Fujifilm X-Trans IV Film Simulation Recipe: Fujicolor Super HG v2 (Part 2 of 3)

Lilac Sun – McCall, ID – Fujifilm X-E4 – “Fujicolor Super HG v2”

When Thomas Schwab sent me his settings that would later be called Fujicolor Super HG, he asked me if there were any changes that I would make. I tried his recipe, and then created a couple of alternate versions. I concluded that I liked his recipe as-is with no changes; however, I thought that one variation I created was interesting, so I shot with it, too, and turned it into its own recipe. I call it Fujicolor Super HG v2. While it’s a collaboration between Thomas and I, he contributed the most to it.

Fujifilm introduced the Super HG line in 1986, with versions in ISOs between 100 and 1600. It saw several iterations and improvements before being replaced by the Superia line is 1998. Thomas Schwab’s Fujicolor Super HG recipe and this Fujicolor Super HG v2 recipe are more similar to Super HG 100 or Super HG 200 film. One film can have many different looks depending on how it was shot, developed, printed or scanned. The differences between the Fujicolor Super HG and Fujicolor Super HG v2 recipes might be like the differences produced by using different film scanners.

Joshua Wall – Scottsdale, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4 – “Fujicolor Super HG v2”

While both Super HG recipes look great, I prefer the Fujicolor Super HG recipe for natural light photography, and I prefer the Fujicolor Super HG v2 recipe for artificial light photography. I invite you to try both, and see which version you like better. You might find that you prefer one in a certain situation and the other in a different situation. Because this recipe uses the new Auto White Priority white balance, it’s only compatible (as of this writing) with the Fujifilm X-T4, X-S10 and X-E4 cameras (and maybe the GFX100S?). If you have the X-Pro3 or X100V, you can use Auto white balance instead, and in natural light you’ll get identical results, although in artificial light it won’t look quite the same.

Classic Negative
Dynamic Range: DR400
Highlight: -1
Shadow: +1
Color: +2
Noise Reduction: -4
Sharpening: 0
Clarity: +2
Grain Effect: Weak, Large
Color Chrome Effect: Weak
Color Chrome Effect Blue: Strong
White Balance: Auto White Priority, -3 Red & -1 Blue
ISO: Auto, up to ISO 6400
Exposure Compensation: +2/3 to +1 (typically)

Example photographs, all camera-made JPEGs using this Fujicolor Super HG v2 film simulation recipe on my Fujifilm X-E4:

Crocodile – Scottsdale, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4
Library Lamp – Scottsdale, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4
Books on a Table – Scottsdale, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4
Wood Workshop – Scottsdale, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4
33 RPM – Scottsdale, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4
Tired Lake Water – McCall, ID – Fujifilm X-E4
Children Playing With Sand – McCall, ID – Fujifilm X-E4
Pink Blooms – Scottsdale, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4
American Renovation – McCall, ID – Fujifilm X-E4
Sisters – McCall, ID – Fujifilm X-E4

Part 1 – Fujicolor Super HG Film Simulation Recipe
Part 3 – Super HG Astia Film Simulation Recipe

Find these film simulation recipes and many more on the Fuji X Weekly — Film Recipes App!

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Fujifilm X-Trans IV Film Simulation Recipe: Fujicolor Super HG (Part 1 of 3)

Suburban Home – Scottsdale, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4 – “Fujicolor Super HG”

This Fujicolor Super HG recipe was created by Thomas Schwab, who has made several film simulation recipes published on this website, including Fujicolor NPS 160 PulledSuperia Xtra 400Urban Vintage ChromeKodachrome IIKodak Portra 800 v2Classic MonochromeB&W Superia, and Monochrome Kodachrome. Thomas has also collaborated on other recipes, playing an important role in getting them right, including Kodak Portra 800Kodak Ektar 100Kodachrome 1Kodak Portra 400, and Kodak T-Max 400. Whenever Thomas sends me a new recipe idea, I’m always eager to try it out!

Thomas was photographing using the Provia 400 film simulation recipe, which requires a Fluorescent 2 (also called “Warm White Fluorescent” or “Neon 2”) White Balance. He wanted to see how that not-often-used White Balance would look with some other film simulations, and, after several adjustments, came up with this recipe. He shared it with me, and I shot with it and really liked the results! We wondered if it closely resembled any particular film—it seemed to be in the general ballpark of several Fujifilm emulsions without matching any. After digging a little deeper, and after a chance encounter with a box of prints from 1992, it was determined that Fujicolor Super HG, which is a predecessor to the Superia line, was a surprisingly close match. This recipe wasn’t intended to resemble Fujicolor Super HG film, but fortunately it does!

Smokey Sunrise – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4 – “Fujicolor Super HG”

I thoroughly enjoyed shooting with this recipe, as it produces some great analogue-like results! Because it requires Classic Negative, Color Chrome FX Blue, and Clarity, it is only compatible with (as of this writing) the Fujifilm X-Pro3, X100V, X-T4, X-S10 and X-E4 cameras. I want to give a big “Thank you!” to Thomas Schwab for creating this great recipe and allowing me to share it with you—thanks, Thomas!

Classic Negative
Dynamic Range: DR400
Highlight: 0
Shadow: +1
Color: +2
Noise Reduction: -4
Sharpening: 0
Clarity: -3
Grain Effect: Weak, Large
Color Chrome Effect: Weak
Color Chrome Effect Blue: Strong
White Balance: Fluorescent 2, -3 Red & -1 Blue
ISO: Auto, up to ISO 6400
Exposure Compensation: +1/3 to +2/3 (typically)

Example photographs, all camera-made JPEGs using this Fujicolor Super HG film simulation recipe on my Fujifilm X-E4:

Hole in the Wall – Scottsdale, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4
Locked Bike – Scottsdale, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4
Free College – Scottsdale, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4
College Hunks – Scottsdale, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4
Arizona Neighborhood – Scottsdale, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4
Hidden Home – Scottsdale, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4
Window Desk – Scottsdale, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4
Suburban Patriotism – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Ceiling Lights – Scottsdale, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4
Carousel Top – Scottsdale, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4
Super Shock Control – Scottsdale, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4
Giant Metal Gorilla – Scottsdale, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4

Part 2 – Fujicolor Super HG v2
Part 3 – Super HG Astia

Find these film simulation recipes and many more on the Fuji X Weekly — Film Recipes App!

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Fujifilm X100V + Fujicolor Pro 400H Recipe + Ponderosa State Park + Dreary Day = Photographic Awesomeness

Payette Lake Between Trees – Ponderosa State Park, ID – Fujifilm X100V

I recently visited Ponderosa State Park just outside of McCall, Idaho. It was a dreary day—off-and-on it drizzled rain from the grey overcast sky—with cool temperatures. This might be my favorite weather conditions, and was perfect for a hike through the forest with my Fujifilm X100V, which has some weather sealing, so it’s fine that it got a little wet. I loaded the camera with my Fujicolor Pro 400H film simulation recipe and headed down the trail through the tall trees.

Ponderosa State Park sits on a peninsula on Payette Lake in the middle of Idaho. It’s heavily forested and green. The lake is very clear. As I was exploring, it felt like Ponderosa could be a National Park and not a State Park. It’s missing a headliner feature that would propel it into National Park status, and that’s fine because it wasn’t crowded, so I enjoyed the feeling of being in a National Park without all of the people. At some points it seemed like I had the place all to myself.

The Fujicolor Pro 400H recipe delivered a great analog-like aesthetic on this outing. It captured the scenes how I wanted it to. This recipe does great in sunny conditions, but it also does well on overcast days, like this one. It was a wonderful time for photography, and it was also great to just be in nature, enjoying the sights, sounds and scents of the forest. Enjoy the pictures!

Evergreen Trunks – Ponderosa State Park, ID – Fujifilm X100V
Mossy Trunk – Ponderosa State Park, ID – Fujifilm X100V
Deer In The Forest Ponderosa State Park, ID – Fujifilm X100V
Broken Down – Ponderosa State Park, ID – Fujifilm X100V
Fallen – Ponderosa State Park, ID – Fujifilm X100V
Forest Trail #1 – Ponderosa State Park, ID – Fujifilm X100V
Forest Trail #2 – Ponderosa State Park, ID – Fujifilm X100V
Trees & Pond – Ponderosa State Park, ID – Fujifilm X100V
Curved Trees Over Pond – Ponderosa State Park, ID – Fujifilm X100V
Lily Marsh #1 – Ponderosa State Park, ID – Fujifilm X100V
Lily Marsh #2 – Ponderosa State Park, ID – Fujifilm X100V
V Tree – Ponderosa State Park, ID – Fujifilm X100V
Trees & Lake – Ponderosa State Park, ID – Fujifilm X100V
Rain Clouds Over Payette Lake – Ponderosa State Park, ID – Fujifilm X100V
Lakeshore – Ponderosa State Park, ID – Fujifilm X100V
Above Payette – Ponderosa State Park, ID – Fujifilm X100V

Fujifilm X-Trans IV (X-Pro3, X100V, X-T4, X-S10 & X-E4) Film Simulation Recipe: Fujicolor NPS 160 Pulled

Sunlight Through The Forest – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4 – “Fujicolor NPS 160 Pulled”

Fujifilm introduced Fujicolor NPS 160 sometime in the 1990’s. It was a low contrast, low saturation color negative film intended for portrait photography. Fujifilm replaced it in 2004 with Fujicolor Pro 160S (later renamed Fujicolor Pro 160NS). I actually shot a few rolls of NPS 160 back in the day, and a picture of my parents captured with this film hangs an a wall in their house. Pulling the film, which is a technique where you overexpose and reduce development time to compensate, further reduces the contrast and saturation. This recipe looks a lot like NPS 160 that’s been pulled.

