Fujifilm X100V (X-Trans IV) Film Simulation Recipe: Fujicolor Pro 400H

Sun-Kissed Forest – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V – “Fujicolor Pro 400H”

This film simulation recipe is one that I’m particularly excited for because I’ve been after this look for a long, long time. The timeline goes as follows: September 2017 I suggested that Fujifilm should make a Fujicolor Pro 400H Overexposed film simulation, October 2018 I made this same suggestion again, December 2018 I published a Fujicolor Pro 400H film simulation recipe for X-Trans III cameras, February 2020 I made a Fujicolor Pro 400H recipe for X-Trans IV cameras, and February of this year I made a Fujicolor NPH recipe (available as a Patron early-access recipe on the Fuji X Weekly App), which is very similar to Pro 400H (NPH was basically an earlier version of the film). Now, I’ve finally made a Fujicolor Pro 400H recipe that I’m quite pleased with. This is an immediate favorite recipe of mine!

After George Coady shared with me his wonderful Fujicolor C200 recipe, he showed me his initial attempt at a recipe for Pro 400H, which inspired me to try my hands at a better Fujicolor Pro 400H Overexposed recipe using the new JPEG options found on the newer cameras, such as Classic Negative, Color Chrome FX Blue and Clarity. At first glance I was disappointed with my results because it didn’t look exactly like what I was hoping for, but then I realized what I actually had created (which I’ll talk more about in just a moment); however, first let’s briefly discuss the film that this recipe is based on.

Table Tulips – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V – “Fujicolor Pro 400H”

Fujifilm introduced Fujicolor Pro 400H in 2004 and it’s been a popular color negative film ever since. Photographers often overexpose this film by as many as four stops. When overexposed, the film turns from a somewhat ordinary high-ISO (that’s what the “H” stands for in the name) portrait film into something almost magical. Colors become vibrant and pastel. The exact look of overexposed Pro 400H varies, depending on how much overexposed, how developed, and how printed or scanned, and the effect can range from subtle to pronounced, but generally you know overexposed Pro 400H film when you see it.

It was that pastel look that I was hoping to achieve with this recipe, and at first I thought I had failed—it looked more like Pro 400H overexposed by one stop or maybe two, but not three or four where the pastel colors are found. Even though I didn’t get that wonderful pastel aesthetic, the recipe looked really great nonetheless. Still, I wondered if it would be possible to get closer to that overexposed look simply by increasing the exposure. Sure enough, it worked! The two images below are examples of this, with exposure compensation set to a whopping +2 2/3!

Toys on a Chair – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V – “Fujicolor Pro 400H”
Messy Hair – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V – “Fujicolor Pro 400H”

As you can see, there are pastel colors in those two pictures, much like well-overexposed Pro 400H film. Does it closely match the film results? It’s closer than my previous attempts, but it’s not perfect. It’s as close as you’re likely going to get straight-out-of-camera. It’s fun to do this, but you’d have to be pretty brave to shoot a wedding with this much overexposure—I’d do it, but, then again, I’ve sandpapered a camera; I have a history of doing some risky (stupid?) things in the name of art.

What about Fujicolor Pro 400H that’s not overexposed? Can this recipe mimic that, too? Yes, sort of. By not overexposing this recipe, you get results that don’t look overexposed (imagine that), but does it closely resemble the film? It’s not as exact as I’d like it to be, but not far off, either. It’s more convincing as an overexposed recipe, but it also does well when not mimicking that. The two pictures below are examples of this, with exposure compensation set at +1/3.

Yard Toys – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V – “Fujicolor Pro 400H”
Ivy Leaves – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V – “Fujicolor Pro 400H”

As you can see, there’s a certain beauty in not overexposing when using this recipe.

The two sets of pictures below are examples of +1/3 exposure compensation, +1 1/3 exposure compensation, and +2 1/3 exposure compensation. In my opinion, the best results are found in the middle category, with exposure compensation in the +1 to +1 2/3 range, but sometimes reducing or increasing the exposure produces interesting results. In other words, oftentimes the best results are with exposure compensation set to +1 to +1 2/3, but try anywhere from +1/3 to +2 2/3, because, depending on the light and subject, you can get good results across a large range of exposures.

