Fujifilm X-T1 (X-Trans II) Film Simulation Recipe: Porto 200

Hidden House – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T1 – “Porto 200”

I was asked to make a film simulation recipe for Fujifilm X-Trans II cameras that mimics the aesthetic of photographer João Falcão (Instagram). I got pretty close to his look with this recipe, although perhaps not exact. Certainly if you like João’s aesthetic, you’ll appreciate these settings. It produces some really nice results! I call it Porto 200.

Why do I call this film simulation recipe Porto 200? After all, there’s no film called Porto 200. Well, Porto is the city in Portugal where João is from. While Porto means “port” I think it has a nice film-stock-like name, similar to “Portra” for example. So Porto 200 it is!

Moody Lake – Big Arm, MT – Fujifilm X-T1 – “Porto 200”

I really enjoy using this recipe on my X-T1! It has (at least for now) a permanent spot in the Q menu. It produces a look that might be kind of similar to ColorPlus 200. It’s not intended to be similar to that film, but to me it seems a little similar. Feel free to try it with +1 Color and/or Sharpness if you prefer, or -5 Blue if you think it’s too yellow. This recipe is intended for X-Trans II cameras, but it will work on X-Trans I and Bayer cameras, too, but with slightly different results.

PRO Neg. Std
Dynamic Range: DR400
Highlight: 0 (Std)
Shadow: +1 (Medium-Hard)
Color: 0 (Mid)
Sharpness: 0 (Std)
Noise Reduction: -2 (Low)

White Balance: Daylight/Fine, +2 Red & -6 Blue
ISO: Auto, up to ISO 3200
Exposure Compensation: -1/3 to +2/3 (typically)

Example photographs, all camera-made JPEGs using this Porto 200 recipe on my Fujifilm X-T1:

Holiday Rain – Big Arm, MT – Fujifilm X-T1
Forest Ivy – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T1
Fall Wall – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T1
Forest Fence – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T1
Dying Leaves – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T1
Tree Leaves – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T1
Hanging Leaves – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T1
Little Red Berries – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T1
Red Berries in a Tree – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T1
Treescape – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T1

See also: X-Trans II Film Simulation Recipes

50420721321_913cb090ac_c

Help Fuji X Weekly

Nobody pays me to write the content found on fujixweekly.com. There’s a real cost to operating and maintaining this site, not to mention all the time that I pour into it. If you appreciated this article, please consider making a one-time gift contribution. Thank you!

2.00 $

Fujifilm X-M1 (X-Trans I) Film Simulation Recipe: Vivid Color

Vibrant Autumn – Fruit Heights, UT – Fujifilm X-M1 – “Vivid Color”

The Fujifilm X-M1 doesn’t have nearly as many JPEG options as newer X-Series cameras have; however, that doesn’t mean that this camera can’t produce great-looking images straight-out-of-camera. This film simulation recipe is proof of that, as it simply looks great!

Many of you don’t have X-Trans I cameras, since there were only three models made: the X-M1, X-E1 and X-Pro1. Fujifilm quickly moved on to the X-Trans II sensor. I know that some of you still have your old X-Trans I camera, or have purchased one second-hand for cheap. For a long time I neglected creating recipes for these cameras, but no more! This is the second one for X-Trans I, and expect several more to be published in the coming months.

Fall Forest – Flathead Lake, MT – Fujifilm X-M1 – “Vivid Color”

Even though this film simulation recipe is intended for the X-M1, X-E1 and X-Pro1, if you have an X-Trans II or Bayer model, feel free to try this recipe on your camera. It won’t be exactly the same, but it will produce very similar results.

Velvia
Dynamic Range: DR200
Highlight: +1 (Medium-Hard)
Shadow: +2 (Hard)
Color: +2 (High)
Sharpness: +1 (Medium-Hard)
Noise Reduction: -2 (Low)
White Balance: Fluorescent 1 (“Daylight Fluorescent”), -5 Red & +5 Blue
ISO: Auto, up to ISO 3200
Exposure Compensation: +1/3 to +2/3 (typically)

Example photographs, all camera-made JPEGs made using this Vivid Color film simulation recipe on a Fujifilm X-M1:

Stinker – Idaho Falls, ID – Fujifilm X-M1
Leave the Light On – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-M1
Sunlight Through the Curtain – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-M1
Business Hours – Idaho Falls, ID – Fujifilm X-M1
Thrifty Nickel – Idaho Falls, ID – Fujifilm X-M1
Clothes Hangers – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-M1
H&M – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-M1
Autumn Forest Sunlight – Fruit Heights, UT – Fujifilm X-M1
Bright Autumn Leaves – Fruit Heights, UT – Fujifilm X-M1
Red Berries & Orange Leaves – Fruit Heights, UT – Fujifilm X-M1
Early Autumn Leaves – Fruit Heights, UT – Fujifilm X-M1
October Leaves – Fruit Heights, UT – Fujifilm X-M1
Leaves in a Dark Forest – Fruit Heights, UT – Fujifilm X-M1
Lit Autumn Leaves – Fruit Heights, UT – Fujifilm X-M1
Slowly Dying – Fruit Heights, UT – Fujifilm X-M1
Autumn Leaves & Green Weed – Missoula, MT – Fujifilm X-M1
Misty Mountain Morning – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-M1

See also: Film Simulation Recipes

50414263302_aaf2b96285_c

Help Fuji X Weekly

Nobody pays me to write the content found on fujixweekly.com. There’s a real cost to operating and maintaining this site, not to mention all the time that I pour into it. If you appreciated this article, please consider making a one-time gift contribution. Thank you!

2.00 $

Fujifilm X100V Film Simulation Recipe: Nature Neon

Setting Sun Trees – Bountiful, UT – Fujifilm X100V – “Nature Neon”

This film simulation recipe isn’t mine. It was created by Fuji X Weekly reader Immanuel Sander, who has actually posted several different recipes on his Instagram account (@captn.look). Thomas Schwab was the one who tipped me off to this. There are several really nice recipes that Immanuel has shared, but this one is my personal favorite. I asked him if I could share it with you on this website, and he graciously agreed. Immanuel calls this recipe Captn Look Nature Neon.

I’m not sure what film this might most closely resemble. It’s kind of similar to my Golden Negative recipe (although not exactly), which is kind of similar to FPP Retrochrome (expired high-speed Ektachrome). It’s also almost redscale-ish, a little more subtly than my Redscale recipe. Cross processed film can sometimes have a red/orange color cast, particularly (non-Velvia) Fujifilm transparencies, but I don’t think these settings are especially close to that. Even if this recipe doesn’t look exactly like any particular film, it nonetheless produce very interesting results.

The Road Less Traveled – Antelope Island SP, UT – Fujifilm X100V – “Nature Neon”

It’s called “Nature Neon” in part because it uses the Fluorescent 1 white balance, which is also called Daylight Fluorescent or Neon Light. It gives a look as if a red neon light is illuminating the scene. The change that I made to Immanuel’s recipe is that I set Sharpness to -2; he had it set to -4. Thomas prefers it set to 0. Really, whatever Sharpness you prefer to use from -4 to 0 is acceptable.

This film simulation recipe is compatible with the Fujifilm X100V, X-Pro3 and X-T4. This article is a bit unusual in that it features example photographs from three photographers: Immanuel Sanders, Thomas Schwab, and myself. You can see how three different photographers used these settings. I want to give a big thank-you to Immanuel for creating and sharing this recipe, and to Thomas for showing it to me. Thank you, guys! I encourage you to check out their Instagram pages to see more of their pictures.

Classic Chrome
Dynamic Range: DR400
Highlight: 0
Shadow: +2
Color: +3
Noise Reduction: -4
Sharpness: -2
Clarity: -4
Grain Effect: Weak, Small
Color Chrome Effect: Weak
Color Chrome Effect Blue: Weak
White Balance: Fluorescent 1, +2 Red & -5 Blue
ISO: Auto, up to ISO 6400
Exposure Compensation: +1/3 to +1 (typically)

Example photographs, all camera-made JPEGs using this Nature Neon film simulation recipe:

Immanuel Sanders

Photo by Immanuel Sander
Photo by Immanuel Sander
Photo by Immanuel Sander
Photo by Immanuel Sander
Photo by Immanuel Sander

Thomas Schwab

Photo by Thomas Schwab
Photo by Thomas Schwab
Photo by Thomas Schwab
Photo by Thomas Schwab
Photo by Thomas Schwab

Ritchie Roesch

Salt Lake from Ladyfinger Point – Antelope Island SP, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Peeking Peak – Antelope Island SP, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Rocks & Shrubs – Antelope Island SP, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Bison in a Meadow – Antelope Island SP, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Lava Sunset – Antelope Island SP, UT – Fujifilm X100V

This post contains affiliate links, and if you make a purchase using my links I’ll be compensated a small amount for it.