This Fujicolor NPS 160 Pulled recipe was created by Thomas Schwab, who has made several film simulation recipes published on this website, including Superia Xtra 400Urban Vintage ChromeKodachrome II, Kodak Portra 800 v2Classic MonochromeB&W Superia, and Monochrome Kodachrome. Thomas has also collaborated on other recipes, playing an important role in getting them right, including Kodak Portra 800Kodak Ektar 100Kodachrome 1Kodak Portra 400, and Kodak T-Max 400. Some of Thomas Schwab’s pictures that he captured with this recipe can be found further down.

Empty Garage – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-E4 – “Fujicolor NPS 160 Pulled”

What I especially love about this recipe is that it has a soft feel that’s just wonderful. It has a film-like quality to it that’s easy to appreciate. I really love shooting with this recipe! Because it required the Classic Negative film simulation, Color Chrome FX Blue and Clarity, it’s only compatible with the Fujifilm X-E4, X100V, X-Pro3, X-T4, and X-S10 cameras.

Classic Negative
Dynamic Range: DR400
Highlight: -2
Shadow: -2
Color: -4
Noise Reduction: -4
Sharpeness: +1
Clarity: -2
Grain Effect: Weak, Small
Color Chrome Effect: Weak
Color Chrome Effect Blue: Strong
White Balance: Auto, -1 Red & -4 Blue
ISO: Auto, up to ISO 6400
Exposure Compensation: +2/3 to +1 1/3 (typically)

Example photographs, all camera-made JPEGs using this Fujicolor NPS 160 Pulled film simulation recipe:

Thomas Schwab

Photo by Thomas Schwab
Photo by Thomas Schwab
Photo by Thomas Schwab
Photo by Thomas Schwab
Photo by Thomas Schwab
Photo by Thomas Schwab
Photo by Thomas Schwab
Photo by Thomas Schwab
Photo by Thomas Schwab

Ritchie Roesch

Evening Condos – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Country Trailers – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Farm Dirt – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Sunlight Through Forest Branches – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Forest Trail – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Fresh Leaves – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Ghost Bike Ahead – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Bunch of Blooms – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Peace – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Building Legos – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Jon on a Couch – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4

Find this film simulation recipe on the Fuji X Weekly — Film Recipes App!

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7 New Fujicolor Pro 400H Film Simulation Recipes!

Pink Roses – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 – “Fujicolor Pro 400H Box Speed”

In my last post, entitled A Different Approach, I shared Anders Lindborg‘s new take on film simulation recipes, which included seven different Fujicolor Pro 160NS recipes that he invented. This is Part 2 of that article. Below you’ll find another seven recipes, this time for Fujicolor Pro 400H! If you haven’t read the first post, you’ll want to do that now, because this will make a lot more sense if you have that prerequisite understanding.

If you don’t want to take the time to read it (or if you’ve already forgotten), here’s a quick summery. Anders’ approach is to have a good base recipe that works well in most circumstances, but also have subtle variations of that recipe, that mimic pushed and pulled film, for when the conditions require either less contrast (pulled) or more contrast (pushed). You can use all seven Custom Presets in the Q Menu to save each of these recipes if you want, or just save the base recipe (called “Box Speed”) and adjust to the various variations on-the-fly, or save the base setting and have the variations programmed into X RAW Studio. Also, by design these recipes will work with any film simulation, even though they call for PRO Neg. Hi.

Like the 160NS recipe, I’m only including the “Box Speed” version in the Fuji X Weekly app, and I encourage you to use the Notes section under the recipe to store the pushed and pulled variations. These seven Fujicolor Pro 400H recipes are compatible with the Fujifilm X-T3 and X-T30 cameras. If you have a newer X-Trans IV camera (X-Pro3, X100V, X-T4, X-S10 and X-E4), Anders recommends setting Clarity to -3 and Grain to Weak & Large. If you have an X-Trans III camera, ignore Color Chrome Effect; the results will be slightly different, but it will still produce good results. For Pushed +3 and Pushed +4, feel free to try Grain Strong.

This recipe wasn’t intended to mimic Fujicolor Pro 400H film, but it does resemble it fairly well. A lot of people like to overexpose real 400H film to get a pastel look; unfortunately, this recipe won’t achieve that particular aesthetic (but look here and here). Anders created this recipe by modifying his Pro 160NS settings; I made a couple of small modifications to it, but mostly these settings are created by him. Thank you, Anders, for creating these recipes and allowing me to share them!

Fujicolor Pro 400H Box Speed

Pops of Red – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

PRO Neg. Hi
Dynamic Range: DR400
Highlight: 0
Shadow: 0
Color: +1
Color Chrome Effect: Strong
Grain: Weak
Noise Reduction: -4
Sharpness: -3
White Balance: Daylight, +1 Red & -3 Blue
ISO: Auto up to ISO 6400
Exposure Compensation: 0 to +2/3 (typically)

Free Pie – South Ogden, UT – Fujifilm X-T30
Birthday Girl Coloring – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30
Shelf Plant – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

Fujicolor Pro 400H Pulled -1

Snail – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

PRO Neg. Hi
Dynamic Range: DR400
Highlight: -1
Shadow: -1
Color: +1
Color Chrome Effect: Strong
Grain: Weak
Noise Reduction: -4
Sharpness: -3
White Balance: Daylight, +1 Red & -3 Blue
ISO: Auto up to ISO 6400
Exposure Compensation: 0 to +2/3 (typically)

If you are adding this recipe to the Notes in the app, consider using this abbreviation: Pulled -1: HL & SH -1.

Green Aspen Leaves – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30
Tank Cars – Uintah, UT – Fujifilm X-T30
Yellow Cat – Layton, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

Fujicolor Pro 400H Pulled -2

Hazy Mountain – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

PRO Neg. Hi
Dynamic Range: DR400
Highlight: -2
Shadow: -1
Color: 0
Color Chrome Effect: Strong
Grain: Weak
Noise Reduction: -4
Sharpness: -3
White Balance: Daylight, +1 Red & -3 Blue
ISO: Auto up to ISO 6400
Exposure Compensation: 0 to +1 (typically)

If you are adding this recipe to the Notes in the app, consider using this abbreviation: Pulled -2: HL -2, SH -1, CLR 0.

Box Cars – Uintah, UT – Fujifilm X-T30
Suburban Sunset – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30
Hazy Tree – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

Fujicolor Pro 400H Pushed +1

Yucca Leaves – Uintah, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

PRO Neg. Hi
Dynamic Range: DR400
Highlight: +1
Shadow: 0
Color: +1
Color Chrome Effect: Strong
Grain: Weak
Noise Reduction: -4
Sharpness: -3
White Balance: Daylight, +1 Red & -3 Blue
ISO: Auto up to ISO 6400
Exposure Compensation: 0 to +2/3 (typically)

If you are adding this recipe to the Notes in the app, consider using this abbreviation: Pushed +1: HL +1.

Red Tree – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30
Tree & Dark Clouds – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30
David Baldwin – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

Fujicolor Pro 400H Pushed +2

Wood Stripes – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

PRO Neg. Hi
Dynamic Range: DR400
Highlight: +2
Shadow: 0
Color: +2
Color Chrome Effect: Strong
Grain: Weak
Noise Reduction: -4
Sharpness: -3
White Balance: Daylight, +1 Red & -3 Blue
ISO: Auto up to ISO 6400
Exposure Compensation: -1/3 to +2/3 (typically)

If you are adding this recipe to the Notes in the app, consider using this abbreviation: Pushed +2: HL +2, CLR +2.

Mountain Biking – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30
Radar Mountain – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30
Bloomin’ Onion – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

Fujicolor Pro 400H Pushed +3

Three Artificial Plants – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

PRO Neg. Hi
Dynamic Range: DR400
Highlight: +2
Shadow: +1
Color: +3
Color Chrome Effect: Strong
Grain: Weak
Noise Reduction: -4
Sharpness: -3
White Balance: Daylight, +1 Red & -3 Blue
ISO: Auto up to ISO 6400
Exposure Compensation: -1/3 to +2/3 (typically)

If you are adding this recipe to the Notes in the app, consider using this abbreviation: Pushed +3: HL +2, SH +1, CLR +3.

Berry Bush Leaves #1 – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30
Berry Bush Leaves #2 – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30
Sky Leaves – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

Fujicolor Pro 400H Pushed +4

Old Phone – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

PRO Neg. Hi
Dynamic Range: DR400
Highlight: +3
Shadow: +2
Color: +4
Color Chrome Effect: Strong
Grain: Weak
Noise Reduction: -4
Sharpness: -4
White Balance: Daylight, +1 Red & -3 Blue
ISO: Auto up to ISO 6400
Exposure Compensation: -1/3 to +2/3 (typically)

If you are adding this recipe to the Notes in the app, consider using this abbreviation: Pushed +4: HL +3, SH +2, CLR +4, SHARP -4.

