New FXW App Patron Early-Access Film Simulation Recipe: Analog Gold

Wood Shack – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4 – “Analog Gold”

The Fuji X Weekly App is free, yet becoming a Fuji X Weekly Patron unlocks the best App experience! One benefit of being a Patron is you get early access to some new film simulation recipes. These Early-Access Recipes will eventually become available free to everyone in time, including this new one. In fact, many Early-Access Recipes have been publicly published on this blog and the App, so now everyone can use them! Patrons help support Fuji X Weekly and, really, without them there would be no App. So I want to give a special “thank you” to all of the Patrons!

This new Patron Early-Access recipe is called Analog Gold because it has a vintage film-like aesthetic with a golden color cast. It produces a warm, somewhat-muted look, and does well in both sunny and overcast conditions. While it’s not modeled after any specific film or process, it does convey an analog quality that’s easy to appreciate. I know that some of you will love this one!

This “Analog Gold” Patron Early-Access Recipe is compatible with the Fujifilm X-T4, X-S10, X-E4, and X-T30 II cameras. If you are a Fuji X Weekly Patron, it’s available to you right now on the Fuji X Weekly App! If you don’t have the App, download it for free today.

Example photographs, all camera-made JPEGs captured using this “Analog Gold” film simulation recipe on my Fujifilm X-E4:

Kaysville Pond in January – Kaysville, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Weather Radar – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Dry Leaves & Red Berries – Kaysville, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Rusty Fence Post – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Flowing Creek in Grass – Kaysville, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Frozen Pond – Kaysville, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Grass & Frozen Pond Water – Kaysville, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Grass in the Ice – Kaysville, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Dry Shrub – Kaysville, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Helicopters Waiting to Fly – Kaysville, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Statue & Sky – Kaysville, UT – Fujifilm X-E4

New Fujifilm X-Trans IV Patron Early-Access Film Simulation Recipe: Kodak Max 800

Ice Cold Pepsi – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4 – “Kodak Max 800”

The Fuji X Weekly App is free, yet becoming a Fuji X Weekly Patron unlocks the best App experience! One benefit of being a Patron is you get early access to some new film simulation recipes. These Early-Access Recipes will eventually become available free to everyone in time, including this new one. In fact, many Early-Access Recipes have been publicly published on this blog and the App, so now everyone can use them! Patrons help support Fuji X Weekly and, really, without them there would be no App. So I want to give a special “thank you” to all of the Patrons!

This new Patron Early-Access Recipe is modeled after some prints I found in a box that I thought looked interesting. I didn’t initially know what film had been used, but after locating the negatives I discovered it was something called Kodak GT 800-3, and I had no idea what that was. After much sleuthing, I found out it was Kodak Max Zoom 800, also known as Max 800. The film was shot in 2006 (I believe by my wife), and it was the third and final iteration of the emulsion (this version was introduced in 2000). Max Zoom 800 was replaced in 2006 by the similar Max Versatility Plus 800 (which was around for five or six years before its discontinuation).

Kodak made Max 800 film for point-and-shoot and disposable cameras—specifically, they marketed it for point-and-shot cameras with a zoom lens, which exaggerated camera shake. It was a cheap high-ISO consumer color negative film intended for the novice. It had a large latitude for underexposure and (especially) overexposure, but color reproduction was a little different (some have said bland or weird) when compared to other Kodak films. Kodak intended the film to be printed on Ektacolor Edge paper, but my samples were printed on Fujicolor Crystal Archive paper (which certainly affects the aesthetic)—this recipe is modeled after my samples.

Winter Greenhouse – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4 – “Kodak Max 800”

This Kodak Max 800 Patron Early-Access Recipe is compatible with the Fujifilm X-Pro3, X100V, X-T4, X-S10, X-E4, and X-T30 II cameras. If you are a Fuji X Weekly Patron, it’s available to you right now on the Fuji X Weekly App! If you don’t have the App, download it for free today.

