Crossing the California Desert with Fujifilm X100V + Kodak Tri-X 400

Welcome to California… Maybe – Blythe, CA – Fujifilm X100V – “Kodak Tri-X 400”

For those keeping up with my move (from Utah to Arizona) and adventure: I’m on the road again. The long story is that we found a home in Arizona, but the moving company can’t deliver our stuff for a couple of weeks. The short story is that we’re off on a new adventure! Among some other stops, we’re enroute to the central California Coast—one of the most beautiful places in the world, in my opinion—while we wait for our furniture and such.

A lot of times I’m the driver on road trips, but as we crossed the Mojave Desert along Interstate 10 in California, I was in the passenger seat. Of course, as a photographer I took full advantage of it, and documented the trek in black-and-white; specifically, I photographed with my Fujifilm X100V using the Kodak Tri-X 400 Film Simulation Recipe. I’ve been using this camera as a monochrome-only model lately.

Shooting out a dirty window at 75 miles-per-hour isn’t ideal; however, in whatever situations that I find myself, I try to do the best I can with what I have. That’s all anyone can do. I’m not always successful, but I thought this series was decent enough to share. I hope that you enjoy!

Storm in the Mirror – Somewhere Along I-10, CA – Fujifilm X100V – “Kodak Tri-X 400”
Driving Backwards – Somewhere Along I-10, CA – Fujifilm X100V – “Kodak Tri-X 400”
Objects Are Closer – Somewhere Along I-10, CA – Fujifilm X100V – “Kodak Tri-X 400”
Freight Flight – Somewhere Along I-10, CA – Fujifilm X100V – “Kodak Tri-X 400”
Dash Cam – Somewhere Along I-10, CA – Fujifilm X100V – “Kodak Tri-X 400”
Desert Center 16 – Somewhere Along I-10, CA – Fujifilm X100V – “Kodak Tri-X 400”
Cars – Somewhere Along I-10, CA – Fujifilm X100V – “Kodak Tri-X 400”
Parked Truck – Somewhere Along I-10, CA – Fujifilm X100V – “Kodak Tri-X 400”
Fasten Seatbelt & Dead Palms – Somewhere Along I-10, CA – Fujifilm X100V – “Kodak Tri-X 400”
Life is a Highway – Somewhere Along I-10, CA – Fujifilm X100V – “Kodak Tri-X 400”
Exit 146 – Coachella, CA – Fujifilm X100V – “Kodak Tri-X 400”
Expensive Gas – Coachella, CA – Fujifilm X100V – “Kodak Tri-X 400”

Photographing Panguitch — Fujifilm X100V + Kodak Tri-X 400

Empty Lumber Yard – Panguitch, UT – Fujifilm X100V

The first stop on the epic road trip that I’m currently on was Panguitch, a small town in southern Utah. Panguitch is close to Bryce Canyon National Park, not too far from Zion National Park, and within reach of Capital Reef National Park. Tourism is the main reason Panguitch is even on the map. People eat, sleep, and get gas here, while visiting the various natural wonders of the region. That’s why we were there.

I only stayed one night in Panguitch, but I was able to get out with my camera and photograph the quaint town. It’s obvious that Panguitch has seen better days—it seems to be just hanging on. The town has a lot of character, though. It was a great location for photography—if I had a few weeks, it would make for an incredible photo project—but alas I only had one night, as we left early the next morning.

For the pictures in this article I used my Fujifilm X100V loaded with the Kodak TRi-X 400 Film Simulation Recipe. I also had a 5% CineBloom filter attached to the camera. The X100V is such the perfect travel tool (and my “desert island” camera), and I always make sure that I have it with me. I love black-and-white photography, and the Kodak Tri-X 400 recipe is my favorite. The camera and recipe combo were ideal for Panguitch, and I’m quite happy with this set of pictures; however, I realize that I need to go back. This town (and so many others) are yearning for the camera’s attention. There is so much photographic potential, and I barely scratched the surface.

Thanks For Shopping Local – Panguitch, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Auto Entrance – Panguitch, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Chairs Along A Fence – Panguitch, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Fake News – Panguitch, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Folding Chairs – Panguitch, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Window Canopy – Panguitch, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Souvenir & Gift – Panguitch, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Delicious Dinner – Panguitch, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Raya – Panguitch, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Condiments – Panguitch, UT – Fujifilm X100V
The Duke – Panguitch, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Henrie’s – Panguitch, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Old Sign – Panguitch, UT – Fujifilm X100V
House Roof – Panguitch, UT – Fujifilm X100V
One Way Garage – Panguitch, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Motel – Panguitch, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Creative Collective 023: Easy Double Exposure Photography

In Camera Double Exposure – Fujifilm X100V – “Kodak Tri-X 400

Sometimes I get into a double exposure mood. It might seem difficult to create good double exposure pictures—thankfully, Fujifilm cameras make double exposure photography easy! In this article I’ll explain just how simple it is to do it, and also explain why it’s difficult to do it well.

