Fujifilm X100V (X-Trans IV) Film Simulation Recipe: Pulled Fujicolor Superia

Salt Lake Shorelands – Layton, UT – Fujifilm X100V – “Pulled Fujicolor Superia”

After creating the Scanned Superia and Portra-Style film simulation recipes, which use D-Range Priority Auto, I wanted to create a recipe that utilized D-Range Priority Strong. You might recall that Anders Lindborg made an interesting discovery that D-Range Priority (DR-P) is essentially the same thing as Hypertone on Fujifilm Frontier scanners. In my own experiments, I’ve come to the conclusion that D-Range Priority Weak is more practical for everyday photography than D-Range Priority Strong, because, unless there is a bright light in the frame, DR-P Strong tends to be too flat, since it maximizes dynamic range. Undeterred, I set out to create a nice recipe that utilizes DR-P Strong.

I call this recipe “Pulled Fujicolor Superia” because it is similar to Fujicolor Superia Xtra 400 film that’s been pulled one stop. Of course, how any emulsion is shot, developed, printed and/or scanned has an impact on its aesthetic, and one film can have many different looks. I didn’t set out to recreate the look of pulled Superia film, but, in fact, it does look surprisingly close to some examples I found. It’s better to be lucky than good, right? I wouldn’t say that this is 100% spot-on for pulled Superia 400 film, but it’s not far off at all.

Break – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X100V – “Pulled Fujicolor Superia”

Because this recipe uses the Classic Negative film simulation, Clarity, and Color Chrome Effect Blue, it is compatible with the Fujifilm X-Pro3, X100V, X-T4, X-S10, X-E4, and X-T30 II cameras. I think it works best on sunny days, but I did use it with some success in overcast and indoor situations.

Classic Negative
Dynamic Range: D-Range Priority Strong
Color: +3
Noise Reduction: -4
Sharpening: -2
Clarity: +2
Grain Effect: Weak, Small
Color Chrome Effect: Strong
Color Chrome Effect Blue: Strong
White Balance: Daylight, -4 Red & -2 Blue
ISO: Auto, up to ISO 6400
Exposure Compensation: 0 to +2/3 (typically)

Example photographs, all camera-made JPEGs using this “Pulled Fujicolor Superia” film simulation recipe on my Fujifilm X100V:

Packed Parking Garage – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Dee’s – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Salt Lake Shoreland Preserve Boardwalk – Layton, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Wetland Grass & Mountains – Layton, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Grass – Layton, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Fence & Hidden Building – Layton, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Playing Pokemon – Layton, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Looking Through Binoculars – Layton, UT – Fujifilm X100V
My Four Kids – Layton, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Jonathan at f/3.6 – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Yellow & Green Grass – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Pops of Fall – Fruit Heights, UT – Fujifilm X100V
A Little Splash of Autumn – Fruit Heights, UT – Fujifilm X100V

Find this film simulation recipe and many more on the Fuji X Weekly — Film Recipes App!

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Comparing Classic Negative Recipes

Classic Negative is one of my favorite film simulations, if not my favorite. There’s something special and unique about it that separates it from the other film simulations. It produces a very Superia film-like look, but can be made to have all sorts of different aesthetics. I thought it would be fun to compare the different film simulation recipes that use Classic Negative. I did this experiment a couple of months ago (I meant to post it back then), so some of the most recent Classic Negative recipes didn’t make this list, including Fujicolor C200, Fujicolor Pro 400H, Fujicolor NPS 160 Pulled, and Positive Film. And more Classic Negative recipes are in the works right now!

My hope is that one of the pictures below will inspire you to try a recipe that you haven’t yet tried. Maybe one of them stands out to you as more interesting than the rest. If so, let me know! Also, be sure to let me know in the comments which Classic Negative recipe is your favorite!

These pictures were captured in Yosemite National Park with a Fujifilm X-E4 and Fujinon 18mm f/2 lens.

Fujifilm X100V + Fujicolor Pro 400H Recipe + Ponderosa State Park + Dreary Day = Photographic Awesomeness

Payette Lake Between Trees – Ponderosa State Park, ID – Fujifilm X100V

I recently visited Ponderosa State Park just outside of McCall, Idaho. It was a dreary day—off-and-on it drizzled rain from the grey overcast sky—with cool temperatures. This might be my favorite weather conditions, and was perfect for a hike through the forest with my Fujifilm X100V, which has some weather sealing, so it’s fine that it got a little wet. I loaded the camera with my Fujicolor Pro 400H film simulation recipe and headed down the trail through the tall trees.

Ponderosa State Park sits on a peninsula on Payette Lake in the middle of Idaho. It’s heavily forested and green. The lake is very clear. As I was exploring, it felt like Ponderosa could be a National Park and not a State Park. It’s missing a headliner feature that would propel it into National Park status, and that’s fine because it wasn’t crowded, so I enjoyed the feeling of being in a National Park without all of the people. At some points it seemed like I had the place all to myself.

The Fujicolor Pro 400H recipe delivered a great analog-like aesthetic on this outing. It captured the scenes how I wanted it to. This recipe does great in sunny conditions, but it also does well on overcast days, like this one. It was a wonderful time for photography, and it was also great to just be in nature, enjoying the sights, sounds and scents of the forest. Enjoy the pictures!

