Fujifilm X-T20 (X-Trans III) + X-T30 Film Simulation Recipe: Kodak Ultramax

Street Lamp Sunset – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 – “Kodak Ultramax”

I’ve received a lot of positive feedback from my Fujifilm X100V Kodak Ultramax 400 film simulation recipe, which I published two weeks ago. I’ve had a ton of requests to make a version of this recipe that’s compatible with X-Trans III sensor cameras, plus the X-T30 and X-T3. Well, I’ve done it, and here it is!

This version of the Ultramax recipe is pretty close to the original, but not precisely the same. Because the new cameras—the X100V, X-T4 and X-Pro3—have different tools, that recipe isn’t compatible with “older” Fujifilm cameras, but I made some adjustments and changes, and created this new version, which produces similar results. It’s fully compatible with the X-Pro2, X100F, X-E3, X-T2, X-T20, X-H1, X-T3 and X-T30 cameras. While not 100% exactly the same as the original recipe, it definitely has the same overall Ultramax aesthetic.

Sunstar Through Peach Leaves – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T20 – “Kodak Ultramax”

Ultramax 400 is Kodak’s consumer grade ISO 400 color negative film. Kodak has sold Ultramax 400 under many different names, beginning in 1987 with Kodacolor VR-G 400, rebranded Gold 400 one year later, called simply GC at one point, and finally, in 1997, Kodak settled on Ultramax 400. Kodak still sells Ultramax 400, although it’s not the same film as Kodacolor VR-G 400. This film has been tweaked and updated at least nine times over the years; however, the overall aesthetic is still substantially similar between all variations.

Classic Chrome
Dynamic Range: DR400
Highlight: +2
Shadow: +2
Color: +4
Sharpening: +2
Noise Reduction: -4
Grain: Strong
Color Chrome Effect: Off or N/A
White Balance: Auto, +1 Red & -6 Blue
ISO: Auto up to ISO 6400
Exposure Compensation: +1/3 to +1 (typically)

Example photographs, all camera-made JPEGs captured using this Kodak Ultramax film simulation recipe on a Fujifilm X-T20 and X-T30:

Creek – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T20
Shadow Catcher – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30
Boy by a Window – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30
Jonathan in Window Light – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30
Pencils on the Table – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30
Balcony – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T20
Panda Express – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T20
Window Flag – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30
American Tree – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30
Green Mountain Summer – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30
Summer Pear Tree – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30
Greens of Summer – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30
Backyard Tree Evening – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T20
Backyard Aspen Leaves – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

See also:
Fujifilm X-Trans III Film Simulation Recipe Compatibility
Fujifilm X-Trans IV Film Simulation Recipe Compatibility

Fujifilm X100F Review Blog

Help Fuji X Weekly

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Fujifilm X-Trans II Film Simulation Recipe: Astia

Evergreen Sunstar – Mirror Lake, UT – Fujifilm XQ1 – “Astia”

One of my favorite film simulation recipes that I’ve created is Fujicolor 100 Industrial. It’s not compatible with X-Trans II cameras, but I wanted to make something similar to it for the Fujifilm XQ1. This camera doesn’t have PRO Neg. Std, the film simulation that the Fujicolor 100 Industrial recipe requires. For color photographs, the XQ1 has three options: Provia, Velvia and Astia. I tried both Provia and Astia, and neither worked, but I liked how the Astia recipe looked, so I continued working with it.

What this Astia recipe reminds me of is Provia 100F film. When Fujifilm created their film simulations, the one they named Provia more closely resembles Astia film, and the one they named Astia more closely resembles Provia film, but neither are a great match. This recipe isn’t a 100% match to Provia 100F, but it is closer than the Astia film simulation out-of-the-box or especially the Provia film simulation. Confused? Well, to make it even more confusing, since it’s not really intended to look like Provia 100F and it’s not an especially close match, I named this recipe “Astia” after the film simulation it requires. Whatever the name, and whatever film it may or may not resemble, this film simulation recipe is actually pretty good for everyday use.

Diagonal Lines on Decor – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm XQ1 – “Astia”

The XQ1 has a small X-Trans II sensor inside, which means this recipe is fully compatible with all X-Trans II cameras. If you are using it on an APS-C X-Trans II camera, you can increase the maximum ISO to 3200. Feel free to try this recipe on X-Trans I or Bayer sensor cameras, too—it will work but the results might be slightly different.