Berry Bush Leaves #3 – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30
Green – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30
Landscape Leaves – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

Below are examples of using the Fujicolor Pro 160NS Box Speed recipe using other film simulations. You can do this with all of the pull and push variants, too, although I didn’t supply any examples of those because this article is already very long.

PRO Neg. Hi “Box Speed”
Provia “Box Speed”
Velvia “Box Speed”
Astia “Box Speed”
Classic Chrome “Box Speed”
PRO Neg. Std “Box Speed”
Eterna “Box Speed”
Acros “Box Speed”
Monochrome “Box Speed”

Find this film simulation recipe on the Fuji X Weekly — Film Recipes App!

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A Different Approach + 7 New Fujicolor Pro 160NS Film Simulation Recipes! (Yes, 7!)

Pink Paper Blossom – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 – “Fujicolor Pro 160NS Pulled +2”

I received an email the other day from Anders Lindborg with this subject title: A Different Approach. Anders created the Kodak Tri-X 400 film simulation recipe, which is my personal favorite for black-and-white photography. I was immediately intrigued, and I was not disappointed as I read his message. I’ll let Anders explain this new approach below as he described it to me.

“Doing professional work is tough. Since getting a Fujifilm X-T3 (and later an X-Pro3), I’ve come to rely totally on the straight-out-of-camera JPEGs. They look great and I get more jobs just because I can deliver good results fast. After diving deep into the Fujifilm film simulations, I’ve come to realize that you cannot create a single recipe that will always look great. Sometimes the sunlight is so strong that everything gets blown out and the next day the same recipe will make everything look murky and dull.”

“Coming from a film background, I’m reasonably used to pushing and pulling film as needed. With cheap consumer film stocks, you could sometimes get absolutely horrific (or ”creative” as some call them) results, but the professional films were often quite predictable. Some film stocks have become legendary because they really could take a good beating, no matter how you treated them. Also, the exposure latitude of film is insane compared to digital, which is something I really have missed since switching. Awhile back I started experimenting with recreating this, but I slowly realized that it would require several different variations of my settings. When I was finished, I had used up all seven slots! A lot of research and assumptions went into the process. For example, I totally assume that Fujifilm knows what they’re doing and that their stock simulations are good. I can honestly say after all this, that—yes—they do know their game!”

“The settings emulate a flexible film look. They serve as a base that can be modified as needed on the spot via the Q Menu (for example: changing film simulation, white balance, tint, dynamic range, etc.). The objective was to always have working settings for any scenario that emulates how professional film behaves when being pushed or pulled. They’re intended for professional use and come out of both a need and want for realistic film-like simulations that are guaranteed to work, no matter what task I’m currently challenged with. Of course it’s up to the end user to tune it to their specific preferences, but I strongly recommend you leave the highlight/shadow settings as-is. They are heavily tested with all standard film simulations and you will get a nice looking result with them. These settings took me a couple of years to develop, but this is what I actually use every day now.”

“Just step outside and try to come to a conclusion about what the current weather and light conditions are like. If the sun is harsh, you need to pull. If the sun is blindingly bright, pull two steps. The same goes for pushing. If you’re missing just a bit of light, push one step. If it’s dull, push two steps. The third and fourth push settings are perhaps a bit special as the contrast starts to increase. On a regular day, of course you use the box speed setting. Once you’ve selected your setting for the day, stick with it! This is the key to consistent results.”

“I recommend shooting RAW+JPEG and having the settings stored in X Raw Studio. RAWs are great to have if you aren’t happy with the results of your selected setting. The settings were created for the Fujifilm X-T3, but can be easily adapted to taste on any X-series camera. On my X-Pro3, I set Clarity to -3 and Grain to Weak & Large on all slots.”

Thank you, Anders Lindborg, for creating and sharing this new approach!

Pink Rose – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 – “fujicolor Pro 160NS Pulled -1”

For those without a film background, let me briefly explain what pushing and pulling means in film photography. Film is rated at a certain ISO, for example ISO 100, ISO 200, ISO 400, etc., which is a measurement of the film’s sensitivity to light (it’s pretty much just like on your digital camera). You can underexpose a roll of film and increase the development time to get correctly exposed pictures, and this is called push-processing or pushing the film. Also, you can overexpose a roll of film and decrease the development time to get correctly exposed pictures, and this is called pull-processing or pulling the film. Pushing the film increases the contrast, vibrancy (for color film), and grain, while pulling the film decreases the contrast, vibrancy (for color film), and grain. With film, you have to push or pull the entire roll and not just one or a few frames.

The genius of Anders’ method is that you can apply this film approach to your digital pictures, and you can do it with as few or as many frames as you wish. You can push one frame, pull the next, and shoot the third at “box speed” (nether pushed nor pulled) if you want. This type of flexibility was unimaginable in the film era!

In case you didn’t understand this approach, let me rephrase it. You have one recipe, but that recipe has push and pull variants. You can use any film simulation with the recipe, and Anders’ film simulation of choice is PRO Neg. Hi, but try any of them! The rest of the settings stay the same. His push and pull variants don’t necessarily represent stops of pushing or pulling, but more like half-stop increments (although Fujifilm lenses have 1/3 stop increments, but don’t worry about that). You can dedicate slots in your Custom Settings Menu for the recipe and variants, or you can have one Custom Settings slot set to the standard “box speed” recipe and adjust on-the-fly if you have the required changes memorized, or you can do it in X RAW Studio.

Anders actually sent me two recipes. The first, which you’ll find below, is called Fujicolor Pro 160NS. It wasn’t purposely intended to resemble that film, but it nonetheless does, more-or-less. The second, which you can find here), is called Fujicolor Pro 400H. The Pro 160NS recipe is the “standard” one, while the Pro 400H recipe is just a little more bold for when you need a bit more pizzaz.

There are seven versions of the Fujicolor Pro 160NS recipe: Pulled -2, Pulled -1, Box Speed, Pushed +1, Pushed +2, Pushed +3, and Pushed +4. You’ll find each of these below, although the Box Speed version is the only one included on the Fuji X Weekly app. My recommendation is to manually add the other versions into the notes section under the recipe in the app. These seven recipes are compatible with X-Trans III cameras plus the X-T3 and X-T30; for newer cameras Anders recommends setting Clarity to -3 and Grain to Weak & Large. As a reminder, these recipes are intended to look good no matter the film simulation used, despite it calling for PRO Neg. Hi. For Pushed +3 and Pushed +4, feel free to use Grain Strong if you’d like.

Fujicolor Pro 160NS Box Speed

Two Broken Cars – Uintah, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

PRO Neg. Hi
Dynamic Range: DR400
Highlight: 0
Shadow: 0
Color: 0
Color Chrome Effect: Off
Grain: Weak
Noise Reduction: -4
Sharpness: -3
White Balance: Daylight, 0 Red & 0 Blue
ISO: Auto up to ISO 6400
Exposure Compensation: 0 to +2/3 (typically)

Old Railroad Sign – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30
Rainy Day Railroad – Uintah, UT – Fujifilm X-T30
Hazy Mountain & Red Helicopter – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

Fujicolor Pro 160NS Pulled -1

Clouds Over Green Mountain – Uintah, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

PRO Neg. Hi
Dynamic Range: DR400
Highlight: -1
Shadow: -1
Color: 0
Color Chrome Effect: Off
Grain: Weak
Noise Reduction: -4
Sharpness: -3
White Balance: Daylight, 0 Red & 0 Blue
ISO: Auto up to ISO 6400
Exposure Compensation: 0 to +2/3 (typically)

If you are adding this recipe to the Notes in the app, consider using this abbreviation: Pulled -1: HL & SH -1.

Cryo-Trans – Uintah, UT – Fujifilm X-T30
Jonathan – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30
Orange Flower – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

Fujicolor Pro 160NS Pulled -2

Trailer Interior – Uintah, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

PRO Neg. Hi
Dynamic Range: DR400
Highlight: -2
Shadow: -1
Color: -1
Color Chrome Effect: Off
Grain: Weak
Noise Reduction: -4
Sharpness: -3
White Balance: Daylight, 0 Red & 0 Blue
ISO: Auto up to ISO 6400
Exposure Compensation: 0 to +1 (typically)

If you are adding this recipe to the Notes in the app, consider using this abbreviation: Pulled -2: HL -2, SH -1, CLR -1.

Not Driven – Uintah, UT – Fujifilm X-T30
Americana Country – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30
Uncertain Walking Path – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

Fujicolor Pro 160NS Pushed +1

Green Tree & Storm Clouds – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

PRO Neg. Hi
Dynamic Range: DR400
Highlight: +1
Shadow: 0
Color: 0
Color Chrome Effect: Off
Grain: Weak
Noise Reduction: -4
Sharpness: -3
White Balance: Daylight, 0 Red & 0 Blue
ISO: Auto up to ISO 6400
Exposure Compensation: 0 to +2/3 (typically)

If you are adding this recipe to the Notes in the app, consider using this abbreviation: Pushed +1: HL +1.

