First Fujifilm X-T1 Film Simulation Recipes


Fujifilm X-T1 Blog

I’ve had my Fujifilm X-T1 for less than two weeks. I plan to create many different film simulation recipes for it, but that takes time, so they’ll likely trickle out over the coming months. I did create three film simulation recipes, which you’ll find below. I like to mimic the aesthetic of vintage films with in-camera JPEG settings, as I learned photography in the film era. These three X-T1 recipes aren’t intended to mimic the look of any particular film; I just like how they look.

The in-camera JPEG options on the X-T1, which has an X-Trans II sensor, are different and much more limited than X-Trans IV or even X-Trans III cameras. Fujifilm continues to provide more and better features to achieve desired looks straight out of camera. While the X-T1 doesn’t have as many options, it’s still possible to get very nice pictures right out of the camera, no post-processing needed. Actually, sometimes it’s nice to have fewer choices as it makes things more simple.

Even though these recipes were created on a Fujifilm X-T1, they’re compatible with all X-Trans II cameras, such as the X100T, X-E2, and X-T10, as well as Fujifilm Bayer cameras, like the XF10, X-T100, and X-A7. The Velvia and Monochrome recipes are compatible with X-Trans I cameras, such as the X-Pro1, X100S and X-E1. I should also point out that my Fujifilm XF10 film simulation recipes are compatible with the X-T1 and other X-Trans II cameras.

Some of you have been asking me to create recipes that are compatible with the older models for some time now, and I’m happy to finally be able to share some. You’ve waited awhile! These three film simulations are just the beginning for the X-T1. I will be creating more. I hope to recreate some of my other looks with the X-Trans II sensor, but we’ll see how that goes. Some future recipes might require unconventional approaches. I can’t wait to see what I come up with! In the meantime, enjoy the recipes below.

Classic Chrome

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Praying the Order is Right – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-T1

Film Simulation: Classic Chrome
Dynamic Range: DR200
White Balance: Auto, -1 Red & -1 Blue
Color: +2 (High)
Highlight: +1 (Medium-High)
Shadow: +1 (Medium-High)
Sharpness: 0 (STD)
Noise Reduction: -2 (Low)
ISO: Auto, up to ISO 3200

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Rural Road In Winter – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-T1

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Winter Boxcar – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T1

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Flaming Lemon – South Ogden, UT – Fujifilm X-T1

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Joyful Dining – South Ogden, UT – Fujifilm X-T1

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Opening a Soda Bottle – South Ogden, UT – Fujifilm X-T1

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Egg, Bowl & Rice – South Ogden, UT – Fujifilm X-T1

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Grill Fire – South Ogden, UT – Fujifilm X-T1

Velvia

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Pink Penguin – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-T1

Film Simulation: Velvia
Dynamic Range: DR200
White Balance: Auto, 0 Red & -2 Blue
Color: +2 (High)
Highlight: -1 (Medium-Low)
Shadow: -1 (Medium-Low)
Sharpness : 0 (STD)
Noise Reduction: -2 (Low)
ISO: Auto, up to ISO 3200

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Kobe Cold – South Ogden, UT – Fujifilm X-T1

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Sushi Lamp – South Ogden, UT – Fujifilm X-T1

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For Goodness Sake – South Ogden, UT – Fujifilm X-T1

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Anchored Caboose – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T1

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Red In The Woods – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T1

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When The Season Is All Wrong – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T1

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Rudy Drain Winter – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-T1

Monochrome

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Rebuilt 24 – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T1

Film Simulation: Monochrome (+Y, +R, +G)
Dynamic Range: DR200
Highlight: +1 (Medium-High)
Shadow: +1 (Medium-High)
Sharpness : +1 (Medium -Hard)
Noise Reduction: -2 (Low)
ISO: Auto, up to ISO 6400

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Monochrome Lines – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T1

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Metal – South Ogden, UT – Fujifilm X-T1

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When Life Gives You Lemons – South Ogden, UT – Fujifilm X-T1

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Soup – South Ogden, UT – Fujifilm X-T1

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Jo With Chopsticks – South Ogden, UT – Fujifilm X-T1

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Drinking Soup – South Ogden, UT – Fujifilm X-T1

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Eating Rice – South Ogden, UT – Fujifilm X-T1

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38 comments

  1. Michał · January 22

    That was quick, thank you!
    When I was trying to adjust your recipes for more modern cameras to my X-T1, I wondered how its contrast scale 0-3 compares to 0-5 in e.g. X-T2. Is the strongest setting the same level and X-T2 just has it split into more steps for finer control, or maybe +1, +2 have the same power and X-T2 pushes it even further beyond X-T1 capability?

    It seems to me, besides Acros & grain settings, the biggest difference in settings are those contrast values – white balance tweaking options look fairly the same, and it’s a good news as you rely heavily on it 😉

    I totally admire the colours in your picture of two horses in “Fujifilm X-T30 Kodachrome 64 Film Simulation Recipe” so I keep my fingers crossed that your deep understanding of WB & other things will get my X-T1 pictures somewhere there. Please take your time, though! No need to feel pressured 🙂

    Many thanks again!

