Moment Mentions Fuji X Weekly!

Moment mentioned this website and the Fuji X Weekly app in their YouTube video (above)! It’s around the six minute mark. Also, there’s a Fujinon lens giveaway that you might be interested in, so take a look!

This website isn’t sponsored by Moment (or anyone), but, if you’re from Moment (or B&H, Fujifilm, etc., etc., etc.) and want to become a sponsor, I’m open to it, so send me a note and let’s chat!

Fujifilm X-Trans IV Film Simulation Recipe: Super HG Astia (Part 3 of 3)

Cacti Wall – Scottsdale, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4 – “Super HG Astia”

When Thomas Schwab shared with me his Fujicolor Super HG film simulation recipe, he also sent me an alternative recipe that uses Astia instead of Classic Negative. I gave it a try and thought that it worked quite well for landscape photography, particularly in sunny conditions. It can produce interesting results indoors or on cloudy days, but I think it really shines in sunshine. It’s called “Super HG Astia” because it is a modification of the Super HG recipe, but with Astia.

This “Super HG Astia” recipe wasn’t intended to mimic any particular film; however, it does have some resemblance to Fujichrome Provia 100F. For whatever reason, Fujifilm programmed the Provia film simulation to look more like Astia film, and the Astia film simulation to look more like Provia film, although neither are an exact match. This recipe brings the Astia film simulation closer to resembling Provia film (albeit unintentionally). It’s definitely not a perfect facsimile, but it does nonetheless produce a very nice Fuji color-reversal film aesthetic.

Green Pines – McCall, ID – Fujifilm X-E4 – “Super HG Astia”

This recipe is compatible with the Fujifilm X-Pro3, X100V, X-T4, X-S10, and X-E4 cameras. I accidentally used Large grain for some of my pictures, and the results were fine, but Small grain is better in my opinion—feel free to use whichever Grain size you’d prefer. For the X-T3 and X-T30, you can use this recipe by ignoring Grain size, Clarity and Color Chrome FX Blue—the results will be slightly different, but pretty close. For X-Trans III cameras, you’ll have to additionally ignore Color Chrome Effect; again, the results will be a little different but still very similar. If you’ve got an X-Trans III or newer camera, I invite you to try this recipe. I want to give a special “Thank you!” to Thomas for creating and sharing this recipe!

Astia
Dynamic Range: DR400
Highlight: +2
Shadow: +1
Color: +2
Noise Reduction: -4
Sharpening: -1
Clarity: +2
Grain Effect: Weak, Small
Color Chrome Effect: Weak
Color Chrome Effect Blue: Weak
White Balance: Fluorescent 2, -3 Red & -1 Blue
ISO: Auto, up to ISO 6400
Exposure Compensation: +2/3 to +1 (typically)

Example photographs, all camera-made JPEGs using this Super HG Astia film simulation recipe on my Fujifilm X-E4:

Blue Dumpsters – Phoenix, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4
This Sucker’s Electrical – Phoenix, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4
Gas Pipe – Phoenix, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4
Ms Pac-Man – Phoenix, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4
Pen – Phoenix, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4
Missing Boxer – Phoenix, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4
Watching A Two-Screen Movie – Scottsdale, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4
Lake Harbor – McCall, ID – Fujifilm X-E4
Lake Payette – McCall, ID – Fujifilm X-E4
Lake Log – McCall, ID – Fujifilm X-E4

Part 1 – Fujicolor Super HG Film Simulation Recipe
Part 2 -Fujicolor Super HG v2 Film Simulation Recipe

Find these film simulation recipes and many more on the Fuji X Weekly — Film Recipes App!

Help Fuji X Weekly

Nobody pays me to write the content found on fujixweekly.com. There’s a real cost to operating and maintaining this site, not to mention all the time that I pour into it. If you appreciated this article, please consider making a one-time gift contribution. Thank you!

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Fujifilm X-Trans IV Film Simulation Recipe: Fujicolor Super HG v2 (Part 2 of 3)

Lilac Sun – McCall, ID – Fujifilm X-E4 – “Fujicolor Super HG v2”

When Thomas Schwab sent me his settings that would later be called Fujicolor Super HG, he asked me if there were any changes that I would make. I tried his recipe, and then created a couple of alternate versions. I concluded that I liked his recipe as-is with no changes; however, I thought that one variation I created was interesting, so I shot with it, too, and turned it into its own recipe. I call it Fujicolor Super HG v2. While it’s a collaboration between Thomas and I, he contributed the most to it.

Fujifilm introduced the Super HG line in 1986, with versions in ISOs between 100 and 1600. It saw several iterations and improvements before being replaced by the Superia line is 1998. Thomas Schwab’s Fujicolor Super HG recipe and this Fujicolor Super HG v2 recipe are more similar to Super HG 100 or Super HG 200 film. One film can have many different looks depending on how it was shot, developed, printed or scanned. The differences between the Fujicolor Super HG and Fujicolor Super HG v2 recipes might be like the differences produced by using different film scanners.

Joshua Wall – Scottsdale, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4 – “Fujicolor Super HG v2”

While both Super HG recipes look great, I prefer the Fujicolor Super HG recipe for natural light photography, and I prefer the Fujicolor Super HG v2 recipe for artificial light photography. I invite you to try both, and see which version you like better. You might find that you prefer one in a certain situation and the other in a different situation. Because this recipe uses the new Auto White Priority white balance, it’s only compatible (as of this writing) with the Fujifilm X-T4, X-S10 and X-E4 cameras (and maybe the GFX100S?). If you have the X-Pro3 or X100V, you can use Auto white balance instead, and in natural light you’ll get identical results, although in artificial light it won’t look quite the same.