Evergreen Trunks – Ponderosa State Park, ID – Fujifilm X100V
Mossy Trunk – Ponderosa State Park, ID – Fujifilm X100V
Deer In The Forest Ponderosa State Park, ID – Fujifilm X100V
Broken Down – Ponderosa State Park, ID – Fujifilm X100V
Fallen – Ponderosa State Park, ID – Fujifilm X100V
Forest Trail #1 – Ponderosa State Park, ID – Fujifilm X100V
Forest Trail #2 – Ponderosa State Park, ID – Fujifilm X100V
Trees & Pond – Ponderosa State Park, ID – Fujifilm X100V
Curved Trees Over Pond – Ponderosa State Park, ID – Fujifilm X100V
Lily Marsh #1 – Ponderosa State Park, ID – Fujifilm X100V
Lily Marsh #2 – Ponderosa State Park, ID – Fujifilm X100V
V Tree – Ponderosa State Park, ID – Fujifilm X100V
Trees & Lake – Ponderosa State Park, ID – Fujifilm X100V
Rain Clouds Over Payette Lake – Ponderosa State Park, ID – Fujifilm X100V
Lakeshore – Ponderosa State Park, ID – Fujifilm X100V
Above Payette – Ponderosa State Park, ID – Fujifilm X100V

Fujifilm X100V (X-Trans IV) Film Simulation Recipe: Fujicolor Pro 400H

Sun-Kissed Forest – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V – “Fujicolor Pro 400H”

This film simulation recipe is one that I’m particularly excited for because I’ve been after this look for a long, long time. The timeline goes as follows: September 2017 I suggested that Fujifilm should make a Fujicolor Pro 400H Overexposed film simulation, October 2018 I made this same suggestion again, December 2018 I published a Fujicolor Pro 400H film simulation recipe for X-Trans III cameras, February 2020 I made a Fujicolor Pro 400H recipe for X-Trans IV cameras, and February of this year I made a Fujicolor NPH recipe (available as a Patron early-access recipe on the Fuji X Weekly App), which is very similar to Pro 400H (NPH was basically an earlier version of the film). Now, I’ve finally made a Fujicolor Pro 400H recipe that I’m quite pleased with. This is an immediate favorite recipe of mine!

After George Coady shared with me his wonderful Fujicolor C200 recipe, he showed me his initial attempt at a recipe for Pro 400H, which inspired me to try my hands at a better Fujicolor Pro 400H Overexposed recipe using the new JPEG options found on the newer cameras, such as Classic Negative, Color Chrome FX Blue and Clarity. At first glance I was disappointed with my results because it didn’t look exactly like what I was hoping for, but then I realized what I actually had created (which I’ll talk more about in just a moment); however, first let’s briefly discuss the film that this recipe is based on.

Table Tulips – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V – “Fujicolor Pro 400H”

Fujifilm introduced Fujicolor Pro 400H in 2004 and it’s been a popular color negative film ever since. Photographers often overexpose this film by as many as four stops. When overexposed, the film turns from a somewhat ordinary high-ISO (that’s what the “H” stands for in the name) portrait film into something almost magical. Colors become vibrant and pastel. The exact look of overexposed Pro 400H varies, depending on how much overexposed, how developed, and how printed or scanned, and the effect can range from subtle to pronounced, but generally you know overexposed Pro 400H film when you see it.

It was that pastel look that I was hoping to achieve with this recipe, and at first I thought I had failed—it looked more like Pro 400H overexposed by one stop or maybe two, but not three or four where the pastel colors are found. Even though I didn’t get that wonderful pastel aesthetic, the recipe looked really great nonetheless. Still, I wondered if it would be possible to get closer to that overexposed look simply by increasing the exposure. Sure enough, it worked! The two images below are examples of this, with exposure compensation set to a whopping +2 2/3!

Toys on a Chair – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V – “Fujicolor Pro 400H”
Messy Hair – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V – “Fujicolor Pro 400H”

As you can see, there are pastel colors in those two pictures, much like well-overexposed Pro 400H film. Does it closely match the film results? It’s closer than my previous attempts, but it’s not perfect. It’s as close as you’re likely going to get straight-out-of-camera. It’s fun to do this, but you’d have to be pretty brave to shoot a wedding with this much overexposure—I’d do it, but, then again, I’ve sandpapered a camera; I have a history of doing some risky (stupid?) things in the name of art.

What about Fujicolor Pro 400H that’s not overexposed? Can this recipe mimic that, too? Yes, sort of. By not overexposing this recipe, you get results that don’t look overexposed (imagine that), but does it closely resemble the film? It’s not as exact as I’d like it to be, but not far off, either. It’s more convincing as an overexposed recipe, but it also does well when not mimicking that. The two pictures below are examples of this, with exposure compensation set at +1/3.

Yard Toys – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V – “Fujicolor Pro 400H”
Ivy Leaves – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V – “Fujicolor Pro 400H”

As you can see, there’s a certain beauty in not overexposing when using this recipe.