Fujifilm X100V Black    Amazon   B&H
Fujifilm X100V Silver   Amazon   B&H

Fujifilm X100V Film Simulation Recipe: Agfa Vista 100

Daisies at the Dock – Big Arm, MT – Fujifilm X100V – “Agfa Vista 100”

In the film era, Agfa was not as big as Fujifilm or especially Kodak, but they were popular nonetheless, particularly in Europe. Vista 100 was a general purpose color negative film made by Agfa between 2001 and 2005. It was preceded by Agfacolor HDC+ 100, which produced similar (but not identical) results. There were two films, AgfaPhoto Vista 100 and AgfaPhoto Vista Plus 100, that were manufactured for a time, neither of which are the same emulsion as Agfa Vista 100. Similar names, different films.

This Agfa Vista 100 film simulation recipe came about after someone asked for settings similar to an Agfa Vista 100 Lightroom preset. It was sample pictures from that preset that I most consulted for this recipe, but I did look at examples of the film that I found online. This recipe produces results similar to the film, but is closer to the preset than the film. This might be more similar to Agfa Vista 200, which had a bit more saturation, contrast and grain; really, it’s in the ballpark of both the ISO 100 and 200 versions of the film, as they’re both pretty close to each other.

Newstand – Polson, MT – Fujifilm X100V – “Agfa Vista 100”

Because this requires the Classic Negative film simulation, as well as Clarity (which will slow your camera down, unfortunately) and Color Chrome Effect Blue, this film simulation recipe is only compatible (as of this writing) with the Fujifilm X100V, X-T4 and X-Pro3. I think many of you are going to really appreciate this recipe and it will be an instant favorite for some of you.

Classic Negative
Dynamic Range: DR200
Highlight: +1
Shadow: -2
Color: +2
Noise Reduction: -4
Sharpening: -0
Clarity: +3
Grain Effect: Strong, Small
Color Chrome Effect: Weak
Color Chrome Effect Blue: Weak
White Balance: 5600K, -4 Red & -5 Blue
ISO: Auto, up to ISO 6400
Exposure Compensation: 0 to +2/3 (typically)

Example photographs, all camera-made JPEGs using this Agfa Vista 100 film simulation recipe on my Fujifilm X100V:

Lake McDonald Driftwood – Glacier NP, MT – Fujifilm X100V
Vuja de – Big Arm, MT – Fujifilm X100V
Boy, Fishing – Big Arm, MT – Fujifilm X100V
Shore of Wild Horse Island – Flathead Lake, MT – Fujifilm X100V
Evening at the Lake – Big Arm, MT – Fujifilm X100V
Three Sailboats – Big Arm, MT – Fujifilm X100V
Yellow Kayak – Big Arm, MT – Fujifilm X100V
Green Canoe – Big Arm, MT – Fujifilm X100V
Lunch Date – Polson, MT – Fujifilm X100V
Man in the Hat – Polson, MT – Fujifilm X100V
Brick & Metal – Polson, MT – Fujifilm X100V
Bank Building – Butte, MT – Fujifilm X100V
Cafe Open – Butte, MT – Fujifilm X100V
Drinking Fountain – Layton, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Circle Slide – Layton, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Yard Sale – Layton, UT – Fujifilm X100V
If a Tree Falls in the Forest – Glacier NP, MT – Fujifilm X100V
Cabin Flowers – Polebridge, MT – Fujifilm X100V

See also: Film Simulation Recipes

This post contains affiliate links, and if you make a purchase using my links I’ll be compensated a small amount for it.

Fujifilm X100V Black    Amazon   B&H
Fujifilm X100V Silver   Amazon   B&H

Help Fuji X Weekly

Nobody pays me to write the content found on fujixweekly.com. There's a real cost to operating and maintaining this site, not to mention all the time that I pour into it. If you appreciated this article, please consider making a one-time gift contribution. Thank you!

$2.00

Fujifilm X-T200 (Bayer) Film Simulation Recipe: Analog Cool

Squash Leaves – Sunset, UT – Fujifilm X-T200 – “Analog Cool”

This new film simulation recipe, which is for Fujifilm cameras with a Bayer sensor, isn’t meant to mimic any specific film. I wanted to create something with a cool color cast, perhaps similar to Tungsten film. Kind of the opposite of my Golden Negative recipe. I call it Analog Cool.

I can’t tell you how many requests I’ve had for recipes compatible with Fujifilm Bayer cameras, such as the X-T200, X-T100, X-A7, X-A5 and XF10, but it’s been a lot! I don’t have very many recipes for these cameras, partly because you cannot save custom presets like you can on X-Trans models. You more-or-less have to use one recipe for a period of time, and only switch occasionally. This recipe will work on X-Trans I & II cameras, but it won’t look exactly the same.

Leaves & Thistle – Fruit Heights, UT – Fujifilm X-T200 – “Analog Cool”

This “Analog Cool” film simulation recipe works well in warm light, because it balances with that lighting condition. I didn’t test it under artificial light or for night photography, but I imagine it would be good for those situations. In cool light conditions, it will produce a pronounced blue cast that is similar to using Tungsten film in daylight, which is something you can try for creative effect or avoid if you don’t like it. Overall this is a pretty good recipe that produces interesting results under the right conditions, and I think some of you are going to really appreciate it.

Provia
Dynamic Range: DR400
Highlight: +1
Shadow: -1
Color: +2
Noise Reduction: -2
Sharpening: 0
White Balance: 4200K, -2 Red & -5 Blue
ISO: Auto, up to ISO 6400
Exposure Compensation: -1/3 to +1/3 (typically)

Example photographs, all camera-made JPEGs using this “Analog Cool” film simulation recipe on a Fujifilm X-T200:

Thistle Alone – Fruit Heights, UT – Fujifilm X-T200
Green Forest Leaves – Fruit Heights, UT – Fujifilm X-T200
Better Days Behind – Fruit Heights, UT – Fujifilm X-T200
Suburban Sunflowers – Sunset, UT – Fujifilm X-T200
Red Fruit in a Green Tree – Fruit Heights, UT – Fujifilm X-T200
Pear Tree – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T200
Wasatch Ridge & Contrail – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T200
Summer Garage – Sunset, UT – Fujifilm X-T200
Signs – Layton, UT – Fujifilm X-T200
Pillow on a Chair – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T200

See also: Film Simulation Recipes

This post contains affiliate links, and if you make a purchase using my links I’ll be compensated a small amount for it.

Fujifilm X-T200   Amazon   B&H

Help Fuji X Weekly

Nobody pays me to write the content found on fujixweekly.com. There's a real cost to operating and maintaining this site, not to mention all the time that I pour into it. If you appreciated this article, please consider making a one-time gift contribution. Thank you!

$2.00

Fujifilm X100V Film Simulation Recipe: Kodachrome 1

Kodak Blossoms – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V – “Kodachrome 1”

Kodachrome
They give us those nice bright colors
They give us the greens of summer
Makes you think all the world’s a sunny day

Kodachrome is probably the most iconic photographic film ever made. It was legendary, and many people saw the world through its colors. Kodak produced Kodachrome film from 1935 through 2009, when it was suddenly discontinued.

The Kodachrome name has been used for many different films over the years. The first Kodachrome product was a two-glass-plate color negative that was introduced in 1915. Like all other color photography methods of its time, the results weren’t particularly good and the product not especially successful.

Forest Brooks – Fruit Heights, UT – Fujifilm X100V – “Kodachrome 1”

In 1935 Kodak released its next Kodachrome, which was a color transparency film with an ISO of 10. This Kodachrome was the first color film that produced reasonably accurate colors and was the first commercially successful color film. It became the standard film for color photography for a couple decades, and was even Ansel Adams’ preferred choice for color work. The December 1946 issue of Arizona Highways, which was the first all-color magazine in the world, featured Barry Goldwater’s Kodachrome images.

Kodak made significant improvements to Kodachrome, and in 1961 released Kodachrome II. This film boasted more accurate colors, sharper images, finer grain, and a faster ISO of 25. While it was still similar to the previous Kodachrome, it was better in pretty much every way. A year later Kodachrome-X was introduced, which had an ISO of 64.

Another generation of Kodachrome, which came out in 1974, saw Kodachrome II replaced by Kodachrome 25 and Kodachrome-X replaced by Kodachrome 64. The differences between this version and the previous weren’t huge with nearly identical image quality. The biggest change was going from the K-12 to the K-14 development process (which was a little less complex, but still complex). This generation of Kodachrome is what most people think of when they picture (pun intended) the film, gracing the pages of magazines like National Geographic.

CPI – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V – “Kodachrome 1”

I personally have shot plenty of Kodachrome, mostly Kodachrome 64. It was a good general use film that produced sharp images and pleasing colors. I haven’t used it in more than a decade. Its days are gone. Even if you can find an old roll of the film, there are no labs in the world that will develop it.

This Kodachrome 1 film simulation recipe is meant to mimic that first era of Kodachrome. This isn’t your parent’s or grandparent’s Kodachrome, it’s your great-grandparent’s. This Kodachrome 1 recipe is actually an updated version of my Vintage Kodachrome recipe. Since the new Fujifilm cameras have more JPEG options, such as Clarity, Color Chrome Effect and Color Chrome Effect Blue, it’s possible to get more accurate or at least different looks out-of-camera. This recipe is very similar to the original version, but I hope this one is just a tad better. It’s only compatible with the X100V, X-Pro3 and X-T4 cameras; if you don’t have one of those cameras, give the Vintage Kodachrome recipe a try. Both the old and this new version have a great vintage analog look that I’m sure many of you will appreciate. I want to give a big “thank you” to Fuji X Weekly reader Thomas Schwab for his help with updating this recipe.