Classic Negative
Dynamic Range: DR400
Highlight: -1
Shadow: +1
Color: +2
Noise Reduction: -4
Sharpening: 0
Clarity: +2
Grain Effect: Weak, Large
Color Chrome Effect: Weak
Color Chrome Effect Blue: Strong
White Balance: Auto White Priority, -3 Red & -1 Blue
ISO: Auto, up to ISO 6400
Exposure Compensation: +2/3 to +1 (typically)

Example photographs, all camera-made JPEGs using this Fujicolor Super HG v2 film simulation recipe on my Fujifilm X-E4:

Crocodile – Scottsdale, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4
Library Lamp – Scottsdale, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4
Books on a Table – Scottsdale, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4
Wood Workshop – Scottsdale, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4
33 RPM – Scottsdale, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4
Tired Lake Water – McCall, ID – Fujifilm X-E4
Children Playing With Sand – McCall, ID – Fujifilm X-E4
Pink Blooms – Scottsdale, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4
American Renovation – McCall, ID – Fujifilm X-E4
Sisters – McCall, ID – Fujifilm X-E4

Part 1 – Fujicolor Super HG Film Simulation Recipe
Part 3 – Super HG Astia Film Simulation Recipe

Find these film simulation recipes and many more on the Fuji X Weekly — Film Recipes App!

Help Fuji X Weekly

Nobody pays me to write the content found on fujixweekly.com. There’s a real cost to operating and maintaining this site, not to mention all the time that I pour into it. If you appreciated this article, please consider making a one-time gift contribution. Thank you!

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Fujifilm X-Trans IV Film Simulation Recipe: Fujicolor Super HG (Part 1 of 3)

Suburban Home – Scottsdale, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4 – “Fujicolor Super HG”

This Fujicolor Super HG recipe was created by Thomas Schwab, who has made several film simulation recipes published on this website, including Fujicolor NPS 160 PulledSuperia Xtra 400Urban Vintage ChromeKodachrome IIKodak Portra 800 v2Classic MonochromeB&W Superia, and Monochrome Kodachrome. Thomas has also collaborated on other recipes, playing an important role in getting them right, including Kodak Portra 800Kodak Ektar 100Kodachrome 1Kodak Portra 400, and Kodak T-Max 400. Whenever Thomas sends me a new recipe idea, I’m always eager to try it out!

Thomas was photographing using the Provia 400 film simulation recipe, which requires a Fluorescent 2 (also called “Warm White Fluorescent” or “Neon 2”) White Balance. He wanted to see how that not-often-used White Balance would look with some other film simulations, and, after several adjustments, came up with this recipe. He shared it with me, and I shot with it and really liked the results! We wondered if it closely resembled any particular film—it seemed to be in the general ballpark of several Fujifilm emulsions without matching any. After digging a little deeper, and after a chance encounter with a box of prints from 1992, it was determined that Fujicolor Super HG, which is a predecessor to the Superia line, was a surprisingly close match. This recipe wasn’t intended to resemble Fujicolor Super HG film, but fortunately it does!

Smokey Sunrise – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4 – “Fujicolor Super HG”

I thoroughly enjoyed shooting with this recipe, as it produces some great analogue-like results! Because it requires Classic Negative, Color Chrome FX Blue, and Clarity, it is only compatible with (as of this writing) the Fujifilm X-Pro3, X100V, X-T4, X-S10 and X-E4 cameras. I want to give a big “Thank you!” to Thomas Schwab for creating this great recipe and allowing me to share it with you—thanks, Thomas!

Classic Negative
Dynamic Range: DR400
Highlight: 0
Shadow: +1
Color: +2
Noise Reduction: -4
Sharpening: 0
Clarity: -3
Grain Effect: Weak, Large
Color Chrome Effect: Weak
Color Chrome Effect Blue: Strong
White Balance: Fluorescent 2, -3 Red & -1 Blue
ISO: Auto, up to ISO 6400
Exposure Compensation: +1/3 to +2/3 (typically)

Example photographs, all camera-made JPEGs using this Fujicolor Super HG film simulation recipe on my Fujifilm X-E4:

Hole in the Wall – Scottsdale, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4
Locked Bike – Scottsdale, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4
Free College – Scottsdale, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4
College Hunks – Scottsdale, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4
Arizona Neighborhood – Scottsdale, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4
Hidden Home – Scottsdale, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4
Window Desk – Scottsdale, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4
Suburban Patriotism – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Ceiling Lights – Scottsdale, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4
Carousel Top – Scottsdale, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4
Super Shock Control – Scottsdale, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4
Giant Metal Gorilla – Scottsdale, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4

Part 2 – Fujicolor Super HG v2
Part 3 – Super HG Astia

Find these film simulation recipes and many more on the Fuji X Weekly — Film Recipes App!

Help Fuji X Weekly

Nobody pays me to write the content found on fujixweekly.com. There’s a real cost to operating and maintaining this site, not to mention all the time that I pour into it. If you appreciated this article, please consider making a one-time gift contribution. Thank you!

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3 Ways To Use Film Simulation Recipes

Suburban Home – Scottsdale, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4
Free College – Scottsdale, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4
Hole in the Wall – Scottsdale, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4
33 RPM – Scottsdale, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4
Joshua Wall – Scottsdale, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4

There’s no right or wrong way to do photography. One technique or method might work for one person but not another. Whatever works for you is what you should do. With that in mind, I can think of three ways that you can approach using film simulation recipes on your Fujifilm camera.

The SOOC live video series that Nathalie Boucry and I are doing focuses on one of those approaches: straight-out-of-camera JPEGs. Shoot JPEG (or RAW+JPEG) with your recipe of choice, and use the unedited or lightly edited pictures (crops and very minor adjustments) that come out of the camera (which is one-step photography). This is probably the most common way to use film simulation recipes, and this is the method that works for me, as it saves me a lot of time (which allows me to be more productive), and I find it to be more fun. Shooting RAW and using X RAW Studio is a similar approach, although it does add a step to the process.

The photographs at the top of this article, which I captured over the last two days, are straight-out-of-camera JPEGs (aside from some minor cropping on a couple). The recipes that I used for those pictures (the top three are one, the bottom two are another) are future recipes that will be published on this website (and the app) soon. The entirety of my post-processing workflow was simply this: 1) transfer the pictures from the camera to my phone, 2) crop the pictures that needed to be cropped, 3) upload them to my online storage. Done.

Another option is to shoot RAW with a recipe and post-process the pictures using a software like Lightroom, Capture One, RAW Power, Exposure, etc., etc.—the software will apply its interpretation of many (but not all) of the JPEG settings to the RAW file (obviously each program is a little different). This gives you a head start with your editing, as you’re already 70% “there” when you start, and you just need to finish it. This is a great way to speed up your workflow without losing the flexibility of RAW.