The two sets of pictures below are examples of +1/3 exposure compensation, +1 1/3 exposure compensation, and +2 1/3 exposure compensation. In my opinion, the best results are found in the middle category, with exposure compensation in the +1 to +1 2/3 range, but sometimes reducing or increasing the exposure produces interesting results. In other words, oftentimes the best results are with exposure compensation set to +1 to +1 2/3, but try anywhere from +1/3 to +2 2/3, because, depending on the light and subject, you can get good results across a large range of exposures.

+1/3 Exposure Compensation
+1 1/3 Exposure Compensation
+2 1/3 Exposure Compensation
+1/3 Exposure Compensation
+1 1/3 Exposure Compensation
+2 1/3 Exposure Compensation

This film simulation recipe (as of this writing) is only compatible with the Fujifilm X-Pro3, X100V, X-T4, X-S10 and X-E4 cameras. I used a Fujifilm X100V to capture all of the images in this article. For some of the pictures I used a Tiffen 1/4 Black Pro Mist filter to diffuse the highlights, particularly the ones with a bright light source; because you are bumping up the exposure so much, this recipe pairs especially well with a diffusion filter, producing a more film-like result.

Classic Negative
Dynamic Range: DR400
Highlight: -2
Shadow: +4
Color: +4
Noise Reduction: -4
Sharpening: -2
Clarity: -4
Grain Effect: Strong, Small
Color Chrome Effect: Strong
Color Chrome Effect Blue: Weak
White Balance: 4900K, 0 Red & -4 Blue
ISO: Auto, up to ISO 6400
Exposure Compensation: +1 to +1 2/3 (typically), but try between +1/3 to +2 2/3

Example photographs, all camera-made JPEGs using this new Fujicolor Pro 400H film simulation recipe:

Forest of Light – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Bright Leaf – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

Pink Flowers & Green Leaves – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Spring Sunshine – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Country Trees – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Bright Tree – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Evening Creek – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Tree Fence – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Wild Weeds – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Field of Wishes – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Make A Wish – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
White Tree Blooms – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Forest Fence – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Gnarled Tree – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Creek Trail – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Jon in the Forest – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Trail Bridge – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Flatcar Bridge – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Dandelion Bench – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Lighter Tree – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Fresh Aspen Leaves – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Farmington Creek – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Onion Flower – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Bright Rose – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Rose Bush & Wall – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Rosebush & Vine Ladder – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Ready to Float – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Hide – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Sibling Yard Play – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Kids & Outdoor Table – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Waiting For Food – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Heavenly Hot Cakes – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Smiling Joy – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Art & Craft Tray – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

Johanna & Jonathan – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Fisher Price Phone – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Indoor Basketball Hoop – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Slapfish – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Three Fake Plants on a Shelf – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Find this film simulation recipe on the Fuji X Weekly — Film Recipes App!

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Fujifilm X100V (X-Trans IV) Film Simulation Recipe: Fujicolor Negative

November Tree – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V – “Fujicolor Negative”

Fuji X Weekly Patrons have had early access to this Fujicolor Negative film simulation recipe since the launch of the Fuji X Weekly app, but now it is available to all! What film does this recipe resemble? I’m not completely certain. I was messing around with the settings and stumbled upon something that I liked, which means that this recipe wasn’t intended to mimic any specific film; however, I think it’s kind of similar to Fujicolor F-II or Fujicolor Super G, but it’s not really like either. It does have a vintage Fujicolor vibe thanks to the Classic Negative film simulation that it uses as its base. Whatever film this recipe might or might not resemble, it looks beautiful!

I really enjoy using this recipe—it just produces good results that have a film-like quality. It has good contrast and natural or perhaps somewhat muted colors. This could be my go-to settings for everyday photography—that is, if I wasn’t constantly creating new recipes!

Coming Out of the Shadows – Layton, UT – Fujifilm X100V – “Fujicolor Negative”

This Fujicolor Negative film simulation recipe is only compatible (as of this writing) with the Fujifilm X-Pro3, X100V, X-T4, X-S10 and X-E4 because it uses Classic Negative and Clarity. If you have a GFX camera like GFX-50S that has Classic Negative but doesn’t have Clarity, give this recipe a try anyway—it won’t be exactly the same but should be pretty darn close.

Classic Negative
Dynamic Range: DR400
Highlight: -2
Shadow: +3
Color: -4
Noise Reduction: -4
Sharpening: -2
Clarity: -3
Grain Effect: Strong, Small
Color Chrome Effect: Off
Color Chrome Effect Blue: Off
White Balance: Auto, -1 Red & -6 Blue
ISO: Auto, up to ISO 6400
Exposure Compensation: +2/3 to +1 (typically)

Example photographs, all camera-made JPEGs using this Fujicolor Negative film simulation recipe on my Fujifilm X100V:

Winter Berries – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Small Stop Sign – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Waste Management – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Pile of Pots – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Spilled Sakrete – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Framed – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Reserved Rose – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Oh Deer – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Book of Film – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Succulent Shelf– Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

This post contains affiliate links, and if you make a purchase using my links I’ll be compensated a small amount for it.

Fujifilm X100V Black    Amazon   B&H
Fujifilm X100V Silver   Amazon   B&H

Find this film simulation recipe on the Fuji X Weekly — Film Recipes App!