+1/3 Exposure Compensation
+1 1/3 Exposure Compensation
+2 1/3 Exposure Compensation
+1/3 Exposure Compensation
+1 1/3 Exposure Compensation
+2 1/3 Exposure Compensation

This film simulation recipe (as of this writing) is only compatible with the Fujifilm X-Pro3, X100V, X-T4, X-S10 and X-E4 cameras. I used a Fujifilm X100V to capture all of the images in this article. For some of the pictures I used a Tiffen 1/4 Black Pro Mist filter to diffuse the highlights, particularly the ones with a bright light source; because you are bumping up the exposure so much, this recipe pairs especially well with a diffusion filter, producing a more film-like result.

Classic Negative
Dynamic Range: DR400
Highlight: -2
Shadow: +4
Color: +4
Noise Reduction: -4
Sharpening: -2
Clarity: -4
Grain Effect: Strong, Small
Color Chrome Effect: Strong
Color Chrome Effect Blue: Weak
White Balance: 4900K, 0 Red & -4 Blue
ISO: Auto, up to ISO 6400
Exposure Compensation: +1 to +1 2/3 (typically), but try between +1/3 to +2 2/3

Example photographs, all camera-made JPEGs using this new Fujicolor Pro 400H film simulation recipe:

Forest of Light – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Bright Leaf – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

Pink Flowers & Green Leaves – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Spring Sunshine – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Country Trees – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Bright Tree – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Evening Creek – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Tree Fence – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Wild Weeds – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Field of Wishes – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Make A Wish – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
White Tree Blooms – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Forest Fence – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Gnarled Tree – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Creek Trail – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Jon in the Forest – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Trail Bridge – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Flatcar Bridge – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Dandelion Bench – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Lighter Tree – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Fresh Aspen Leaves – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Farmington Creek – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Onion Flower – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Bright Rose – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Rose Bush & Wall – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Rosebush & Vine Ladder – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Ready to Float – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Hide – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Sibling Yard Play – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Kids & Outdoor Table – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Waiting For Food – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Heavenly Hot Cakes – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Smiling Joy – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Art & Craft Tray – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

Johanna & Jonathan – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Fisher Price Phone – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Indoor Basketball Hoop – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Slapfish – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Three Fake Plants on a Shelf – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

This post contains affiliate links, and if you make a purchase using my links I’ll be compensated a small amount for it.

Fujifilm X100V Black    Amazon   B&H
Fujifilm X100V Silver   Amazon   B&H

Find this film simulation recipe on the Fuji X Weekly — Film Recipes App!

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Fujifilm X-Trans III + X-T30 & X-T3 Film Simulation Recipe: Chrome Bypass

Don’t Walk Under Falling Bicycles – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 – “Chrome Bypass”

There are a number of X-Trans IV film simulation recipes that I’ve had multiple requests to create versions for that are compatible with X-Trans III and X-T3 and X-T30 cameras. LomoChrome Metropolis and Bleach Bypass are two that are commonly requested. These recipes require JPEG settings that don’t exist on the “older” cameras, including the Classic Negative or Eterna Bleach Bypass film simulations. I knew it would be impossible to recreate those recipes for X-Trans III and the X-T3 and X-T30 cameras, but I wanted to get as close as I could. After much experimenting, I came up with some settings that are sometimes similar to the LomoChrome Metropolis recipe and are sometimes similar to the Bleach Bypass recipe, and sometimes not like either.

What the LomoChrome Metropolis and the Bleach Bypass recipes have in common are that they’re both high in contrast and low in color saturation. There are some other similarities between them, but there’s plenty that’s different, too. This recipe with certain subjects and in certain light situations can resemble one or the other, or neither. It’s as close as I could get. If you like the LomoChrome Metropolis and Bleach Bypass recipes, this is your best bet for X-Trans III and X-T3 and X-T30 cameras (aside from doing double-exposures). While it’s not as “perfect” as I was hoping to achieve, I think it’s a pretty good recipe for capturing dramatic pictures. It’s kind of (but not really) the low saturation version of Dramatic Classic Chrome.