Another approach is a mix of the first two: shoot JPEG (or RAW+JPEG) and edit the JPEGs using a software like Lightroom, Capture One, VSCO, Exposure, etc. This might sound like an odd approach at first (why not just shoot RAW if you’re going to edit?); however, if you like the way the straight-out-of-camera JPEGs look, and feel only minor refinements are required to achieve the exact aesthetic you desire, this is a good option. The JPEG is 90% “there” and just needs small adjustments to finish. This is my wife, Amanda’s, preferred approach. This is also what Vuhlandes describes in the video below.

Whether you rely strictly on straight-out-of-camera JPEGs, or you edit your JPEGs, or you post-process your RAW files, film simulation recipes can be used on your Fujifilm camera to help you get the look that you want. There’s not one path that is right for everyone. What’s important is that you find the method that works for you. Hopefully, no matter your preferred process, there’s something on this website that you have found helpful in some way to your photography. If so, let me know in the comments! Also, tell me how you use film simulation recipes—which of the three method works best for you. Or, if you have a different approach that I didn’t mention, I’d love to hear it.

Comparing Classic Negative Recipes

Classic Negative is one of my favorite film simulations, if not my favorite. There’s something special and unique about it that separates it from the other film simulations. It produces a very Superia film-like look, but can be made to have all sorts of different aesthetics. I thought it would be fun to compare the different film simulation recipes that use Classic Negative. I did this experiment a couple of months ago (I meant to post it back then), so some of the most recent Classic Negative recipes didn’t make this list, including Fujicolor C200, Fujicolor Pro 400H, Fujicolor NPS 160 Pulled, and Positive Film. And more Classic Negative recipes are in the works right now!

My hope is that one of the pictures below will inspire you to try a recipe that you haven’t yet tried. Maybe one of them stands out to you as more interesting than the rest. If so, let me know! Also, be sure to let me know in the comments which Classic Negative recipe is your favorite!

These pictures were captured in Yosemite National Park with a Fujifilm X-E4 and Fujinon 18mm f/2 lens.

Kodachrome II Recipe + Submit Your Pictures!

In Season 01 Episode 01 of the new live collaborative video series SOOC with Fuji X Weekly and Tame Your Fujifilm, Fujifilm X Photography Nathalie Boucry and I, Ritchie Roesch, discussed the Kodachrome II film simulation recipe. If you missed it, be sure to check it out! I had a fun time, and I hope that you found it helpful, interesting, or entertaining—or all three! I appreciate all those who tuned in and participated.

The Kodachrome II recipe is intended to mimic the aesthetic of the second era of Kodachrome color reversal film. It’s actually closer to Kodachrome-X than Kodachrome-II film, but in the ballpark of both. Kodak produced those versions of Kodachrome from 1961 to 1974, when they replaced them with Kodachrome 25 and Kodachrome 64. Ernst HaasLuigi Ghirri, and William Eggleston are three well-known photographers who used this era of Kodachrome, at least for some of their images.

One of my all-time favorite recipes that I’ve created is Kodachrome II. I made it three years ago, and used it extensively for awhile, and still use it sometimes now. It was created for Fujifilm X-Trans III cameras, although it is fully compatible with the X-T3 and X-T30 (set Color Chrome Effect to Off). Newer X-Trans IV cameras can also use it (set Color Chrome Effect and Color Chrome FX Blue to Off, and Clarity to 0), simply select Grain size Small; however, there are two new Kodachrome II options (aside from this one) for those cameras. There’s also a Kodachrome II recipe for X-Trans II cameras. You have a lot of options! The Kodachrome II recipe discussed in the video is the original one for X-Trans III.

This new video series is interactive. One way to participate in Season 01 Episode 02 of SOOC (on August 12th) is to submit a picture that you’ve captured using the Kodachrome II film simulation recipe (click here). We’ll show some of your pictures live in the next video! By submitting a photo (by the way, this isn’t a contest), you’ll have a chance to win a one-year Patron subscription for the Fuji X Weekly App. I look forward to seeing your images!

Below are some recent pictures that I made using the Kodachrome II film simulation recipe:

Thank You For Joining Me On SOOC Live!

I want to give a big “Thank You” to all those who tuned into SOOC, a new live video series with myself and Fujifilm X Photography Nathalie Boucry. I appreciate your participation and kindness! I’d love to know what you thought of it.

If you missed the show, you can watch it above. It takes a couple of minutes for it to start. It’s an hour-and-a-half long, and I hope there’s something interesting or helpful in there that you’ll appreciate. Tune in next month, August 12, for the next episode!

New Fujifilm X-Trans IV Patron Early-Access Film Simulation Recipe: Silver Summer

Wrong Way Shadow – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4 – “Silver Summer”

The Fuji X Weekly app is free, yet becoming a Fuji X Weekly Patron unlocks the best app experience! One benefit of being a Patron is you get early access to some new film simulation recipes. These early-access recipes will eventually become available free to everyone in time, including this new one. In fact, many early-access recipes have already been publicly published on this blog and the app, so now everyone can use them. Patrons help support Fuji X Weekly and, really, without them there would be no app. So I want to give a special “thank you” to all of the Patrons!

This new Patron early-access recipe is called “Silver Summer” and is compatible with the Fujifilm X-T4, X-S10, and X-E4 X-Trans IV cameras. It’s not modeled after any specific film, but it definitely has an analog aesthetic. It does have some unintentional similarities to Lomography Cine 200, but it’s definitely not an exact match. I really like how this one looks, and I think some of you will really appreciate it, too!

If you are a Fuji X Weekly Patron, it’s available to you right now on the app!