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Fujifilm X100V Film Simulation Recipe: Color Negative 400

Wind Rewind – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V – “Color Negative 400”

I ran across a picture in an article about coffee, and that picture reminded me a lot of the Classic Negative film simulation. I don’t think the picture was captured with Classic Negative; perhaps a VSCO (or some other brand) preset was used that was intended to look something like Superia film. So, with one picture as my guide, I set out to recreate the look with my Fujifilm X100V. Ideally you want more than one sample picture to study, but that’s all I had. These settings look pretty darn close to that picture, but it’s difficult to know if it’s truly accurate because I only had one sample to work with, and I don’t know how it should look in various situations. Still, I’m happy with how it turned out.

Initially I was going to name this recipe “Fujicolor Negative” because it has a Fujicolor Superia-like look, but then I stumbled across some Kodak ColorPlus 400 photographs, and they looked quite similar to these pictures. Even though the resemblance to ColorPlus 400 is completely accidental, I thought that calling it “Color Negative 400” was more appropriate because it is in the general ballpark of a film that’s not Fujicolor. Or, more accurately, it is similar to both a Kodak stock and a Fujifilm stock, and not exactly like either. I do think, no matter how close it may or may not be to an actual film, it has a nice film-like aesthetic to it that many will appreciate.

Ability – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V – “Color Negative 400”

This recipe is dark and contrasty, and can be used to create a certain moody look. I think it works best in low-contrast scenes, and does well both indoors and outdoors. This recipe is only compatible (as of this writing) with the Fujifilm X100V, X-Pro3, X-T4 and X-S10 cameras.

Classic Negative
Dynamic Range: DR400
Highlight: 0
Shadow: +4
Color: +4
Noise Reduction: -4
Sharpening: 0
Clarity: -5
Grain Effect: Weak, Large
Color Chrome Effect: Weak
Color Chrome Effect Blue: Weak
White Balance: Auto, -2 Red & -4 Blue
ISO: Auto, up to ISO 6400
Exposure Compensation: +1/3 to +1 (typically)

Example photographs, all camera-made JPEGs using this Color Negative 400 film simulation recipe on my Fujifilm X100V:

Succulent Faux – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Fabric Leaf – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Holga 120N & Ilford HP5 Plus – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Table Bolsey – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Three Indoor Plants – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Face Masks Are Required – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Speed Stars – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Fish on a Wall – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Waiting for Fish – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Contemplation – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Stroller Ride – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Leaning into the Frame – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Bicycle Here – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Birds in a Dormant Tree – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

See also: Film Simulation Recipes

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Fujifilm X100V Film Simulation Recipe: Superia Premium 400

Ivy Leaves – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V – “Superia Premium 400”

After publishing film simulation recipes for Superia 100, Superia Xtra 400, Superia 800 and Superia 1600 film stocks, as well as Reala 100 and Luis Costa’s Classic Negative (which are both in the Superia realm), I’ve been asked a few times to create a Superia Premium 400 recipe. I’ve never shot actual Premium 400 film, and had to rely on the internet, which isn’t ideal, especially since there are limited examples for this particular film, but I think these settings are pretty good.

Superia Premium 400 is a variant of Superia Xtra 400, sold only in Japan, intended to better replicate Japanese skin tones. It seems to have more of an orange color-cast. Premium 400 doesn’t have the “4th cyan color layer” that every other Superia film has, and that seems to be the biggest difference between it and Xtra 400. The way that this recipe came about is a Fuji X Weekly reader (sorry, I forgot who, and I can’t find the message) sent me his or her best guess of some settings to replicate Premium 400, and wanted advice on how to improve it. I took a look, made some changes, and sent it back, but it wasn’t right, so I kept working on it. After a couple weeks of experimenting, I settled on these settings, which I’m quite satisfied with.

Amanda’s Camera – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V – “Superia Premium 400”

There are a whole bunch of options for achieving a Superia look with your Fujifilm camera. Even though this recipe is based on a more obscure variation, the results are quite interesting, and I think a lot of people are going to really appreciate it. It’s compatible with the Fujifilm X100V, X-Pro3, X-T4 and X-S10 cameras.

Classic Negative
Dynamic Range: DR200
Highlight: -2
Shadow: 0
Color: +4
Noise Reduction: -4
Sharpening: -1
Clarity: -2
Grain Effect: Strong, Small
Color Chrome Effect: Strong
Color Chrome Effect Blue: Weak
White Balance: 4700K, +4 Red & -3 Blue
ISO: Auto, up to ISO 6400
Exposure Compensation: +2/3 to +1 (typically)

Example photographs, all camera-made JPEGs using this Superia Premium 400 film simulation recipe on my Fujifilm X100V:

Masked Reflection – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Waiting Girl – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Shrub & Fountain – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Nutcracker – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Cinemark Sun – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Hill House – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Jon on a Bridge – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Setting Sun Forest – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Rural Fence – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Forget Me Knots – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Chainlink Berries – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Yellow Blackberry Leaf – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Rural Autumn Leaves – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Late Autumn Sunstar – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Neighborhood in Evening Light – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Intent – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Fujifilm X100V Film Simulation Recipe: Agfa Vista 100

Daisies at the Dock – Big Arm, MT – Fujifilm X100V – “Agfa Vista 100”

In the film era, Agfa was not as big as Fujifilm or especially Kodak, but they were popular nonetheless, particularly in Europe. Vista 100 was a general purpose color negative film made by Agfa between 2001 and 2005. It was preceded by Agfacolor HDC+ 100, which produced similar (but not identical) results. There were two films, AgfaPhoto Vista 100 and AgfaPhoto Vista Plus 100, that were manufactured for a time, neither of which are the same emulsion as Agfa Vista 100. Similar names, different films.