Astia
Dynamic Range: DR400
Highlight: -2 (Soft)
Shadow: 0 (Standard)
Color: -2 (Low)
Sharpness: -1 (Medium-Soft)
Noise Reduction: -2 (Low)
White Balance: 2650K, +8 Red & -8 Blue
ISO: Auto, up to ISO 1600
Exposure Compensation: +1/3 to +1 (typically)

Example photographs, all camera-made JPEGs made using this Astia film simulation recipe on a Fujifilm XQ1:

Mirror Lake Sign – Mirror Lake, UT – Fujifilm XQ1
Floating Preparations – Mirror Lake, UT – Fujifilm XQ1
Lake Boardwalk – Mirror Lake, UT – Fujifilm XQ1
Blue Boat by the Boardwalk – Mirror Lake, UT – Fujifilm XQ1
Fishing Blues – Mirror Lake, UT – Fujifilm XQ1
Lone Pine – Mirror Lake, UT – Fujifilm XQ1
Tree Silhouette – Mirror Lake, UT – Fujifilm XQ1
Nature Flames – Mirror Lake, UT – Fujifilm XQ1
Reaching Leaves – Mirror Lake, UT – Fujifilm XQ1
Mountain Flower Blossom – Mirror Lake, UT – Fujifilm XQ1
Sunlit Pine Needles – Mirror Lake, UT – Fujifilm XQ1
Trunk & Log – Mirror Lake, UT – Fujifilm XQ1
Logs in the Lake – Mirror Lake, UT – Fujifilm XQ1

See also:
Film Simulation Recipes
X-Trans II Compatible Recipes

Fujifilm X100F Review Blog

Help Fuji X Weekly

Nobody pays me to write the content found on fujixweekly.com. There's a real cost to operating and maintaining this site, not to mention all the time that I pour into it. If you appreciated this article, please consider making a one-time gift contribution. Thank you!

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Fujifilm White Balance Shift: What It Is + How To Use It

White Balance: Daylight. Shift: +3 Red & +1 Blue. Fujicolor Superia 1600.

What is White Balance Shift and how do you use it on your Fujifilm camera? White Balance Shift is one of my favorite JPEG tools that Fujifilm has included on their cameras. It can have a big impact on the aesthetic of an image, and it’s a critical component of my Film Simulation Recipes. It’s one of those things that’s easy to overlook. In this article I’ll explain what White Balance Shift is and how to use it.

White Balance is the adjustment of color temperature (measured in Kelvin) to account for various light conditions, so that white objects appear white, and not yellow or blue or some other color. White Balance Shift is a tool to precisely fine-tune the White Balance. The intention of White Balance and White Balance Shift is to achieve a natural color balance that matches what the eye sees. But you can give your photographs whatever color balance you’d like—this is art; there are no rules.

How do you adjust White Balance Shift on your Fujifilm camera? It’s not immediately obvious, but quite easy once you know where it is. In your camera’s Menu select White Balance. Once in the White Balance Menu, arrow up or down to whichever White Balance you’d like to use, and then arrow right to adjust the White Balance Shift for that particular White Balance. Select OK to set.

Easy, right?

Now that you know how to adjust the White Balance Shift, let’s take a look at what it does to a photograph. The image below demonstrates the dramatic impact White Balance Shift can have on a picture:

Center: 0 Red & 0 Blue. Top-Left: -9 Red & +9 Blue. Top-Center: 0 Red & +9 Blue. Top-Right: +9 Red & +9 Blue. Center-Right: +9 Red & 0 Blue. Bottom-Right: +9 Red & -9 Blue. Bottom-Center: 0 Red & -9 Blue. Bottom-Left: -9 Red & -9 Blue. Center-Left: -9 Red & 0 Blue.

Those are examples of big White Balance Shifts, but what about subtle Shifts? Do they make a difference? Take a look at the picture below. The left image is without a Shift (0 Red & 0 Blue), and the right image is with a subtle Shift (+1 Red & -1 Blue). It’s not a huge change, but noticeable nonetheless.

Slide left and right to compare images.

Now let’s take a look at some less subtle White Balance Shifts and how it can change the aesthetic of a picture. The examples below are all Auto White Balance using various White Balance Shifts, which are prescribed in different Film Simulation Recipes. The specific Shifts and Recipes are listed under each picture.