Example photographs, all camera-made JPEGs captured using this “Silver Summer” film simulation recipe:

Bee on a Thistle – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Lily – Sundance, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Tree Branch and Creek – Sundance, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Mountain Sky – Sundance, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Zigzag Sky – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Concessions – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Summer Slide – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Wood Coaster – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Don’t Stand – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Summer Swing – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Chains – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4

Fujifilm X-Trans IV Film Simulation Recipe: Kodak Portra 400 Warm

Old Trolley Building – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X100V – “Kodak Portra 400 Warm”

This Kodak Portra 400 Warm recipe came about after the Kyle McDougall Portra-Style comparison article. These settings are an attempt to get closer to Kyle’s preset aesthetic. Some film simulation recipes are good for everyday use, while some are good only in the right situations. This is one falls into the latter category, I think. This recipe isn’t for everyone or every situation, but for some people in the right situations, this recipe will be greatly loved! I think it looks best in sunny daylight, but can produce interesting results occasionally in other lighting situations, too. Thank you to Ryan for helping out with this!

One film can have many different looks depending on how it’s shot, developed, and scanned or printed. This Kodak Portra 400 Warm film simulation recipe is an alternative aesthetic. Portra 400 was introduced by Kodak in 1998, and was redesigned in 2006 and again in 2010. As the name implies, it’s intended for portrait photography, but can be used for many other types of photography. It’s similar to Portra 160, but with more contrast, saturation and grain. Believe it or not, ISO 400 was considered “high ISO” by many photographers back in the film days, and Portra 400 was one of the absolute best “high ISO” color films ever made.

Evening Chair – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V – “Kodak Portra 400 Warm”

If you like my other Portra recipes, you might like this one, too. It uses Clarity, which slows down the camera considerably—I hope that Fujifilm speeds this up with a firmware update at some point. This recipe is only compatible with the latest Fujifilm X-Trans IV cameras: the X-Pro3, X100V, X-T4, X-S10, and X-E4. This was a Patron early-access recipe on the Fuji X Weekly App, so if you are a Patron you’ve had access to this Kodak Portra 400 Warm recipe for awhile—there’s now a new early-access recipe in its place, so be sure to check that out!

Classic Chrome
Dynamic Range: DR400
Highlight: -1
Shadow: -2
Color: +2
Noise Reduction: -4
Sharpening: -2
Clarity: -2
Grain Effect: Strong, Small
Color Chrome Effect: Strong
Color Chrome Effect Blue: Off
White Balance: 5500K, 0 Red & -7 Blue
ISO: Auto, up to ISO 6400
Exposure Compensation: +2/3 to +1 1/3 (typically)

Example photographs, all camera-made JPEGs using this “Kodak Portra 400 Warm” film simulation recipe:

Dumpster, Truck – Layton, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Beer & Wings – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Bright Yellow House – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Western Structure – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Turn of the Century – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Train Bridge – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
New Holland – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Food Field – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Sunlight in the Forest – Sundance, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Leaves Below Tree – Sundance, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Wispy Grass – Sundance, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Pond Creek – Sundance, UT – Fujifilm X-E4

Find these film simulation recipes and many more on the Fuji X Weekly — Film Recipes App!

Help Fuji X Weekly

Nobody pays me to write the content found on fujixweekly.com. There’s a real cost to operating and maintaining this site, not to mention all the time that I pour into it. If you appreciated this article, please consider making a one-time gift contribution. Thank you!

$2.00

Live From South Africa: SOOC – A Fuji X Weekly Collaboration with Tame Your Fujifilm

Join Ritchie Roesch (Fuji X Weekly) and Nathalie Boucry (Tame Your Fujifilm) this Thursday (7/8/21) at 11:00 am Mountain Standard Time for a live interactive broadcast called SOOC where we’ll talk about Fujifilm camera settings and film simulation recipes! In Season 01 Episode 01 we’ll discuss the Kodachrome II film simulation recipe.

Nathalie Boucry is an official Fujifilm-X Photographer from Johannesburg, South Africa, who specializes in corporate event, portraiture, and lifestyle photography. She’s also an official Instax Ambassador. Nathalie is the creator and host of the Tame Your Fujifilm educational series.

SOOC is a collaboration between Tame Your Fujifilm and Fuji X Weekly. It will be a monthly live video series, with each episode focused on a different film simulation recipe. It will be a fun and educational experience where we will not only talk about Fujifilm camera settings, but also answer your questions. This is an interactive program, which means that we need your participation! Mark your calendar and be sure to tune in!

You can find Episode 01 below, but in order to interact, you’ll want to jump onto YouTube or Facebook, where you can leave comments, some of which will be incorporated into the show. The broadcast will begin at 10 am Pacific Time, 11 am Mountain Time, 12 pm Central Time, and 1 pm Eastern Time. Wherever you are in the world, I hope that you can join us. See you this Thursday!

Help us get the word out, and share this post or the video above on your social media channels! I appreciate your support, and I look forward to hearing from you on Thursday!

Two Fujifilm X-Trans IV Film Simulation Recipes: Expired Slide + Expired Slide v2

United Carrier – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-E4 – “Expired Slide”
United Carrier – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-E4 – “Expired Slide v2”

I set out to recreate the look of expired slide film. Perhaps expired is the wrong term, because the aesthetic that I was after is more like mishandled slide film—not stored correctly or developed promptly. Maybe it passed its expiration date because it sat in a drawer for so long, or maybe it was in a hot car for a couple of hours, but, whatever the reason, it definitely doesn’t look right.

Why would I want to create this look? Because it’s an interesting vintage aesthetic that was somewhat common in the film era. While most people would not want this outcome, interestingly enough, there are some film photographers (a.k.a. Lomographers) who do this kind of thing on purpose specifically because they want this look. The two film simulation recipes below are for those people seeking something different. Neither of these will likely be anyone’s “go-to” recipe, but if you want something that’s a bit unusual, these are ones to try.

The film simulation recipe called Expired Slide was actually the second one, as I created (what I now call) Expired Slide v2 first. I liked the original settings, but thought that it might be a bit too much, so I toned it back slightly. I posted examples of both recipes to Instagram and let you guys decide which one was best. The Expired Slide recipe won hands-down, but there were some who passionately preferred Expired Slide v2, so I’m posting both. The only difference is the white balance (and shift), otherwise they’re identical. Expired Slide has more of a red-orange cast while Expired Slide v2 has more of a red-purple cast. Both recipes (as of this writing) are only compatible with the Fujifilm X-Pro3, X100V, X-T4, X-S10 and X-E4 cameras.