Example photographs, all camera-made JPEGs captured using this “Kodak Max 800” film simulation recipe on my Fujifilm X-E4:

Frozen Ponds at a Bird Refuge – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Winter Gate – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Open Gate – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Icy Marshland – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
What Remains of Summer – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Winter Water – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Frozen Marsh Pond – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Nature Trail – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Green Truck – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Santa’s Sled – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Neighborhood Path in Winter – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Trail Closed – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
No Shooting Past the Fence – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Pallets – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Inside Abandoned Shed – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Walking Tunnel – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Farm in the City – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Barnes & Noble Window – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Building Top in Last Light – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4

New Fujifilm X-Trans III App Patron Early-Access Film Simulation Recipe: Vintage Kodacolor

Large Stone & Tall Grass – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-H1 – “Vintage Kodacolor”

The Fuji X Weekly App is free, yet becoming a Fuji X Weekly Patron unlocks the best App experience! One benefit of being a Patron is you get early access to some new film simulation recipes. These early-access recipes will eventually become available free to everyone in time, including this new one. In fact, many early-access recipes have already been publicly published on this blog and the App, so now everyone can use them. Patrons help support Fuji X Weekly and, really, without them there would be no App. So I want to give a special “thank you” to all of the Patrons!

This new Patron early-access recipe is called Vintage Kodacolor. I was inspired by some old Kodacolor puzzles that I stumbled across (did you know that Kodak made jigsaw puzzles?). I’m not completely certain which Kodacolor film was used for these puzzles—possibly Kodacolor II—or how much the printing process affected the aesthetic, or even how much the colors have faded and shifted over time. Whatever the case, this recipe does a pretty good job emulating it, and produces a warm vintage-like aesthetic that’s easy to appreciate. There’s some similarities between this and my Kodacolor II 126 recipe. This “Vintage Kodacolor” recipe is fully compatible with all X-Trans III cameras, plus the Fujifilm X-T3 and X-T30. Those with newer X-Trans IV cameras can use it, too, but you’ll have to decide on Grain size.

If you are a Fuji X Weekly Patron, it’s available to you right now on the App!

Example photographs, all camera-made JPEGs captured using this “Vintage Kodacolor” film simulation recipe on my Fujifilm X-H1:

Vintage Phragmites – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-H1
Evening Reeds and Sky – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-H1
Three Brown Leaves – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-H1
Don’t Approach the Great Blue Heron – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-H1
Safe Zone – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-H1
Sunset Through The Grass – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-H1
Evening Light on the Wood – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-H1
Flowers No More – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-H1
Metal Door – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-H1
Cardboard Architect – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-H1
Holiday Horse Rider – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-H1

New Patron Early-Access Film Simulation Recipe: Fujicolor Analog

Cotton On – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V – “Fujicolor Analog”

The Fuji X Weekly App is free, yet becoming a Fuji X Weekly Patron unlocks the best App experience! One benefit of being a Patron is you get early access to some new film simulation recipes. These early-access recipes will eventually become available free to everyone in time, including this new one. In fact, many early-access recipes have already been publicly published on this blog and the App, so now everyone can use them. Patrons help support Fuji X Weekly and, really, without them there would be no App. So I want to give a special “thank you” to all of the Patrons!

This new Patron early-access recipe is called Fujicolor Analog. I was asked to recreate the look of a certain photographer, and I noticed that a lot of their photographs had a Classic Negative aesthetic, so I thought it would be easy to mimic. It turns out that this person shoots a lot of film, including (but not limited to) Fujicolor C200 and various Superia emulsions, as well as digital (but not Fujifilm, as far as I can tell), using RNI and perhaps some other filters or presets. Nothing said what each picture had been captured with, so it became difficult to recreate. After a little frustration, I decided to select only pictures with a certain aesthetic to attempt to emulate. I believe these might have been captured on a Superia emulsion, but they might not have been—they might not even be film! I think I was able to create a pretty close facsimile to this person’s aesthetic… at least one of the many various (but still somewhat similar) looks that this photographer has.

One film can have many different looks, depending on how it was shot, developed, and printed or scanned. I do believe this “Fujicolor Analog” recipe mimics the aesthetic of a Fujifilm color negative film, but which exact film, and how handled, is uncertain. What is certain is that this is a very nice film simulation recipe that some of you will love! It’s compatible with the Fujifilm X-Pro3, X100V, X-T4, X-S10, X-E4, X-T30 II cameras.

If you are a Fuji X Weekly Patron, it’s available to you right now on the App!