Shift: +2 Red & -2 Blue. Recipe: Fujicolor Pro 400 Overexposed.
Shift: +2 Red & -4 Blue. Recipe: Vintage Kodachrome.
Shift: +5 Red & -6 Blue. Recipe: Eterna.
Shift: -3 Red & -8 Blue. Recipe: Cross Process.

As you can see, you can get many different color casts using White Balance Shift. In fact, Fujifilm gives you over 350 different options! You can get creative and mix a White Balance Shift with a White Balance that’s other than Auto. Below you’ll find some examples of this. The specific White Balance, Shift, and Recipe are located under each picture.

White Balance: Daylight. Shift: +2 Red & -5 Blue. Recipe: Kodachrome 64.
White Balance: Fluorescent 1 (Daylight Fluorescent). Shift: -3 Red & -1 Blue. Recipe: Kodak Vision3 250D.
White Balance: 6050K. Shift +3 Red & 0 Blue. Recipe: Kodak Ektar 100.
White Balance: 2650K. Shift: -1 Red & +4 Blue. Recipe: Jeff Davenport Night.

White Balance and White Balance Shift affect black-and-white pictures, too! You can manipulate how grey tones are rendered in an image using these tools. The picture below was captured using Acros+R. The version on the left has Auto White Balance and no Shift (0 Red & 0 Blue), while the one on the right has a White Balance of 4200K and a Shift of 0 Red & +9 Blue. Otherwise these two dramatically different images have identical settings.

Slide left and right to compare images.

Below are a few more examples of combining White Balance and White Balance Shift in black-and-white pictures. The specific White Balance, Shift, and Recipe are located under each picture.

White Balance: Auto. Shift: 0 Red & +9 Blue. Recipe: Monochrome Kodachrome.
White Balance: Daylight. Shift: +9 Red & -9 Blue. Recipe: Kodak Tri-X 400.
White Balance: 2750K. Shift: -5 Red & +5 Blue. Recipe: B&W Ifrared.

There’s one more application of White Balance Shift that I’d like to mention: Multiple Exposure photography. One example of White Balance Shift applied to Multiple Exposures, which is the first image below, is an exposure (the “main exposure”) made without a Shift, and then a second exposure of white paper or card-stock with a Shift applied. This gives the picture a faded color-cast aesthetic. Another example, which is the second picture below, is to capture two or more (for cameras capable of more than two) exposures, changing the Shift between exposures. This creates an abstract color rendering.

Shift: +9 Red & +9 Blue. Recipe: Faded Color.
Four exposures, each with a different Shift: +9 Red & -9 Blue; +9 Red & +9 Blue; -9 Red & -9 Blue; -9 Red & +9 Blue.

Most Fujifilm cameras do not have the ability to save White Balance Shifts within Custom Presets. Most of my Film Simulation Recipes require a Shift, yet you cannot save the Shift, so each time you change Recipes you must manually adjust the Shift. This is unfortunate, but thankfully Fujifilm has fixed this issue on the X100V (review here), X-Pro3 and X-T4! If you have one of those three cameras, you can save a White Balance Shift with each Custom Preset. As much as I love the new Clarity setting, Color Chrome Effect Blue, and the new Classic Negative film simulation, my absolute favorite new feature Fujifilm has added to their cameras is the ability to save White Balance Shifts. Thank you, Fujifilm!

White Balance Shift is an amazing tool on your Fujifilm camera! Found within the White Balance Menu, it allows you to fine-tune the color cast of your pictures. You can use this tool to customize your picture aesthetics. I use it extensively in my Film Simulation Recipes, both color and black-and-white, to achieve various looks. Without White Balance Shift many of my Recipes would not be possible. You can use it subtly or dramatically, with Auto White Balance or one of the other White Balance options.

Now you know what White Balance Shift is on your Fujifilm camera and how to use it. Now it’s time to get creative with it!

Fujifilm X100V Film Simulation Recipe: Kodak Ultramax 400

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Empty Outdoor Seating – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V – “Kodak Ultramax 400”

Ultramax 400 is Kodak’s consumer grade ISO 400 color negative film. Kodak has sold Ultramax 400 under many different names, beginning in 1987 with Kodacolor VR-G 400, rebranded Gold 400 one year later, called simply GC at one point, and finally, in 1997, Kodak settled on Ultramax 400. Kodak still sells Ultramax 400, although it’s not the same film as Kodacolor VR-G 400. This film has been tweaked and updated at least nine times over the years; however, the overall aesthetic is still substantially similar between all variations.