Garden Blooms – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30
F’n’R – Uintah, UT – Fujifilm X-T30
Boy Smile – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

Fujicolor Pro 160NS Pushed +2

Worn Seat Abstract – Uintah, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

PRO Neg. Hi
Dynamic Range: DR400
Highlight: +2
Shadow: 0
Color: +1
Color Chrome Effect: Off
Grain: Weak
Noise Reduction: -4
Sharpness: -3
White Balance: Daylight, 0 Red & 0 Blue
ISO: Auto up to ISO 6400
Exposure Compensation: -1/3 to +2/3 (typically)

If you are adding this recipe to the Notes in the app, consider using this abbreviation: Pushed +2: HL +2, CLR +1.

Shasta Trailers – Uintah, UT – Fujifilm X-T30
Onions in Bloom – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30
Flowering Bush – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

Fujicolor Pro 160NS Pushed +3

Branches Over Creek – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

PRO Neg. Hi
Dynamic Range: DR400
Highlight: +2
Shadow: +1
Color: +2
Color Chrome Effect: Off
Grain: Weak
Noise Reduction: -4
Sharpness: -3
White Balance: Daylight, 0 Red & 0 Blue
ISO: Auto up to ISO 6400
Exposure Compensation: -1/3 to +2/3 (typically)

If you are adding this recipe to the Notes in the app, consider using this abbreviation: Pushed +3: HL +2, SH +1, CLR +2.

Two Cows – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30
Green Leaves – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

Fujicolor Pro 160NS Pushed +4

Wet Leaves – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

PRO Neg. Hi
Dynamic Range: DR400
Highlight: +3
Shadow: +2
Color: +3
Color Chrome Effect: Off
Grain: Weak
Noise Reduction: -4
Sharpness: -4
White Balance: Daylight, 0 Red & 0 Blue
ISO: Auto up to ISO 6400
Exposure Compensation: -1/3 to +2/3 (typically)

If you are adding this recipe to the Notes in the app, consider using this abbreviation: Pushed +4: HL +3, SH +2, CLR +3, SHARP -4.

Forest – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30
Wall Shelf – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30
Yellow Bike – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

Below are examples of using the Fujicolor Pro 160NS Box Speed recipe using other film simulations. You can do this with all of the pull and push variants, too, although I didn’t supply any examples of those because this article is already very long.

PRO Neg. Hi “Box Speed”
Provia “Box Speed”
Velvia “Box Speed”
Astia “Box Speed”
Classic Chrome “Box Speed”
PRO Neg. Std “Box Speed”
Eterna “Box Speed”
Acros “Box Speed”
Monochrome “Box Speed”

Find this film simulation recipe on the Fuji X Weekly — Film Recipes App!

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Fujifilm X100V (X-Trans IV) Film Simulation Recipe: Fujicolor Pro 400H

Sun-Kissed Forest – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V – “Fujicolor Pro 400H”

This film simulation recipe is one that I’m particularly excited for because I’ve been after this look for a long, long time. The timeline goes as follows: September 2017 I suggested that Fujifilm should make a Fujicolor Pro 400H Overexposed film simulation, October 2018 I made this same suggestion again, December 2018 I published a Fujicolor Pro 400H film simulation recipe for X-Trans III cameras, February 2020 I made a Fujicolor Pro 400H recipe for X-Trans IV cameras, and February of this year I made a Fujicolor NPH recipe (available as a Patron early-access recipe on the Fuji X Weekly App), which is very similar to Pro 400H (NPH was basically an earlier version of the film). Now, I’ve finally made a Fujicolor Pro 400H recipe that I’m quite pleased with. This is an immediate favorite recipe of mine!

After George Coady shared with me his wonderful Fujicolor C200 recipe, he showed me his initial attempt at a recipe for Pro 400H, which inspired me to try my hands at a better Fujicolor Pro 400H Overexposed recipe using the new JPEG options found on the newer cameras, such as Classic Negative, Color Chrome FX Blue and Clarity. At first glance I was disappointed with my results because it didn’t look exactly like what I was hoping for, but then I realized what I actually had created (which I’ll talk more about in just a moment); however, first let’s briefly discuss the film that this recipe is based on.

Table Tulips – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V – “Fujicolor Pro 400H”

Fujifilm introduced Fujicolor Pro 400H in 2004 and it’s been a popular color negative film ever since. Photographers often overexpose this film by as many as four stops. When overexposed, the film turns from a somewhat ordinary high-ISO (that’s what the “H” stands for in the name) portrait film into something almost magical. Colors become vibrant and pastel. The exact look of overexposed Pro 400H varies, depending on how much overexposed, how developed, and how printed or scanned, and the effect can range from subtle to pronounced, but generally you know overexposed Pro 400H film when you see it.

It was that pastel look that I was hoping to achieve with this recipe, and at first I thought I had failed—it looked more like Pro 400H overexposed by one stop or maybe two, but not three or four where the pastel colors are found. Even though I didn’t get that wonderful pastel aesthetic, the recipe looked really great nonetheless. Still, I wondered if it would be possible to get closer to that overexposed look simply by increasing the exposure. Sure enough, it worked! The two images below are examples of this, with exposure compensation set to a whopping +2 2/3!

Toys on a Chair – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V – “Fujicolor Pro 400H”
Messy Hair – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V – “Fujicolor Pro 400H”

As you can see, there are pastel colors in those two pictures, much like well-overexposed Pro 400H film. Does it closely match the film results? It’s closer than my previous attempts, but it’s not perfect. It’s as close as you’re likely going to get straight-out-of-camera. It’s fun to do this, but you’d have to be pretty brave to shoot a wedding with this much overexposure—I’d do it, but, then again, I’ve sandpapered a camera; I have a history of doing some risky (stupid?) things in the name of art.

What about Fujicolor Pro 400H that’s not overexposed? Can this recipe mimic that, too? Yes, sort of. By not overexposing this recipe, you get results that don’t look overexposed (imagine that), but does it closely resemble the film? It’s not as exact as I’d like it to be, but not far off, either. It’s more convincing as an overexposed recipe, but it also does well when not mimicking that. The two pictures below are examples of this, with exposure compensation set at +1/3.

Yard Toys – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V – “Fujicolor Pro 400H”
Ivy Leaves – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V – “Fujicolor Pro 400H”

As you can see, there’s a certain beauty in not overexposing when using this recipe.

The two sets of pictures below are examples of +1/3 exposure compensation, +1 1/3 exposure compensation, and +2 1/3 exposure compensation. In my opinion, the best results are found in the middle category, with exposure compensation in the +1 to +1 2/3 range, but sometimes reducing or increasing the exposure produces interesting results. In other words, oftentimes the best results are with exposure compensation set to +1 to +1 2/3, but try anywhere from +1/3 to +2 2/3, because, depending on the light and subject, you can get good results across a large range of exposures.

+1/3 Exposure Compensation
+1 1/3 Exposure Compensation
+2 1/3 Exposure Compensation
+1/3 Exposure Compensation
+1 1/3 Exposure Compensation
+2 1/3 Exposure Compensation

This film simulation recipe (as of this writing) is only compatible with the Fujifilm X-Pro3, X100V, X-T4, X-S10 and X-E4 cameras. I used a Fujifilm X100V to capture all of the images in this article. For some of the pictures I used a Tiffen 1/4 Black Pro Mist filter to diffuse the highlights, particularly the ones with a bright light source; because you are bumping up the exposure so much, this recipe pairs especially well with a diffusion filter, producing a more film-like result.

Classic Negative
Dynamic Range: DR400
Highlight: -2
Shadow: +4
Color: +4
Noise Reduction: -4
Sharpening: -2
Clarity: -4
Grain Effect: Strong, Small
Color Chrome Effect: Strong
Color Chrome Effect Blue: Weak
White Balance: 4900K, 0 Red & -4 Blue
ISO: Auto, up to ISO 6400
Exposure Compensation: +1 to +1 2/3 (typically), but try between +1/3 to +2 2/3

Example photographs, all camera-made JPEGs using this new Fujicolor Pro 400H film simulation recipe:

Forest of Light – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Bright Leaf – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

Pink Flowers & Green Leaves – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Spring Sunshine – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Country Trees – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Bright Tree – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Evening Creek – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Tree Fence – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Wild Weeds – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Field of Wishes – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Make A Wish – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
White Tree Blooms – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Forest Fence – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Gnarled Tree – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Creek Trail – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Jon in the Forest – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Trail Bridge – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Flatcar Bridge – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Dandelion Bench – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Lighter Tree – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Fresh Aspen Leaves – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Farmington Creek – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Onion Flower – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Bright Rose – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Rose Bush & Wall – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Rosebush & Vine Ladder – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Ready to Float – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Hide – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Sibling Yard Play – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Kids & Outdoor Table – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Waiting For Food – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Heavenly Hot Cakes – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Smiling Joy – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Art & Craft Tray – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

Johanna & Jonathan – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Fisher Price Phone – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Indoor Basketball Hoop – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Slapfish – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Three Fake Plants on a Shelf – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

This post contains affiliate links, and if you make a purchase using my links I’ll be compensated a small amount for it.

Fujifilm X100V Black    Amazon   B&H
Fujifilm X100V Silver   Amazon   B&H

Find this film simulation recipe on the Fuji X Weekly — Film Recipes App!

