My Fujifilm X-Pro2 Vintage Agfacolor Film Simulation Recipe

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Always Moving Ahead – Rawlins, WY – Fujifilm X-Pro2 & Meike 35mm

I stumbled across a new film simulation recipe while travelling through Wyoming last month. I saw this peculiar classic car parked in front of a gas station with an old radio station in the background, and an analog-film-esque photograph seemed most appropriate for the scene. Normally I’d go with my Vintage Kodachrome recipe, but I decided to play around with the setting and came up with something new.

At first these settings, which I’m calling Vintage Agfacolor, reminded me of Autochrome, an early color film from France. But after using the recipe for a few images, I decided that it more resembles 1950’s Agfachrome. It’s not exactly Agfachrome, but it definitely produces a vintage Agfacolor look.

While never as popular as Kodak, Agfa produced many great films (and other photography products) for still pictures and cinematography back in the good ol’ days. I used a few of their products, including paper for my black-and-white pictures. I liked Agfa, and it’s too bad that they don’t make film anymore.

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Purple Weed Bloom – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-Pro2 & Fujinon 60mm

While the title says “X-Pro2,” this film simulation recipe can be used by all X-Trans III cameras. I have it saved on my X-Pro2, and I’ll likely plug it into my X100F at some point in the near future. All of my film simulations are interchangeable between the latest generation of Fujifilm cameras.

Classic Chrome
Dynamic Range: DR-Auto
Highlight: +2
Shadow: +1
Color: -4
Noise Reduction: -3
Sharpening: 0
Grain Effect: Strong
White Balance: Auto, -3 Red & -4 Blue
ISO: Auto up to ISO 6400
Exposure Compensation: -1/3 to -2/3 (typically)

Example photos, all camera-made JPEGs using my Fujifilm X-Pro2 Vintage Agfacolor Film Simulation recipe:

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Johanna In A Swing – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-Pro2 & Fujinon 60mm

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Scout – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-Pro2 & 7artisans 25mm

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Handbag Abstract – South Weber, Utah – Fujifilm X-Pro2 & Fujinon 60mm

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Clouds Over Mountain Green – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-Pro2 & Fujinon 60mm

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Winnie The Pooh – Riverdale, UT – Fujifilm X-Pro2 & Fujinon 60mm

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Red Handles – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-Pro2 & Fujinon 60mm

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Left Behind Lunch – SLC, UT – Fujifilm X-Pro2 & Fujinon 16mm

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City Sun – SLC, UT – Fujifilm X-Pro2 & Fujinon 16mm

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Airport Walkway – SLC, UT – Fujifilm X-Pro2 & Fujinon 16mm

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Window Waiting – SLC, UT – Fujifilm X-Pro2 & Fujinon 16mm

See also: My Fujifilm X-Pro2 Dramatic Classic Chrome Film Simulation Recipe

10 comments

  1. moody things · June 24

    Nice. Thank you! There are two photographers known for their interesting work with colours – Ernst Haas and Luigi Ghirri. Could you take a look? For maybe possible next recipes 🙂

    Like

    • Ritchie Roesch · June 25

      It would be interesting to research what films that they primarily used.

      Like

    • Ritchie Roesch · June 25

      Interestingly, they both used a lot of Kodachrome (Kodachrome II and Kodachrome-X mostly).

      Liked by 1 person

      • moody things · June 25

        Yes, Kodachrome. And Haas makes vibrant colours and Ghirri prefers muted tones and hues :)))

        Like

  2. Pingback: My Fujifilm X-Pro2 Kodachrome II Film Simulation Recipe | Fuji X Weekly
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  5. Pingback: Fujifilm Classic Chrome Film Simulation Recipes | Fuji X Weekly
  6. Ingo Bartels · 23 Days Ago

    Hello, this recipe ist really funtastic! I will dedicate some of my next instgram posts to your blog using your settings. *Ingoinstabart*

    Liked by 1 person

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