This recipe is a happy accident. I was actually working on a different Kodak film simulation recipe, and this was a failed attempt. But I liked how this one looked, so I made a minor adjustment, and created this recipe, which I determined looked a heck-of-a-lot like Ultramax 400. I didn’t intentionally create an Ultramax 400 recipe, but nonetheless here it is! Sometimes it’s better to be lucky than good.

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Colorful Store Decor – Layton, UT – Fujifilm X100V – “Kodak Ultramax 400”

For some of you this new recipe will be an instant favorite. I really love how it looks and plan to use it frequently. This one might be right up there with Kodachrome 64 and Portra 400 for favorite Kodak presets. A word of caution: it does require Clarity, which slows down the camera considerably. This film simulation recipe (as of this writing) is only compatible with the Fujifilm X100V, X-Pro3 and X-T4 cameras.

Classic Chrome
Dynamic Range: DR-Auto
Highlight: +1
Shadow: +1
Color: +4
Noise Reduction: -4
Sharpening: 0
Clarity: +3
Grain Effect: Strong, Large
Color Chrome Effect: Weak
Color Chrome Effect Blue: Weak
White Balance: Auto, +1 Red & -5 Blue
ISO: Auto, up to ISO 6400
Exposure Compensation: +1/3 to +1 (typically)

Example photographs, all camera-made JPEGs using this new Kodak Ultramax 400 film simulation recipe on my Fujifilm X100V:

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Road Construction – Clearfield, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Store Closing – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Urban Roses – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Summer Fruit Tree – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Ripening Peaches – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Wood Barrel – Layton, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Table & Chair – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Library Lights – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Contemplation – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Blackberry Boy – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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End Table Succulent – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Math Books on a Table – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Kitchen Tools – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Quality Goods – Layton, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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75 – Layton, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Table Bloom – Layton, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Fake Tulips – Layton, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Fake Flowers in Window Light – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

See also: Film Simulation Recipes

This post contains affiliate links, and if you make a purchase using my links I’ll be compensated a small amount for it.

Fujifilm X100V Black    Amazon   B&H
Fujifilm X100V Silver   Amazon   B&H

Fujifilm X100F Review Blog

Help Fuji X Weekly

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Fujifilm XQ1 (X-Trans II) Film Simulation Recipe: Kodachrome Without Classic Chrome

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Red Greens – Kaysville, UT – Fujifilm XQ1 – “Kodachrome”

I’ve made a lot of Kodachrome film simulation recipes for Fujifilm cameras (click here, here, here, here, here and here), and they’re very popular. Kodachrome was an iconic slide film made by Kodak for many, many years, so it’s no surprise that people want to get that look out of their Fujifilm camera. All of my Kodachrome recipes use Classic Chrome because it has a Kodak-esque slide film aesthetic, but some cameras don’t have Classic Chrome, such as the Fujifilm XQ1. Yes, the XQ1 is an X-Trans II camera, and most X-Trans II cameras have Classic Chrome, but this one doesn’t, only Provia, Velvia, and Astia for color images.

I created this recipe by capturing an image on my X-T1 using my Kodachrome 64 recipe for that camera, and then as best as possible recreated the look not using Classic Chrome. While I tried Velvia and Astia, I ended up using Provia. It’s a surprisingly close match, although not exact. I think you’ll like this Kodachrome recipe if your camera doesn’t have Classic Chrome.