1100 Stop – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 – “Chrome Bypass”

Because these settings resemble both the LomoChrome Metropolis and the Bleach Bypass film simulation recipes, I decided to name this recipe Chrome Bypass, taking a little from each name. I don’t currently have access to an X-Trans III camera, so I don’t have any samples captured with a Fujifilm X-Trans III camera, but it should look very similar.

PRO Neg. Std
Dynamic Range: DR200
Highlight: +3
Shadow: +4
Color: -4
Color Chrome Effect: Off or N/A
Sharpness: -1
Noise Reduction: -4
Grain Effect: Strong
White Balance: Auto, +2 Red & -5 Blue
ISO: Auto up to ISO 6400
Exposure Compensation: 0 to +2/3 (typically)

Sample photographs, all camera-made JPEGs, captured with a Fujifilm X-T30 using this “Chrome Bypass” film simulation recipe:

Mountain Teasels – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30
Cloudy Branches – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30
Summer Tree – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30
Country Fence & Old Tires – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30
Tulip Pot – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30
Colorful Tulips – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30
Handy Dandy Grill – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30
Little Bit of Green – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30
Thrown Pillow – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30
Instax Table – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

Find this film simulation recipe on the Fuji X Weekly — Film Recipes App!

Help Fuji X Weekly

Nobody pays me to write the content found on fujixweekly.com. There’s a real cost to operating and maintaining this site, not to mention all the time that I pour into it. If you appreciated this article, please consider making a one-time gift contribution. Thank you!

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What I’ve Been Working On (New Film Simulation Recipes Coming Soon!)

The Fuji X Weekly blog keeps me busy!

I haven’t posted anything in several days, but that doesn’t mean I’m not working hard. I have in the works right now five new film simulation recipes that will be ready to publish soon (plus another five that I’m working on, but aren’t ready to publish, plus about 20 on a to-do list). I’ve included a sample picture of each new recipe down below, just as a teaser. I also have two product reviews (one camera and one lens) that are in the early stages of writing; reviews always take a lot of time to complete. Besides that, I’ve been working on some other changes to the blog, which you’ll begin seeing soon (and maybe you’ve already noticed a few). Some of these changes will be bigger than others, and hopefully they will make the Fuji X Weekly experience better in some way.

Even though it might seem quiet, there’s so much going on behind the scenes right now. It’s what keeps the blog moving forward. Good things are coming! I appreciate all of you and I’m honored to have you as a part of this thing. Your support is invaluable to me. The Fujifilm community really is the best!

Now, the teaser pictures! Below are a quick sampling of five new film simulation recipes that will be coming soon.

B&W Superia”

Which one of these five are you most looking forward to? Let me know in the comments!

X-Pro3 To Have New Film Simulation: Classic Negative

Fujifilm Classic Negative

The upcoming Fujifilm X-Pro3, which will feature an unusual rear screen, will have a new film simulation called Classic Negative, which is supposed to resemble Superia film, according to Fujifilm. I get a lot of requests for Superia, so I’m very happy to see this as a new film simulation. Yea!

Fujirumors stated that the X-Pro3 will have some additional adjustments for in-camera RAW processing, such as Clarity. I welcome this because the more tools that Fujifilm provides, the more easily I can achieve a desired look in-camera. Fujifilm is one of only a few companies that take camera-made JPEGs seriously, and is one of the big reasons why I appreciate their products. Shooting JPEGs saves me so much time, allowing my photography to be more productive while simultaneously allowing me to spend more time elsewhere, such as with my family.

I hope that Fujifilm makes these things–the Classic Negative film simulation and the additional tools–available to other cameras, such as the X-T3 and X-T30, which share the same sensor and processor as the upcoming X-Pro3. There is, according to Fujirumors, some big firmware updates on the horizon, and I hope that these are a part of that. Sometimes, when a new feature is included in a new camera, Fujifilm will update older cameras to include it as well, and sometimes they don’t. So it’s really hard to know. I will keep my fingers crossed.

Fujifilm Classic NegativeFujifilm X-Pro3Fujifilm X-Pro3Fujifilm X-Pro3