This Agfa Vista 100 film simulation recipe came about after someone asked for settings similar to an Agfa Vista 100 Lightroom preset. It was sample pictures from that preset that I most consulted for this recipe, but I did look at examples of the film that I found online. This recipe produces results similar to the film, but is closer to the preset than the film. This might be more similar to Agfa Vista 200, which had a bit more saturation, contrast and grain; really, it’s in the ballpark of both the ISO 100 and 200 versions of the film, as they’re both pretty close to each other.

Newstand – Polson, MT – Fujifilm X100V – “Agfa Vista 100”

Because this requires the Classic Negative film simulation, as well as Clarity (which will slow your camera down, unfortunately) and Color Chrome Effect Blue, this film simulation recipe is only compatible (as of this writing) with the Fujifilm X100V, X-T4 and X-Pro3. I think many of you are going to really appreciate this recipe and it will be an instant favorite for some of you.

Classic Negative
Dynamic Range: DR200
Highlight: +1
Shadow: -2
Color: +2
Noise Reduction: -4
Sharpening: -0
Clarity: +3
Grain Effect: Strong, Small
Color Chrome Effect: Weak
Color Chrome Effect Blue: Weak
White Balance: 5600K, -4 Red & -5 Blue
ISO: Auto, up to ISO 6400
Exposure Compensation: 0 to +2/3 (typically)

Example photographs, all camera-made JPEGs using this Agfa Vista 100 film simulation recipe on my Fujifilm X100V:

Lake McDonald Driftwood – Glacier NP, MT – Fujifilm X100V
Vuja de – Big Arm, MT – Fujifilm X100V
Boy, Fishing – Big Arm, MT – Fujifilm X100V
Shore of Wild Horse Island – Flathead Lake, MT – Fujifilm X100V
Evening at the Lake – Big Arm, MT – Fujifilm X100V
Three Sailboats – Big Arm, MT – Fujifilm X100V
Yellow Kayak – Big Arm, MT – Fujifilm X100V
Green Canoe – Big Arm, MT – Fujifilm X100V
Lunch Date – Polson, MT – Fujifilm X100V
Man in the Hat – Polson, MT – Fujifilm X100V
Brick & Metal – Polson, MT – Fujifilm X100V
Bank Building – Butte, MT – Fujifilm X100V
Cafe Open – Butte, MT – Fujifilm X100V
Drinking Fountain – Layton, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Circle Slide – Layton, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Yard Sale – Layton, UT – Fujifilm X100V
If a Tree Falls in the Forest – Glacier NP, MT – Fujifilm X100V
Cabin Flowers – Polebridge, MT – Fujifilm X100V

See also: Film Simulation Recipes

This post contains affiliate links, and if you make a purchase using my links I’ll be compensated a small amount for it.

Fujifilm X100V Black    Amazon   B&H
Fujifilm X100V Silver   Amazon   B&H

Help Fuji X Weekly

Nobody pays me to write the content found on fujixweekly.com. There's a real cost to operating and maintaining this site, not to mention all the time that I pour into it. If you appreciated this article, please consider making a one-time gift contribution. Thank you!

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Fujifilm X100V Film Simulation Recipe: Fujicolor Superia 800

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Flags of IKEA – Draper, UT – Fujifilm X100V – “Fujicolor Superia 800”

One of the earliest film simulation recipes I created that was intended to mimic a specific film was Fujicolor Superia 800, which I made on a Fujifilm X100F about two-and-a-half years ago. This is a recipe that I’ve used often; I especially like it on overcast days. When I published the Superia 800 recipe, I stated, “It’s not a 100% match [to the film], but I feel like it’s convincing enough….” I think that’s a true statement, but with the new tools available on the X100V, could I create a closer match, one that might be even more convincing?

Classic Negative needed to be the starting point for a new Fujicolor Superia 800 recipe since this new film simulation is “modeled after” Fujicolor Superia with “Superia-like” colors. I incorporated the new Clarity and Color Chrome Effect Blue features into this recipe. Unfortunately, Clarity slows down the camera considerably, so you’ll either have to accept the slow speed (which is what I do) or add Clarity later by reprocessing the RAW file. I think this new recipe is indeed a closer match to actual Superia 800—in fact, you could likely convince people that you shot film!

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Horse Boarding – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X100V

I think this recipe might be my favorite of the Superia recipes that I’ve created thus far. If you like my Superia 100, Reala 100, and Superia 1600 recipes, you’ll certainly like this one, too! It has a great analog aesthetic. It’s pretty amazing that you can get this look straight out of camera. This Fujicolor Superia 800 recipe is (as of this writing) only compatible with the Fujifilm X100V, X-Pro3 and X-T4.