Classic Chrome
Dynamic Range: DR400
Highlight: +4
Shadow: -2
Color: +4
Noise Reduction: -4
Sharpening: -2
Clarity: +1
Grain Effect: Strong, Small
Color Chrome Effect: Strong
Color Chrome Effect Blue: Weak
White Balance: Auto, +2 Red & -4 Blue
ISO: Auto, up to ISO 6400
Exposure Compensation: -1/3 to -1 (typically)

Example photographs, all camera-made JPEGs using this Kodachrome 1 film simulation recipe on my Fujifilm X100V:

Reel 2 Reel – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Behind the Grocery Store – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
American Neighborhood – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Open Window Blinds – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Playing Cards – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Summer Bloom – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Forest Edge – Fruit Heights, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Dead Tree Trunk – Fruit Heights, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Trees of Life & Death – Fruit Heights, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Sunlight & Leaves – Fruit Heights, UT – Fujifilm X100V

See also: Film Simulation Recipes

This post contains affiliate links, and if you make a purchase using my links I’ll be compensated a small amount for it.

Fujifilm X100V Black    Amazon   B&H
Fujifilm X100V Silver   Amazon   B&H

Help Fuji X Weekly

Nobody pays me to write the content found on fujixweekly.com. There's a real cost to operating and maintaining this site, not to mention all the time that I pour into it. If you appreciated this article, please consider making a one-time gift contribution. Thank you!

$2.00

With Other Film Simulations: Kodachrome 64

Classic Chrome

Here’s a unique idea that was suggested to me: apply different film simulations to different recipes, just to see what you get. Actually, that’s how My Ektachrome 100SW recipe came to be: a Fuji X Weekly reader took my Kodachrome II recipe and replaced Classic Chrome with Velvia. I’m going to make a series out of this, which I’m calling With Other Film Simulations, and maybe something interesting will come out of it.

I’ll start with the Fujifilm X100V Kodachrome 64 film simulation recipe. The original picture (at the top of this post), which you might recognize from my Rover Mini YouTube video, was made using Classic Chrome, the film simulation that the Kodachrome 64 recipe requires. The idea here is to keep every setting the same except for the film simulation. In case you don’t remember, the settings are:

Dynamic Range: DR200
Highlight: 0
Shadow: 0
Color: +2
Noise Reduction: -4
Sharpening: +1
Clarity: +3
Grain Effect: Weak, Small
Color Chrome Effect: Strong
Color Chrome Effect Blue: Weak
White Balance: Daylight, +2 Red & -5 Blue

Let’s look at the pictures:

Provia
Velvia
Astia
PRO Neg. Hi
PRO Neg. Std
Classic Negative
Acros
Monochrome
Sepia

The color images are surprisingly similar. Velvia stands out for being the most vibrant. PRO Neg. Std stands out for having the lowest contrast. Classic Negative stands out for its color shift. The original version, which uses Classic Chrome, is still my favorite, but it is interesting to see how the other film simulations affect the picture. The Monochrome film simulation with these settings might prove to be a good low-contrast black-and-white recipe, something I’ll have to take a closer look at.

I hope that you enjoyed this quick article! We’ll do some more of these in the coming weeks and months. Which film simulation did you find most interesting with the Kodachrome 64 settings? Let me know in the comments!

Fujifilm X100V Film Simulation Recipe: Kodak T-Max 400

Tree Behind Bars – North Salt Lake, UT – Fujifilm X100V – “Kodak T-Max 400”

Kodak introduced T-Max black-and-white negative film back in 1986, and they dubbed it “the finest-grained black-and-white film in the world.” While it certainly has fine-grain, particularly the low-ISO version, I don’t know how accurate Kodak’s proclamation was. It’s available in ISO 100, 400 and 3200 variants. This film simulation recipe is intended to resemble the ISO 400 version.

T-Max 400 is a popular B&W film. I’ve used it, although it has been many, many years. Kodak updated the film in 2007 to be sharper and have finer grain; it’s the old version that I have personal experience with. With any film, but perhaps especially with black-and-white negative film, so much can be altered in the darkroom to customize the aesthetic, and one film can produce many different looks, so creating a recipe can be controversial because it might not look exactly like what someone thinks it should. Still, I hope that you will recognize this as T-Max-esque.

You might find that this recipe looks familiar. Actually, it began as Kodak Tri-X 400. Fuji X Weekly readers Thomas Schwab (who has helped with several recipes) and Anders Linborg (who invented the Tri-X recipe) worked together to modify that recipe into this one. I added a couple of small revisions, and now we have Kodak T-Max 400! It really was a group effort, but mostly Thomas and Anders. Thanks, guys!

Night Clouds – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V – “Kodak T-Max 400”

This Kodak T-Max 400 film simulation recipe is intended for the Fujifilm X100V, X-Pro3 and X-T4 cameras; however, with a couple small modifications, it can be used on any X-Trans III or IV camera. First, if your camera doesn’t have Clarity, consider using +1 Highlight and +4 Shadow instead, although you can certainly keep those settings as they are in the recipe below. If your camera doesn’t have the option for Grain size (only strength), set it to Strong. I used Toning on this recipe, which is completely optional, but on the X-T3 and X-T30, which has a different Toning menu, consider using +1 (warm). Back when I shot film I would often give my prints a quick Sepia bath, both for warmth and archival reasons, and the Toning option on your X-Trans IV camera does a good job of mimicking that.

One difference that you might notice between this recipe and Tri-X is ISO. On that recipe I suggest using ISO 1600 to 12800. I think for this recipe the best results are found between ISO 1600 and 3200, but anything from ISO 320 to 6400 looks good. I feel like ISO 12800 is a bit too much, but feel free to try it and see what you think.

Monochrome (+Y, +R, +G)
Dynamic Range: DR200
Highlight: 0
Shadow: +3
Noise Reduction: -4
Sharpening: +2
Clarity: +3
Toning: WC +2, MG 0

Grain Effect: Strong, Small
Color Chrome Effect: Strong
Color Chrome Effect Blue: Off
White Balance: Daylight,+9 Red & -9 Blue
ISO: Auto, up to ISO 6400
Exposure Compensation: +1/3 to +1 (typically)

Example photographs, all camera-made JPEGs using this Kodak T-Max 400 film simulation recipe on my Fujifilm X100V:

Hanging Leaves Silhouette – North Salt Lake, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Light Through The Dark Forest – North Salt Lake, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Ghosts – North Salt Lake, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Tree Trunks & Ground Cover – North Salt Lake, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Tree at Forest Edge – North Salt Lake, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Paved Forest Path – North Salt Lake, UT – Fujifilm X100V
People Shadows – North Salt Lake, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Happy Jon – North Salt Lake, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Fish in the Net – Hyrum Reservoir, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Tired Old Dock – Hyrum Reservoir, UT – Fujifilm X100V
A Boy & His Fishing Pole – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Lake Water – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Flower Photo – North Salt Lake, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Monochrome Wildflower – North Salt Lake, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Photo by Thomas Schwab – Husum, Germany – Fujifilm X100V

See also: Film Simulation Recipes

This post contains affiliate links, and if you make a purchase using my links I’ll be compensated a small amount for it.

Fujifilm X100V Black    Amazon   B&H
Fujifilm X100V Silver   Amazon   B&H

Help Fuji X Weekly

Nobody pays me to write the content found on fujixweekly.com. There's a real cost to operating and maintaining this site, not to mention all the time that I pour into it. If you appreciated this article, please consider making a one-time gift contribution. Thank you!

$2.00

Fujifilm X100V Film Simulation Recipe: Verano Tostado

Sunshine Pines – Mirror Lake, UT – Fujifilm X100V – “Verano Tostado”

There are some film simulation recipes that are more series and some that are more fun. This one is falls into the latter category. Even the name, Verano Tostado (“Toasted Summer”), and the story behind it, is fun. Fuji X Weekly reader Ricardo Guzman sent me this recipe to try. He called it “Tostado” and when I asked him why, Ricardo answered, “Toasted like summer—when you sleep after lunch at the beach, you wake up looking at funny colors.” Yes, that’s exactly what it looks like—verano tostado!

What’s great about this recipe is, even though the title says Fujifilm X100V, this actually will work on any X-Trans III and X-Trans IV camera. Simply disregard Grain set to Large if your camera doesn’t have that option. Clarity, Color Chrome Effect and Color Chrome Effect Blue are all set to 0 or Off, which makes this recipe usable on cameras that don’t have those options. I tried it on both a Fujifilm X-T20 and X-T30 and it worked great!

Roof and Ceiling – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V – “Verano Tostado”

I did not include a “typical” exposure compensation because you can get some really interesting looks with this recipe from both overexposure and underexposure. Try -2/3 all the way up to +1 1/3 and see what happens. I want to thank Ricardo Guzman for creating this recipe and allowing me to share it here with you. Thanks, Ricardo!

