97174e5_c

Frame 6: Grasshopper

48475974596_24c4b3083f_c

Frame 8: Ducks Beyond The Fence

48475943961_17b3d3fb0d_c

Frame 12: Branch Over River

48475898466_890e08f882_c

Frame 25: Water Over Rocks #1

48475904081_43b68651e9_c

Frame 31: Water Over Rocks #2

48475858026_0a5e0b846a_c

Frame 34: Bright Yellow Blooms

48476004032_db08b3f3ba_c

Frame 35: Lots of Yellow Blooms

48475857771_8d34a982e5_c

Frame 36: Bright Seagull

Roll 2: Kodacolor

 

The Film Simulation Challenge

 

36314901471_2bc5ddf2b2_c

#filmsimulationchallenge

Back in the analog days, I would load film into the camera, and I was stuck with whatever was in the camera until the very last frame was exposed. The most common options were 12, 24 or 36 exposures, and frequently the roll of film that I loaded was either 24 or 36 exposures. Once the film was fully exposed, I could then change to another film if I wanted, or load another roll of the same. What I appreciate about this is that you know what you’re going to get, the strengths and weaknesses of the film, and your photographic vision is tuned into that. You look for picture opportunities that best fit what the film is good at.

With digital photography, it’s easy to make the exposure first and think about the end result later. If you don’t like how it looks one way, it’s simple to change it to another look. You might even post-process one frame to have several different aesthetics and decide later which version you like best. There’s nothing wrong with this technique, but I personally find it better to consider in advance the finished photograph, and do what you can to get as close as you can to that finished picture in-camera.

One way that you can practice this using your Fujifilm X camera is to load it with “film” and force yourself to capture a predetermined number of frames with that film before changing. The film in this case is a film simulation recipe, programming into your camera in advance the one that you want to use. You tell yourself that you’ll capture 24 or 36 exposures with those settings, then, when you’re done with those frames, consider if you want to use another “film” or shoot a second “roll” of the first one. I call this the Film Simulation Challenge.

Back when I shot a lot of film, I would consider three to five good pictures from one roll of film to be average. If I got more than five good pictures from 36 exposures, that was a good day for me. If I had less than three, it wasn’t a good day, unless one of those frames was especially good. The idea with the Film Simulation Challenge is that from each “roll” of “film” that you capture, you share three to five (or more if you had a good day) of your best photos from that roll. Share it on your blog, share it Facebook, share it on Instagram, share it somewhere. You can use the hashtag #filmsimulationchallenge if you’d like. You can link to Fuji X Weekly if you want (you certainly don’t have to), or post a link to it in the comments. The purpose of this is to practice photographic vision in a fun way, while also sharing the joy of shooting with Fujifilm X cameras.

You can consider yourself officially challenged. I’m looking forward to seeing what you do, which films you choose and the pictures that you create. Best of luck in this challenge! I’ll be doing the Film Simulation Challenge, too, and I’ll share the results periodically on this blog.