Expired Slide:

Forest Flowers – Ponderosa State Park, ID – Fujifilm X-E4

Velvia
Dynamic Range: DR400
Highlight: +2
Shadow: -1
Color: -4
Noise Reduction: -4
Sharpness: -2
Clarity: -2
Grain Effect: Strong, Large
Color Chrome Effect: Strong
Color Chrome Effect Blue: Strong
White Balance: 5500K, +7 Red & -2 Blue
ISO: Auto, up to ISO 6400
Exposure Compensation: -1/3 to +2/3 (typically)

Limited 4404 – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Free – Boise, ID – Fujifilm X-E4
Free Signs – Boise, ID – Fujifilm X-E4
Construction Crane – Boise, ID – Fujifilm X-E4
10:45 – Boise, ID – Fujifilm X-E4
Red Fence – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Tulip Blooms – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Dark Payette Lake – McCall, ID – Fujifilm X-E4
Mossy Trunk – Ponderosa State Park, ID – Fujifilm X-E4

Expired Slide v2:

Caterpillar – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-E4

Velvia
Dynamic Range: DR400
Highlight: +2
Shadow: -1
Color: -4
Noise Reduction: -4
Sharpness: -2
Clarity: -2
Grain Effect: Strong, Large
Color Chrome Effect: Strong
Color Chrome Effect Blue: Strong
White Balance: 5000K, +8 Red & 0 Blue
ISO: Auto, up to ISO 6400
Exposure Compensation: -1/3 to +2/3 (typically)

Red Barn – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Jump Pad – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Stack of Buckets – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
The Oaks – Ogden Canyon, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Lake Marina – McCall, ID – Fujifilm X-E4
Two Dogs Swimming – Ponderosa State Park, ID – Fujifilm X-E4
Jon Fishin’ – McCall, ID – Fujifilm X-E4
Log in the Water – McCall, ID – Fujifilm X-E4
Payette Lakeshore – Ponderosa State Park, ID – Fujifilm X-E4

Find these film simulation recipes and many more on the Fuji X Weekly — Film Recipes App!

Help Fuji X Weekly

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Best Fujifilm Film Simulations

DPReview listed their Top 5 Best Fujifilm Film Simulations in the video above. I think it’s great that they’re highlighting Fujifilm’s great JPEG options and give light to some of the film simulations. While I’m sure that they made adjustments to the stock settings, I feel like they haven’t discovered the joy of film simulation recipes, and are mostly using the stock settings. There’s nothing wrong with that, of course, because out-of-the-box the different film simulations are great, but with some tweaking you can achieve all sorts of different looks. I think it’s something that they’d really appreciate, if they only knew.

I went on the Fuji X Weekly — Film Recipes App (available for iOS and Android) and filtered by Camera and Film Simulation. If you are a Patron on the App, you can filter the recipes by camera model or sensor, and by film simulation or color/b&w—the best app experience is reserved for Patrons. For this experiment, I chose the Fujifilm X100F and Classic Chrome. There are 15 different options, each with a different aesthetic (Vintage Kodachrome didn’t fit on the screenshot list). Those are just the X-Trans III recipes that use Color Chrome. If you don’t filter by camera or sensor, there are 45 recipes that use Classic Chrome (and over 150 total recipes)!

I know in the video they say that Classic Chrome is “gross” but perhaps it’s only because they haven’t used the right film simulation recipe. It could be that one of those 45 mentioned above produces a look that they’d love.

I don’t want to rehash DPReview’s video, so instead I will list some of my personal favorite recipes, organized by Film Simulation (they’re not ranked), which you’ll find below. There are so many to choose from, and narrowing it down is a tough task, so obviously not all of my favorites made the list. There are so many Classic Chrome and Classic Negative options that I love, so those two were especially difficult to decide what to include below. Hopefully you’ll find this this exercise helpful, or at least fun, and maybe discover a new recipe to try.

Provia

Provia 400

Big Sky Over Yellow House – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm GFX-50S – “Provia 400”

Cross Process

Truck Stop – Bowie, TX – Fujifilm X100F – “Cross Process”

Color Negative Film

Pink Roses – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-Pro1 – “Color Negative Film”

Velvia

Velvia v2

Sunset Cyclists – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 – “Velvia v2”

The Rockwell

Abandoned Dream – Red Rock Lakes NWR, MT – Fujifilm X100V – “The Rockwell”

Vivid Color

Vibrant Autumn – Fruit Heights, UT – Fujifilm X-M1 – “Vivid Color”

Astia

Astia

Nature Flames – Mirror Lake, UT – Fujifilm XQ1 – “Astia”

Superia Xtra 400

Forest River – Layton, UT – Fujifilm X-M1 – “Superia Xtra 400”

Redscale

Corner Trunk – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 – “Rescale”

Classic Chrome

Kodak Portra 400 v2

Julien Jarry with RED Camera – Antelope Island SP, UT – Fujifilm X100V – “Kodak Portra 400 v2”

Kodachrome 64

Onaqui Wild Horses – Dugway, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 – “Kodachrome 64”

Golden Negative

Hidden Church – North Salt Lake, UT – Fujifilm X-T200 – “Golden Negative”

PRO Neg. Hi

Jeff Davenport Night

Wet Glass Bokeh – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 – “Jeff Davenport Night”

Fujicolor Pro 400H

Pink Roses – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 – “Fujicolor Pro 400H”

PRO Neg. Hi

Christmas Joy – Scottsdale, AZ – Fujifilm X100F – “PRO Neg. Hi”

PRO Neg. Std

Fujicolor 100 Industrial

Urban Binding – SLC, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 – “Fujicolor 100 Industrial”

CineStill 800T

Night Synergy – Centerville, UT – Fujifilm X-T1 – “CineStill 800T”

Fujicolor Superia 800

Caramel Macchiato – Sandy, UT – Fujifilm X100F – “Fujicolor Superia 800”

Eterna

Kodak Vision3 250D

Ice Cream Trailer – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 – “Kodak Vision3 250D”

Vintage Color

Sentinel & Merced – Yosemite NP, CA – Fujifilm X100V – “Vintage Color”