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!!! Ride !!! – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm XQ1 – “Kodachrome”

Provia
Dynamic Range: DR200
Highlight: +2 (Hard)
Shadow: +1 (Medium-Hard)
Color: -2 (Low)
Sharpness: 0 (Standard)
Noise Reduction: -2 (Low)
White Balance: Daylight (Fujifilm calls it “Fine” for some reason), -1 Red & -4 Blue
ISO: Auto, up to ISO 1600
Exposure Compensation: +1/3 to +2/3 (typically)

Example photographs, all camera-made JPEGs made using this “Kodachrome Without Classic Chrome” film simulation recipe on a Fujifilm XQ1:

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Lights & Reflections – Kaysville, UT – Fujifilm XQ1

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Flag Poles – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm XQ1

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Drive Thru Gas & Wash – Kaysville, UT – Fujifilm XQ1

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Flowers in a Pot on Concrete – Kaysville, UT – Fujifilm XQ1

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Horse Ranch – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm XQ1

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Closed Umbrella, Threatening Clouds – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm XQ1

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Drawing Jonathan – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm XQ1

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Breakfast – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm XQ1

See also: Film Simulation Recipes

Fujifilm X100F Review Blog

Help Fuji X Weekly

Nobody pays me to write the content found on fujixweekly.com. There's a real cost to operating and maintaining this site, not to mention all the time that I pour into it. If you appreciated this article, please consider making a one-time gift contribution. Thank you!

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Fujifilm XQ1 (X-Trans II) Film Simulation Recipe: Lomography Color 100

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Backlit Backyard Leaves – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm XQ1 – “Lomography 100”

My second attempt at a film simulation recipe for the Fujifilm XQ1, which has an X-Trans II sensor, was Lomography Color 100. I have a recipe for this film for X-Trans IV cameras, such as my X-T30, and this is a conversion of that recipe for X-Trans II cameras. Honestly, this version isn’t quite as good as the X-Trans IV version (because the newer cameras have more JPEG options), but it’s still a good all-around, everyday film simulation recipe.

As I explained in my X-Trans IV recipe, there are three and perhaps four different emulsions that have been sold under the Lomography Color 100 name. Making a recipe that matches the film is impossible for that reason. Besides, people who use this film also often use alternative techniques, such as push-processing. Lomography Color 100 can have many, many different looks; despite that, this recipe is in the general ballpark of the film.

Velvia
Dynamic Range: DR400
Highlight: +2 (Hard)
Shadow: 0 (Standard)
Color: -2 (Low)
Sharpness: 0 (Standard)
Noise Reduction: -2 (Low)
White Balance: Cloudy/Shade, -3 Red & +7 Blue
ISO: Auto, up to ISO 1600
Exposure Compensation: 0 to +1/3 (typically)

Example photographs, all camera-made JPEGs made using this Lomography 100 film simulation recipe on a Fujifilm XQ1:

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Green Leaves & Blue Sky – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm XQ1

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Rooster Roof – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm XQ1

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Promenade – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm XQ1

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Towing – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm XQ1

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Yellow Hitch – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm XQ1

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Rusty Ford – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm XQ1

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Camper Special – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm XQ1

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Grate Airport Bus – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm XQ1

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Major Award – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm XQ1

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Abandoned Truck Trailers – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm XQ1

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Graffiti Truck – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm XQ1

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Yucca Leaves – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm XQ1

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Sunlight Through The Green Tree – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm XQ1

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Evening Tree & Reeds – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm XQ1

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Red Berries – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm XQ1

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Irrigation Cover – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm XQ1

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White Thistle – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm XQ1

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Rocky Landscape – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm XQ1

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Single Reed – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm XQ1

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Reeds Reaching To The Sky – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm XQ1

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Jonathan Outside – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm XQ1

See also:
Fujifilm XQ1 Cross Process Film Simulation Recipe
Film Simulation Recipes

Fujifilm X100F Review Blog

Help Fuji X Weekly

Nobody pays me to write the content found on fujixweekly.com. There's a real cost to operating and maintaining this site, not to mention all the time that I pour into it. If you appreciated this article, please consider making a one-time gift contribution. Thank you!

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Fujifilm XQ1 (X-Trans II) Film Simulation Recipe: Cross Process

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A Fuji X Weekly reader sent me his camera, a Fujifilm XQ1, so that I might create some film simulation recipes for it. For those who don’t know, the XQ1 is a premium compact-zoom that Fujifilm made six or seven years ago, and it has a 2/3″ 12-megapixel X-Trans II sensor. While the sensor is much smaller than APS-C, it has the same processor and software as other X-Trans II cameras, although it is missing some options (Classic Chrome, PRO Neg. Hi and PRO Neg. Std, for instance). I discovered that some of the X-Trans II recipes I’ve created, such as Ektachrome 100SW, Agfa Optima, Velvia and Monochrome, all work great on the XQ1. My intentions are to create some more recipes that will work on this camera, and, really, all X-Trans II cameras.