Classic Chrome
Dynamic Range: DR200
Highlight: -1
Shadow: +2
Color: +3
Noise Reduction: -4
Sharpening: +2
Clarity: 0
Grain Effect: Strong, Large
Color Chrome Effect: Off
Color Chrome Effect Blue: Off
White Balance: Auto, -2 Red & -5 Blue
ISO: Auto, up to ISO 6400

Example photographs, all camera-made JPEGs using this Verano Tostado film simulation recipe on my Fujifilm X100V:

Summer Flowers – Mirror Lake, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Lake Fishing – Mirror Lake, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Mountain Lake – Mirror Lake, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Water Log – Mirror Lake, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Blue Lake Water – Mirror Lake, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Baiting a Fishing Lure – Mirror Lake, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Small Stream & Tiny Waterfall – Mirror Lake, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Green Leaf – Mirror Lake, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Forest Light Peek – Mirror Lake, UT – Fujifilm X100V
If a Tree Falls in the Forest – Mirror Lake, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Summer Feelings – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Hello – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Stripes – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Table Plant – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

This post contains affiliate links, and if you make a purchase using my links I’ll be compensated a small amount for it.

Fujifilm X100V Black    Amazon   B&H
Fujifilm X100V Silver   Amazon   B&H

Help Fuji X Weekly

Nobody pays me to write the content found on fujixweekly.com. There's a real cost to operating and maintaining this site, not to mention all the time that I pour into it. If you appreciated this article, please consider making a one-time gift contribution. Thank you!

$2.00

Fujifilm X-T20 (X-Trans III) + X-T30 Film Simulation Recipe: Kodak Ultramax

Street Lamp Sunset – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 – “Kodak Ultramax”

I’ve received a lot of positive feedback from my Fujifilm X100V Kodak Ultramax 400 film simulation recipe, which I published two weeks ago. I’ve had a ton of requests to make a version of this recipe that’s compatible with X-Trans III sensor cameras, plus the X-T30 and X-T3. Well, I’ve done it, and here it is!

This version of the Ultramax recipe is pretty close to the original, but not precisely the same. Because the new cameras—the X100V, X-T4 and X-Pro3—have different tools, that recipe isn’t compatible with “older” Fujifilm cameras, but I made some adjustments and changes, and created this new version, which produces similar results. It’s fully compatible with the X-Pro2, X100F, X-E3, X-T2, X-T20, X-H1, X-T3 and X-T30 cameras. While not 100% exactly the same as the original recipe, it definitely has the same overall Ultramax aesthetic.

Sunstar Through Peach Leaves – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T20 – “Kodak Ultramax”

Ultramax 400 is Kodak’s consumer grade ISO 400 color negative film. Kodak has sold Ultramax 400 under many different names, beginning in 1987 with Kodacolor VR-G 400, rebranded Gold 400 one year later, called simply GC at one point, and finally, in 1997, Kodak settled on Ultramax 400. Kodak still sells Ultramax 400, although it’s not the same film as Kodacolor VR-G 400. This film has been tweaked and updated at least nine times over the years; however, the overall aesthetic is still substantially similar between all variations.

Classic Chrome
Dynamic Range: DR400
Highlight: +2
Shadow: +2
Color: +4
Sharpening: +2
Noise Reduction: -4
Grain: Strong
Color Chrome Effect: Off or N/A
White Balance: Auto, +1 Red & -6 Blue
ISO: Auto up to ISO 6400
Exposure Compensation: +1/3 to +1 (typically)

Example photographs, all camera-made JPEGs captured using this Kodak Ultramax film simulation recipe on a Fujifilm X-T20 and X-T30:

Creek – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T20
Shadow Catcher – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30
Boy by a Window – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30
Jonathan in Window Light – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30
Pencils on the Table – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30
Balcony – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T20
Panda Express – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T20
Window Flag – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30
American Tree – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30
Green Mountain Summer – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30
Summer Pear Tree – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30
Greens of Summer – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30
Backyard Tree Evening – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T20
Backyard Aspen Leaves – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

See also:
Fujifilm X-Trans III Film Simulation Recipe Compatibility
Fujifilm X-Trans IV Film Simulation Recipe Compatibility

Help Fuji X Weekly

Nobody pays me to write the content found on fujixweekly.com. There's a real cost to operating and maintaining this site, not to mention all the time that I pour into it. If you appreciated this article, please consider making a one-time gift contribution. Thank you!

$2.00

Fujifilm X-Trans II Film Simulation Recipe: Astia

Evergreen Sunstar – Mirror Lake, UT – Fujifilm XQ1 – “Astia”

One of my favorite film simulation recipes that I’ve created is Fujicolor 100 Industrial. It’s not compatible with X-Trans II cameras, but I wanted to make something similar to it for the Fujifilm XQ1. This camera doesn’t have PRO Neg. Std, the film simulation that the Fujicolor 100 Industrial recipe requires. For color photographs, the XQ1 has three options: Provia, Velvia and Astia. I tried both Provia and Astia, and neither worked, but I liked how the Astia recipe looked, so I continued working with it.

What this Astia recipe reminds me of is Provia 100F film. When Fujifilm created their film simulations, the one they named Provia more closely resembles Astia film, and the one they named Astia more closely resembles Provia film, but neither are a great match. This recipe isn’t a 100% match to Provia 100F, but it is closer than the Astia film simulation out-of-the-box or especially the Provia film simulation. Confused? Well, to make it even more confusing, since it’s not really intended to look like Provia 100F and it’s not an especially close match, I named this recipe “Astia” after the film simulation it requires. Whatever the name, and whatever film it may or may not resemble, this film simulation recipe is actually pretty good for everyday use.

Diagonal Lines on Decor – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm XQ1 – “Astia”

The XQ1 has a small X-Trans II sensor inside, which means this recipe is fully compatible with all X-Trans II cameras. If you are using it on an APS-C X-Trans II camera, you can increase the maximum ISO to 3200. Feel free to try this recipe on X-Trans I or Bayer sensor cameras, too—it will work but the results might be slightly different.

Astia
Dynamic Range: DR400
Highlight: -2 (Soft)
Shadow: 0 (Standard)
Color: -2 (Low)
Sharpness: -1 (Medium-Soft)
Noise Reduction: -2 (Low)
White Balance: 2650K, +8 Red & -8 Blue
ISO: Auto, up to ISO 1600
Exposure Compensation: +1/3 to +1 (typically)

Example photographs, all camera-made JPEGs made using this Astia film simulation recipe on a Fujifilm XQ1:

Mirror Lake Sign – Mirror Lake, UT – Fujifilm XQ1
Floating Preparations – Mirror Lake, UT – Fujifilm XQ1
Lake Boardwalk – Mirror Lake, UT – Fujifilm XQ1
Blue Boat by the Boardwalk – Mirror Lake, UT – Fujifilm XQ1
Fishing Blues – Mirror Lake, UT – Fujifilm XQ1
Lone Pine – Mirror Lake, UT – Fujifilm XQ1
Tree Silhouette – Mirror Lake, UT – Fujifilm XQ1
Nature Flames – Mirror Lake, UT – Fujifilm XQ1
Reaching Leaves – Mirror Lake, UT – Fujifilm XQ1
Mountain Flower Blossom – Mirror Lake, UT – Fujifilm XQ1
Sunlit Pine Needles – Mirror Lake, UT – Fujifilm XQ1
Trunk & Log – Mirror Lake, UT – Fujifilm XQ1
Logs in the Lake – Mirror Lake, UT – Fujifilm XQ1

See also:
Film Simulation Recipes
X-Trans II Compatible Recipes

Help Fuji X Weekly

Nobody pays me to write the content found on fujixweekly.com. There's a real cost to operating and maintaining this site, not to mention all the time that I pour into it. If you appreciated this article, please consider making a one-time gift contribution. Thank you!

$2.00

Fujifilm White Balance Shift: What It Is + How To Use It

White Balance: Daylight. Shift: +3 Red & +1 Blue. Fujicolor Superia 1600.

What is White Balance Shift and how do you use it on your Fujifilm camera? White Balance Shift is one of my favorite JPEG tools that Fujifilm has included on their cameras. It can have a big impact on the aesthetic of an image, and it’s a critical component of my Film Simulation Recipes. It’s one of those things that’s easy to overlook. In this article I’ll explain what White Balance Shift is and how to use it.

White Balance is the adjustment of color temperature (measured in Kelvin) to account for various light conditions, so that white objects appear white, and not yellow or blue or some other color. White Balance Shift is a tool to precisely fine-tune the White Balance. The intention of White Balance and White Balance Shift is to achieve a natural color balance that matches what the eye sees. But you can give your photographs whatever color balance you’d like—this is art; there are no rules.

How do you adjust White Balance Shift on your Fujifilm camera? It’s not immediately obvious, but quite easy once you know where it is. In your camera’s Menu select White Balance. Once in the White Balance Menu, arrow up or down to whichever White Balance you’d like to use, and then arrow right to adjust the White Balance Shift for that particular White Balance. Select OK to set.

Easy, right?

