Fujifilm XQ1 (X-Trans II) Film Simulation Recipe: Cross Process

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A Fuji X Weekly reader sent me his camera, a Fujifilm XQ1, so that I might create some film simulation recipes for it. For those who don’t know, the XQ1 is a premium compact-zoom that Fujifilm made six or seven years ago, and it has a 2/3″ 12-megapixel X-Trans II sensor. While the sensor is much smaller than APS-C, it has the same processor and software as other X-Trans II cameras, although it is missing some options (Classic Chrome, PRO Neg. Hi and PRO Neg. Std, for instance). I discovered that some of the X-Trans II recipes I’ve created, such as Ektachrome 100SW, Agfa Optima, Velvia and Monochrome, all work great on the XQ1. My intentions are to create some more recipes that will work on this camera, and, really, all X-Trans II cameras.

The first film simulation recipe that I created for the XQ1 (and, again, it’s compatible with all X-Trans II cameras) is Cross Process. I have a couple Cross Process recipes that I’ve created for newer camera models (here and here), but never for older models. This one was rather easy to make, and so that’s why I started with it. While I set the maximum ISO to 1600, if you are using an APS-C X-Trans II camera, I’d go as high as ISO 3200. Feel free to try this recipe on X-Trans I or Bayer cameras, if you have one of those, and see how it turns out.

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Summer Evening Dream – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm XQ1 – “Cross Process”

Cross processing is a technique where you develop a film in chemicals intended for another film. For example, the most common cross process is to develop color transparencies, which require the E-6 process, using color negative film chemicals, which is known as C-41 process. For slide film, the photographs typically increase in contrast and grain and the colors shift dramatically. There are other types of cross processing, as well. I’ve done cross processing before, and the results can be fun. Different films will look different when they are cross processed. Overexposing or underexposing or even how the development is handled can effect how the image is rendered. The aesthetic can vary significantly, but usually you can spot a cross processed photograph when you see it.

Provia
Dynamic Range: DR200
Highlight: +2 (Hard)
Shadow: +2 (Hard)
Color: +2 (High)
Sharpness: -1 (Medium-Soft)
Noise Reduction: -2 (Low)
White Balance: Auto, -3 Red & -9 Blue
ISO: Auto, up to ISO 1600
Exposure Compensation: +1/3 (typically)

Example photographs, all camera-made JPEGs made using this Cross Process film simulation recipe on a Fujifilm XQ1:

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SkyWest Sunset – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm XQ1

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Eagle TT-12 – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm XQ1

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SkyWest Carts – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm XQ1

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Ford Truck – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm XQ1

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Ranger – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm XQ1

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Warehouse Deliveries – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm XQ1

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Stop! – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm XQ1

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Cross Process Red Roses – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm XQ1

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Yellow Stump – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm XQ1

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Sand Toys Without Sand – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm XQ1

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Spirit of Photography – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm XQ1

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Blessed – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm XQ1

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Message From Space – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm XQ1

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Green Leaves – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm XQ1

See also: Film Simulation Recipes

Fujifilm X100F Review Blog

Help Fuji X Weekly

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My Fujifilm X-T30 Cross Process Film Simulation Recipe

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Pot in the Sky – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 “Cross Process”

My last film simulation recipe was modeled after a look by photographer Jeff Davenport. Jeff has several different aesthetics, depending on his project. His Venice Beach Canals series has an interesting look that I wanted to attempt. I recognized right away the “look” that he created: orange and teal. Early color photography used two color layers (instead of three), orange-red and blue-teal. Digital software can mimic this aesthetic, and the strength of it can be adjusted. Exposure X5 software has a one-click preset for it. Jeff has customized his images to where both orange and pink lean towards peach.

I had a few ideas of how to create this look in-camera on my Fujifilm X-T30. I tried out those ideas and did some experiments, but unfortunately none of them worked. What you see here is the closest that I came to recreating Jeff’s Venice Beach Canals aesthetic. It’s not especially close, but I like it nonetheless. What this recipe actually reminds me of is Provia or Sensia cross processed. Cross processing color reversal film in C-41 chemicals isn’t uncommon. I’ve done it several times myself. I’ve already created a cross process film simulation recipe, but that recipe and this one produce somewhat different looks, despite both emulating cross processed film.

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Riding Around the Cones – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 “Cross Process”

When I created this film simulation recipe, I didn’t intend for it to look cross processed. It was after the fact that I decided it resembled that analog effect. If I wanted it to more resemble cross processed film, I’d probably set Grain to Strong, and consider setting Shadows to 0; however, I do like the results from the recipe as-is. Feel free to adjust it to your own personal preferences. This recipe is compatible with X-Trans III & IV cameras.