The first film simulation recipe that I created for the XQ1 (and, again, it’s compatible with all X-Trans II cameras) is Cross Process. I have a couple Cross Process recipes that I’ve created for newer camera models (here and here), but never for older models. This one was rather easy to make, and so that’s why I started with it. While I set the maximum ISO to 1600, if you are using an APS-C X-Trans II camera, I’d go as high as ISO 3200. Feel free to try this recipe on X-Trans I or Bayer cameras, if you have one of those, and see how it turns out.

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Summer Evening Dream – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm XQ1 – “Cross Process”

Cross processing is a technique where you develop a film in chemicals intended for another film. For example, the most common cross process is to develop color transparencies, which require the E-6 process, using color negative film chemicals, which is known as C-41 process. For slide film, the photographs typically increase in contrast and grain and the colors shift dramatically. There are other types of cross processing, as well. I’ve done cross processing before, and the results can be fun. Different films will look different when they are cross processed. Overexposing or underexposing or even how the development is handled can effect how the image is rendered. The aesthetic can vary significantly, but usually you can spot a cross processed photograph when you see it.

Provia
Dynamic Range: DR200
Highlight: +2 (Hard)
Shadow: +2 (Hard)
Color: +2 (High)
Sharpness: -1 (Medium-Soft)
Noise Reduction: -2 (Low)
White Balance: Auto, -3 Red & -9 Blue
ISO: Auto, up to ISO 1600
Exposure Compensation: +1/3 (typically)

Example photographs, all camera-made JPEGs made using this Cross Process film simulation recipe on a Fujifilm XQ1:

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SkyWest Sunset – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm XQ1

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Eagle TT-12 – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm XQ1

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SkyWest Carts – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm XQ1

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Ford Truck – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm XQ1

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Ranger – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm XQ1

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Warehouse Deliveries – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm XQ1

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Stop! – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm XQ1

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Cross Process Red Roses – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm XQ1

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Yellow Stump – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm XQ1

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Sand Toys Without Sand – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm XQ1

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Spirit of Photography – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm XQ1

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Blessed – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm XQ1

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Message From Space – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm XQ1

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Green Leaves – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm XQ1

See also: Film Simulation Recipes

Fujifilm X100F Review Blog

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Fujifilm X100V Film Simulation Recipe: The Rockwell (Velvia)

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Abandoned Dream – Red Rock Lakes NWR, MT – Fujifilm X100V – “The Rockwell”

Ken Rockwell likes to say that Fujifilm cameras aren’t good for landscape photography because the JPEG colors aren’t “wild” enough for him. Even on his review of the X100V, he says, “The as-shot JPG color palette and contrasts are quite sedate,” and, “the X100V won’t amp-up colors if they aren’t strong to begin with.” He adds, “The Velvia film simulation modes don’t look any better; certainly not like real Velvia.” He’s entitled to his opinion, but I think he just hasn’t used the “right” recipe, and he might change his mind if he did. This recipe is one that Ken Rockwell might approve of, as it’s inspired by him, and that’s why I call it The Rockwell.

Ken mentions that the Velvia film simulation isn’t like real Velvia, and he means Velvia 50. There are, in fact, a few different films that share the Velvia name. Straight out of the box, the film simulation differs a little from the film. My X-T30 Velvia recipe is intended to get the film simulation closer to actual Velvia 50 film. “The Rockwell” recipe is also in the ballpark of Velvia 50 film, although it might actually exceed it. I’ve heard it said that Fujifilm’s short lived Fortia film (which Color Chrome Effect and Color Chrome Effect Blue are inspired by), which is like Velvia 50 on steroids, was a mistake. Supposedly it (or at least the original Fortia 50) was a botched Velvia run, but instead of trashing it Fujifilm sold it as a new film. This recipe isn’t as crazy as Fortia, but it’s every bit as crazy as Velvia 50 and perhaps slightly more. Another film that is in the general vicinity of this aesthetic is Kodak’s Ektachrome 100VS, which was essentially Kodak’s closest film to Velvia, but this recipe is a little off from that film. No, “The Rockwell” isn’t an exact match to any film, it’s just a recipe that Ken might use on his X100V if he ever read this article.