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Creative Collective 021: Introducing the Fujifilm X100V Acros Edition

The Fujifilm X100V Acros Edition

I’ve said for awhile now that Fujifilm should make a black-and-white only camera. There’s actually an advantage to a monochrome sensor. With a typical Bayer color array, only 50% of the light-sensitive sensor elements are recording luminosity information, while the other 50% are recording color information. With an X-Trans sensor, 55% of the light-sensitive sensor elements are recording luminosity information while 45% are recording color information. With a monochrome sensor, 100% of the light-sensitive sensor elements are recording luminosity information. Because of this, you get a higher perceived resolution, as pictures will appear more richly detailed, and there’s more shadow latitude, which also improves high-ISO capabilities. You can also use color filters like with black-and-white film.

Fujifilm has said that they have no plans currently to make a monochrome camera. You can actually convert any Fujifilm camera to be black-and-white only, but it is expensive and extreme. I’ve wanted a monochrome-only Fujifilm camera for awhile, but I’m not willing to convert one, and I’m impatient waiting for an official model to come out. So what did I do? I made my own.

Introducing the Fujifilm X100V Acros Edition!

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Fujifilm X-Trans IV Film Simulation Recipe: Moody Monochrome

Apocalyptic Pavillion – Layton, UT – Fujifilm X100V – “Moody Monochrome”

Of the different faux filter options for Acros, +Y is the one I use the least. I think it goes back to my film days when I used color filters with B&W film. I would select Orange or Red before Yellow, because Yellow is fairly subtle, but the advantage of the Yellow filter is that it doesn’t block as much light. Of course, the faux filters on Fujifilm cameras don’t affect the exposure like real filters with film. Anyway, recognizing that I infrequently use Acros+Y, I set out to make a Film Simulation Recipe that uses +Y and produces an aesthetic that I like. I think it is important to challenge myself sometimes, so if there’s some setting or gear or option that I don’t use often, forcing myself to use it helps me to grow as a photographer. That’s why I made this recipe.

I wanted something with an overall darker curve, so that it would produce a moody look. Maybe deep blacks reminiscent of Tri-X, and maybe a push-process feel. I didn’t have any specific film in mind, but I’m reminded of this time that I push-processed a roll of Ilford Delta 400, but inadvertently got it wrong—I underexposed two stops, and only had the lab push it by one stop, so the pictures were largely underexposed, and they were darker and moodier (yet less contrasty and grainy) than I had intended. This isn’t exactly the same as that, but not too dissimilar, either, so that’s why I call this recipe Moody Monochrome.

Early Blossoms – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V – “Moody Monochrome”

Because this film simulation recipe uses Clarity, it is compatible with the Fujifilm X-Pro3, X100V, X-T4, X-S10, X-E4, and X-T30 II cameras. If you have an X-T3 or X-T30 or X-Trans III camera, ignore Clarity and Grain size, and use a diffusion filter, like a 10% CineBloom or 1/4 Black Pro Mist, to get similar results.

Acros+Y
Dynamic Range: DR400
Highlight: -1
Shadow: +4
Noise Reduction: -4
Sharpness: -2
Clarity: -3
Grain Effect: Strong, Large 
Color Chrome Effect: Off
Color Chrome Effect Blue: Off
White Balance: Fluorescent 3, -4 Red & -9 Blue
ISO: 3200
Exposure Compensation: +1/3 to +1 (typically)

Example photographs, all camera-made JPEGs using this “Moody Monochrome” Film Simulation Recipe on my Fujifilm X100V:

Stop West – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Watch For Falling Bikes – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Sun Beams – Layton, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Tower in the Middle of Nowhere – Layton, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Path Through The Grass – Layton, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Wetland Boardwalk – Layton, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Wetland Grass – Layton, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Creek in the Trees – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Creek, Stick & Vines – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Log Above The Water – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Grey Brush – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Cat on a Log – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Do Fujifilm Photographs Look Like Film?

The Big Ocean – Fort Stevens SP, OR – Fujifilm X-E4 – “Fujicolor Super HG

Do straight-out-of-camera JPEGs from Fujifilm X cameras actually resemble film?

I used to shoot film. I learned photography at the height of film, in the late-1990’s. I disliked digital when it began to get popular. Yes, I was a film snob for at least a decade, almost two. I don’t want to rehash my journey (you can read about it here), but I simply want to convey that for a long time I was a film-only guy, and I have a lot of experience with it. Now I rarely shoot film (only occasionally); instead, I use Fujifilm X cameras. I make Film Simulation Recipes that often mimic various film stocks and analog processes. I know a thing or two about film, Fujifilm, and making Fujifilm resemble film.