Now that you know how to adjust the White Balance Shift, let’s take a look at what it does to a photograph. The image below demonstrates the dramatic impact White Balance Shift can have on a picture:

Center: 0 Red & 0 Blue. Top-Left: -9 Red & +9 Blue. Top-Center: 0 Red & +9 Blue. Top-Right: +9 Red & +9 Blue. Center-Right: +9 Red & 0 Blue. Bottom-Right: +9 Red & -9 Blue. Bottom-Center: 0 Red & -9 Blue. Bottom-Left: -9 Red & -9 Blue. Center-Left: -9 Red & 0 Blue.

Those are examples of big White Balance Shifts, but what about subtle Shifts? Do they make a difference? Take a look at the picture below. The left image is without a Shift (0 Red & 0 Blue), and the right image is with a subtle Shift (+1 Red & -1 Blue). It’s not a huge change, but noticeable nonetheless.

Slide left and right to compare images.

Now let’s take a look at some less subtle White Balance Shifts and how it can change the aesthetic of a picture. The examples below are all Auto White Balance using various White Balance Shifts, which are prescribed in different Film Simulation Recipes. The specific Shifts and Recipes are listed under each picture.

Shift: +2 Red & -2 Blue. Recipe: Fujicolor Pro 400 Overexposed.
Shift: +2 Red & -4 Blue. Recipe: Vintage Kodachrome.
Shift: +5 Red & -6 Blue. Recipe: Eterna.
Shift: -3 Red & -8 Blue. Recipe: Cross Process.

As you can see, you can get many different color casts using White Balance Shift. In fact, Fujifilm gives you over 350 different options! You can get creative and mix a White Balance Shift with a White Balance that’s other than Auto. Below you’ll find some examples of this. The specific White Balance, Shift, and Recipe are located under each picture.

White Balance: Daylight. Shift: +2 Red & -5 Blue. Recipe: Kodachrome 64.
White Balance: Fluorescent 1 (Daylight Fluorescent). Shift: -3 Red & -1 Blue. Recipe: Kodak Vision3 250D.
White Balance: 6050K. Shift +3 Red & 0 Blue. Recipe: Kodak Ektar 100.
White Balance: 2650K. Shift: -1 Red & +4 Blue. Recipe: Jeff Davenport Night.

White Balance and White Balance Shift affect black-and-white pictures, too! You can manipulate how grey tones are rendered in an image using these tools. The picture below was captured using Acros+R. The version on the left has Auto White Balance and no Shift (0 Red & 0 Blue), while the one on the right has a White Balance of 4200K and a Shift of 0 Red & +9 Blue. Otherwise these two dramatically different images have identical settings.

Slide left and right to compare images.

Below are a few more examples of combining White Balance and White Balance Shift in black-and-white pictures. The specific White Balance, Shift, and Recipe are located under each picture.

White Balance: Auto. Shift: 0 Red & +9 Blue. Recipe: Monochrome Kodachrome.
White Balance: Daylight. Shift: +9 Red & -9 Blue. Recipe: Kodak Tri-X 400.
White Balance: 2750K. Shift: -5 Red & +5 Blue. Recipe: B&W Ifrared.

There’s one more application of White Balance Shift that I’d like to mention: Multiple Exposure photography. One example of White Balance Shift applied to Multiple Exposures, which is the first image below, is an exposure (the “main exposure”) made without a Shift, and then a second exposure of white paper or card-stock with a Shift applied. This gives the picture a faded color-cast aesthetic. Another example, which is the second picture below, is to capture two or more (for cameras capable of more than two) exposures, changing the Shift between exposures. This creates an abstract color rendering.

Shift: +9 Red & +9 Blue. Recipe: Faded Color.
Four exposures, each with a different Shift: +9 Red & -9 Blue; +9 Red & +9 Blue; -9 Red & -9 Blue; -9 Red & +9 Blue.

Most Fujifilm cameras do not have the ability to save White Balance Shifts within Custom Presets. Most of my Film Simulation Recipes require a Shift, yet you cannot save the Shift, so each time you change Recipes you must manually adjust the Shift. This is unfortunate, but thankfully Fujifilm has fixed this issue on the X100V (review here), X-Pro3 and X-T4! If you have one of those three cameras, you can save a White Balance Shift with each Custom Preset. As much as I love the new Clarity setting, Color Chrome Effect Blue, and the new Classic Negative film simulation, my absolute favorite new feature Fujifilm has added to their cameras is the ability to save White Balance Shifts. Thank you, Fujifilm!

White Balance Shift is an amazing tool on your Fujifilm camera! Found within the White Balance Menu, it allows you to fine-tune the color cast of your pictures. You can use this tool to customize your picture aesthetics. I use it extensively in my Film Simulation Recipes, both color and black-and-white, to achieve various looks. Without White Balance Shift many of my Recipes would not be possible. You can use it subtly or dramatically, with Auto White Balance or one of the other White Balance options.

Now you know what White Balance Shift is on your Fujifilm camera and how to use it. Now it’s time to get creative with it!

Fujifilm X100V Film Simulation Recipe: Kodak Ultramax 400

50174810886_0124629e81_c

Empty Outdoor Seating – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V – “Kodak Ultramax 400”

Ultramax 400 is Kodak’s consumer grade ISO 400 color negative film. Kodak has sold Ultramax 400 under many different names, beginning in 1987 with Kodacolor VR-G 400, rebranded Gold 400 one year later, called simply GC at one point, and finally, in 1997, Kodak settled on Ultramax 400. Kodak still sells Ultramax 400, although it’s not the same film as Kodacolor VR-G 400. This film has been tweaked and updated at least nine times over the years; however, the overall aesthetic is still substantially similar between all variations.

This recipe is a happy accident. I was actually working on a different Kodak film simulation recipe, and this was a failed attempt. But I liked how this one looked, so I made a minor adjustment, and created this recipe, which I determined looked a heck-of-a-lot like Ultramax 400. I didn’t intentionally create an Ultramax 400 recipe, but nonetheless here it is! Sometimes it’s better to be lucky than good.

50200245208_d78ebfb3c4_c

Colorful Store Decor – Layton, UT – Fujifilm X100V – “Kodak Ultramax 400”

For some of you this new recipe will be an instant favorite. I really love how it looks and plan to use it frequently. This one might be right up there with Kodachrome 64 and Portra 400 for favorite Kodak presets. A word of caution: it does require Clarity, which slows down the camera considerably. This film simulation recipe (as of this writing) is only compatible with the Fujifilm X100V, X-Pro3 and X-T4 cameras.

Classic Chrome
Dynamic Range: DR-Auto
Highlight: +1
Shadow: +1
Color: +4
Noise Reduction: -4
Sharpening: 0
Clarity: +3
Grain Effect: Strong, Large
Color Chrome Effect: Weak
Color Chrome Effect Blue: Weak
White Balance: Auto, +1 Red & -5 Blue
ISO: Auto, up to ISO 6400
Exposure Compensation: +1/3 to +1 (typically)

Example photographs, all camera-made JPEGs using this new Kodak Ultramax 400 film simulation recipe on my Fujifilm X100V:

50178962181_da32606fab_c

Road Construction – Clearfield, UT – Fujifilm X100V

50178327343_0ac683488a_c

Store Closing – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

50175068762_488e04a441_c

Urban Roses – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

50186500091_d71ac4d89d_c

Summer Fruit Tree – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

50186500256_e7d9cafc5d_c

Ripening Peaches – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

50201065162_652937ce49_c

Wood Barrel – Layton, UT – Fujifilm X100V

50174810781_941e788494_c-1

Table & Chair – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

50174272903_8148e89df8_c

Library Lights – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

50174272833_412c04112c_c

Contemplation – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

50186753377_66e82229c5_c

Blackberry Boy – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

50186500246_317a74d048_c

End Table Succulent – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

50186555573_f3855e1f02_c-1

Math Books on a Table – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

50202588233_e9759a3c0e_c

Kitchen Tools – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

50200787276_d1efd98ae7_c

Quality Goods – Layton, UT – Fujifilm X100V

50200788091_501ee832c8_c

75 – Layton, UT – Fujifilm X100V

50200245203_b57a1d0732_c

Table Bloom – Layton, UT – Fujifilm X100V

50200787921_cd3d64a367_c

Fake Tulips – Layton, UT – Fujifilm X100V

50178423693_30aafce99f_c

Fake Flowers in Window Light – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

See also: Film Simulation Recipes

This post contains affiliate links, and if you make a purchase using my links I’ll be compensated a small amount for it.

Fujifilm X100V Black    Amazon   B&H
Fujifilm X100V Silver   Amazon   B&H

Help Fuji X Weekly

Nobody pays me to write the content found on fujixweekly.com. There's a real cost to operating and maintaining this site, not to mention all the time that I pour into it. If you appreciated this article, please consider making a one-time gift contribution. Thank you!

$2.00

Film Simulation Recipe Compatibility: Bayer, X-Trans I & II

35191776924_3a26d8eecc_k

Fuji X Weekly reader Gustavo Potenza sifted through all of the film simulation recipes on this website and organized them by sensor and camera compatibility. Whoa! That was a tall task, but he knocked it out in a matter of minutes. I wanted to share this information with you, but also separate it into multiple posts so that you can quickly find the recipes you’re looking for. I’ll link this article to the recipe page for easy access, and I’ll keep it updated as I make new recipes. Thank you, Gustavo, for doing the hard work on this!