Classic Negative
Dynamic Range: DR400
Highlight: -1
Shadow: +1
Color: -1
Noise Reduction: -4
Sharpening: -1
Clarity: -4
Grain Effect: Strong, Large
Color Chrome Effect: Strong
Color Chrome Effect Blue: Weak
White Balance: Daylight, -1 Red & -3 Blue
ISO: Auto, up to ISO 6400
Exposure Compensation: +1/3 to +2/3 (typically)

Example photographs, all camera-made JPEGs using this Fujicolor Superia 800 film simulation recipe on my Fujifilm X100V:

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Line Begins Here – Draper, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Fire Suppression – Draper, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Trash – Draper, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Family Friendly Parking – Draper, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Waiting for Hope? – Draper, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Waiting to Enter – Draper, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Waiting Reflection – Draper, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Keeper of the Door – Draper, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Entrance – Draper, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Cloud Above Yellow Wall – Draper, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Two Flag Poles – Draper, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Home Furnishings – Draper, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Upplaga – Draper, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Track Closed – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Artificial – Draper, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Hanging Patio Lights – Draper, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Two Step – Draper, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Red Light – Draper, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Rainbow Spirit – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Chair Back – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Joshua Eating – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Brother & Sister on the Couch – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Balcony Railing – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Umbrella Unopened – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Sunlight Sky & Green Leaves – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Ripening Soon – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Fallen Log in the Forest – Monte Cristo, UT – Fujifilm X100V

See also: Film Simulation Recipes

This post contains affiliate links, and if you make a purchase using my links I’ll be compensated a small amount for it.

Fujifilm X100V Black    Amazon   B&H
Fujifilm X100V Silver   Amazon   B&H

Help Fuji X Weekly

Nobody pays me to write the content found on fujixweekly.com. There's a real cost to operating and maintaining this site, not to mention all the time that I pour into it. If you appreciated this article, please consider making a one-time gift contribution. Thank you!

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Fujifilm X100V Film Simulation Recipe: Fujicolor Superia 1600

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Red Rose – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V – “Fujicolor Superia 1600”

For some of you, this new Fujicolor Superia 1600 film simulation recipe will be your favorite! It is so good! It’s very analog-esque, and does a great job of mimicking the film in a number of circumstances. If you love my Fujicolor Superia 100 and my Fujicolor Reala 100 recipes, you’re bound to love this one, too!

For high-ISO color photography, Superia 1600 film was your best bet if you needed to go faster than ISO 800. It has higher contrast and lower saturation than other Superia films, and is also more grainy, but with a very nice look. There are people who use Superia 1600 just for its aesthetic. Fujifilm discontinued Superia 1600 in 2016, but supposedly Fujicolor Natura 1600 and Press 1600 are the same film, just sold to different markets.

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Sephora – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V – “Fujicolor Superia 1600”

I didn’t include a “typical” exposure compensation with this recipe because you can get some very interesting looks by underexposing and (especially) overexposing—don’t be afraid to try -1 all the way to +2! This recipe is only compatible with the Fujifilm X100V, X-Pro3 and X-T4 (hopefully someday the X-T3 and X-T30, too—Fujifilm, please!).

Classic Negative
Dynamic Range: DR400
Highlight: 0
Shadow: +2
Color: -3
Noise Reduction: -4
Sharpening: -1
Clarity: -4
Grain Effect: Strong, Large
Color Chrome Effect: Strong
Color Chrome Effect Blue: Strong
White Balance: Daylight, +3 Red & +1 Blue
ISO: 1600 to 6400

Example photographs, all camera-made JPEGs using this Fujicolor Superia 1600 film simulation recipe on my Fujifilm X100V:

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Electric Sunset – Kaysville, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Evening Overlook – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Sunlight Tree – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Country Fence – Kaysville, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Rose Bush Shadow – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Red Rose Bush – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Yellow Flower – South Ogden, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Not Yet Blackberries – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Backyard Girl – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Evening Light Tunnel – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Building in Evening Light – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Head On Illusion – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Walking Reflection – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Indoor/Outdoor Restaurant – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Carbonaro – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Vegetables – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Dessert – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Willards – Layton, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Thank You For You Patronage – South Ogden, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Wall Pipes – South Ogden, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Closed Gas Station Store – South Ogden, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Abandoned Drive Thru Window – South Ogden, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Abandoned Gas Station Overhang – South Ogden, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Light at the Top – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Blue in the Middle – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Moon Above – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Suburban Sunstar – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Bike 48 – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Sunstar in the City – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Strength and Endurance – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

See also: Film Simulation Recipes

This post contains affiliate links, and if you make a purchase using my links I’ll be compensated a small amount for it.

Fujifilm X100V Black    Amazon   B&H
Fujifilm X100V Silver   Amazon   B&H

Help Fuji X Weekly

Nobody pays me to write the content found on fujixweekly.com. There's a real cost to operating and maintaining this site, not to mention all the time that I pour into it. If you appreciated this article, please consider making a one-time gift contribution. Thank you!