But does it? Can SOOC JPEGs really resemble film?

Horsetail Falls from Bridge – Columbia River Gorge, OR – Fujifilm X100V – “Improved Velvia

Why I’m writing this post is because I stumbled upon two articles on The Phoblogger: Fujifilm vs Film Photography and We Challenge You to Identify the Fujifilm Negative Film vs Simulation. Neither of these articles are particularly profound, and Film Simulation Recipes are not mentioned, and I’m pretty sure not used. I don’t know if any of my tips for achieving a film-look in-camera were implemented, but probably not. However, as I read these two articles I began to contemplate: what makes a film photograph special, why do we even want our digital pictures to look like film, and can they?

The answer to the first question—what makes film photographs special?—is soul. Digital and film, while very similar, have unique attributes—there are advantages and disadvantages for each. Digital is often very mathematical and clinical, which certainly serves a purpose. Film is more random and serendipitous, which is the character that gives it soul. With digital, the possibilities for an exposure are endless, but with film it is much more limited—yes, there’s a lot that can be done in the darkroom, but you’re still limited by the film itself and how it was shot. You get what you get—especially if it’s slide film—but that’s the fun of it.

You might want your digital pictures to look like film for that analog soul. How can you get the best of both worlds and achieve a film-soul in a digital picture? How can you leave some of that clinical-ness behind and replace it with randomness and serendipity? My first advice is to use Fujifilm cameras, as Fujifilm has sought to use their vast film experience to infuse a little of that soul into their digital cameras. Next, I suggest shooting JPEG using Film Simulation Recipes, which make it a you-get-what-you-get process more similar to film. Then try some of my tips for achieving a film-look in-camera, such as diffusion filters, vintage glass, high-ISO, etc., etc.. This isn’t the only method, but simply what I use and recommend.

Desert Snow – Canyonlands NP, UT – Fujifilm X-Pro3 – “Old Ektachrome

Can you capture digital pictures that resemble film? Could they actually trick someone into thinking you shoot film when you don’t? While I think the answer to both questions is “yes” (at least to some extent), I think they’re the wrong questions. Instead, the questions should be: what process works for me? And: do my pictures have soul?

If your process doesn’t really work for you, then change it. It took me years to figure out what process works for me: shooting SOOC JPEGs using Film Simulation Recipes on Fujifilm cameras. I don’t edit (aside from minor cropping, straightening, and very occasional small adjustments), which saves me tons of time. The three pictures in this article are recently captured camera-made JPEGs using different recipes on different cameras. That process is great for me, and it might be for you, too, but it’s not for everyone because people are different. You have to do what works for you and not worry about what others are doing.

While the serendipity of film gives it soul, and some of that soul can also be found in Fujifilm cameras (and even in other cameras and processes), the number one thing that gives a picture soul is the photographer. What you do with your photography gear to craft an image is what’s most important. When you infuse a bit of yourself into your images, that’s what makes it special—much more than anything else. So whether your pictures do or don’t resemble film doesn’t matter, just as long as your process works for you and you are photographing with vision. Capture the images that you want to create in the way that you want to create them. The rest just doesn’t matter.

Fujifilm X-Trans IV Film Simulation Recipe: Ilford HP5 Plus 400

Haystack Driftwood – Cannon Beach, OR – Fujifilm X100V – “Ilford HP5 Plus 400”

This new film simulation recipe comes from Anders Lindborg (Instagram). Anders is the one who created the Kodak Tri-X 400 recipeIlford Pan F Plus 50 recipe, Kodak Gold v2seven Fujicolor Pro 160NS recipesseven Fujicolor Pro 400H recipes, and made an important D-Range Priority discovery. So I know that you’ll love this one, too! He was kind enough to share it with me and allow me to share it with all of you—thank you, Anders!

Anders sent me a lengthy note on his process to create this recipe, and I want to share with you a short snippet just so you get an idea of the effort put into this. “I checked the spectrum sensitivity chart and looked for any significant bumps in the wavelengths,” he wrote. “For the largest bump, I checked what color it represents to try to match it as close as possible with the white balance shift. This recreated the bump in the recipe to make the simulation a bit extra sensitive to that specific color.” This was point four of seven in his process, and shows the kind of effort that can go into creating Film Simulation Recipes.

Specifically about this recipe, Anders noted, “Middle gray is the game here. Soft highlights and things disappearing into deep dark shadows, but never as black as Tri-X. Great for all day shooting in just about any weather. Looks totally awesome on winter shots!” I can add that it looks great on both sunny days and rainy days, too. I think it does especially well in moderate and high contrast situations.