Example photographs, all camera-made JPEGs captured using this “Fujicolor Analog” film simulation recipe on my Fujifilm X100V:

Noble Fir – Kaysville, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Pine Trunk – Kaysville, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Burly Ladder – Kaysville, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Red Lights – Kaysville, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Utah Reeds – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Pine in the Sky – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Withering Blooms – Orem, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Peaks Above The Gap – Orem, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Arts – Draper, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Stop Spreading Germs – Draper, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Pharmacy Lift – Centerville, UT – Fujifilm X100V

Fujifilm X-Trans III + X-T3 & X-T30 Patron Early-Access Film Simulation Recipe: Ektachrome E100GX

Pink Rose Blossom – Ogden, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

I wanted to make another recipe that uses the Fluorescent 2 (or “warm white fluorescent”) white balance. Why? Because this is a very underutilized and under appreciated option. I have only four other recipes that use it—Provia 400, Fujicolor Super HG, Super HG Astia, and Fujichrome Sensia 100—and those are all very good recipes. I didn’t have any specific film in mind when I made this, I was simply attempting something that looked good.

After shooting with it awhile, and looking at the pictures, the results looked familiar, but I couldn’t put a finger on it. I started digging through my old pictures, and wasn’t finding anything. Then I stumbled on a few Kodak Ektachrome E100GX frames, and the results were similar.

Ektachrome E100GX was a color transparency film made by Kodak from 2001-2009, and is what replaced E100SW. It was known for vibrant saturation, a warm color cast, and fine grain. It wasn’t quite as warm, vibrant, or sharp as E100SW, but overall very similar, yet with finer grain. Some people thought it was better than E100SW, some people thought it was worse. I liked E100SW a bit better, but E100GX was still a good film, particularly if you wanted something warm, colorful, and contrasty, but not overly so.

Intelligent Children – Bountiful, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 – “Ektachrome E100GX”

The Fuji X Weekly app is free, yet becoming a Fuji X Weekly Patron unlocks the best app experience! One benefit of being a Patron is you get early access to some new film simulation recipes. These early-access recipes will eventually become available free to everyone in time, including this new one. In fact, many early-access recipes have already been publicly published on this blog and the app, so now everyone can use them. Patrons help support Fuji X Weekly and, really, without them there would be no app. So I want to give a special “thank you” to all of the Patrons!

This recipe is compatible with Fujifilm X-Trans III, X-T3 and X-T30 cameras. If you are a Fuji X Weekly Patron, it’s available to you right now on the app!

Example photographs, all camera-made JPEGs captured using this “Ektachrome E100GX” film simulation recipe on my Fujifilm X-T30:

Yellow Glow of Iowa – Bountiful, UT – Fujifilm X-T30
Sunlight Reflected on Window – Bountiful, UT – Fujifilm X-T30
Dark Red Tree & Partly Cloudy Sky – Ogden, UT – Fujifilm X-T30
Dead Leaves in a Dry Drinking Fountain – Bountiful, UT – Fujifilm X-T30
Small Waterfall – Ogden, UT – Fujifilm X-T30
Forest Graffiti – Ogden, UT – Fujifilm X-T30
Growing Out of the Side – Ogden, UT – Fujifilm X-T30
Two Boys Going Down a Trail – Ogden, UT – Fujifilm X-T30
Autumn Trunks – Ogden, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 – “Ektachrome E100GX”
Backlit Yellow Leaf – Ogden, UT – Fujifilm X-T30
Rose in the Garden – Ogden, UT – Fujifilm X-T30
Bright Bloom – Ogden, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 –
Rose Clump – Ogden, UT – Fujifilm X-T30
Wagon Duty – Ogden, UT – Fujifilm X-T30
Pines in Autumn – Ogden, UT – Fujifilm X-T30
Reflection in the River – Ogden, UT – Fujifilm X-T30
Left – Bountiful, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

The Current 10 FXW App Patron Early-Access Recipes!

One benefit of becoming a Fuji X Weekly App Patron is that you get early-access to some new film simulation recipes. There are, of course, a number of reasons why you should become a Fuji X Weekly Patron, including Early-Access Recipes—perhaps the best benefit might be the ability to quickly and easily find the recipes that are compatible with your camera. The best App experience is reserved for Patrons.

Currently there are 10 Early Access Recipes on the App. Right now these recipes are only available to Patrons, but they will eventually become free to everyone as new Early-Access Recipes replace them. Several are due to be replaced soon, so this list will probably look significantly different before the end of the year.

Let’s take a look at the current 10 Patron Early-Access Recipes!