Polaroid

Wilting Flower – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 – “Polaroid”

Eterna Bleach Bypass

LomoChrome Metropolis

Stop No. 11 – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T4 – “LomoChrome Metropolis”

Ektachrome 320T

Since 1938 – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4 – “Ektachrome 320T”

Grizzly Ride

Slug Bug – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4 – “Grizzly Ride”

Classic Negative

Xpro ’62

Empty Diner – Reno, NV – Fujifilm X100V – “Xpro ’62”

Positive Film

Approaching Storm at Last Light – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4 – “Positive Film”

Vintage Vibes

Autumn Aspen – Big Arm, MT – Fujifilm X100V – “Vintage Vibes”

Acros

Kodak Tri-X 400

Leaves in the Forest – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V – ISO 3200 – “Kodak Tri-X 400”

Agfa Scala

Semi & Dinosaur – Santa Rosa, NM – Fujifilm X100F – “Agfa Scala”

Black & White Infrared

Stop Here on Infrared – Yellowstone NP, WY – Fujifilm X100V – “Black & White Infrared”

Monochrome

Ilford Ortho Plus 80

760 – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V – “Ilford Ortho Plus 80”

Dramatic Monochrome

The Obscurity of Light – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 – “Dramatic Monochrome”

Kodak T-Max 400

People Shadows – North Salt Lake, UT – Fujifilm X100V – “Kodak T-Max 400”

Sepia

Sepia

No Credit Tires – Bountiful, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 – “Sepia”

Now it’s your turn! Which of these film simulation recipes do you like best? Which recipes that I didn’t include are your favorites? Let me know in the comments!

Find these film simulation recipes and many more in the Fuji X Weekly — Film Recipes App!

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First Sponsored Video!

I’ve never sponsored a video before. I never thought that I would. Companies sponsor videos, and I’m just a guy posting his camera settings on a blog, so why would I do this? For a couple of years I’ve wanted someone to sponsor me, but here I am, sponsoring someone else’s content.

My hope is that this sponsorship simply gets the word out. Hopefully it will reach some new people. Why is this important? Why might it be “worth it” to do this?

First, I appreciate Andrew and Denae’s YouTube channel. They’ve been publishing solid content for years. Their channel has been helpful to many photographers, and especially Fujifilm photographers. I’m very happy to support them, because I want Andrew and Denae to continue to create great content. It’s good for the Fujifilm community.

Second, the film simulation recipes that I’ve published on the Fuji X Weekly blog and the Fuji X Weekly App are having a real impact on photography. I was speaking recently to an official Fujifilm X-Photographer, and she explained to me how the film simulation recipes are opening up photography to people who are intimidated by photo editing software, or don’t have the time (or maybe the desire) to learn it, or perhaps don’t have the resources to obtain it. There are people who are photographing with Fujifilm cameras using recipes who otherwise would not be photographing. That’s amazing! Besides that, people are having a lot of fun with them—I often get messages or comments stating how the recipes have made photography a more enjoyable experience. People also tell me how they’re more productive since using these camera settings, as it saves them time. These are great things! Recipes are having a positive effect on real people across the world. It’s a real honor to impact photography in these ways.

While many people in the Fujifilm community are familiar with Fuji X Weekly and film simulation recipes, there are also many who aren’t. I want to reach those people, and maybe have a positive effect on their photography. I hope they’ll find something helpful on this website and the app. By sponsoring Andrew and Denae’s video, I’m supporting their work, which is helping people, and I’m bringing awareness to what’s going on over here, which is helping people, so it’s a win-win.

If you’re a company who’s interested in sponsoring me, I’d love to hear from you. If it’s a win-win situation for the Fujifilm community, I’m sure we can work something out. For everyone else, I hope that you enjoy Andrew and Denae’s video about the Fujifilm X-E4, which you’ll find at the top of this article—if you’re thinking about buying that camera, you’ll find some good advice that might help you decide.

Fujifilm X-Trans II Film Simulation Recipe: Yosemite Velvia

Photo by Joy Roesch – Yosemite NP, CA – Fujifilm X-T1 -“Yosemite Velvia”

On a recent trip to Yosemite National Park, my daughter, Joy, created a new film simulation recipe for X-Trans II cameras, which I’m calling Yosemite Velvia. Joy has made two X-Trans I recipes, Superia Xtra 400 and Winter Blue, but this is her first for X-Trans II. On this trip I let her use my Fujifilm X-T1 camera, and I told her that she could use whichever settings she wanted—this recipe is what she came up with.

I asked her why she chose these settings. She told me that she wanted the pictures to be colorful but without too much contrast. She decided on the Shade white balance because the forecast was for overcast sky, although it ended up being mostly sunny; however, she liked how it looked, so she stuck with it. Besides photographing in Yosemite, she also used these settings in Reno, Nevada.

Photo by Joy Roesch – Yosemite NP, CA – Fujifilm X-T1 -“Yosemite Velvia”

This film simulation recipe is compatible with all Fujifilm X-Trans II cameras. You can use it on X-Trans I and Bayer sensor cameras, too, but the results will be a little different (feel free to try, though).

Velvia
Dynamic Range: DR200
Highlight: -1
Shadow: -2
Color: +2
Sharpness: -1
Noise Reduction: -2
White Balance: Shade, -2 Red & -2 Blue
ISO: Auto up to ISO 3200

Exposure Compensation: 0 to +2/3 (typically)

Example photographs, all camera-made JPEGs captured by Joy on my Fujifilm X-T1 using this “Yosemite Velvia” film simulation recipe:

Photo by Joy Roesch – Yosemite NP, CA – Fujifilm X-T1
Photo by Joy Roesch – Yosemite NP, CA – Fujifilm X-T1
Photo by Joy Roesch – Yosemite NP, CA – Fujifilm X-T1
Photo by Joy Roesch – Yosemite NP, CA – Fujifilm X-T1
Photo by Joy Roesch – Yosemite NP, CA – Fujifilm X-T1
Photo by Joy Roesch – Reno, NV – Fujifilm X-T1
Photo by Joy Roesch – Reno, NV – Fujifilm X-T1
Photo by Joy Roesch – Reno, NV – Fujifilm X-T1

Find this film simulation recipe on the Fuji X Weekly — Film Recipes App!