Help Fuji X Weekly

Nobody pays me to write the content found on fujixweekly.com. There’s a real cost to operating and maintaining this site, not to mention all the time that I pour into it. If you appreciated this article, please consider making a one-time gift contribution. Thank you!

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Fujifilm X-Trans IV Film Simulation Recipe: Fujicolor C200

Blooming Pink – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4 “Fujicolor C200”

I’ve been asked at least a dozen times—probably more—to create a Fujicolor C200 film simulation recipe. I’ve tried a few different times, but I never felt that I got close enough. A couple of recipes came out of those experiments, but a C200 recipe remained elusive. The good news is that George Coady (check out his Instagram) figured it out! Yea! George has a lot of experience shooting actual Fujicolor C200 film, and he experimented using X RAW Studio until he got the recipe right. I had a very small hand in tweaking it, but really George did all the work. He gave me permission to publish his recipe here. Thanks, George!

Fujifilm introduced Fujicolor C200 in 1990 as a low-budget, no frills color negative film. I’ve shot several rolls of it over the years, although it was never my go-to option. Fujifilm gave it a small refresh in 2017, and it’s still available today. Even though C200 is a cheap color film, it has a cult-like following, and many people enjoy its aesthetic and choose it over more expensive emulsions.

Red Chairs in a Yard – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4 – “Fujicolor C200”

This recipe looks great! In high-contrast situations DR400 does better to protect highlights than DR200, but in low-contrast situations DR200 produces better contrast. After awhile I decided to set my camera to DR400 and adjust it to DR200 when the situation calls for it. The pictures in this article are a mix of DR200 and DR400. The White Balance Shift can be set to -4 Blue, which can sometimes be more accurate to the film, or -2 Blue, which can sometimes be more accurate to the film, because one film can have many different looks depending on how it was shot, developed, and scanned or printed, but -3 Blue does well for all-around use. Because this recipe requires a half adjustment to Highlight & Shadow, it’s only compatible with the Fujifilm X-T4, X-S10 and X-E4, although if you use Highlight 0 and Shadow -1 it’s pretty close to the same, which opens it up for use on the X100V and X-Pro3.

Classic Negative
Dynamic Range: DR400 (DR200 in low contrast situations)
Highlight: +0.5
Shadow: -0.5
Color: +2
Noise Reduction: -4
Sharpeness: -3
Clarity: -3
Grain Effect: Weak, Large
Color Chrome Effect: Weak
Color Chrome Effect Blue: Off
White Balance: Daylight, 0 Red & -3 Blue
ISO: Auto, up to ISO 6400
Exposure Compensation: 0 to +2/3 (typically)

Example photographs, all camera-made JPEGs using this Fujicolor C200 film simulation recipe on my Fujifilm X-E4:

Red Palms – Centerville, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Red Chair – Layton, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Fairy & Elf – Layton, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Throw Pillows – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
R&R BBQ – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Restaurant Counter – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Standing Tall – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Sour Honey – Kaysville, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Large Leaf – Kaysville, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Blooming Branch – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Yellow Bush – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
If a Tree Falls Does Anyone Hear? – Kaysville, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Up The Trunk – Kaysville, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Trailers – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4

Find this film simulation recipe on the Fuji X Weekly — Film Recipes App!

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Nobody pays me to write the content found on fujixweekly.com. There’s a real cost to operating and maintaining this site, not to mention all the time that I pour into it. If you appreciated this article, please consider making a one-time gift contribution. Thank you!

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Fujifilm X-Trans I Film Simulation Recipe: Superia Xtra 400

Forest River – Layton, UT – Fujifilm X-M1 – “Superia Xtra 400” – Photo by Joy Roesch

I handed my Fujifilm X-M1 camera to my daughter, Joy, and told her that she could change the settings to whatever she wanted them to be—you might remember that she created the Winter Blue film simulation recipe. She used the camera to capture a bunch of pictures; afterwards, when I reviewed the images, I was very impressed with the look that she created. I asked her why she chose these settings, and she answered that she had hoped to capture some cherry blossoms, and it was initially overcast when she dialed in the settings, and she thought that it might work well for that.

These settings remind me of my X-Trans IV Superia Xtra 400 film simulation recipe. It’s definitely not an exact match—there’s no way that it could be because X-Trans I cameras don’t have many of the JPEG options that X-Trans IV cameras have, including the Classic Negative film simulation—but it’s surprisingly similar. I don’t imagine it’s possible to get closer. If you have an X-Pro1, X-E1 or X-M1, this is your best bet for a Superia Xtra 400 look. I think it’s also not far off from my Superia Premium 400 recipe, although, again, it’s not an exact match, just in the general ballpark. For some of you, I have no doubts that this will become your new favorite recipe.

Horsetail Reeds – Layton, UT – Fujifilm X-M1 – “Superia Xtra 400” – Photo by Joy Roesch

While this recipe is intended for X-Trans I cameras, it’s possible to use it on Fujifilm Bayer cameras, although it will look slightly different. You can also use it on X-Trans II cameras, but it will look fairly significantly different, although you might like the results anyway, so it might be worth a try.

Astia
Dynamic Range: DR200
Highlight: -2 (Low)
Shadow: +1 (Medium-High)
Color: +2 (High)
Sharpness: 0 (Normal)
Noise Reduction: -2 (Low)
White Balance: Shade, +2 Red & +2 Blue
ISO: Auto, up to ISO 3200
Exposure Compensation: +2/3 to +1 (typically)

Example photographs, all camera-made JPEGs captured by Joy using her “Superia Xtra 400” film simulation recipe on a Fujifilm X-M1:

Dirt Cliff Forest – Layton, UT – Fujifilm X-M1 – Photo by Joy Roesch
Sideways Tree – Layton, UT – Fujifilm X-M1 – Photo by Joy Roesch
Photographer Hiding in the Forest – Layton, UT – Fujifilm X-M1 – Photo by Joy Roesch
Forest Creek – Layton, UT – Fujifilm X-M1 – Photo by Joy Roesch
Water in the Woods – Layton, UT – Fujifilm X-M1 – Photo by Joy Roesch
Johanna on a Bridge – Layton, UT – Fujifilm X-M1 – Photo by Joy Roesch
Path Through The Trees – Layton, UT – Fujifilm X-M1 – Photo by Joy Roesch
Small Flower – Layton, UT – Fujifilm X-M1 – Photo by Joy Roesch
Patch of Red – Layton, UT – Fujifilm X-M1 – Photo by Joy Roesch
White Tree – Layton, UT – Fujifilm X-M1 – Photo by Joy Roesch

Find this film simulation recipe on the Fuji X Weekly — Film Recipes App!

Help Fuji X Weekly

Nobody pays me to write the content found on fujixweekly.com. There’s a real cost to operating and maintaining this site, not to mention all the time that I pour into it. If you appreciated this article, please consider making a one-time gift contribution. Thank you!

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New Patron Early-Access Film Simulation Recipe: Fujicolor NPH

Winter Evergreens – Weber Canyon, UT – Fujifilm X100V – “Fujicolor NPH”

The Fuji X Weekly app is free, yet becoming a Fuji X Weekly Patron unlocks the best app experience! One benefit of being a Patron is you get early access to some new film simulation recipes. These early-access recipes will eventually become available free to everyone in time, including this new one. In fact, a couple of the original early-access recipes have been publicly published on this blog and the app, so everyone can use them now. Patrons help support Fuji X Weekly and, really, without them there would be no app. So I want to give a special “thank you” to all of the Patrons!

This new Patron early-access film simulation recipe is called “Fujicolor NPH” because it is inspired by that film. Actually, I was attempting a Fujicolor Pro 400H recipe. I have a couple already: Fujicolor Pro 400H for X-Trans III and Fujicolor Pro 400H Overexposed for X-Trans IV. I don’t think either are 100% accurate to the film; perhaps no recipe is, but some are closer than others. I really like this new version I made—I believe it’s closer than the X-Trans III recipe, but it’s not a perfect match. I actually think it’s closer to Fujicolor NPH 400 film, which was the predecessor to Pro 400H. Those two emulsions were nearly identical, with only some small differences, so this new recipe does well at mimicking both, but in my opinion it’s slightly closer to NPH 400.

If you are a Fuji X Weekly Patron, this new Fujicolor NPH film simulation recipe is already on the app!

Weber River in Winter – Weber Canyon, UT – Fujifilm X100V – “Fujicolor NPH”
Honey Salmon – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X100V – “Fujicolor NPH”
760 Sign – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V – “Fujicolor NPH”
Stepping Into the Night Circle – Sunset, UT – Fujifilm X100V – “Fujicolor NPH”

Fujifilm X100V Film Simulation Recipe: Fujicolor Superia 1600

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Red Rose – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V – “Fujicolor Superia 1600”

For some of you, this new Fujicolor Superia 1600 film simulation recipe will be your favorite! It is so good! It’s very analog-esque, and does a great job of mimicking the film in a number of circumstances. If you love my Fujicolor Superia 100 and my Fujicolor Reala 100 recipes, you’re bound to love this one, too!