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Gibbon Falls – Yellowstone NP, WY – Fujifilm X100V – “The Rockwell”

This film simulation recipe is definitely not for everyone. Just like the person it was named after, it’s bold yet sometimes over-the-top. Many of you will find it to be much too much for your photography. But some of you are going to love it. In the right situations, this recipe is stunning! It uses Clarity, which slows down the camera considerably, but this is a recipe that you might want to work slow with anyway, so it should be alright. This recipe is only compatible (as if this writing) with the X100V, X-Pro3 and X-T4.

Velvia
Dynamic Range: DR200
Highlight: -1
Shadow: -1
Color: +4
Noise Reduction: -4
Sharpening: +4
Clarity: +5
Grain Effect: Weak, Small
Color Chrome Effect: Strong
Color Chrome Effect Blue: Strong
White Balance: Auto, +1 Red & -1 Blue
ISO: Auto, up to ISO 6400
Exposure Compensation: +1/3 to +2/3 (typically)

Example photographs, all camera-made JPEGs using this “The Rockwell” film simulation recipe on my Fujifilm X100V:

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Lake McDonald Shore Trees – Glacier National Park, MT – Fujifilm X100V

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Driftwood Shore – Glacier National Park, MT – Fujifilm X100V

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McDonald Lake & Rocks – Glacier National Park, MT – Fujifilm X100V

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Lake McDonald – Glacier National Park, MT – Fujifilm X100V

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Flathead Lake – Flathead Lake, MT – Fujifilm X100V

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Clear Blue Water – Glacier National Park, MT – Fujifilm X100V

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Tree & Snake River – Idaho Falls, ID – Fujifilm X100V

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McDonald Creek Behind Pines – Glacier National Park, MT – Fujifilm X100V

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Trees Obscuring the River – Glacier National Park, MT – Fujifilm X100V

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McDonald Creek – Glacier National Park, MT – Fujifilm X100V

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Green Trees – Glacier National Park, MT – Fujifilm X100V

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Forest Flowers – Glacier National Park, MT – Fujifilm X100V

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Lake Daisies – Flathead Lake, MT – Fujifilm X100V

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Blossomed Bush by the Lake – Flathead Lake, MT – Fujifilm X100V

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Upper Red Rock Lake – Red Rock Lakes NWR, MT – Fujifilm X100V

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Red Lake Light – Flathead Lake, MT – Fujifilm X100V

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Morning Rays – Canyon Ferry Lake, MT – Fujifilm X100V

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Sunset Through The Trees – Island Park, ID – Fujifilm X100V

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Aspen Sunstar – Island Park, ID – Fujifilm X100V

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Johnny Sack Cabin – Island Park, ID – Fujifilm X100V

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Hanging Flower Pot – Big Sky, MT – Fujifilm X100V

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Mountain Wildflowers 1 – Red Rock Lakes NWR, MT – Fujifilm X100V

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Mountain Wildflowers 2 – Red Rock Lakes NWR, MT – Fujifilm X100V

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Rural Blossoms – Island Park, ID – Fujifilm X100V

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Mountain Springtime – Island Park, ID – Fujifilm X100V

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Blossom by the River – Island Park, ID – Fujifilm X100V

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River Grass – Island Park, ID – Fujifilm X100V

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Grassy Hills – Wild Horse Island State Park, MT – Fujifilm X100V

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Pine in the Field – Wild Horse Island State Park, MT – Fujifilm X100V

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Abandoned Rural Building – Wild Horse Island State Park, MT – Fujifilm X100V

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Pop of Color Cabin – Polebridge, MT – Fujifilm X100V

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Birdhouse Fence – Island Park, ID – Fujifilm X100V

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Playground at the Edge of Nowhere – Island Park, ID – Fujifilm X100V

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Hot Water – Yellowstone National Park, WY – Fujifilm X100V

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Blue Eye – Yellowstone National Park, WY – Fujifilm X100V

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Red Rock Turtle – Island Park, ID – Fujifilm X100V

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Colorful Pallets – Bozeman, MT – Fujifilm X100V

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Westfield – Idaho Falls, ID – Fujifilm X100V

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Pink – Island Park, ID – Fujifilm X100V

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Stop for the Pink Bus – Silos, MT – Fujifilm X100V

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18 – Silos, MT – Fujifilm X100V

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Stop Here – Yellowstone National Park, WY – Fujifilm X100V

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Blue Trailer – Rexburg, ID – Fujifilm X100V

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Grease Work – Rexburg, ID – Fujifilm X100V

See also: Film Simulation Recipes

This post contains affiliate links, and if you make a purchase using my links I’ll be compensated a small amount for it.