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Fujifilm X-Trans II Film Simulation Recipe: Kodak Platinum 200

Bicycle 88 – West Valley City, UT – Fujifilm X-T1 – “Kodak Platinum 200”

Fuji X Weekly reader Corey Steib (Instagram here and here) shared with me an X-Trans II recipe that he created called Kodak Platinum 200. Corey named it this because it reminds him of vibrant Kodak film captured with a Panaflex Platinum motion picture camera, and because the best results are found at or near ISO 200. This recipe is nothing like the Eterna film simulation, but it does have a slight cinematic feel to it nonetheless thanks to the Shadow setting. It looks really nice, with vibrant colors and soft shadows, and is a great all-purpose recipe. Thank you, Corey, for creating this and allowing me to share it!

I have the ISO in my camera set to Auto, with the upper limit set to ISO 3200. I’m happy with the results from my X-T1 all the way to ISO 3200, but the intention of this recipe is to keep the ISO lower when you can. In bright light, depending on the contrast in the scene, because of the DR-Auto setting, the camera might select ISO 200 or ISO 400, and the idea is to use this recipe at those ISOs when practical. As the available light decreases, it’s perfectly fine to increase the ISO, and I feel good going as high as ISO 3200 when necessary.

Touch of Red – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-T1 – “Kodak Platinum 200”

This film simulation recipe is compatible with all Fujifilm X-Trans II cameras. You can use it on X-Trans I and Bayer sensor cameras, too, but the results will be a little different (feel free to try, though).

Provia
Dynamic Range: DR-Auto
Highlight: +1 (Medium-High)
Shadow: -2 (Low)
Color: +2 (High)
Sharpness: +1 (Medium-High)
Noise Reduction: -2 (Low)
White Balance: Daylight/Fine, 0 Red & 0 Blue
ISO: Auto up to ISO 3200
(but… the lower the better)
Exposure Compensation: -1/3 to +1/3 (typically)

Example photographs, all camera-made JPEGs captured with my Fujifilm X-T1 using this “Kodak Platinum 200” film simulation recipe:

Snack – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-T1
Yellow Rope – West Valley City, UT – Fujifilm X-T1
Unicorn Jo – West Valley City, UT – Fujifilm X-T1
Curved Trunk – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-T1
Log Bridge & 3 Trees – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-T1
Bridge & Stump – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-T1
Pine Needles – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-T1
Tree Canopy – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-T1
Plastic Plants – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T1

Find this film simulation recipe on the Fuji X Weekly — Film Recipes App!

Help Fuji X Weekly

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Fujifilm X-E4 (X-Trans IV) Film Simulation Recipe: Positive Film

Approaching Storm at Last Light – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4 – “Positive Film”

I was attempting to create a film simulation recipe that mimicked the aesthetic of Saul Leiter. The problem with this task is that Saul used many different films over the years; while he had a unique and recognizable style, his exact aesthetic varied significantly. These settings can sometimes mimic his look, but sometimes not, so I wouldn’t call it a success, but I just love how this recipe looks—that’s why I’m sharing it. If you’re attempting to recreate Saul’s aesthetic, this recipe is a good starting point. Another one to try is “Old Kodak“—available (as of this writing) as a Patron early-access recipe on the Fuji X Weekly app.

I think this recipe is in the ballpark of the “Positive Film Effect” on Ricoh GR cameras—perhaps not an exact match, but definitely a similar feel, which is why I named this recipe “Positive Film.” There’s a likeness to Kodak Elite Chrome or maybe Ektachrome 100G, although (again) it’s more of a similar feel than an exact match. Whether this recipe is close to Saul Leiter’s look, Ricoh Positive Film, or a Kodak transparency is debatable; what’s not debatable is that this recipe looks really, really good!

Blacktop Lines – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-E4 – “Positive Film”

You might notice that I used a similar White Balance and White Balance Shift technique as my Fujicolor 100 Industrial recipe. Because it uses the Classic Negative film simulation, Color Chrome FX Blue, and Clarity, this recipe (as of this writing) is only compatible with the Fujifilm X-E4, X100V, X-Pro3, X-T4 and X-S10 cameras.

Classic Negative
Dynamic Range: DR400
Highlight: +1
Shadow: +2
Color: +4
Noise Reduction: -4
Sharpeness: -2
Clarity: -4
Grain Effect: Weak, Large
Color Chrome Effect: Strong
Color Chrome Effect Blue: Strong
White Balance: 2950K, +7 Red & -9 Blue
ISO: Auto, up to ISO 6400
Exposure Compensation: 0 to +2/3 (typically)

Example photographs, all camera-made JPEGs using this “Positive Film” film simulation recipe on my Fujifilm X-E4:

Sunset Behind Trees – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Mountain Ridge & Rainbow Sky – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Dark Sky Behind Francis Peak – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Blue Ridge Storm – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
White House – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
House in Last Light – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Low Sun Behind Pines – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Light on the Treetop – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Suburb Home – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Turnstile – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Wristbands – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Wet Benches – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Red Rose – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Underground Mini – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Garage Pole – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Sliced – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Empty Chairs – Uintah, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
In Window Light – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Tiny Wet Blooms – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
T – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-E4

Find this film simulation recipe on the Fuji X Weekly — Film Recipes App!

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Fujifilm X-Trans I (X-Pro1, X-E1 & X-M1) Film Simulation Recipe: Provia

Cradle Tree Branch – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-M1 – “Provia”

This film simulation recipe reminds me of a filter that I used frequently on a photo editing app on my old Nokia Lumia 1020 phone (sorry, I don’t remember the app name, it’s been many years). It produces a nice vintage feel, with perhaps a cross-processed aesthetic. I especially like how it renders green and blue. Because it uses the Provia film simulation, I’ve named this recipe simply “Provia” even though it doesn’t look all that much like real Provia film. Cameras that are older than the Fujifilm X-Pro3 can’t save White Balance Shifts with each Custom Preset, so it’s helpful to have recipes that use different White Balance options. That’s how this recipe began, and why it uses the Incandescent White Balance option.