Classic Chrome
Dynamic Range: DR400
Highlight: +4
Shadow: -1
Color: +3
Noise Reduction: -4
Sharpness: +1
Grain Effect: Weak
Color Chrome Effect: Off
White Balance: 7700K, -8 Red & -3 Blue
ISO: Auto, up to ISO 6400
Exposure Compensation: -1/3 to -2/3 (typically)

Example photographs, all camera-made JPEGs using this Cross Process film simulation recipe on my Fujifilm X-T30:

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Cloud over Apex – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Four Garages – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Bike & Cones – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Roofline & Siding – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Bike Park Bench – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Tennis Racket – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Razor – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Self Shadow – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Pedaling Around – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Reeds Cross Process – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

See also: Film Simulation Recipes

Fujifilm X100F Review Blog

Help Fuji X Weekly

Nobody pays me to write the content found on fujixweekly.com. There's a real cost to operating and maintaining this site, not to mention all the time that I pour into it. If you appreciated this article, please consider making a one-time gift contribution. Thank you!

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My Fujifilm X100F Cross Process Film Simulation Recipe


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Silos – Waco, TX – Fujifilm X100F “Cross Process”

Cross processing film is a technique where you develop a film in chemicals intended for another film. For example, the most common cross process is to develop color transparencies, which require the E-6 process, using color negative film chemicals, which is known as the C-41 process. For slide film, the photographs typically increase in contrast and grain and the colors shift dramatically. There are other types of cross processing, as well. I’ve done cross processing before, and the results can be fun. It’s a great experiment if you’ve never done it before!

Different films will look different when they are cross processed. Overexposing or underexposing or even how the development is handled can effect how the image is rendered. The aesthetic can vary significantly, but usually you can spot a cross processed photograph when you see it. Below are a few examples of actual film that I’ve cross processed:

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Westbound CA HWY 58 – Tehachapi, CA – Fujifilm Velvia 50 cross process

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Flare & Flag – Barstow, CA – Fujifilm Velvia 50 cross process

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Old Tractor – Tehachapi, CA – Kodak Gold 400 cross process

Notice how the three photographs are quite a bit different from each other. There is not a singular look that is cross process, but rather an aesthetic spectrum. The images tend to be less literal and more abstract.

There is a significant challenge in developing a film simulation that mimics the look of cross processing. Most notably, which film and process? There are so many, and besides, one film can give many different looks. For example, the two Velvia images above were from the same 36 exposure roll of film, and one has a much more pronounced yellow-green cast than the other. What I decided to do was create something that could conceivably fall within the aesthetic spectrum, while not copying any specific film.

While this film simulation recipe does not copy one specific film, I do think it’s close to Kodak EliteChrome that’s been cross processed, or perhaps Ektachrome 100G. I think it’s close to Fujifilm Sensia sometimes, although I’d emphasis the word sometimes. These settings are never going to produce results that will always match a certain film because one film can vary in look from frame-to-frame. It’s convincing, but should be thought of in generic terms.

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Truck Stop Cross Process – Bowie, TX – Fujifilm X100F “Cross Process”

Because the results of actual cross process film can vary so much, it would be fun to change up this recipe as you shoot. Maybe add a little more to the shadows or highlights sometimes and change the white balance shift a little after a few frames. I haven’t tried this, but it sounds like a good idea. I did change the Dynamic Range setting a number of times, going between DR100, DR200 and DR-Auto. After some playing around I settled on DR200, although I think you’d be fine with whichever Dynamic Range setting you’d prefer.

Provia
Dynamic Range: DR200
Highlight: +2
Shadow: +3
Color: +4
Noise Reduction: -3
Sharpening: 0
Grain Effect: Strong
White Balance: Auto, -3 Red & -8 Blue
ISO: Auto up to ISO 6400
Exposure Compensation: +2/3 (typically)

Example photos, all camera-made JPEGs using my Fujifilm X100F Cross Process Film Simulation recipe:

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Taos Umbrella – Taos, NM – Fujifilm X100F “Cross Process”

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Pentax Shutter Dial – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X100F “Cross Process”

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Get 1 Back – Draper, UT – Fujifilm X100F “Cross Process”

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Umbrella Tie – Layton, UT – Fujifilm X100F “Cross Process”

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Covered Hoppers – Westlake, TX – Fujifilm X100F “Cross Process”

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Counters – McKinney, Texas – Fujifilm X100F “Cross Process”

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Kitchen Cross Process – Waco, TX – Fujifilm X100F “Cross Process”

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Speaker – Riverdale, UT – Fujifilm X100F “Cross Process”

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Grain Elevator – Kaysville, UT – Fujifilm X100F “Cross Process”

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Two Towers Cross Process – Dallas, TX – Fujifilm X100F “Cross Process”