Pushed CineStill 800T (X-T4, X-S10, X-E4, X-T30 II)

This recipe is intended to resemble CineStill 800T film, which is Tungsten balanced. Film can have many different aesthetics, depending on how it’s shot, developed, scanned or printed, and viewed, and this recipe is modeled after one particular look from this film. It’s good for night photography, but can produce interesting results in other light conditions.

Snow on the Stormy Mountain – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Empty Harmons Fuel Stop – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Ready To Go Nowhere – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4

Pushed CineStill 800T (X-Pro3, X100V)

This is essentially the same CineStill 800T recipe above, but adapted for use on the X-Pro3 and X100V cameras. They’re nearly identical, yet very subtly different. Those with an X-T4, X-S10, X-E4, and X-T30 II camera can use it, too, and you get to decide if you like this recipe or the one above better.

City Roses – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Cigarettes – Reno, NV – Fujifilm X100V
Hoop – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4

Kodacolor VR (X-T3, X-T30)

This recipe resembles expired Kodacolor VR film. This film dates back to the early 1980’s, and is a predecessor to ColorPlus 200. A great option for a vintage analog aesthetic.

Inside City Creek – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-T30
Stones & Glass Ceiling – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-T30
Stoneground – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

Vintage Color (X-T4, X-S10, X-E4, X-T30 II)

I described this one as an “artist’s recipe” because it produces a look similar to famed Hudson River School painter Albert Bierstadt, particularly his Yosemite paintings. It’s one of my absolute favorites!

Sentinel & Merced – Yosemite NP, CA – Fujifilm X100V
Yosemite Creek – Yosemite NP, CA – Fujifilm X100V
El Cap & Merced – Yosemite NP, CA – Fujifilm X100V

Old Kodak (X-T4, X-S10, X-E4, X-T30 II)

This recipe is an alternate take on the very popular Vintage Kodachrome recipe. Definitely has an old Kodak feel to it.

Wet Radio Flyer – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Suburban Storm – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Gumby on a Table – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4

Fujicolor NPH (X-Pro3, X100V, X-T4, X-S10, X-E4, X-T30 II)

Fujicolor NPH was a predecessor to Fujicolor Pro 400H. This recipe produces a nice Fuji print-film aesthetic.

Winter Evergreens – Weber Canyon, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Weber River in Winter – Weber Canyon, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Stepping Into the Night Circle – Sunset, UT – Fujifilm X100V

Vintage Negative (X-Pro3, X100V, X-T4, X-S10, X-E4, X-T30 II)

This recipe was modeled after some old photographs that someone shared with me. In the right conditions it can produce incredibly excellent vintage results.

Vintage Berries – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Water Tower – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Suburban Reed Evening – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

Porto 200 (X-Trans III + X-T3, X-T30)

The name is not a typo. Nor is there a film called “Porto 200.” But there is an X-Trans II recipe called Porto 200 (named after Porto, Portugal), and this is an adaptation of it for X-Trans III plus X-T3 and X-T30 cameras.

Yellow Bike – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30
Winter Trees – Layton, UT – Fujifilm X-T30
Night Train – Clinton, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

Ektachrome (X-Pro1, X-E1)

Loosely resembles Ektachrome film… at least one of the 40+ emulsions that carried the Ektachrome name.

Diesel – Park City, UT – Fujifilm X-Pro1
Two Cans – Weber Canyon, UT – Fujifilm X-Pro1
House Flag – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-Pro1

Color Negative Film (X-Trans II)

This recipe is an adaptation of the X-Trans I Color Negative Film recipe, but for X-Trans II cameras. Great for sunny days.

Yellow – Layton, UT – Fujifilm X-T1
No Swimming – Layton, UT – Fujifilm X-T1
Water Logged – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T1 – Photo by Jon Roesch

Find these film simulation recipes and many more on the Fuji X Weekly App!

Why Should You Become a Fuji X Weekly App Patron?

I’ve received feedback from a number of Fuji X Weekly App users with this suggestion: explain better the benefits of becoming a Patron. I’ve heard stories like, “I’ve had the app for awhile, but I didn’t realize how much better it was when you subscribe. I wish I’d known this months ago!” Let me lay out for you the benefits of becoming a Fuji X Weekly App Patron.