For high-ISO color photography, Superia 1600 film was your best bet if you needed to go faster than ISO 800. It has higher contrast and lower saturation than other Superia films, and is also more grainy, but with a very nice look. There are people who use Superia 1600 just for its aesthetic. Fujifilm discontinued Superia 1600 in 2016, but supposedly Fujicolor Natura 1600 and Press 1600 are the same film, just sold to different markets.

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Sephora – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V – “Fujicolor Superia 1600”

I didn’t include a “typical” exposure compensation with this recipe because you can get some very interesting looks by underexposing and (especially) overexposing—don’t be afraid to try -1 all the way to +2! This recipe is only compatible with the Fujifilm X100V, X-Pro3 and X-T4 (hopefully someday the X-T3 and X-T30, too—Fujifilm, please!).

Classic Negative
Dynamic Range: DR400
Highlight: 0
Shadow: +2
Color: -3
Noise Reduction: -4
Sharpening: -1
Clarity: -4
Grain Effect: Strong, Large
Color Chrome Effect: Strong
Color Chrome Effect Blue: Strong
White Balance: Daylight, +3 Red & +1 Blue
ISO: 1600 to 6400

Example photographs, all camera-made JPEGs using this Fujicolor Superia 1600 film simulation recipe on my Fujifilm X100V:

50038839473_6fe9e775c1_c

Electric Sunset – Kaysville, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Evening Overlook – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Sunlight Tree – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Country Fence – Kaysville, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Rose Bush Shadow – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

50038003066_d69ea1549e_c

Red Rose Bush – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Yellow Flower – South Ogden, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Not Yet Blackberries – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Backyard Girl – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Evening Light Tunnel – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Building in Evening Light – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Head On Illusion – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Walking Reflection – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Indoor/Outdoor Restaurant – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Carbonaro – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Vegetables – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Dessert – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Willards – Layton, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Thank You For You Patronage – South Ogden, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Wall Pipes – South Ogden, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Closed Gas Station Store – South Ogden, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Abandoned Drive Thru Window – South Ogden, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Abandoned Gas Station Overhang – South Ogden, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Light at the Top – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Blue in the Middle – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Moon Above – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Suburban Sunstar – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Bike 48 – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Sunstar in the City – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Strength and Endurance – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

See also: Film Simulation Recipes

This post contains affiliate links, and if you make a purchase using my links I’ll be compensated a small amount for it.

Fujifilm X100V Black    Amazon   B&H
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New Video: Fuji Film Simulation – Fujicolor Superia 100

I published a new video on the Fuji X Weekly YouTube Channel! This one showcases my Fujicolor Superia 100 film simulation on my Fujifilm X100V while at a local amusement park. I think it turned out pretty well, and it’s worth your time to watch. My wife, Amanda, shot all the footage and did all of the editing. I captured all of the photographs and did the narration. Check it out! Let me know what you think of it.

Fujifilm X100V Film Simulation Recipe: Fujicolor Reala 100

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Amusement Poles – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V – “Fujicolor Reala 100”

Fujicolor Reala 100 was Fujifilm’s first Superia film, even though initially it did not have Superia in the name. Superia films shared Fuji’s “4th layer technology” and Reala was the first to have it, but Reala was marketed towards “pro” photographers while Superia was marketed towards “consumer” photographers. Eventually Fujifilm added Superia to Reala’s name. There were several different versions of Reala manufactured, including a high-ISO Tungsten one made for motion pictures, but Reala 100 was the most popular.

The Classic Negative film simulation is “modeled after” Superia with “Superia-like” colors, so it’s the best starting point for a Reala recipe. Reala 100 was very similar to Superia 100, but Superia 100 was intended for “general purpose” photography while Reala 100 was intended for portrait photography (interestingly, my wedding photos were shot on Reala). Colors are rendered a little differently between the two films, especially blue, which is deeper and more saturated on Reala, despite Reala being overall slightly less saturated than Superia 100. You’ll find that this recipe and my Fujicolor Superia 100 recipe replicate these differences quite nicely. Reala film was discontinued in 2013.

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Tunnel & Fountain – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V – “Fujicolor Reala 100”

This Fujicolor Reala 100 film simulation recipe is a great all-around option. It looks good under many circumstances. The aesthetic of this recipe is very close to my Superia 100 recipe, and I’m not sure which one I like better. This one is better for stronger blues, and the other is better for stronger reds, but they’re not far apart from each other. Unfortunately, as of this writing, this Reala recipe is only compatible with the Fujifilm X100V, X-Pro3 and X-T4 cameras.

Classic Negative
Dynamic Range: DR400
Highlight: -1
Shadow: -1
Color: +0
Noise Reduction: -4
Sharpening: -2
Clarity: -3
Grain Effect: Weak, Small
Color Chrome Effect: Strong
Color Chrome Effect Blue: Strong
White Balance: Daylight, 0 Red & 0 Blue
ISO: Auto, up to ISO 6400
Exposure Compensation: 0 to +1 (typically)

Example photographs, all camera-made JPEGs using this Fujicolor Reala 100 film simulation recipe on my Fujifilm X100V:

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Ferris Wheel – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Ferris Wheel Through The Trees – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Hands Raised – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Blue Coaster – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Waterless Waterslides – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Umbrella Ride – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Green Trees, Blue Sky – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Cat Statue – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Ride Operator – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Waiting to Fly – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Sunstar Tree – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Backlit Fountain – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Flowerbed – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Field of Wildflowers – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Potted Blooms – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Flowers in a Garden – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Blossoms Along a Fence – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Red Blossoms – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Covered Wagon – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Man Waiting – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Standing, Waiting – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Corner – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Puddle Reflections – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Stroller – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Almost – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Please Unload Children – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Lying on a Bench – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Pink Hair Bow – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Backpack – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Josh Riding Carousel – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Happy Jon – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Map on a Fence – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Woodford, Iowa – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Forest Trees – Fruit Heights, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Windshield Rain – Fruit Heights, UT – Fujifilm X100V

See also: Film Simulation Recipes

This post contains affiliate links, and if you make a purchase using my links I’ll be compensated a small amount for it.

Fujifilm X100V Black    Amazon   B&H
Fujifilm X100V Silver   Amazon   B&H

Help Fuji X Weekly

Nobody pays me to write the content found on fujixweekly.com. There's a real cost to operating and maintaining this site, not to mention all the time that I pour into it. If you appreciated this article, please consider making a one-time gift contribution. Thank you!

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Fujifilm X100V Film Simulation Recipe: Fujicolor Superia 100

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Rose Garden – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V – “Fujicolor Superia 100”

The new Classic Negative film simulation that’s found on Fujifilm’s latest cameras is intended to mimic Fujicolor Superia. Fujifilm doesn’t state which version of the film it’s intended to resemble; Fujifilm simply says that it’s “modeled after” Superia with “Superia-like” colors. They did very well in creating it, as it is unmistakably Superia. To me, straight-out-of-the-box Classic Negative most closely resembles Superia 200, although it’s not an exact match (but pretty close). There were at least a dozen different versions of Superia made by Fujifilm beginning in 1998, and a couple are still available today. I believe that Classic Negative can be made to resemble many of these different films. I started with Fujicolor Superia 100.

Superia 100 is a daylight balanced color negative film that Fujifilm produced between 1998 and 2009. It replaced Fujicolor Super G Plus 100, which, honestly, didn’t look all that much different. Superia 100 had improved grain, sharpness, and more accurate color under florescent light. Under normal conditions, and without a close inspection, the two films looked quite similar. Superia was a “consumer” film that was widely found in drug and convenient stores. It was regularly used for family snapshots, but was also popular among photojournalists, as well as portrait and wedding photographers. Superia 100 was marketed as a “general use” low-ISO color film. Like the film, this Fujicolor Superia 100 film simulation recipe serves as a general use option.

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Sunset Behind the Reeds – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V – “Fujicolor Superia 100”

I think many of you will really appreciate this film simulation recipe. It has fairly low contrast, but not too low, and produces very nice colors. It has a nostalgic quality to it, since the film that it’s based on was widely used for family snapshots in the 1990’s and 2000’s. You can use it for portraits or street photography or landscapes—really, it’s good for most situations. Unfortunately, as of this writing, this Fujicolor Superia 100 film simulation recipe is only compatible with the Fujifilm X-Pro3, X100V and X-T4 cameras. This recipe does use the new Clarity feature, and you should be aware that it slows down the camera considerably.

Classic Negative
Dynamic Range: DR-Auto
Highlight: -1
Shadow: -2
Color: +1
Noise Reduction: -4
Sharpening: -2
Clarity: -2
Grain Effect: Weak, Small
Color Chrome Effect: Strong
Color Chrome Effect Blue: Weak
White Balance: Daylight, 0 Red & -1 Blue
ISO: Auto, up to ISO 6400
Exposure Compensation: +1/3 to +2/3 (typically)

Example photographs, all camera-made JPEGs using this Fujicolor Superia 100 film simulation recipe on my Fujifilm X100V:

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Under the Green Canopy – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Light Through The Trees – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Red Tree – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Pagoda – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Pink Tree – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Nearly Empty Park – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Waiting Alone – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Fascinating – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Fanatic Family – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Grandmother & Grandson – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Thirsty Peacock – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Give it Back – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Red & Blue Benches – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Lagoon Railroad – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Patriotic Boy – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Ride is Closed – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Nervously Ready for Tea Cup Ride – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Do Not Enter – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Rocks by the Raging River – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Leaves Above Farmington Creek – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Storm Above – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Mine! – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Refreshment Station – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Evening Red – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Desk Near a Window – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Fake Blossoms – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Backyard Jo – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Jon, Laughing – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Sunlit Tree Leaves – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Evening Leaves – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

See also: Film Simulation Recipes

This post contains affiliate links, and if you make a purchase using my links I’ll be compensated a small amount for it.