Footbridge & Falls – Multnomah Falls, OR – Fujifilm X100V – “Ilford HP5 Plus 400”

Ilford began the Hypersensitive Panchromatic (HP) series in 1931. HP5 Plus 400 is the latest version, released in 1989, and still available today. This is a classic black-and-white film stock that has stood the test of time, and Anders did a great job mimicking it on Fujifilm cameras. This recipe is intended for use on the X-Pro3, X100V, X-T4, X-S10, X-E4, and X-T30 II cameras; however, for the X-T3 and X-T30, as well as X-Trans III cameras, simply ignore Grain size, and this recipe is compatible with those cameras, so anyone with an X-Trans III or IV camera can use this.

A side note: this recipe is different than my old Ilford HP5 Plus and Ilford HP5 Push Process recipes, which I still quite like, and are both excellent in low and mid contrast situations. Try those or Anders’ version—or all three if you are feeling adventurous!

Monochrome
Dynamic Range: DR400
Highlight: -1
Shadow: +1
Noise Reduction: -4
Sharpness: -2
Clarity: 0
Grain Effect: Strong, Large 
Color Chrome Effect: Off
Color Chrome Effect Blue: Off
White Balance: Daylight, +1 Red & -8 Blue
ISO: Auto, up to ISO 6400
Exposure Compensation: -2/3 to +2/3 (typically)

Example photographs, all camera-made JPEGs using this “Ilford HP5 Plus 400” Film Simulation Recipe on my Fujifilm X100V:

Horsetail Falls From Bridge – Columbia River Gorge, OR – Fujifilm X100V
Horsetail Falls – Columbia River Gorge, OR – Fujifilm X100V
Upper Falls – Multnomah Falls, OR – Fujifilm X100V
36 CFR 261.53(e) – Multnomah Falls, OR – Fujifilm X100V
Use Caution For Slipping Bandits – Multnomah Falls, OR – Fujifilm X100V
No Cars – Astoria, OR – Fujifilm X100V
Two Elk in a Yard – Warrenton, OR – Fujifilm X100V
Spiral Stairs – Fort Stevens SP, OR – Fujifilm X100V
Old Fireplace – Fort Stevens SP, OR – Fujifilm X100V
Stairs in the Forest – Fort Stevens SP, OR – Fujifilm X100V
Astoria & Columbia River – Astoria, OR – Fujifilm X100V
Two Ships in the Columbia River – Astoria, OR – Fujifilm X100V
Tetons, As Seen By Oneskies – Grand Teton NP, WY – Fujifilm X100V
South Jetty – Fort Stevens SP, OR – Fujifilm X100V
Pointing To The Pacific – Cannon Beach, OR – Fujifilm X100V
Haystack Sticks – Cannon Beach, OR – Fujifilm X100V

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Fujifilm X100V vs iPhone, Part 2: Multnomah Falls

iPhone 11 – RitchieCam app – Faded Film filter

Part 1: Grand Tetons

Multnomah Falls is an iconic scenic stop along the historic Columbia River Highway in Oregon. Found within the Columbia River Gorge, it is the tallest year-round waterfall in Oregon, and the most visited natural site in the Pacific Northwest of the United States. The famous footbridge was constructed in 1915, while the gift-shop at the bottom—originally a lodge—was built in 1925, and both are on the National Register of Historic Places. It is an incredible location to experience, with beauty that rivals what one might find within National Parks.

I recently visited Multnomah Falls, and used my Fujifilm X100V and iPhone 11 to photograph this amazing spot. Unsurprisingly, I had several of my Film Simulation Recipes programmed into my X100V, and I used my RitchieCam camera app on my iPhone. Because there is a lot of mist from the falls, and it was a rainy day (as is common there), having weather-sealed cameras was important—both the X100V (as long as a filter is on the front) and the iPhone can handle getting wet, and both did get wet. Really wet.

While it might seem unnecessary to carry both an X100V and an iPhone, that turned out not to be the case for two reasons: focal-length, and ease of sharing. The X100V has a very useful 34.5mm (equivalent) focal-length lens, while the iPhone 11 has a 26mm (equivalent) camera and 13mm (equivalent) camera (if I had the “Pro” version, it would also include a 52mm camera, but alas I don’t have that model). The X100V was wide-angle enough to capture some good photographs of the falls, but the wider-angle lenses on the iPhone 11 were often better options, and I used it more than the Fujifilm camera at this location. To the second point, I was able to text pictures of the falls to some family and friends immediately—before even getting back to the car—and share with you via social media pictures of the falls within minutes. The X100V pictures were pretty quick and easy to share, too—thanks to the wonderful JPEG output of the camera—but not quite as immediate as the iPhone images.