First, before I get too far into this, let me briefly explain what the App is and why you should go download it right now, if you don’t already have it on your phone. The Fuji X Weekly App is a mobile film simulation recipe library containing over 175 recipes for Fujifilm cameras. Film simulation recipes are JPEG settings that allow you to achieve various looks, many based on classic film stocks, straight-out-of-camera without the need to edit. These settings save you time, simplify the photographic process, and make capturing pictures even more enjoyable. If you own a Fujifilm camera, you should try these recipes and have the App on your phone. So take a moment right now to download the Fuji X Weekly App if you don’t already have it.

My film simulation recipes are completely free, and the Fuji X Weekly App is also free. There is absolutely no cost to you. It’s my gift to the Fujifilm community—it’s a real honor if you find it beneficial to your photography, as I’m happy to be helpful.

Within the App there is an option to become a Fuji X Weekly Patron (click the gear icon), which is $19.99 (USD + tax) for an annual subscription. Why should you subscribe? What benefits do Patrons get?

Becoming a Patron unlocks the best App experience.

This app does have some advanced features that can be unlocked by becoming a Fuji X Weekly Patron! These advanced features include filtering by sensor or camera, as well as by film simulation or color/B&W, and the ability to favorite recipes for quick access. Let’s take a closer look at the benefits of these features.

Filtering

If you are using the free version of the App, you have to look at each recipe individually to discover which cameras it is compatible with. For example, if you open the Agfa Optima 200 recipe on the App and scroll down a little, it lists all of the fully compatible cameras that this recipe will work on. If your camera is listed, you can use the recipe, and if your camera isn’t listed, you probably need to keep looking. Alternatively, you could cross-reference the recipes using this website, which are sorted by sensor, as a method for narrowing your search.

There is an easier way, if you are a Fuji X Weekly App Patron.

If your camera is, let’s say, a Fujifilm X-S10, you can Filter By Sensor, and select X-Trans IV, and you’ll find the Agfa Optima 200 recipe in the list, because that recipe is compatible with X-Trans IV cameras. If your camera is, let’s say, an X-E3, you can Filter By Sensor, and you’ll find the Agfa Optima 200 recipe in that list, too, because that recipe is also compatible with X-Trans III cameras. Another option is to Filter By Camera. You might think that the Agfa Optima 200 recipe would still show up—and it will for the X-E3—but it won’t show up for the X-S10. Why? Because that recipe isn’t fully compatible with all X-Trans IV cameras, and the X-S10 is one of those that the recipe won’t fully work with; however, it’s 99% compatible, so with one change you can use it. You see, newer X-Trans IV cameras have Grain Size (either Small or Large) that you must choose, a feature not found on older X-Trans IV and X-Trans III cameras, so that’s why it is only 99% compatible.

You have two options to narrow down the recipes that you can use—Sensor or Camera—and understanding these tools can help you find the recipe that you’re looking for. If you want a recipe that is 100% compatible with your camera, then Filter By Camera is what you want to use. Note that you can only choose one camera. If you want to find the most recipes that will work with your camera, but perhaps some aren’t 100% compatible (like Agfa Optima 200 on the X-S10) and you might have to make a choice on a setting (like Grain Size), or accept that it might produce a slightly different look (more on this in a moment), or you might even have to sort through some non-compatible recipes, then Filter By Sensor is what you want to use. Note that you can choose as many sensors as you’d like. If you have an X-S10 and if you Filter By Camera, you’ll find over 60 recipes that are 100% compatible with your camera. If you Filter By Sensor, choosing X-Trans III, X-Trans IV, and GFX, you’ll find over 140! Yes, you can use those 140+ recipes, but that’s a lot to go through.

Other cameras are in a similar situation. Bayer sensor cameras only have six recipes, but you can also use X-Trans I and X-Trans II recipes, although the results will be slightly different. You might like it, you might not, but you won’t know unless you try. If you Filter By Sensor and choose X-Trans I, X-Trans II, and Bayer, you’ll find nearly 40 recipes that will work on your Bayer camera. It’s a similar story if you have an X-Trans II camera. For GFX, many X-Trans IV recipes are compatible with GFX, but will render just slightly different. The bottom line is that you can Filter By Camera and get a limited list of fully compatible recipes that will look as intended on your camera, or you can Filter By Sensor (and even select multiple sensors) and potentially get a much bigger list of recipes that may or may not be good options for your camera model—you get to decide how adventurous you want to be.