Fujifilm X100V Black    Amazon   B&H
Fujifilm X100V Silver   Amazon   B&H

Help Fuji X Weekly

Nobody pays me to write the content found on fujixweekly.com. There's a real cost to operating and maintaining this site, not to mention all the time that I pour into it. If you appreciated this article, please consider making a one-time gift contribution. Thank you!

$2.00

Fuji Film Simulation: Fujicolor 100 Industrial (Video)

I posted a new video to the Fuji X Weekly YouTube channel! This is a new series called Fuji Film Simulation, which is sort of the video version of my Film Simulation Reviews. It’s my way of demonstrating how you can use my different recipes in various situations. In this episode I walk around the University of Utah campus in Salt Lake City using my Fujicolor 100 Industrial film simulation recipe on my Fujifilm X-T30 with a Fujinon 35mm f/2 lens.

The first part of the video, which is right after the super cool intro sequence, is just me talking about this blog, how I got started in photography, my gear, film simulations and so forth. I hope that you find it interesting. Where I walk around the college campus begins at the 3:12 mark. This might be my favorite section of the episode! Be sure to watch to the end.

My wife, Amanda, made this video. The photographs are mine, but all of the footage was captured by her using a Fujifilm X-T20 and a GoPro Hero 8 Black. She did all of the editing. She did such a great job! Really, it turned out better than I hoped it would. She far exceeded my expectations when she showed me the finished video.

I invite you to watch this episode, which you’ll find at the top of this article. If you liked it, I invite you to give it a thumbs up, share and subscribe. I appreciate any feedback that you might have. Let me know what you think!

Film Simulation Review: Dreary Day with Fujicolor Superia 800

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Gone Fishin’ – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 & 90mm

I get asked frequently what film simulation recipes are good for which situations. It can be hard to know when to use each one. When faced with a scene, which recipe should you choose? I hope that this Film Simulation Review series helps to bring clarity to this.

On grey-sky days there’s one film simulation recipe that I love to use: Fujicolor Superia 800. When I invented this recipe, I had no idea how good it was for dreary days. Fuji X Weekly reader Luis Costa shared his use of this recipe on a grey day, and it blew me away! Ever since, when there’s overcast sky and a little rain, for color pictures, my Fujicolor Superia 800 film simulation recipe is what I use.

This series of pictures were captured on a recent dreary day using the Superia 800 recipe. I used a Fujifilm X-T30 with a Fujinon 90mm f/2 lens attached to it. This 90mm lens can be difficult to use just because of its focal length, which is full-frame equivalent to 135mm, but it delivers excellent results. It’s super sharp and nearly flawless. It’s such a great lens!

My Superia 800 recipe is based on Fujicolor Superia X-tra 800 film. Fujifilm introduced this consumer grade high ISO color negative film in 1998 and discontinued it in 2016. It was a common film to find at the local store. It was an excellent choice for low-light situations, and it was commonly used by photojournalists. All of the pictures in this article are camera-made JPEGs using my Superia 800 film simulation recipe.

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Raining in the Alley – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 & 90mm

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Goodyear – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 & 90mm

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Drop in the Bucket – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 & 90mm

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Wet Slide – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 & 90mm

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Wish Maker – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 & 90mm

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Green – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 & 90mm

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Drop of Water on a Blackberry Leaf – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 & 90mm

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Green Tree Tops – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 & 90mm

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Trees – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 & 90mm

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King – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 & 90mm

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Catching a Lost Float – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 & 90mm

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Geese – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 & 90mm

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Swimming Duck – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 & 90mm

Film Simulation Review: Waiting With Fujicolor 100 Industrial

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Waiting Outside – Ogden, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 & Fujinon 35mm f/2

My Fujicolor 100 Industrial film simulation recipe is very underrated. I don’t hear many people talk about it. This recipe doesn’t get nearly as many views as some of my other ones, perhaps because the film that it mimics isn’t especially well known. Make no mistake, this recipe is one of the best! If you’ve never tried it, I invite you to do so.

This particular film simulation recipe pairs well with urban scenes. It’s good for more than just that, but a downtown environment seems to be where this recipe does its best work. These photographs aren’t urban, but my Fujicolor 100 Industrial recipe was a good choice for this series.

Anytime can be a good time for photography. Take a camera with you wherever you go, and you’ll be surprised at the photographic opportunities that present themselves. This series of pictures was captured while waiting in line to get inside of Costco, and I was able to do this because I had my Fujifilm X-T30 with me, which had a Fujinon 35mm f/2 lens attached to it. With what’s going on in the world, there’s a line to even get inside of the store to shop. I used the wait as an opportunity to create some pictures. This is no special event. The lighting wasn’t extraordinary. It was unremarkable. Despite that, there were pictures worth capturing, images worth creating, even in an ordinary moment. Use the ordinary moments in life as photographic opportunities.

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Architecture of Costco – Ogden, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 & Fujinon 35mm f/2

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Green Tree & Roof – Ogden, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 & Fujinon 35mm f/2

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Removing Gloves – Ogden, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 & Fujinon 35mm f/2

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Pushing Baskets – Ogden, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 & Fujinon 35mm f/2

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Distancing – Ogden, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 & Fujinon 35mm f/2

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Guy in a Red Shirt – Ogden, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 & Fujinon 35mm f/2

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Cart Man – Ogden, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 & Fujinon 35mm f/2

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Red & Silver Carts – Ogden, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 & Fujinon 35mm f/2

See also: Film Simulation Reviews

The Diversity of Utah Landscapes in Color, Part 1: Water

Utah is a beautiful state with a diverse environment. There are snow-capped mountain peaks, green forests, extensive lakes, snaking rivers, vast red deserts and pretty much everything in-between. This photoessay series is intended to exhibit that diversity through my photographs, and each part will have a specific theme. This article, which is Part 1 of The Diversity of Utah Landscapes in Color, is about water.

Utah is the second driest state in America based on annual rainfall, but there are massive bodies of water and many miles of rivers. The Great Salt Lake is the largest salt lake and the sixth largest overall lake in America. Lake Powell, which is on the boarder of Utah and Arizona, is the 23rd largest lake in the country. Utah Lake is the 36th largest lake in America, and Bear Lake is the 47th largest. There are thousands of miles of rivers and streams throughout the state. Despite the lack of rainfall, there’s a surprisingly large amount of water in Utah, and it has been the subject of my photography numerous times.

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Great Salt Lake Evening – Layton, UT – Fujifilm X-T20 – 12/26/2018

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Low Sun Over The Salt Lake – Antelope Island SP, UT – Fujifilm X-T20 – 3/11/2019

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Afterglow – Antelope Island SP, UT – Fujifilm X-T20 – 3/11/2019

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Blue Sunset – Antelope Island SP, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 – 6/25/2019

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Blue Umbrella At The Lake – Antelope Island SP, UT – Fujifilm X-E1 – 8/2/2016

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Salt Lake Water – Antelope Island SP, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 – 6/25/2019

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East Canyon Reservoir – East Canyon SP, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 – 6/13/2019

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Logs In A Pond – Wasatch-Cache NF, UT – Fujifilm X-Pro2 – 7/18/2018

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Waterfall Into The Ogden River – Ogden Canyon, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 – 7/1/2019

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White Duck – Ogden, UT – Fujifilm X-T20 – 11/15/2018

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Kids At The Lake – East Canyon SP, UT – Fujifilm XF10 – 9/26/2018

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Virgin River From Canyon Junction – Zion NP, UT – Fujifilm X100F – 11/20/2018

Processed with RNI Films. Preset 'Agfa Optima 200 Faded'

River Through Zion – Zion NP, UT – Fujifilm XF10 – 11/20/2018

Processed with RNI Films. Preset 'Kodak Ektar 100'

Autumn Along The Virgin River – Zion NP, UT – Fujifilm XF10 – 11/20/2018

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Virgin River In November – Zion NP, UT – Fujifilm XF10 – 11/20/2018

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Winter Pond & Tree Trunk – Bountiful, UT – Fujifilm XF10 – 1/19/2019

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Flaming Gorge – Flaming Gorge, UT – Fujifilm X-E1 – 7/13/2017

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Mirrored Mountain – Mirror Lake, UT – Fujifilm X-E1 – 9/4/2016

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Sunset Kayak – Willard Bay SP, UT – Fujifilm X-E1 – 6/13/2017

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Clouds At Night – Bear Lake, UT – Fujifilm X-E1 – 9/17/2016

Part 2 – Flowers   Part 3 – Trees  

My Fujifilm X-T30 Fujicolor 100 Industrial Film Simulation Recipe


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Urban Binding – SLC, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 – “Fujicolor 100 Industrial”

I get asked frequently to create different film simulation recipes, and I always put some consideration into those requests. I don’t get around to attempting all of them, although I do attempt many, but I at least think about how I might create a certain look. Even if I do attempt it, I’m not usually successful, as it just doesn’t look right quite often, so I go back to the drawing board when time and inspiration allows. On rare occasions I’m able to create a certain aesthetic quickly and easily. This recipe falls into the latter category.