This “Provia” film simulation recipe has been a Patron early-access recipe on the Fuji X Weekly app since January, but now it’s available to everyone! There’s a new Patron early-access recipe for X-Trans I cameras on the app that replaced this one. This recipe is compatible with the Fujifilm X-Pro1, X-E1 or X-M1 camera. If you have a Bayer or X-Trans II camera, this recipe will still work, although it won’t look the same; however, I invite you to try it anyway.

Green Tree & Blue Sky – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-Pro1 – “Provia”

Provia
Dynamic Range: DR200
Highlight: -2 (Low)
Shadow: -1 (Medium-Low)
Color: +1 (Medium-High)
Sharpness: 0 (Normal)
Noise Reduction: -2 (Low)
White Balance: Incandescent, +6 Red & -9 Blue
ISO: Auto, up to ISO 3200
Exposure Compensation: +1/3 to +2/3 (typically)

Example photographs, all camera-made JPEGs captured using this “Provia” film simulation recipe:

Sun over Country Horses – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-M1
Target – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-M1
Bricks in the Wall – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-M1 – Photo by Joy Roesch
Strollin’ Jo – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-M1
Green Canopy – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-Pro1
Bunch of Little Blooms – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-Pro1
White Bloom in a Green Bush – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-Pro1
Park Path – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-Pro1
Looking up Through The Trees – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-Pro1

Find this film simulation recipe on the Fuji X Weekly — Film Recipes App!

Help Fuji X Weekly

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New Fujifilm X-Trans I Patron Early-Access Film Simulation Recipe on the App: Color Negative Film

Pink Roses – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-Pro1 – “Color Negative Film”

The Fuji X Weekly app is free, yet becoming a Fuji X Weekly Patron unlocks the best app experience! One benefit of being a Patron is you get early access to some new film simulation recipes. These early-access recipes will eventually become available free to everyone in time, including this new one. In fact, a few of the original early-access recipes have been publicly published on this blog and the app, so everyone can now use them. Patrons help support Fuji X Weekly and, really, without them there would be no app. So I want to give a special “thank you” to all of the Patrons!

This new Patron early-access recipe is called “Color Negative Film” and it is perhaps the X-Trans I recipe that produces the most film-like results. It’s not modeled after any specific film, but it definitely has an analog aesthetic. In the right conditions it is simply beautiful! I think it will be many people’s go-to recipe for X-Trans I cameras.

If you are a Fuji X Weekly Patron, it’s available to you right now on the app!

Example photographs, all camera-made JPEGs captured using this “Color Negative Film” recipe:

Rising Up – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-Pro1
Red Leaves of Summer – Layton, UT – Fujifilm X-Pro1
Backlit White Blossom – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-Pro1
Yellow Bench – Layton, UT – Fujifilm X-Pro1
Log Bridge – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-Pro1

Fujifilm X-Trans IV (X-Pro3, X100V, X-T4, X-S10 & X-E4) Film Simulation Recipe: Fujicolor NPS 160 Pulled

Sunlight Through The Forest – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4 – “Fujicolor NPS 160 Pulled”

Fujifilm introduced Fujicolor NPS 160 sometime in the 1990’s. It was a low contrast, low saturation color negative film intended for portrait photography. Fujifilm replaced it in 2004 with Fujicolor Pro 160S (later renamed Fujicolor Pro 160NS). I actually shot a few rolls of NPS 160 back in the day, and a picture of my parents captured with this film hangs an a wall in their house. Pulling the film, which is a technique where you overexpose and reduce development time to compensate, further reduces the contrast and saturation. This recipe looks a lot like NPS 160 that’s been pulled.

This Fujicolor NPS 160 Pulled recipe was created by Thomas Schwab, who has made several film simulation recipes published on this website, including Superia Xtra 400Urban Vintage ChromeKodachrome II, Kodak Portra 800 v2Classic MonochromeB&W Superia, and Monochrome Kodachrome. Thomas has also collaborated on other recipes, playing an important role in getting them right, including Kodak Portra 800Kodak Ektar 100Kodachrome 1Kodak Portra 400, and Kodak T-Max 400. Some of Thomas Schwab’s pictures that he captured with this recipe can be found further down.

Empty Garage – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-E4 – “Fujicolor NPS 160 Pulled”

What I especially love about this recipe is that it has a soft feel that’s just wonderful. It has a film-like quality to it that’s easy to appreciate. I really love shooting with this recipe! Because it required the Classic Negative film simulation, Color Chrome FX Blue and Clarity, it’s only compatible with the Fujifilm X-E4, X100V, X-Pro3, X-T4, and X-S10 cameras.

Classic Negative
Dynamic Range: DR400
Highlight: -2
Shadow: -2
Color: -4
Noise Reduction: -4
Sharpeness: +1
Clarity: -2
Grain Effect: Weak, Small
Color Chrome Effect: Weak
Color Chrome Effect Blue: Strong
White Balance: Auto, -1 Red & -4 Blue
ISO: Auto, up to ISO 6400
Exposure Compensation: +2/3 to +1 1/3 (typically)

Example photographs, all camera-made JPEGs using this Fujicolor NPS 160 Pulled film simulation recipe:

Thomas Schwab

Photo by Thomas Schwab
Photo by Thomas Schwab
Photo by Thomas Schwab
Photo by Thomas Schwab
Photo by Thomas Schwab
Photo by Thomas Schwab
Photo by Thomas Schwab
Photo by Thomas Schwab
Photo by Thomas Schwab

Ritchie Roesch

Evening Condos – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Country Trailers – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Farm Dirt – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Sunlight Through Forest Branches – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Forest Trail – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Fresh Leaves – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Ghost Bike Ahead – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Bunch of Blooms – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Peace – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Building Legos – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Jon on a Couch – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4

Find this film simulation recipe on the Fuji X Weekly — Film Recipes App!

Help Fuji X Weekly

Nobody pays me to write the content found on fujixweekly.com. There’s a real cost to operating and maintaining this site, not to mention all the time that I pour into it. If you appreciated this article, please consider making a one-time gift contribution. Thank you!

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