Quick Eterna Bleach Bypass Experiments

LomoChrome Metropolis recipe, using the Eterna Bleach Bypass film simulation

My wife has a Fujifilm X-T4, and I was able to borrow it briefly for an experiment with the new Eterna Bleach Bypass film simulation. The X-T4 and the X-S10 are currently the only cameras that have this film simulation. My new LomoChrome Metropolis recipe, which is currently only found on the Fuji X Weekly App for iOS, uses Eterna Bleach Bypass.

I snapped the picture below of my daughter using the Fujifilm X-T4 and the Eterna Bleach Bypass film simulation. Highlight, Shadow and Color were set to 0, using Auto White Balance, and pretty much everything set to defaults.

Eterna Bleach Bypass

I reprocessed the RAW file in-camera, and tried to (in a short period of time) recreate Eterna Bleach Bypass using regular ol’ Eterna. I set Highlight to +4, Shadow to +3, Color to -4, and set a shift of -2 Red and -3 Blue to the Auto White Balance, which roughly gets you close. If I had more time I could get closer, but this was just a quick experiment. The takeaway is that Eterna Bleach Bypass is essentially Eterna but with more contrast and less color saturation, and some other small differences.

“Eterna Bleach Bypass” using Eterna

Below I reprocessed the RAW file in-camera using my Bleach Bypass film simulation recipe that uses Classic Negative. That recipe wasn’t intended to mimic the Eterna Bleach Bypass film simulation, but actual bleach bypassed film. It looks kind of like the new film simulation, but with more contrast and saturation.

“Bleach Bypass” using Classic Negative

There was an interview published recently in Japan where a couple of Fujifilm managers explained a bunch of different things about Fujifilm cameras. Between the translation and my interpretation of that translation, I mistakenly thought that it said a Bleach Bypass look could be achieved using the Provia film simulation with Highlight set to +1, Shadow set to +3 and Color set to -4, so I reprocessed the RAW file in-camera doing this, which is below.

“Bleach Bypass” using Provia?

Obviously that doesn’t look right, so I reread the quote, and realized what it actually said was that the Eterna Bleach Bypass film simulation recipe is intended to mimic cinematic film (for cinematic purposes) that’s skipped the bleach during development. Bleach bypass for still photography is (or often is) not the same—different film and/or different process. What was being said by those Fujifilm managers is to mimic bleach bypass for still photography, use the Eterna Bleach Bypass film simulation (not Provia) with Highlight set to +1, Shadow set to +3, and color Set to -4. An example of that is below.

Eterna Bleach Bypass with more contrast and less saturation

Bleach bypass is a darkroom technique where you skip or limit the bleach during development of color film, which causes it to retain the silver. Results will vary greatly depending on the film used and exactly how you develop it, but generally speaking what you get with bleach bypass is a high-contrast, low-saturation, grainy picture that appears as if a black-and-white and color picture were combined together. This technique is more common for motion picture film than still photography, but some people do bleach bypass with C-41 film.

There’s no one exact aesthetic for bleach bypass. The Eterna Bleach Bypass film simulation is a great starting point, and I plan to experiment more with it and create at least a few different film simulation recipes using it. Classic Negative can also be used, and maybe even Classic Chrome and PRO Neg. Hi (and perhaps others), just depending on the exact bleach bypass look you are after. While more complicated, you can use the double-exposure feature to create a bleach bypass look. There’s not necessarily a right or wrong way, or even a right or wrong look, which makes experimentation more fun. I invite you to pick a film simulation (whether or not your camera has the new Eterna Bleach Bypass film simulation), turn up the contrast and turn down the color saturation, and see what you can create!

Fujifilm X100V Film Simulation Recipe: Bleach Bypass

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Rose on a Table – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V – “Bleach Bypass”

The Fujifilm X-T4 has a new film simulation called Bleach Bypass. At this time, the X-T4 is the only camera that has it. It might come to the X-Pro3 and X100V at some point via a firmware update, but it’s difficult to know for sure if or when that will happen. Hopefully Fujifilm will add Bleach Bypass to the other cameras at some point.

Back in February I created a “Bleach Bypass” film simulation recipe for the X-T30 and X-T3 utilizing the double-exposure feature of the camera. The results are great, but the process is tricky, and the subject has to be completely still because it requires two exposures. The Fujifilm X100V and X-Pro3 cameras don’t (yet) have the new Bleach Bypass film simulation, but they do have the new Classic Negative film simulation, which makes a “bleach bypass” look possible with just one exposure.

Bleach bypass is a darkroom technique where you skip or limit the bleach during development of color film, which causes it to retain the silver. Results will vary greatly depending on the film used and exactly how you develop it, but generally speaking what you get with bleach bypass is a high-contrast, low-saturation, grainy picture that appears as if a black-and-white and color picture were combined together. This technique is more common for motion picture film than still photography, but some people do bleach bypass with C-41 film.