I have to be honest, when I was asked to create a recipe to mimic the look of Fujicolor 100 Industrial film, I had never heard of it and knew absolutely nothing about it. I had to do some research on this film, and I found lots of good and helpful information. As it turns out, Fujicolor 100 Industrial is a negative film only sold in bulk in Japan, although you can purchase it from some camera stores who sell it individually. It’s actually re-branded Fujicolor 100, well, the Japanese version of Fujicolor 100, which is not the same film as Fujicolor 100 in America, although they’re similar to each other. Something interesting about Fujicolor 100 Industrial (and Fujicolor 100 Japan, which is the same film) is that it has a Tungsten emulsion (with a Kelvin temperature of 3200), but it is daylight balanced because the dye colors have been shifted to account for the cooler temperature. Weird, huh? Well, it turns out that you can do the same thing in your Fujifilm camera using white balance shift, and it creates a similar aesthetic.

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Backyard Daisy – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 – “Fujicolor 100 Industrial”

I find that this recipe is especially good in higher-contrast scenes, although it can still deliver interesting results in lower-contrast scenes. It’s a milder recipe that doesn’t have a lot of saturation, although sometimes just the right amount, and it handles shadows and highlights well. It creates lovely pictures that are soft and not bold. It needs the right subject and light to stand out, but it can look really great in the right situations. It definitely has a low-ISO print-film quality to it, and resembles Fujicolor 100 Industrial film surprisingly well.

PRO Neg. Std
Dynamic Range: DR400
Highlight: +1
Shadow: +2
Color: +1
Color Chrome Effect: Weak
Sharpening: +2
Noise Reduction: -4
Grain Effect: Weak
White Balance: 3200K, +8 Red & -8 Blue
ISO: Auto up to ISO 6400
Exposure Compensation: +1/3 to +2/3 (typically)

Sample photographs, all camera-made JPEGs, captured with a Fujifilm X-T30 using this Fujicolor 100 Industrial recipe:

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US Bike Lane – SLC, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Twilight Temple – SLC, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Broadway Me – SLC, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Three Stories – SLC, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Boston Building Reflection – SLC, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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The Corporate Ladder – SLC, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Their Bank – SLC, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Urban Sunset – SLC, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Partial Loaf – SLC, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Purple Zebra – SLC, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Leaves In The Sky – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Partly Cloudy – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Rosebud Sky – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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In Case of Fire – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Watching Television – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Little Feet – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Donut Eater – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Plastic Hand – SLC, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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My Fujifilm X-T20 Fujicolor Pro 400H Film Simulation Recipe


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Taking Out The Trash – Ogden, UT – Fujifilm X-T20 “Pro 400H”

Fujifilm Pro 400H is a color negative film that was first introduced in 2002 (originally named NPH400). It’s a popular print film that has survived the digital era, as Fujifilm continues to manufacture Pro 400H to this very day, while many other films have seen the chopping block. It’s a fine-grain (for ISO 400), natural-color, versatile film that’s especially good for weddings and portraits. I have used it a couple times myself, although not anytime recently. I do remember some of the idiosyncrasies of the film. Interestingly, the “H” in the name stands for “high speed,” which is the designation that Fujifilm gave to all their ISO 400 films.

I’ve tried in the past to create a Pro 400H recipe for Fujifilm X cameras, but I was never happy with the results. In fact, you might recall that I suggested Fujifilm include this as a new film simulation in future cameras. Recently a Fuji X Weekly reader, Mauricio, shared with me his settings for Pro 400H, and he asked my thoughts on it. I was able to try it out and I liked it! His settings were indeed close, although I felt it needed some tweaking to better mimic the film.

Anytime that you are attempting to recreate the look of a certain film with a digital camera, there are variables that make it difficult. How was it shot? How was it developed? Was it printed, and how so? Was it scanned, and how so? Those are common challenges, plus more. With Pro 400H, there is an additional challenge: the film can look much different depending on the light and exposure. There are several distinct looks that can be achieved using the film, and it’s not possible to recreate all of those aesthetics with a film simulation recipe. Despite all of the challenges, I do feel that I was able to create a look that is in the ballpark of the film, thanks to the help of Mauricio.

There were several compromises that I had to make. I tried many different things to get the aesthetics as close as I could. For example, the film is known for cool blueish shadows and a warm pinkish highlights. Split toning is not possible on Fujifilm X cameras. I could get the shadow color cast more accurate but at the expense of the highlight color, or I could get the highlight color cast more accurate but at the expense of the shadow color. The white balance shift that I settled on, which is the same one that was suggested to me in the first place, isn’t spot-on accurate for the shadows or highlights, but it’s a nice middle ground that’s close enough to both to be convincing. What you get is a cool color cast showing through in the shadows and a slight red color cast showing up in the highlights. The light and exposure of an image will change the look of it in a similar fashion to the actual film, although not completely the same. It’s as close as I could get it.

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Holiday Decor – S. Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T20 “Pro 400H”

Fujifilm Pro 400H film has a huge latitude in the highlights. You can overexpose it by three stops easily (maybe four) and get a good print. In fact, a lot of people purposefully overexpose the film because the colors turn pastel and the images become more warm and vibrant. The X-Trans III sensor has a lot of dynamic range, but it cannot hold up to a three stop overexposure. I found that DR200 is a good setting in many circumstances, but in high-contrast scenes, DR400 might be a better option. I used DR200 for all of the pictures in this article, but some might have benefited from the higher dynamic range setting. I think in high contrast scenes, in order to prevent clipped highlights, if you aren’t going to select DR400, perhaps set highlights to -1. I debated on whether +2 or +3 is the best setting for shadows. I think a +2.5 option would be most correct, but unfortunately that doesn’t exist. My recommendation would be to use +2 in higher contrast scenes and +3 in lower contrast scenes. I used +3 for all of the photos here.

Another setting that I debated on was color saturation. I settled on +4, which I think is the most correct for simulating slightly overexposed Pro 400H. An argument could be made that +3, +2 and +1 are also correct, depending on how the film was exposed and handled. If you think that +4 is too saturated for your tastes, simply find the color setting that works best for you. Pro 400H is definitely a tough film to make a recipe for. I think these settings are going to be your best bet for achieving a look straight out of camera that mimics the film’s aesthetic. Even though I captured these photographs using an X-T20, this film simulation recipe is compatible with all Fujifilm X-Trans III and IV cameras.

PRO Neg. STD
Dynamic Range: DR200
Highlight: 0
Shadow: +3
Color: +4
Grain: Weak
Noise Reduction: -3
Sharpening: 0
White Balance: Auto, +2 Red & +1 Blue
ISO: Auto up to ISO 6400
Exposure Compensation: +2/3 to +1 (typically)

Example photographs, all straight-out-of-camera JPEGs captured using my Fujifilm X-T20 Fujicolor Pro 400H Film Simulation recipe:

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Red Chairs In Snow – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T20 “Pro 400H”

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Up From The Snow – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T20 “Pro 400H”

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Second Day of Winter – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T20 “Pro 400H”

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Frosted Trees & Winter Sun – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T20 “Pro 400H”

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Cold Neighborhood Morning – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T20 “Pro 400H”

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Some Lady’s Book Store – Ogden, UT – Fujifilm X-T20 “Pro 400H”

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TV Fiasco – Ogden, UT – Fujifilm X-T20 “Pro 400H”

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Pierre’s Miniature Bakery – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T20 “Pro 400H”

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Christmas Decoration – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T20 “Pro 400H”

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Faith – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T20 “Pro 400H”

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FED 5c Rangefinder – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T20 “Pro 400H”

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Bolsey Behind Bars – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T20 “Pro 400H”

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Fake Grass In A Box – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T20 “Pro 400H”

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Lavender & Twine – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T20 “Pro 400H”

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Pentax & Fujifilm – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T20 “Pro 400H”

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Three 35mm Film Canisters – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T20 “Pro 400H”

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Vase Arm – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T20 “Pro 400H”

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Red Fire Hydrant – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T20 “Pro 400H”

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Neighborhood Window – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T20 “Pro 400H”

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Dead Rose Bush Leaves – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T20 “Pro 400H”

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Frozen Leaf – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T20 “Pro 400H”

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Moon Rise Over The Mountain – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T20 “Pro 400H”

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Snow Dusted Peak – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T20 “Pro 400H”

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Mountain & Cloud – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T20 “Pro 400H”

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Brick Wall Boy – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T20 “Pro 400H”

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Car Play – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T20 “Pro 400H”

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Girl By The Window Light – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T20 “Pro 400H”

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Green Night Shed – Layton, UT – Fujifilm X-T20 “Pro 400H”

Help Fuji X Weekly

Nobody pays me to write the content found on fujixweekly.com. There's a real cost to operating and maintaining this site, not to mention all the time that I pour into it. If you appreciated this article, please consider making a one-time gift contribution. Thank you!

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