The first list, which are recipes compatible with Fujifilm Bayer and X-Trans I sensors, is very short. I really need to make it longer by adding more recipes. I hope to do that eventually. If you have a Fujifilm camera with a Bayer sensor or X-Trans I sensor, these are the recipes that you can use. The Classic Chrome recipe is only compatible with those cameras that have the Classic Chrome film simulation. At the bottom is the X-Trans II list, which is much longer.

Bayer & X-Trans I

29205831118_e596bc81da_h

Velvia, Classic Chrome, & Monochrome
Golden Negative
Analog Cool
Monochrome
Sepia

The above recipes are intended for the Fujifilm X-A1, X-A2, X-A3, X-A5, X-A7, X-A10, XF10, X-T100, X-T200, X100, X-PRO1, X-E1, and X-M1 (I hope I didn’t miss any). Some of the X-Trans II recipes below might also work on your Bayer or X-Trans I camera, although results might vary slightly, and it will depend if your camera has the film simulation that the recipe requires.

X-Trans II

49353781021_a354ef72d4_c

The film simulation recipes below are compatible with X-Trans II cameras. A few X-Trans II cameras don’t have all of the different film simulations required, so some of these recipes might not work on your camera.

Kodachrome 64
Kodachrome II
Ektachrome 100SW
Portra 160
Kodacolor
Eterna
Agfa Optima
Velvia, Classic Chrome & Monochrome
Faded Monochrome
Sepia
Lomography Color 100
Cross Process
Kodachrome Without Classic Chrome
Astia

The above recipes are intended for the Fujifilm X100S, X100T, X-E2, X-E2S, X-T1, X-T10, X70, X20, X30, XQ1, and XQ2 (I hope that I didn’t miss any). Not all of the recipes will be compatible with every X-Trans II camera. Some of them might even be compatible with Bayer and X-Trans I cameras with varying results, so feel free to try.

X-Trans III
X-Trans IV

Fujifilm XQ1 (X-Trans II) Film Simulation Recipe: Lomography Color 100

50140153293_87892967e4_c

Backlit Backyard Leaves – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm XQ1 – “Lomography 100”

My second attempt at a film simulation recipe for the Fujifilm XQ1, which has an X-Trans II sensor, was Lomography Color 100. I have a recipe for this film for X-Trans IV cameras, such as my X-T30, and this is a conversion of that recipe for X-Trans II cameras. Honestly, this version isn’t quite as good as the X-Trans IV version (because the newer cameras have more JPEG options), but it’s still a good all-around, everyday film simulation recipe.

As I explained in my X-Trans IV recipe, there are three and perhaps four different emulsions that have been sold under the Lomography Color 100 name. Making a recipe that matches the film is impossible for that reason. Besides, people who use this film also often use alternative techniques, such as push-processing. Lomography Color 100 can have many, many different looks; despite that, this recipe is in the general ballpark of the film.

Velvia
Dynamic Range: DR400
Highlight: +2 (Hard)
Shadow: 0 (Standard)
Color: -2 (Low)
Sharpness: 0 (Standard)
Noise Reduction: -2 (Low)
White Balance: Cloudy/Shade, -3 Red & +7 Blue
ISO: Auto, up to ISO 1600
Exposure Compensation: 0 to +1/3 (typically)

Example photographs, all camera-made JPEGs made using this Lomography 100 film simulation recipe on a Fujifilm XQ1:

50140153588_f17bc14423_c

Green Leaves & Blue Sky – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm XQ1

50140153503_30f4005271_c

Rooster Roof – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm XQ1

50135821307_57a829a0e5_c

Promenade – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm XQ1

50135468336_fdf081fa41_c

Towing – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm XQ1

50135040108_f9f9a0a899_c

Yellow Hitch – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm XQ1

50135705122_edb0c707b9_c

Rusty Ford – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm XQ1

50135705097_828192428b_c

Camper Special – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm XQ1

50135468431_81c5c541d6_c

Grate Airport Bus – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm XQ1

50134923608_e7c094496f_c

Major Award – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm XQ1

50140153558_b114f561b1_c

Abandoned Truck Trailers – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm XQ1

50140153613_60c8827b4f_c

Graffiti Truck – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm XQ1

50135584731_ee1696d974_c

Yucca Leaves – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm XQ1

50134923623_1cb9f13c4d_c

Sunlight Through The Green Tree – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm XQ1

50140692766_717b56cb43_c

Evening Tree & Reeds – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm XQ1

50140933912_653bd5d3ba_c

Red Berries – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm XQ1

50140151573_328552d0f1_c

Irrigation Cover – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm XQ1

50140151588_eb1115a5a9_c

White Thistle – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm XQ1

50140694976_d312559af4_c

Rocky Landscape – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm XQ1

50140955642_8bd9bfb9b3_c

Single Reed – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm XQ1

50140692746_f3622ab818_c

Reeds Reaching To The Sky – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm XQ1

50140692781_78944cede4_c

Jonathan Outside – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm XQ1

See also:
Fujifilm XQ1 Cross Process Film Simulation Recipe
Film Simulation Recipes

Help Fuji X Weekly

Nobody pays me to write the content found on fujixweekly.com. There's a real cost to operating and maintaining this site, not to mention all the time that I pour into it. If you appreciated this article, please consider making a one-time gift contribution. Thank you!

$2.00

Fujifilm XQ1 (X-Trans II) Film Simulation Recipe: Cross Process

50127261047_710eb2923f_c

A Fuji X Weekly reader sent me his camera, a Fujifilm XQ1, so that I might create some film simulation recipes for it. For those who don’t know, the XQ1 is a premium compact-zoom that Fujifilm made six or seven years ago, and it has a 2/3″ 12-megapixel X-Trans II sensor. While the sensor is much smaller than APS-C, it has the same processor and software as other X-Trans II cameras, although it is missing some options (Classic Chrome, PRO Neg. Hi and PRO Neg. Std, for instance). I discovered that some of the X-Trans II recipes I’ve created, such as Ektachrome 100SW, Agfa Optima, Velvia and Monochrome, all work great on the XQ1. My intentions are to create some more recipes that will work on this camera, and, really, all X-Trans II cameras.

The first film simulation recipe that I created for the XQ1 (and, again, it’s compatible with all X-Trans II cameras) is Cross Process. I have a couple Cross Process recipes that I’ve created for newer camera models (here and here), but never for older models. This one was rather easy to make, and so that’s why I started with it. While I set the maximum ISO to 1600, if you are using an APS-C X-Trans II camera, I’d go as high as ISO 3200. Feel free to try this recipe on X-Trans I or Bayer cameras, if you have one of those, and see how it turns out.

50127599118_c106be3ec6_c

Summer Evening Dream – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm XQ1 – “Cross Process”

Cross processing is a technique where you develop a film in chemicals intended for another film. For example, the most common cross process is to develop color transparencies, which require the E-6 process, using color negative film chemicals, which is known as C-41 process. For slide film, the photographs typically increase in contrast and grain and the colors shift dramatically. There are other types of cross processing, as well. I’ve done cross processing before, and the results can be fun. Different films will look different when they are cross processed. Overexposing or underexposing or even how the development is handled can effect how the image is rendered. The aesthetic can vary significantly, but usually you can spot a cross processed photograph when you see it.

Provia
Dynamic Range: DR200
Highlight: +2 (Hard)
Shadow: +2 (Hard)
Color: +2 (High)
Sharpness: -1 (Medium-Soft)
Noise Reduction: -2 (Low)
White Balance: Auto, -3 Red & -9 Blue
ISO: Auto, up to ISO 1600
Exposure Compensation: +1/3 (typically)

Example photographs, all camera-made JPEGs made using this Cross Process film simulation recipe on a Fujifilm XQ1:

50128166131_d0dbd38fc7_c

SkyWest Sunset – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm XQ1

50128387562_d1d2c392a1_c

Eagle TT-12 – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm XQ1

50128166176_6c7dcd4a24_c-1

SkyWest Carts – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm XQ1

50128166166_79d23f34a4_c

Ford Truck – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm XQ1

50128166156_0bb3160d9d_c

Ranger – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm XQ1

50128387472_ca43188400_c

Warehouse Deliveries – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm XQ1

50131808092_7f270cfe8c_c

Stop! – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm XQ1

50131808067_e10a3f256b_c

Cross Process Red Roses – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm XQ1

50127598473_14aa4e6d0d_c

Yellow Stump – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm XQ1

50126934956_bd51dcdf46_c

Sand Toys Without Sand – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm XQ1

50131808037_d480e0bf82_c

Spirit of Photography – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm XQ1

50131808047_9d7444313c_c

Blessed – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm XQ1

50126363563_e3c9cfc291_c

Message From Space – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm XQ1

50127156627_af2e977e15_c

Green Leaves – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm XQ1

See also: Film Simulation Recipes

Help Fuji X Weekly

Nobody pays me to write the content found on fujixweekly.com. There's a real cost to operating and maintaining this site, not to mention all the time that I pour into it. If you appreciated this article, please consider making a one-time gift contribution. Thank you!