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Thistle Color – Fruit Heights, UT – Fujifilm X100V – “Bleach Bypass”

I don’t know how accurate this recipe is to the Bleach Bypass film simulation that’s on the X-T4. I wasn’t trying to mimic that film simulation, but instead mimic actual bleach bypass film. I know some of you will really appreciate this look, but it’s certainly not going to be everyone’s cup of tea. You can use this recipe if you have a Fujifilm X100V, X-Pro3 or X-T4.

Classic Negative
Dynamic Range: DR100
Highlight: +2
Shadow: +4
Color: -4
Noise Reduction: -4
Sharpening: -1
Clarity: +3
Grain Effect: Strong, Large
Color Chrome Effect: Weak
Color Chrome Effect Blue: Strong
White Balance: Daylight, -1 Red & +1 Blue
ISO: Auto, up to ISO 6400
Exposure Compensation: 0 to +2/3 (typically)

Example photographs, all camera-made JPEGs using this “Bleach Bypass” film simulation recipe on my Fujifilm X100V:

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Silver Aspen Leaves – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Greenberries – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Back Wall – Fruit Heights, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Turkey – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Umbrella Below a Tree – Fruit Heights, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Instamatic Light – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Kodak Instamatic Shelf – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Pronto Polaroid – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Dead Yellow Roses – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Coffee & Book – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Morning Time – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Vase on a Table – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Suburban Grey – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Leaf in the Wet Grass – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Water on a Red Slide – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Lavender Lily – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Sunlight in the Trees – Layton, UT – Fujifilm X100V

See also: Film Simulation Recipes

This post contains affiliate links, and if you make a purchase using my links I’ll be compensated a small amount for it.

Fujifilm X100V Black    Amazon   B&H
Fujifilm X100V Silver   Amazon   B&H

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My Fujifilm X-T30 “Bleach Bypass” Film Simulation Recipe


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Instamatic Morning – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 “Bleach Bypass”

The upcoming Fujifilm X-T4 will have a new film simulation: Bleach Bypass. This new film simulation might eventually come to other X-Trans IV cameras, such as the X-T30, X-T3, X-Pro3 and X100V, but it might not, as Fujifilm has yet to add Classic Negative to the X-T3 and X-T30. It would certainly be nice if Fujifilm gave those of us with “older” X-Trans IV cameras the new film simulations. Even if they never do, you are in luck, as I have created a film simulation recipe to mimic the look of bleach bypass!

Bleach bypass is a darkroom technique where you skip or limit the bleach during development of color film, which causes it to retain the silver. Results will vary greatly depending on the film used and exactly how you develop it, but generally speaking what you get with bleach bypass is a high-contrast, low-saturation, grainy picture that appears as if a black-and-white and color picture were combined together. This technique is more common for motion picture film than still photography, but some people do bleach bypass with C-41 film.

I experimented with the techniques that I used for this film simulation back in June of last year. Much came out of those experiments, including both the Faded Color and Faded Monochrome film simulation recipes, as well as in-camera texturing. I created something similar to this recipe, but gave up on it before completing it. Last week Fuji X Weekly reader James Clinich reached out to me to share some experiments he had been doing, which turned out to be very similar to what I had done back in June. This rekindled my interest, and with inspiration drawn from James, I made this “Bleach Bypass” film simulation recipe.

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Car’s 3 & 4 – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 “Bleach Bypass”

This film simulation recipe requires the use of the double exposure feature of your camera. You will need a tripod, and there can’t be any movement in the scene. You have to make two identical exposures, one in color and one in black-and-white. After the first exposure is made, you must change the film simulation before making the second exposure. You can have both sets of settings programmed into the custom menu as separate presets, and toggle between them, or just change the film simulation, making sure that the tone is set correctly when making the Acros exposure. It’s a bit tricky and limited, but the results are nice. If you don’t want to do double exposures, but want something that will produce similar results to this recipe, try my Dramatic Classic Chrome recipe except set color to -4. That’s about as close as you can get. Otherwise, if you want to create a bleach bypass look in-camera, this recipe is your best option.