In many cases, no matter if you Filter By Sensor or Filter By Camera, there’s still going to be a lot of recipes to choose from, and it can be overwhelming. That’s where Filter By Simulation or Filter By Color/BW comes in handy. If you know that you want a B&W recipe, you can remove all of the color recipes from the list, and if you know that you want a color recipe, you can remove all of the B&W recipes from the list. If you know that you want a Classic Chrome recipe, you can display only those that use Classic Chrome, or if you know that you want an Eterna recipe, you can display only those that use Eterna. These are great tools to really narrow down your search, which will save you time!

Fuji X Weekly App Patrons have a much easier time finding the recipes that they’re looking for. Yes, you could scroll through 175+ recipes individually to find the ones for your camera, or you can use the Filter options to quickly locate exactly what you want, and only Patrons can do that.

Favoriting

Another wonderful tool that is unlocked by becoming a Patron is the ability to Favorite recipes. Once you’ve narrowed down your list with the Filtering options, you can “Star” recipes, and they’ll show up at the top of the list. To Favorite a recipe, with the recipe open, tap the star in the upper-right corner. The Filtering options apply to Favorite recipes, which is demonstrated in the above screenshots. What’s great about this is that, if you have multiple generations of sensors, say X-Trans II and X-Trans III, you can Favorite recipes for both, and when you Filter for your X-Trans II camera, only X-Trans II recipes will show up, and the X-Trans III recipes that you put a Star on won’t display, and vice versa. You can use the Favorite tool to keep track of the recipes that you currently have programmed into your camera, or to list the ones that you want to someday try, or to note the ones that you’ve used and you really like.

Becoming a Patron unlocks early-access recipes.

Fuji X Weekly Patrons also get early access to some new film simulation recipes! There are currently 10 “early-access” film simulation recipes on the App (marked by an aperture symbol), that only Patrons can view. These recipes will eventually be free to everyone, but right now they’re only available to Patrons. As new early-access recipes are cycled into the App for Patrons, the others will be made available to all. My favorite Patron early-access recipes currently on the App are Vintage Color, Old Kodak, Pushed CineStill 800T, Kodacolor VR, and Vintage Negative. Getting early-access to some new film simulation recipes is a fun reward for your support.

Becoming a Patron supports Fuji X Weekly

Nothing is free. My film simulation recipes are free to you, both on this website and on the App, but that doesn’t mean that they’re free—it just means someone else is paying for it. As you can imagine, creating and maintaining an app isn’t cheap. Same for a website. Creating and sharing these recipes takes a lot of time and effort and sometimes even money. All of this is to say that Patrons support the App and website and future film simulation recipes and more! Their support leads to other great things, too, like the Community Recipes page, and even recipes for Ricoh cameras. Patrons partner with Fuji X Weekly for the benefit of the Fujifilm community and beyond, and without their support all of these great things, including the App, wouldn’t happen. Also, if you found film simulation recipes and the app useful to your photography, this is a great way to show your appreciation.

I want to give a big “thank you” to all of the Fuji X Weekly App Patrons! If you’re not already, consider becoming a Patron today.

To conclude, Fuji X Weekly Patrons unlock some great tools for the best app experience, plus they get early-access to some new recipes while supporting Fuji X Weekly for the benefit of the Fujifilm community and more. It’s a win-win!

I want to mention here at the very end of this article that we’re busy building a big App update that will add some great new functions and features. We’re working hard to get this update out before December, and with any luck it will happen. I think you’ll really appreciate these improvements, as they’ll make the Fuji X Weekly App even better!

Learn more about the Fuji X Weekly App here.

New Patron Early-Access Film Simulation Recipe: Pushed CineStill 800T

Snow on the Stormy Mountain – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4 – “Pushed CineStill 800T”

The Fuji X Weekly app is free, yet becoming a Fuji X Weekly Patron unlocks the best app experience! One benefit of being a Patron is you get early access to some new film simulation recipes. These early-access recipes will eventually become available free to everyone in time, including this new one. In fact, many early-access recipes have already been publicly published on this blog and the app, so now everyone can use them. Patrons help support Fuji X Weekly and, really, without them there would be no app. So I want to give a special “thank you” to all of the Patrons!