iPhone 11 – RitchieCam app – MetroColor filter

What’s better, X100V or iPhone? For pure image quality, the Fujifilm camera is hands down better, but that only really matters if you are viewing the pictures large. Looking at them on this website or on social media, the quality difference is hard to spot, and even if you can see it, the quality difference is pretty insignificant. If you were viewing 11″ x 14″ prints of the pictures, the quality difference would still be fairly small, although if you compared them side-by-side you could tell without much trouble that the X100V is superior. But if you are viewing 16″ x 20″ prints or larger, the iPhone images just don’t hold up nearly as well as the Fujifilm. So the X100V is definitely the better tool if you might print the pictures large, but the iPhone is a capable tool if you don’t think you’ll be printing large—let’s face it, most pictures don’t get printed large, or even printed at all.

There’s no reason why both the X100V and the iPhone (or other cellphone camera) can’t both live together in peace and harmony. They’re different photographic tools that have different advantages and disadvantages, and they can both serve purposes within your photography. Film Simulation Recipes make the Fujifilm workflow more streamlined and the process more enjoyable. RitchieCam does the same thing for your iPhone photography. One tool might be better in a certain circumstance, and the other might be better in another circumstance, and perhaps both might be useful in a circumstance like Multnomah Falls.

Do you like the Fujifilm X100V pictures better, the iPhone pictures better, some of each, or none at all? Which Film Simulation Recipe that I used do you prefer? Which RitchieCam filter did the best? Let me know what you think in the comments!

Fujifilm X100V – New Recipe Coming Soon
Fujifilm X100V – New Recipe Coming Soon
Fujifilm X100V – Kodachrome 1 recipe
iPhone 11 – RitchieCam app – Vintage Kodak filter
Fujifilm X100V – Vintage Vibes recipe
iPhone 11 – RitchieCam app – B&W Fade filter
Fujifilm X100V – Kodak High Definition Plus 200 recipe
iPhone 11 – RitchieCam app – Faded Film filter
Fujifilm X100V – Vintage Vibes recipe
iPhone 11 – RitchieCam app – B&W Fade filter
iPhone 11 – RitchieCam app – B&W Fade filter

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Fujifilm X100V vs iPhone, Part 1: Grand Tetons

Sun Behind The Tetons – Grand Teton NP, WY – Fujifilm X100V – “Elite Chrome 200
Sun Behind Tetons & River – Grand Teton NP, WY – iPhone 11 – RitchieCam – “Color Negative Low”

I recently visited the Grand Teton National Park in Wyoming. This iconic mountain range sits just north of the tourist town of Jackson Hole. If you’ve never been, this is a “bucket list” kind of place that you should absolutely try to see in person if you can. My visit was a quick weekend getaway, and not surprisingly the weather didn’t really cooperate. Still, I wanted to get in some photography, and so I did.

Reviewing the pictures, I noticed that I captured some similar images with my Fujifilm X100V using various Film Simulation Recipes and my iPhone 11 with the RitchieCam app using various filters. For those who don’t know, I created an iPhone camera app called RitchieCam, which you can learn more about by clicking here. I thought comparing the X100V and iPhone pictures would make an interesting article.

What I don’t want to do is view massive crops side-by-side. The Fujifilm X100V and the iPhone are much different tools, so this will be a very general overview without pixel-peeping.

Technically speaking, the X100V is far superior, and it isn’t even close. For technical image quality, the X100V is the camera to grab, but the iPhone, with its tiny little sensor, is surprisingly good, all things considered. The advantage of the iPhone is that you have it with you all of the time, and you can quickly and easily share the pictures captured with it across the world (especially if you used the RitchieCam app). Convenience and speed are the reasons to choose the iPhone over the X100V, but the X100V is pretty compact and quick, too. For printing or viewing large, the X100V is the right tool. For quick sharing, the iPhone is the right tool. Here’s the great news: you don’t have to choose—use both, or use the one that you happen to have with you.

This is the first in a series of articles where I’ll compare photographs captured with the Fujifilm X100V using Film Simulation Recipes and the iPhone using the RitchieCam app. Below are photographs captured with these cameras at the Grand Tetons in Wyoming. Let me know in the comments which pictures you like best!