Exposure 1
Classic Chrome
Dynamic Range: DR200
Highlight: +3
Shadow: +4
Color: +2
Color Chrome Effect: Strong
Grain: Strong
Sharpening: +1
Noise Reduction: -4
White Balance: Auto, -1 Red & +3 Blue
ISO: Auto, up to ISO 6400
Exposure Compensation: +1/3 to +2/3 (typically)

Exposure 2
Acros
Dynamic Range: DR200
Highlight: +3
Shadow: +4
Tone: +2 (warm)
Color Chrome Effect: Strong
Grain: Strong
Sharpening: +1
Noise Reduction: -4
White Balance: Auto, -1 Red & +3 Blue
ISO: Auto, up to ISO 6400
Exposure Compensation: +1/3 to +2/3 (typically)

Example photographs, all camera-made JPEGs using this “Bleach Bypass” film simulation recipe on my Fujifilm X-T30:

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Pillows – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Window Robot – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Illuminated Faux Flowers – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Pronto! – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Touch of Green – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Rooftops & Mountaintops – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Tracks Under The Bridge – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Do Not Cross Tracks – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Locked Box & Escape Route – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Empty Walking Bridge – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

See also: Film Simulation Recipes

Help Fuji X Weekly

Nobody pays me to write the content found on fujixweekly.com. There's a real cost to operating and maintaining this site, not to mention all the time that I pour into it. If you appreciated this article, please consider making a one-time gift contribution. Thank you!

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New Film Simulation Coming: Bleach Bypass

According to Fujirumors, the upcoming Fujifilm X-T4 will come with a brand new film simulation: Bleach Bypass. What’s bleach bypass? It’s a darkroom technique where you skip or limit the bleach during the development of color film, which retains the silver in the film. What you end up with is a high-contrast, low-saturated image that might appear as though someone combined a color and black-and-white image. Think Classic Chrome, but with more contrast and less saturation, and a silvery appearance. I think this new film simulation will be an excellent addition!

Will Fujifilm make the new Bleach Bypass film simulation available to other cameras via a firmware update? Maybe the X-Trans IV models, not likely any other. Fujifilm has yet to add Classic Negative to the X-T3 or X-T30, and maybe they never will. I’m hopeful that after the release of the X-T4, Fujifilm will add both of these new film simulations to the “older” X-Trans IV models, but that might be nothing more than wishful thinking. I will tell you this: it’s hard not to be envious! I’m really looking forward to one day trying both of them and creating new film simulation recipes. I just hope that day comes sooner than later.

[Not] My Fujifilm X Urban Vintage Chrome Film Simulation Recipe


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Refine – North Salt Lake, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 & Fujinon 90mm f/2 – “Urban Vintage Chrome”

Fuji X Weekly reader Thomas Schwab recently shared with me a film simulation recipe that he created. He calls it “Urban Vintage Chrome” because it has a classic analog aesthetic, it’s based on the Classic Chrome film simulation, and it pairs especially well with urban scenes. I tried it out and was highly impressed with the results. Thomas agreed to let me share it on this blog, and even allowed me to use some of his pictures in the article.

What the Urban Vintage Chrome recipe reminds me of is Bleach Bypass, which is a technique where, during development, you fully or partially skip the bleach. It increases contrast and grain and decreases saturation. The results can vary depending on the film used and how exactly it’s developed, but generally speaking this recipe produces a look that is similar to it, or at least the closest straight-out-of-camera that I’ve seen. It’s compatible with all Fujifilm X-Trans III and IV cameras.

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Hazy Rural Sunset – Woods Cross, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 & 90mm – “Urban Vintage Chrome”

Classic Chrome
Dynamic Range: DR200
Highlight: 0
Shadow: +2
Color: -4
Sharpening: 0
Noise Reduction: -4
Grain: Weak
Color Chrome Effect: Off
White Balance: 4300K, -1 Red & -3 Blue
ISO: Auto, up to ISO 3200
Exposure Compensation: +1/3 to +2/3 (typically)

I want to give big “thank you” to Thomas for sharing this recipe and allowing me to use some of his photographs in this article. I really appreciate it! Be sure to show your appreciation in the comments!

Example photographs using this film simulation recipe:

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Freiburg im Breisgau, Germany – Fujifilm X100F – Photo by Thomas Schwab

Freiburg im Breisgau, Germany – Fujifilm X-T2 & Fujinon 35mm f/2 – Photo by Thomas Schwab

Freiburg im Breisgau, Germany – Fujifilm X100F – Photo by Thomas Schwab

Freiburg im Breisgau, Germany – Fujifilm X100F – Photo by Thomas Schwab

Freiburg im Breisgau, Germany – Fujifilm X100F – Photo by Thomas Schwab

Freiburg im Breisgau, Germany – Fujifilm X100F – Photo by Thomas Schwab

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Creek Ducks – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 & 90mm

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Green Locomotive – North Salt Lake, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 & 90mm

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Oil Toil – North Salt Lake, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 & 90mm

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Tracks By The Refinery – North Salt Lake, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 & 90mm

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Gate Arm Nut – North Salt Lake, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 & 90mm

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CF Trailer – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 & 90mm

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Hidden Wall Street – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 & 90mm

Help Fuji X Weekly

Nobody pays me to write the content found on fujixweekly.com. There's a real cost to operating and maintaining this site, not to mention all the time that I pour into it. If you appreciated this article, please consider making a one-time gift contribution. Thank you!

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