$2.00

Fujifilm X100V Film Simulation Recipe: The Rockwell (Velvia)

50081372262_784e942bdc_c

Abandoned Dream – Red Rock Lakes NWR, MT – Fujifilm X100V – “The Rockwell”

Ken Rockwell likes to say that Fujifilm cameras aren’t good for landscape photography because the JPEG colors aren’t “wild” enough for him. Even on his review of the X100V, he says, “The as-shot JPG color palette and contrasts are quite sedate,” and, “the X100V won’t amp-up colors if they aren’t strong to begin with.” He adds, “The Velvia film simulation modes don’t look any better; certainly not like real Velvia.” He’s entitled to his opinion, but I think he just hasn’t used the “right” recipe, and he might change his mind if he did. This recipe is one that Ken Rockwell might approve of, as it’s inspired by him, and that’s why I call it The Rockwell.

Ken mentions that the Velvia film simulation isn’t like real Velvia, and he means Velvia 50. There are, in fact, a few different films that share the Velvia name. Straight out of the box, the film simulation differs a little from the film. My X-T30 Velvia recipe is intended to get the film simulation closer to actual Velvia 50 film. “The Rockwell” recipe is also in the ballpark of Velvia 50 film, although it might actually exceed it. I’ve heard it said that Fujifilm’s short lived Fortia film (which Color Chrome Effect and Color Chrome Effect Blue are inspired by), which is like Velvia 50 on steroids, was a mistake. Supposedly it (or at least the original Fortia 50) was a botched Velvia run, but instead of trashing it Fujifilm sold it as a new film. This recipe isn’t as crazy as Fortia, but it’s every bit as crazy as Velvia 50 and perhaps slightly more. Another film that is in the general vicinity of this aesthetic is Kodak’s Ektachrome 100VS, which was essentially Kodak’s closest film to Velvia, but this recipe is a little off from that film. No, “The Rockwell” isn’t an exact match to any film, it’s just a recipe that Ken might use on his X100V if he ever read this article.

50082886058_c562516386_c

Gibbon Falls – Yellowstone NP, WY – Fujifilm X100V – “The Rockwell”

This film simulation recipe is definitely not for everyone. Just like the person it was named after, it’s bold yet sometimes over-the-top. Many of you will find it to be much too much for your photography. But some of you are going to love it. In the right situations, this recipe is stunning! It uses Clarity, which slows down the camera considerably, but this is a recipe that you might want to work slow with anyway, so it should be alright. This recipe is only compatible (as if this writing) with the X100V, X-Pro3 and X-T4.

Velvia
Dynamic Range: DR200
Highlight: -1
Shadow: -1
Color: +4
Noise Reduction: -4
Sharpening: +4
Clarity: +5
Grain Effect: Weak, Small
Color Chrome Effect: Strong
Color Chrome Effect Blue: Strong
White Balance: Auto, +1 Red & -1 Blue
ISO: Auto, up to ISO 6400
Exposure Compensation: +1/3 to +2/3 (typically)

Example photographs, all camera-made JPEGs using this “The Rockwell” film simulation recipe on my Fujifilm X100V:

50100978976_a10f7dbf5e_c

Lake McDonald Shore Trees – Glacier National Park, MT – Fujifilm X100V

50100978726_3fe67320c1_c

Driftwood Shore – Glacier National Park, MT – Fujifilm X100V

50099824247_82874263cc_c

McDonald Lake & Rocks – Glacier National Park, MT – Fujifilm X100V

50101201692_ffd2da3ff2_c

Lake McDonald – Glacier National Park, MT – Fujifilm X100V

50089411922_d13b850e5e_c

Flathead Lake – Flathead Lake, MT – Fujifilm X100V

50100419248_2d3b7ab287_c

Clear Blue Water – Glacier National Park, MT – Fujifilm X100V

50114377287_84d476c730_c

Tree & Snake River – Idaho Falls, ID – Fujifilm X100V

50099630081_b8aec00079_c

McDonald Creek Behind Pines – Glacier National Park, MT – Fujifilm X100V

50099616551_26b2a94a59_c

Trees Obscuring the River – Glacier National Park, MT – Fujifilm X100V

50100040093_7da0515b09_c

McDonald Creek – Glacier National Park, MT – Fujifilm X100V

50101042151_e3dc4c9033_c

Green Trees – Glacier National Park, MT – Fujifilm X100V

50101267077_91660a2384_c

Forest Flowers – Glacier National Park, MT – Fujifilm X100V

50102505437_879b89f927_c

Lake Daisies – Flathead Lake, MT – Fujifilm X100V

50102296641_1c7f5f9894_c

Blossomed Bush by the Lake – Flathead Lake, MT – Fujifilm X100V

50079556031_e689c02ab3_c

Upper Red Rock Lake – Red Rock Lakes NWR, MT – Fujifilm X100V

50089418402_2761445789_c

Red Lake Light – Flathead Lake, MT – Fujifilm X100V

50087244911_8e132d4522_c

Morning Rays – Canyon Ferry Lake, MT – Fujifilm X100V

50083718021_81c762b38e_c

Sunset Through The Trees – Island Park, ID – Fujifilm X100V

50083876901_3815cfc80b_c

Aspen Sunstar – Island Park, ID – Fujifilm X100V

50077389433_64b524d488_c

Johnny Sack Cabin – Island Park, ID – Fujifilm X100V

50082165337_026890d43a_c

Hanging Flower Pot – Big Sky, MT – Fujifilm X100V

50081324107_880c78011d_c

Mountain Wildflowers 1 – Red Rock Lakes NWR, MT – Fujifilm X100V

50081076386_71743fb2f1_c

Mountain Wildflowers 2 – Red Rock Lakes NWR, MT – Fujifilm X100V

50083997022_20b6bfa5e6_c

Rural Blossoms – Island Park, ID – Fujifilm X100V

50083235383_9cc8d25759_c

Mountain Springtime – Island Park, ID – Fujifilm X100V

50083873821_9e86369129_c

Blossom by the River – Island Park, ID – Fujifilm X100V

50084120272_2b300ac6d6_c

River Grass – Island Park, ID – Fujifilm X100V

50101963526_10c6d2a5f5_c

Grassy Hills – Wild Horse Island State Park, MT – Fujifilm X100V

50101249248_9ea7d6e990_c

Pine in the Field – Wild Horse Island State Park, MT – Fujifilm X100V

50102089936_56da4ece5a_c

Abandoned Rural Building – Wild Horse Island State Park, MT – Fujifilm X100V

50100998301_ec15b7a091_c

Pop of Color Cabin – Polebridge, MT – Fujifilm X100V

50084055337_ba426770e4_c

Birdhouse Fence – Island Park, ID – Fujifilm X100V

50084285272_eaf2c64263_c

Playground at the Edge of Nowhere – Island Park, ID – Fujifilm X100V

50082230662_ee04889e7f_c

Hot Water – Yellowstone National Park, WY – Fujifilm X100V

50082168767_a530e17ec5_c

Blue Eye – Yellowstone National Park, WY – Fujifilm X100V

50084070677_d583270784_c

Red Rock Turtle – Island Park, ID – Fujifilm X100V

50082151232_7c5ed965b5_c

Colorful Pallets – Bozeman, MT – Fujifilm X100V

50114082996_0176b2ba5c_c

Westfield – Idaho Falls, ID – Fujifilm X100V

50083970912_c554a9d0c7_c

Pink – Island Park, ID – Fujifilm X100V

50087961053_6b29b97e06_c

Stop for the Pink Bus – Silos, MT – Fujifilm X100V

50086038152_53346e2651_c

18 – Silos, MT – Fujifilm X100V

50081922046_f6253a14c8_c

Stop Here – Yellowstone National Park, WY – Fujifilm X100V

50083466758_52624fe91c_c

Blue Trailer – Rexburg, ID – Fujifilm X100V

50083459853_cd2e2a8104_c

Grease Work – Rexburg, ID – Fujifilm X100V

See also: Film Simulation Recipes

This post contains affiliate links, and if you make a purchase using my links I’ll be compensated a small amount for it.

Fujifilm X100V Black    Amazon   B&H
Fujifilm X100V Silver   Amazon   B&H

Help Fuji X Weekly

Nobody pays me to write the content found on fujixweekly.com. There's a real cost to operating and maintaining this site, not to mention all the time that I pour into it. If you appreciated this article, please consider making a one-time gift contribution. Thank you!

$2.00

Sepia: The Forgotten Film Simulation

49348128471_1229914e13_c

No Credit Tires – Bountiful, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 & Fujinon 35mm f/2 – Sepia

Sepia is Fujifilm’s forgotten film simulation. Despite being included on every X camera since the original X100, very few people use it. Some photographers mock the Sepia film simulation, calling it gimmicky or amateurish. It’s even been the butt of jokes. There seems to be no love for it. I believe that the Sepia film simulation is misunderstood and underappreciated, and it deserves more respect.