Fujifilm X100V

Snake River Overlook Morning – Grand Teton NP, WY – Fujifilm X100V – “The Rockwell
OneSkee – Grand Teton NP, WY – Fujifilm X100V – “Retro Gold Low Contrast
Mountains & Frozen Land – Grand Teton NP, WY – Fujifilm X100V – “Elite Chrome 200”
Pinky Rose – Jackson Hole, WY – Fujifilm X100V – “Kodachrome 64
Cold Nights – Jackson Hole, WY – Fujifilm X100V – Upcoming Recipe
Night Statue – Jackson Hole, WY – Fujifilm X100V – Upcoming Recipe
Tetons in March – Grand Teton NP, WY – Fujifilm X100V – Upcoming Recipe
Snake River Overlook Monochrome – Grand Teton NP, WY – Fujifilm X100V – “Kodak Tri-X 400

iPhone + RitchieCam

Morning at Snake River Overlook – Grand Teton NP, WY – iPhone 11 – RitchieCam – “Analog Gold”
OneSkee Snow – Grand Teton NP, WY – iPhone 11 – RitchieCam – “Instant Color 1”
Sunset Behind the Tetons – Grand Teton NP, WY – iPhone 11 – RitchieCam – “Color Negative Low”
Railroad – Jackson Hole, WY – iPhone 11 – RitchieCam – “Analog Gold”
CocoLove – Jackson Hole, WY – iPhone 11 – RitchieCam – “Night Negative”
Cowboy Bar – Jackson Hole, WY – iPhone 11 – RitchieCam – “Night Negative”
Tetons in Winter – Grand Teton NP, WY – iPhone 11 – RitchieCam – “Color Negative”
Snake River & Tetons – Grand Tetons NP, WY – iPhone 11 – RitchieCam – “Dramatic B&W”

Part 2: Multnomah Falls

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My Fujifilm X100V Adapter & Filters

I’ve been asked a few times recently what adapter and filters I use on my Fujifilm X100V. I will state right off the bat that my choices aren’t necessarily the “best” ones, it’s just what I’ve done. There are likely better options, and perhaps different choices that would be better for you, so keep that in mind. With that said, let me get right into the adapter and filters that I use on my Fujifilm X100V.

The X100V doesn’t initially appear to be able to accept filters. There are no screw-in threads visible. But there’s a “secret” ring around the lens that unscrews to reveal threads, but these threads cannot accept filters. You need to buy an adapter to screw into those threads that has its own threads that filters can screw into. Make sense?

The top reason why you want to do this is because the X100V is almost weather-sealed. The one unsealed point is the lens, but Fujifilm says that if you put a filter in front of it, that should give you protection from the elements. To complete the weather-sealing process, you need to buy an adapter and filter.

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Fujifilm offers their own adapter, but it’s not cheap. I’m a cheapskate, so I went with the $10 Haoge adapter instead, and saved about $40. I think the only disadvantage is that the lens cap fits a little loosely over the adapter, but probably fits snugly on the Fujifilm option (just guessing). There are lots of other choices, including some that have a lens hood included. I don’t think which adapter you choose is all that important, but obviously it’s got to work for you.

I have tons of filters, some going back to the film days. Many of them are not 49mm (the correct filter size for the X100V), but some are, and I don’t use all of them. The number one most used filter is the Fotasy 49mm Ultra Slim UV, which is less than $10. For under $20, it’s possible to add that layer of weather protection to give you some peace of mind. I also own a Hoya UV filter (that predates my X100V), but it’s black and I prefer silver, so I don’t usually use it (yet I have used it), and a Nicna UV filter, which I have no idea where it came from. The UV filter doesn’t do much for you photographically, but it does give a layer of protection, and 90% of the time this is how my X100V is configured.

About 10% of the time I use a diffusion filter instead of (or in conjunction with) the UV filter. The one that I use the most is the 5% CineBloom, which gives a very subtle effect. A 10% CineBloom and 1/4 Black Pro Mist are occasionally used, while a 20% CineBloom is almost never used because it is so strong. If I could only have one, it would be the 5% CineBloom, but I do use the 10% CineBloom and 1/4 Black Pro Mist sometimes, and even use them together, so it’s nice having them around. I have considered buying a 1/8 Black Pro Mist because I think I’d use it frequently, but I haven’t pulled the trigger on that one yet.

What’s left? I own a Tiffen 49mm Circular Polarizer that I rarely use. I probably should use it more, because CPLs are great for reducing unwanted reflections. To some extent, it’s theoretically possible to mimic Color Chrome FX Blue with a CPL filter, I think, although I’ve never tried. I also have a Hoya Intensifier (a.k.a. Didymium filter or Starscape filter) that I’ve used a few times. I have some 49mm color filters for B&W film photography, but obviously those don’t work well on the X100V (I tried). I also have a Hoya 80A filter, which actually does work on the X100V, but I pretty much never use it.

I’m not sure which filters are right for you, but at the very least consider attaching an adapter and UV filter to give your Fujifilm X100V a little more weather protection. I like using diffusion filters sometimes, but not all of the time, and usually less is more when it comes to these. That’s what works for me, but you’ll have to figure out what works for you. Hopefully, this article is helpful to some of you. Let me know in the comments which filters you use on your X100-series camera, because I’d love to know.