    Liked by 1 person

    • Ritchie Roesch · January 22

      I plan to do a side-by-side test, but what I think I see, without a close study, is that each increase or decrease on X-Trans II (or I) is equal to about 1.5 on X-Trans IV (or III). Which means that +2 on the X-T1 is about +3 on the X-T30. But I don’t know for certain. I’ll make sure to get more scientific with this soon.

      Like

  2. Nicolas · January 22

    Hi Ritchie

    again thanks for all your film simulations recipes…. due to the firmware limitations of my X-E3 I have followed your work around to get at least three different simulations saved to C1-C7.
    1 with AWB and colour shifts
    1 with Kelvin setting
    1 with daylight (or other corresponding light setting)

    But since there are way more options I would like to ad more.

    Have you written down all your settings in a spreadsheet, so I could quickly find out which film simulation shares e.g the same AWB (plus colour shift), same Kelvin setting, or same light setting (like daylight)

    Of course I could copy all infos into a spreadsheet my self to see the matches, I hoped I could abbreviate this process!

    Sorry for me being lazy…

    Thanks
    cheers Nicolas

    Like

  3. Phil · January 22

    I’ve got an X-T1 so thank you very much for these recipes. I was feeling a bit left out having an older camera.

    Liked by 2 people

    • Ritchie Roesch · January 22

      More will come!

      Like

      • stefanpanaitescu · January 29

        Thank you so much for the settings! After all these years i still find joy using my XT1 and i felt that the settings i used for my XT20 weren’t the best for it.
        Will look forward to see your next ones!

        Liked by 1 person

      • Ritchie Roesch · January 29

        Thank you! More coming soon. I’m laying the groundwork.

        Like

  4. clement · January 22

    Thanks Ritchie ! I am so glad I found your blog, great work !

    Liked by 1 person

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  6. Jean · January 23

    For the first recipes I’m trying to do it on my xpro1 but there isn’t any classic chrome for it or is there ?

    Like

    • Ritchie Roesch · January 23

      The X-Pro1 doesn’t have Classic Chrome. With that said, when I had an X-E1, which also didn’t have Classic Chrome, I did use this to mimic Classic Chrome:
      Astia
      DR200
      Color -2
      Sharpness 0
      Highlight +1
      Shadow +1
      WB: Auto, +2 R & -1 B

      Like

  7. José Alfredo · January 23

    ¡Por fín! Tengo una XE-2 y cada vez que veía sus recetas para X TRANS III y superior me preguntaba como adaptarlas a la configuración de mi cámara. Espero con ansias la receta de KODACHROME 64 para mi XE-2.

    Muchas gracias por el gran trabajo.

    Saludos desde Chile.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Ritchie Roesch · January 23

      Adaptar las recetas de Kodachrome para X-Trans II es una prioridad en mi lista de prioridades.

      Like

  8. hpchavaz · January 25

    Hi Ritchie,
    Would it not be great to find out on this blog a table giving for each camera type the sensor type and the available film simulations?
    Henri-Pierre

    Liked by 1 person

    • Ritchie Roesch · January 25

      That would indeed be great, but it takes time and work. I wish I could do that, and maybe someday I can, but I just can’t right now. Great suggestion, though—I really appreciated it!

      Like

  9. kiennt26 · January 26

    Hi Ritchie,

    Great work! I’m so glad that I’ve subscribed to your blog. Looking for more X-Trans II recipes so I can play with my old XE2! ^-^

    Like

  10. Nguyen Tuan Kien · January 26

    Hi Ritchie,

    Thanks for your great work! Looking for new X-TransII recipes so I can play with my XE2! 😀
    Btw do you have a guideline post? Like how to work with parameters (sharpness, color…), how they affect the photo. I want to learn about them but don’t know where to begin. Thank you and sorry for my English, I’m still improving it.

    Liked by 1 person

  11. Mario Salinas · January 26

    Thanks Ritchie! My X100T and I really appreciate it.

    Liked by 1 person

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  17. Long Nguyen · March 14

    Hi Richie,
    The new Classic Negative on X100V is wonderful. Could you please make a recipe of it for my old X-T1?

    Like

  18. Paulius Rymeikis · March 21

    So any simulations that I find for X-Trans II (or I) will work on XF10?

    Liked by 1 person

    • Ritchie Roesch · March 22

      They will indeed work. One “issue” is that there will be small differences in white balance, color, contrast, etc., as Fujifilm programs cameras slightly differently, but you can use the recipes nevertheless.

      Like

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  20. SP · June 25

    @ ritchie fantastic compilation.
    I cant thank u enough for the incredible time, effort and work u have put into to get us these magnificient film recipies.
    I have a fuji x70 and would love to have acros feel sim recipe.
    Am refering to your xt1 as both have xtrans II
    Somebody already asked above if The recent classic neg is possible for xtrans II sensor.
    Thanks again and god bless.

    Like

    • Ritchie Roesch · June 25

      I appreciate your kind words of encouragement! Thank you! I don’t really think Acros or Classic Negative are possible to mimic on X-Trans II. But that doesn’t mean X-Trans II cameras can’t produce nice JPEGs. I do plan to create more recipes for it.

      Like

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