You might be surprised to learn that actual sepia is a byproduct of cuttlefish, and it’s been a part of photography for over 150 years. Sepia is used for its archival properties. When black-and-white photographic prints are given a sepia bath, it stabilizes the silver, which slows the aging process. It also stains the paper, producing a brownish-red tone. The longer the paper sits in a sepia bath, the stronger the sepia tone will be. Some photographers would leave their prints in the bath for a long time, producing a pronounced tint. Many years ago when I printed my own black-and-white pictures in a darkroom, I would only give my pictures a quick dip in sepia, which would produce a very subtle warm tone. Sepia has both form and function in the photographic process.

The majority of black-and-white photographers used sepia, although many preferred a short bath for subtle effect; however, some wanted the full sepia aesthetic with it’s pronounced warm tones. There have been different eras in photography when a strong sepia stain was in vogue. You can change the emotion of a black-and-white photograph by toning it, so it’s no surprise that a warm tone would be popular. Even when it wasn’t popular, there were still some photographers who would purposefully use sepia for artistic effect.

49373653041_402f37d556_c

Snow on Rudy Drain – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-T1 & Fujinon 35mm f/2 – Sepia

Even though film photography is much less prevalent now, sepia is still being used today in analog black-and-white printing. It’s unnecessary in digital photography, but Fujifilm has provided an easy solution for simulating the effect: the Sepia film simulation. Specifically, it mimics the look of a black-and-white print that’s spent some time in a sepia bath. Some might call it “old timey” in appearance; yes, sepia has been used in photography for a very long time, yet it is still being used today. Maybe it’s not so gimmicky and amateurish after all.

You know that I love to create film simulation recipes that produce straight-out-of-camera results which mimic analog aesthetics. I have created many different color and black-and-white recipes for Fujifilm cameras, and in the process used all of the different film simulation options that Fujifilm provides on their cameras, except for one: Sepia. This is the first time that I’ve used the Sepia film simulation as the basis for a recipe. I love the feeling that these settings produce in an image; there’s a certain emotional response to Sepia that’s not found in the Acros or Monochrome film simulations. I invite you to try these settings for yourself, and perhaps you’ll discover a newfound respect for the lowly Sepia film simulation.

Sepia film simulation recipe for the X100V, X-Pro3 and X-T4:

Sepia
Dynamic Range DR400
Highlight & Shadow: +3
Grain: Strong, Large
Color Chrome Effect & Color Chrome Effect Blue: Off
Clarity: +2
Sharpening: -2
Noise Reduction: -4

Example photographs:

50062775463_9162fe25e1_c

Sepia Sun – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

50062775398_f532f1aa95_c

Broken Barrier – Kaysville, UT – Fujifilm X100V

50063612832_ddff4d1716_c

Espresso Yourself – Layton, UT – Fujifilm X100V

Sepia film simulation recipe for X-Trans III plus X-T3 and X-T30 cameras:

Sepia
Dynamic Range: DR400
Highlight & Shadow: +3
Grain: Strong
Color Chrome: Off or N/A
Sharpening: -2
Noise Reduction: -4

Example photographs:

49335744781_4908470c2b_c

Lens in the Window Light – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 & Fujinon 90mm f/2

49348335262_d204536a66_c

Chair Light & Shadow Abstract – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 & Fujinon 35mm f/2

49335965617_380f5f0980_c

Night Pump – Centerville, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 & Asahi Super-Takumar 28mm f/3.5

Sepia film simulation recipe for X-Trans I & II plus Bayer cameras:

Sepia
Dynamic Range DR200
Highlight & Shadow: +2
Sharpening: -1
Noise Reduction: -2

Example photographs:

49362719186_b4ee9752f1_c

Cup of Beans – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T1 & Fujinon 35mm f/2

49360206607_657471ee22_c

Selfie – Uintah, UT – Fujifilm X-T1 & Fujinon 35mm f/2

49367856663_2291aa3ea1_c

Suburban Pond in Winter – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T1 & Fujinon 35mm f/2

See also:
Film Simulation Recipes
Review: Fujifilm X-T30
Review: Fujinon 35mm f/2
Review: Fujinon 90mm f/2
Asahi Super-Takumar 28mm f/3.5

Help Fuji X Weekly

Nobody pays me to write the content found on fujixweekly.com. There's a real cost to operating and maintaining this site, not to mention all the time that I pour into it. If you appreciated this article, please consider making a one-time gift contribution. Thank you!

$2.00

Fujifilm X100V New Feature: Color Chrome Effect Blue

49896039986_4e25d72713_c

The Fujifilm X100V, X-Pro3 and X-T4 have a new feature called Color Chrome Effect Blue. This is very similar to a different feature, which has a nearly identical name, that’s also found on X-Trans IV cameras, such as my X-T30, called Color Chrome Effect. What does Color Chrome Effect Blue do to photographs? How is it different than Color Chrome Effect? Those are questions that I hope to answer in this article.

The original Color Chrome Effect takes vibrant colors (mostly reds, but also yellows and greens to a lessor extent) and deepens their tones to retain color gradation. Fujifilm says that a short-lived color slide film called Fortia inspired this setting. Color Chrome Effect Blue is essentially the same, but for blue. It makes blues in the picture a deeper shade. It’s a lot like using a polarizing filter. You have three options: Off, Weak and Strong.

Let’s take a look at the pictures below:

50059924357_4fa2b60cf8_c

Color Chrome Effect Blue Off

50059690836_db322c060e_c

Color Chrome Effect Blue Weak

50059711361_bf24f836aa_c

Color Chrome Effect Blue Strong

50059135473_acea7c53c6_c

Color Chrome Effect Blue Strong & Color Chrome Effect Weak

50059711361_bf24f836aa_c-1

Color Chrome Effect Blue Strong & Color Chrome Effect Strong

Color Chrome Effect Blue noticeably darkens the blue sky. There’s a difference between Off and Weak and Strong that’s not too hard to spot. I added Color Chrome Effect to the bottom two images, and it doesn’t affect the sky—it barely affects the warm building; it’s so subtle that it’s hard to tell the difference even upon close inspection. I believe that Color Chrome Effect Blue makes more of a difference in an image than Color Chrome Effect, but they manipulate different colors, so they have different purposes. Disappointingly, Color Chrome Effect Blue doesn’t seem to change black-and-white images much at all.

For color images where you want blues to be rendered deeper, such as blue sky, Color Chrome Effect Blue is great! It’s like using a polarizing filter. If you want reds to be rendered deeper, use the original Color Chrome Effect. I hope this helps explain what the new Color Chrome Effect Blue feature is, how it’s different than Color Chrome Effect, and when to use it.

See also:
Clarity
B&W Toning
HDR

Fujifilm X-T20 (X-Trans III) Film Simulation Recipe: Cine Teal

50012501463_e209c64aea_c

Garden Flowers Bloomed – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T20 – “Cine Teal”

My Fujifilm X100V “Cine Teal” film simulation recipe has been a lot more popular than I expected it to be. It requires the Eterna film simulation, plus some other settings only found on the newest Fujifilm models. I’ve been asked by a few people to create a “Cine Teal” recipe for X-Trans III cameras, which don’t have that film simulation and those new options, so I did! This recipe woks best during the “Blue Hour” of dusk and dawn, in shade and on overcast days.

PRO Neg. Std
Dynamic Range: DR400
Highlight: -1
Shadow: +3
Color: -3
Noise Reduction: -3
Sharpening: -1
Grain Effect: Weak
White Balance: 4500K, +2 Red & -8 Blue
ISO: Auto up to ISO 6400
Exposure Compensation: +2/3 to +1 (typically)

Example photos, all straight-out-of-camera JPEGs captured on a Fujifilm X-T20 using this “Cine Teal” Film Simulation recipe:

50013213342_4367ff98c1_c

Upside-Down Umbrella – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T20

50013291687_47ac97062c_c

Green Tree & House – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T20

50012502848_1d35a0588b_c

Been Better – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T20

50012969046_5aeb588317_c

Spring Leaves – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T20

50013224692_5f3655e2fa_c

Tree Leaves Green – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T20

50012436638_b118cfffbf_c

Lavender Bloom – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T20

50013230187_f3ab13c7b0_c

Pine & Rock – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T20

These settings also work on the Fujifilm X-T30 and X-T3, just set Color Chrome Effect to Off. I captured the photographs below on my X-T30 using this “Cine Teal” film simulation recipe:

50012423668_b4c5f3f4b3_c

Hazy Light Through The Tree – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

50031831001_6c43d3ed0e_c

Mountain Pines – Francis Peak, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

50031855561_68ee3723be_c

Mountain Ridge – Francis Peak, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

50031315368_78801c17e7_c

Mountain Radar – Francis Peak, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

50031888496_dc8085e405_c

Dusting Snow & Clouds – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

50031337113_68ec77e997_c

Clouds Around The Mountains – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

50013215487_fe8e23222e_c

Spirit of Photography – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

50012571558_a03746e82a_c

Stairs & Reflection – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

50012570718_d904b7b9f3_c

Morning Light & Shadows – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

50013040466_6b3ace6ddf_c

Film – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

See also: Film Simulation Recipes

Help Fuji X Weekly

Nobody pays me to write the content found on fujixweekly.com. There's a real cost to operating and maintaining this site, not to mention all the time that I pour into it. If you appreciated this article, please consider making a one-time gift contribution. Thank you!

$2.00