This new Patron early-access recipe is called “Pushed CineStill 800T” and is compatible with the Fujifilm X-T4, X-S10, X-E4, and X-T30 II X-Trans IV cameras. It mimics the look of push-processed CineStill 800T film. To create this aesthetic, I studied overcast daytime examples of the film, and, interestingly enough, it did quite well at night, too; however, I do believe it more faithfully mimics the film in cloudy daytime conditions—it does produce nice results in daylight or night, so feel free to use it anytime. Film can look different depending on how it is shot, developed, printed, or scanned. This recipe doesn’t replicate pushed CineStill 800T film under all circumstances, but in certain conditions it’s a good facsimile. I really like how this one looks, and I think some of you will really appreciate it, too!

If you are a Fuji X Weekly Patron, it’s available to you right now on the app!

Example photographs, all camera-made JPEGs captured using this “Pushed CineStill 800T” film simulation recipe:

Book & Minolta – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Happy Birthday Wish – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Ready To Go Nowhere – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Pipe Door – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Night Urban Path – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Empty Parking Garage – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Empty Harmons Fuel Stop – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Night Hydrant – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Wet White Blooms – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Little Wild Berries – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Clouds Building Over Green Ridge – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Pumpkins In A Patch – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Bee Boxes – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Hidden Townhomes – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Winter Dusting – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4

New Patron Early-Access Film Simulation Recipe: Old Kodak

Wet Radio Flyer – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4 – “Old Kodak”

The Fuji X Weekly app is free, yet becoming a Fuji X Weekly Patron unlocks the best app experience! One benefit of being a Patron is you get early access to some new film simulation recipes. These early-access recipes will eventually become available free to everyone in time, including this new one. In fact, a few of the original early-access recipes have been publicly published on this blog and the app, so everyone can now use them. Patrons help support Fuji X Weekly and, really, without them there would be no app. So I want to give a special “thank you” to all of the Patrons!

This new recipe, called Old Kodak, is similar to Vintage Kodachrome and Kodachrome 1. I was recently viewing some old pictures captured on various Kodak films, and I was reminded of those two film simulation recipes. I thought that with some tweaks I could get closer to mimicking the aesthetic of the old Kodak pictures I was looking at. If you like the Vintage Kodachrome and Kodachrome 1 recipes, you’ll really appreciate this Old Kodak recipe, too! It’s compatible with the Fujifilm X-T4, X-S10 and X-E4 cameras.

If you are a Fuji X Weekly Patron, it’s available to you right now on the app!

Suburban Storm – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4 – “Old Kodak”
The Joy of Writing – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4 – “Old Kodak”
Gumby on a Table – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4 – “Old Kodak”
Sunset Light on Winter Mountain – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4 – “Old Kodak”

New Patron Early-Access Film Simulation Recipe: Vintage Negative

Vintage Berries – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V – “Vintage Negative”

There’s a new Patron early-access film simulation recipe on the Fuji X Weekly app! It’s called Vintage Negative and is based on some old photographs that someone shared with me. If you’re looking for an aged analog aesthetic, this recipe might be for you! It’s compatible with the Fujifilm X100V, X-Pro3, X-T4, X-S10 and the upcoming X-E4.

The Fuji X Weekly app is currently only available for iOS, but progress is being made on the Android version. I think it’s not that far from being finished. As long as there are no unforeseen delays, it will be available by March 1st, hopefully sooner. The app is free, and some features and functionality can be unlocked by becoming a Patron, which is a great way to support what’s going on here. There’s some wonderful stuff in the works, and I can’t do it without you. I want to give a big “Thank You” to all of the Patrons for your support!

One of the perks of being a Fuji X Weekly Patron is that you get early-access to some new film simulation recipes. This new Vintage Negative recipe is one of those Patron early-access ones. It will eventually become available to everyone once a new Patron early-access recipe replaces it. There were seven of these recipes on the app, but I’m increasing that to ten. So far, two of the original early-access recipes have been made available to everyone, but eventually they all will, including this one. My cameras’ custom presets are chocked full of upcoming recipes and various experiments.

If you have an iPhone or iPad, be sure to download the Fuji X Weekly app—it’s free! You can get early access to the Vintage Negative film simulation recipe by becoming a Patron.

Water Tower – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X100V – “Vintage Negative”
Troller Square – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X100V – “Vintage Negative”
Yellow House Evening – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V – “Vintage Negative”
Suburban Reed Evening – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V – “Vintage Negative”