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Fujifilm X-T20 (X-Trans III) Film Simulation Recipe: Cine Teal

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Garden Flowers Bloomed – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T20 – “Cine Teal”

My Fujifilm X100V “Cine Teal” film simulation recipe has been a lot more popular than I expected it to be. It requires the Eterna film simulation, plus some other settings only found on the newest Fujifilm models. I’ve been asked by a few people to create a “Cine Teal” recipe for X-Trans III cameras, which don’t have that film simulation and those new options, so I did! This recipe woks best during the “Blue Hour” of dusk and dawn, in shade and on overcast days.

PRO Neg. Std
Dynamic Range: DR400
Highlight: -1
Shadow: +3
Color: -3
Noise Reduction: -3
Sharpening: -1
Grain Effect: Weak
White Balance: 4500K, +2 Red & -8 Blue
ISO: Auto up to ISO 6400
Exposure Compensation: +2/3 to +1 (typically)

Example photos, all straight-out-of-camera JPEGs captured on a Fujifilm X-T20 using this “Cine Teal” Film Simulation recipe:

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Upside-Down Umbrella – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T20

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Green Tree & House – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T20

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Been Better – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T20

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Spring Leaves – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T20

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Tree Leaves Green – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T20

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Lavender Bloom – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T20

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Pine & Rock – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T20

These settings also work on the Fujifilm X-T30 and X-T3, just set Color Chrome Effect to Off. I captured the photographs below on my X-T30 using this “Cine Teal” film simulation recipe:

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Hazy Light Through The Tree – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Mountain Pines – Francis Peak, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Mountain Ridge – Francis Peak, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Mountain Radar – Francis Peak, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Dusting Snow & Clouds – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Clouds Around The Mountains – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Spirit of Photography – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Stairs & Reflection – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Morning Light & Shadows – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Film – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

See also: Film Simulation Recipes

Fujifilm X100F Review Blog

Help Fuji X Weekly

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Fujifilm X100V New Feature: B&W Toning

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With the X-T3 and X-T30, Fujifilm introduced black-and-white toning. With the X100V, X-Pro3 and X-T4, Fujifilm took B&W toning to a whole new level! On the X-T3 and X-T30, you have the option of 0 (for neutral), +1 through +9 for warm, and -1 through -9 for cool. On the new cameras, toning is set up more like white-balance-shift, except you can move as many as 18 spots up or down and left or right. Yes, on the X100V, there are 1,368 possible colors to tone your black-and-white pictures! You can even tone B&W video.

The up-and-down option is called “WC” for warm/cool; plus is warm, minus is cool, and 0 is neutral. The left-and-right option is called “MG” for magenta/green; plus is green, minus is magenta, and 0 is neutral. The further you get from 0, the stronger the color, and the closer you get to 0, the more subtle the color. Most people will likely use subtle toning, but some will appreciate the bold options.

I think there is the potential for some very creative uses of this new feature, especially when paired with multiple exposure photography. I haven’t explored the possibilities yet, but I will! If you are a fan of toning your black-and-white pictures, you’ll love this new option. The only thing missing is split-toning, which Fujifilm very well might add on future models—I hope so, anyway! In the meantime, I’ll explore the potential of this new toning feature on the X100V.

Examples of black-and-white toning on the Fujifilm X100V:

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WC 0 MG 0

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WC +5 MG 0

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WC +5 MG +5

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WC 0 MG +5

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WC -5 MG +5

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WC -5 MG 0

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WC -5 MG -5

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WC 0 MG -5

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WC +5 MG -5

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WC +18 MG 0

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WC +18 MG +18

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WC 0 MG +18

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WC -18 MG +18

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WC -18 MG 0

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WC -18 MG -18

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WC 0 MG -18

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WC +18 MG -18

See also:
Fujifilm X100V New Feature: Clarity
Fujifilm X100V New Feature: HDR

This post contains affiliate links, and if you make a purchase using my links I’ll be compensated a small amount for it.

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Fujifilm X100F Review Blog

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