Fujifilm X100V (X-Trans IV) Film Simulation Recipe: Vintage Color

Sentinel & Merced – Yosemite NP, CA – Fujifilm X100V – “Vintage Color”

This particular Film Simulation Recipe is one that I’m especially proud of. I was tasked to create some settings that mimic the aesthetic of Lisa Sorgini’s Behind Glass project, and I believe I got pretty close. I have no idea if Lisa shoots digital or film, and, if film, what film and process, but my suspicion is that it’s digital post-processed to have a vintage analog look. This recipe captures that aesthetic quite well. I call it Vintage Color.

What I like most about this “Vintage Color” recipe, and it was a great surprise when I discovered it, is that it’s pretty close to the aesthetic of famed Hudson River School painter Albert Bierstadt, particularly his Yosemite paintings. It may not mimic any specific film, but, no doubt about it, this is an artist’s recipe! I know that many of you will absolutely love it, and it will quickly become a fan favorite. It’s a personal favorite of mine.

Fuji X Weekly App Patrons have been able to use this recipe since May, because this was a Patron Early-Access Recipe on the App. The best App experience is reserved for Patrons, and one of the benefits is early access to some new recipes. This recipe was replaced by a different Early-Access Recipe, so now it’s available to everyone. If you are an App Patron, be sure to look for the new Early-Access Recipe!

Lower Yosemite Falls Mist – Yosemite NP, CA – Fujifilm X100V – “Vintage Color”

This “Vintage Color” recipe is compatible with the Fujifilm X-Pro3, X100V, X-T4, X-S10, X-E4 and X-T30 II cameras. As a reminder, Clarity causes the camera to pause for a moment after each shot; alternatively, try using a mild diffusion filter, like 1/8 Black Pro Mist or 5% CineBloom, for a similar effect.

Eterna
Dynamic Range: DR200
Highlight: +2
Shadow: +3
Color: +1
Noise Reduction: -4
Sharpness: -2
Clarity: -2
Grain Effect: Strong, Large
Color Chrome Effect: Strong
Color Chrome Effect Blue: Strong
White Balance: 7350K, -1 Red & -4 Blue
ISO: Auto, up to ISO 6400
Exposure Compensation: +1/3 to +2/3 (typically)

Example photographs captured using this “Vintage Color” film simulation recipe on my Fujifilm X100V:

Urban Reflection – Reno, NV – Fujifilm X100V
Storm over Structure – Bountiful, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Windshield Rain – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Joy Behind Glass – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Caution – Layton, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Tracks & Trees – Capitola, CA – Fujifilm X100V
Warm Blossoms – Layton, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Golden Forest – Yosemite NP, CA – Fujifilm X100V
Forest Sun – Yosemite NP, CA – Fujifilm X100V
Half Dome Through The Trees – Yosemite NP, CA – Fujifilm X100V
The Captain – Yosemite NP, CA – Fujifilm X100V
Merced River – Yosemite NP, CA – Fujifilm X100V
El Cap & Merced – Yosemite NP, CA – Fujifilm X100V
Yosemite Creek – Yosemite NP, CA – Fujifilm X100V

Find this Film Simulation Recipe and over 200 more on the Fuji X Weekly — Film Recipes App!

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Fujifilm X-Trans IV Film Simulation Recipe: Kodak Gold v2

Grass and Frozen Pond – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V – “Kodak Gold v2”

This new film simulation recipe comes from Anders Lindborg (Instagram). Anders is the one who created the Kodak Tri-X 400 recipe, Ilford Pan F Plus 50 recipeseven Fujicolor Pro 160NS recipes, seven Fujicolor Pro 400H recipes, and made an important D-Range Priority discovery. So I know that you’ll love this one, too! He was kind enough to share it with me and allow me to share it with all of you—thank you, Anders!

Anders began by looking at some old prints he has, which were captured on Kodak Gold 200 film. He noticed that these prints looked a little different than my Kodak Gold 200 recipe, but one film can have many different looks depending on how it was shot, developed, printed and/or scanned, or even which generation of the emulsion you’re viewing. This recipe mimics the aesthetic of his prints, but he noticed that it also matches many examples of Gold 200 that he found online.

Kids in a Tree – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V – “Kodak Gold v2”

This recipe is compatible with the Fujifilm X-Pro3, X100V, X-T4, X-S10, X-E4, and X-T30 II cameras. To make this recipe work on the X-T3 and X-T30, Anders suggests using Grain Strong, White Balance 5900K (with the same shift), and ignoring Clarity—I suggest that you consider using a weak diffusion filter, such as 1/8 Black Pro Mist or 5% CineBloom, in leu of Clarity. In addition, for X-Trans III, ignore Color Chrome Effect. The results will be slightly different, but nearly the same. Anders suggests trying this recipe with a 3200K white balance for night photography.