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Fujifilm X100V Film Simulation Recipe: Fujicolor Reala 100

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Amusement Poles – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V – “Fujicolor Reala 100”

Fujicolor Reala 100 was Fujifilm’s first Superia film, even though initially it did not have Superia in the name. Superia films shared Fuji’s “4th layer technology” and Reala was the first to have it, but Reala was marketed towards “pro” photographers while Superia was marketed towards “consumer” photographers. Eventually Fujifilm added Superia to Reala’s name. There were several different versions of Reala manufactured, including a high-ISO Tungsten one made for motion pictures, but Reala 100 was the most popular.

The Classic Negative film simulation is “modeled after” Superia with “Superia-like” colors, so it’s the best starting point for a Reala recipe. Reala 100 was very similar to Superia 100, but Superia 100 was intended for “general purpose” photography while Reala 100 was intended for portrait photography (interestingly, my wedding photos were shot on Reala). Colors are rendered a little differently between the two films, especially blue, which is deeper and more saturated on Reala, despite Reala being overall slightly less saturated than Superia 100. You’ll find that this recipe and my Fujicolor Superia 100 recipe replicate these differences quite nicely. Reala film was discontinued in 2013.

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Tunnel & Fountain – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V – “Fujicolor Reala 100”

This Fujicolor Reala 100 film simulation recipe is a great all-around option. It looks good under many circumstances. The aesthetic of this recipe is very close to my Superia 100 recipe, and I’m not sure which one I like better. This one is better for stronger blues, and the other is better for stronger reds, but they’re not far apart from each other. Unfortunately, as of this writing, this Reala recipe is only compatible with the Fujifilm X100V, X-Pro3 and X-T4 cameras.

Classic Negative
Dynamic Range: DR400
Highlight: -1
Shadow: -1
Color: +0
Noise Reduction: -4
Sharpening: -2
Clarity: -3
Grain Effect: Weak, Small
Color Chrome Effect: Strong
Color Chrome Effect Blue: Strong
White Balance: Daylight, 0 Red & 0 Blue
ISO: Auto, up to ISO 6400
Exposure Compensation: 0 to +1 (typically)

Example photographs, all camera-made JPEGs using this Fujicolor Reala 100 film simulation recipe on my Fujifilm X100V:

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Ferris Wheel – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Ferris Wheel Through The Trees – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Hands Raised – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Blue Coaster – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Waterless Waterslides – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Umbrella Ride – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Green Trees, Blue Sky – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Cat Statue – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Ride Operator – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Waiting to Fly – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Sunstar Tree – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Backlit Fountain – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Flowerbed – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Field of Wildflowers – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Potted Blooms – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Flowers in a Garden – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Blossoms Along a Fence – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Red Blossoms – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Covered Wagon – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Man Waiting – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Standing, Waiting – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Corner – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Puddle Reflections – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Stroller – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Almost – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Please Unload Children – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Lying on a Bench – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Pink Hair Bow – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Backpack – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Josh Riding Carousel – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Happy Jon – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Map on a Fence – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Woodford, Iowa – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Forest Trees – Fruit Heights, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Windshield Rain – Fruit Heights, UT – Fujifilm X100V

See also: Film Simulation Recipes

This post contains affiliate links, and if you make a purchase using my links I’ll be compensated a small amount for it.

Fujifilm X100V Black    Amazon   B&H
Fujifilm X100V Silver   Amazon   B&H

Help Fuji X Weekly

Nobody pays me to write the content found on fujixweekly.com. There's a real cost to operating and maintaining this site, not to mention all the time that I pour into it. If you appreciated this article, please consider making a one-time gift contribution. Thank you!

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Fujifilm X100V Film Simulation Recipe: Fujicolor Superia 100

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Rose Garden – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V – “Fujicolor Superia 100”

The new Classic Negative film simulation that’s found on Fujifilm’s latest cameras is intended to mimic Fujicolor Superia. Fujifilm doesn’t state which version of the film it’s intended to resemble; Fujifilm simply says that it’s “modeled after” Superia with “Superia-like” colors. They did very well in creating it, as it is unmistakably Superia. To me, straight-out-of-the-box Classic Negative most closely resembles Superia 200, although it’s not an exact match (but pretty close). There were at least a dozen different versions of Superia made by Fujifilm beginning in 1998, and a couple are still available today. I believe that Classic Negative can be made to resemble many of these different films. I started with Fujicolor Superia 100.

Superia 100 is a daylight balanced color negative film that Fujifilm produced between 1998 and 2009. It replaced Fujicolor Super G Plus 100, which, honestly, didn’t look all that much different. Superia 100 had improved grain, sharpness, and more accurate color under florescent light. Under normal conditions, and without a close inspection, the two films looked quite similar. Superia was a “consumer” film that was widely found in drug and convenient stores. It was regularly used for family snapshots, but was also popular among photojournalists, as well as portrait and wedding photographers. Superia 100 was marketed as a “general use” low-ISO color film. Like the film, this Fujicolor Superia 100 film simulation recipe serves as a general use option.

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Sunset Behind the Reeds – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V – “Fujicolor Superia 100”

I think many of you will really appreciate this film simulation recipe. It has fairly low contrast, but not too low, and produces very nice colors. It has a nostalgic quality to it, since the film that it’s based on was widely used for family snapshots in the 1990’s and 2000’s. You can use it for portraits or street photography or landscapes—really, it’s good for most situations. Unfortunately, as of this writing, this Fujicolor Superia 100 film simulation recipe is only compatible with the Fujifilm X-Pro3, X100V and X-T4 cameras. This recipe does use the new Clarity feature, and you should be aware that it slows down the camera considerably.

Classic Negative
Dynamic Range: DR-Auto
Highlight: -1
Shadow: -2
Color: +1
Noise Reduction: -4
Sharpening: -2
Clarity: -2
Grain Effect: Weak, Small
Color Chrome Effect: Strong
Color Chrome Effect Blue: Weak
White Balance: Daylight, 0 Red & -1 Blue
ISO: Auto, up to ISO 6400
Exposure Compensation: +1/3 to +2/3 (typically)

Example photographs, all camera-made JPEGs using this Fujicolor Superia 100 film simulation recipe on my Fujifilm X100V:

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Under the Green Canopy – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Light Through The Trees – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Red Tree – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Pagoda – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Pink Tree – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Nearly Empty Park – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Waiting Alone – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Fascinating – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Fanatic Family – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Grandmother & Grandson – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Thirsty Peacock – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Give it Back – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Red & Blue Benches – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Lagoon Railroad – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Patriotic Boy – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Ride is Closed – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Nervously Ready for Tea Cup Ride – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Do Not Enter – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Rocks by the Raging River – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Leaves Above Farmington Creek – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Storm Above – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Mine! – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Refreshment Station – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Evening Red – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Desk Near a Window – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Fake Blossoms – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Backyard Jo – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Jon, Laughing – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Sunlit Tree Leaves – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Evening Leaves – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

See also: Film Simulation Recipes

This post contains affiliate links, and if you make a purchase using my links I’ll be compensated a small amount for it.

Fujifilm X100V Black    Amazon   B&H
Fujifilm X100V Silver   Amazon   B&H

Help Fuji X Weekly

Nobody pays me to write the content found on fujixweekly.com. There's a real cost to operating and maintaining this site, not to mention all the time that I pour into it. If you appreciated this article, please consider making a one-time gift contribution. Thank you!

$2.00

[Not] My Fujifilm X100V Classic Negative Film Simulation Recipe

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Boy with a Bubble Gun – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

When the Fujifilm X-Pro3 came out late last year, which was the first camera with the new Classic Negative film simulation, I began to see some wonderful pictures that looked like they were captured using Superia film. Classic Negative is supposed to resemble Fujicolor Superia, most likely Superia 200, although Fujifilm doesn’t say. I believe there were more than 10 variants of Superia film made by Fujifilm, so it’s hard to know which version the film simulation was mostly modeled after. Whichever version of the film it’s intended to be, Classic Negative does a great job of mimicking it, because it definitely looks like Superia.

The Classic Negative look that was most intriguing to me was by Luis Costa, and I couldn’t wait for the day that I’d be able to try it for myself. Luis’ Classic Negative film simulation recipe, which can be found on his website, is nothing short of wonderful! It’s especially great for sunny days. It’s every bit as good as Luis made it look in his photographs. It’s programmed into the C1 slot on my Fujifilm X100V, and I doubt that it will move. It reminds me a lot of Superia X-Tra 400 with a warming filter, or maybe Superia 200 pushed one stop. Either way, it just looks good.

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Warm Light on Reeds – Farmington Bay, UT – Fujifilm X100V

I did modify Luis Costa’s recipe slightly. Nothing big, but I added Color Chrome Effect and Clarity, and set Grain to Weak instead of Strong. It doesn’t change the look much at all. Feel free to turn off Color Chrome Effect and Clarity and set Grain to Strong if you’d like, which is Luis’ exact recipe. I want to thank Luis Costa for making and sharing his great Classic Negative recipe, and for allowing me to post it here. I encourage you to visit his website.

Because the Classic Negative film simulation changes look depending on how it’s exposed, you can get a couple different aesthetics with this recipe. I encourage you to increase exposure on some shots and decrease it on others (over and under exposing slightly), and see how it renders the picture. You might find that you prefer one look over the other, or that you prefer one in some situations and one in another. It’s fun to experiment with, and I invite you to do just that.

Classic Negative
Dynamic Range: DR200
Highlight: +1
Shadow: 0
Color: +3
Noise Reduction: -4
Sharpening: 0
Clarity: +2
Grain Effect: Weak, Large
Color Chrome Effect: Weak
Color Chrome Effect Blue: Weak
White Balance: Auto, +4 Red & -4 Blue
ISO: Auto, up to ISO 6400
Exposure Compensation: +1/3 to +2/3 (typically)

Example photographs, all camera-made JPEGs using this Classic Negative film simulation recipe on my Fujifilm X100V:

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Red Rose Bush – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Flowers by the Fence – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Suburban Blooms – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Dragonfly – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Spring Leaves – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Girl in Evening Light – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Upside Down Wheelbarrow – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Neighborhood Bubbles – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Suburbs Illuminated – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Boy in the Window Light – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Little Yellow Ball in the Sky – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Lake Reeds – Farmington Bay, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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