Classic Chrome
Dynamic Range: DR200
Highlight: 0
Shadow: -1
Color: -1
Noise Reduction: -4
Sharpness: -1
Clarity: -2
Grain Effect: Strong, Large
Color Chrome Effect: Weak
Color Chrome Effect Blue: Off
White Balance: 5800K, +2 Red & +4 Blue
ISO: Auto, up to ISO 6400
Exposure Compensation: 0 to +2/3 (typically)

Example photographs, all camera-made JPEGs using this new Kodak Gold v2 film simulation recipe on my Fujifilm X100V:

Moon Behind Pine – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Moon Behind Cattails – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Safe Zone – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Makeshift Gate – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Wood Post – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Trail to Visitors Center – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Green Leaves in January – Farmington UT – Fujifilm X100V
Hanging Red Berries in Winter – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Berries and Barren Branches – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Brown Reeds – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Jo in a Tree – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Jo Under The Tennis Net – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Back Alley – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

Find this film simulation recipes and over 200 more on the Fuji X Weekly — Film Recipes App!

Creative Collective 014: Using a Fujifilm X100V as a Disposable Film Camera

Well, this is going to sound crazy, but I turned my Fujifilm X100V into a disposable film camera. No, I didn’t disassemble my digital camera, rip out the sensor, and adapt a film spool. Instead, I configured my X100V to capture pictures that appear as though they were captured with a cheap throwaway film camera. Why? I’ve done crazier things before, including distressing a camera, so it shouldn’t be too shocking that I’d do this—perhaps it was just a matter of time.

The inspiration for this project has been building for awhile. I have a picture displayed on my dresser that’s over 20 years old—it’s my wife and I, captured sometime shortly after we got married. A friend took the picture with a disposable camera. I can tell that it was a Fujifilm QuickSnap camera by the color palette, which is clearly Fujicolor. The picture is special to me because it’s a very personal (and happy) moment that’s been frozen in time through photography. It’s nothing more than a snapshot captured on a cheap camera, and would be completely meaningless to almost anyone else. I have a box full of these type of pictures, mostly 4″ x 6″ prints. You might have a box like this, too—snapshots that are meaningful to you.

Bread Truck – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

Fujifilm developed the QuickSnap camera, a “one-time-use” 35mm film camera, in the mid-1980’s (Kodak released its version, called FunSaver, a couple years later), and it was an instant hit. These “disposable” cameras were extremely popular in the 1990’s and 2000’s. They came preloaded with 27 frames (a 24-exposure roll of film, but you got three extra shots), and were point-and-shoot. You’d push the shutter-release and advance the film, but otherwise there typically weren’t any other controls, so anyone could use these cameras—no skill required. Once you exposed all of the frames, you’d take the camera to the 1-hour lab, where they removed the film for development and recycled the camera. 60 minutes later you’d have a packet of 4″ x 6″ prints.

Cheap digital point-and-shoots made a dent in disposable camera sales, but it was really the cellphone camera that rendered them obsolete; however, you might be surprised to learn that you can still buy disposable cameras today. Thanks to the Lomography movement and an increased interest in film photography, there’s enough of a market for these cameras to continue to exist in 2022. I briefly considered purchasing one, but instead of that, I decided to capture QuickSnap-like images on my Fujifilm X100V.

Now you know the why, so let’s get into the how.

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Fujifilm X100V Film Simulation Recipe: Ilford Pan F Plus 50

Santa’s Bed – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X100V – “Ilford Pan F Plus 50”

Anders Lindborg (Instagram) sent me a black-and-white film simulation recipe to try, which he modeled after Ilford Pan F Plus 50 film. Anders, you might recall, created the Kodak Tri-X 400 recipe, teamed with Thomas Schwab to create the Kodak T-Max 400 recipe, made seven Fujicolor Pro 160NS recipes, created seven Fujicolor Pro 400H recipes, and made an important D-Range Priority discovery. His contributions to the Fujifilm community are significant! The Kodak Tri-X 400 recipe is a favorite of mine that I use frequently, so I’m personally very grateful to Anders for his hard work on this recipe and all the others.

And hard work it was! Anders sent me a lengthy note on his process to create this recipe, and I want to share with you a short snippet just so you get an idea of the effort put into this. “I checked the spectrum sensitivity chart and looked for any significant bumps in the wavelengths,” he wrote. “For the largest bump, I checked what color it represents to try to match it as close as possible with the white balance shift. This recreated the bump in the recipe to make the simulation a bit extra sensitive to that specific color.” This was point four of seven in his process, and shows the kind of effort that can go into creating film simulation recipes.

Ilford Pan F 50 Plus is a low-ISO, contrasty, sharp, detailed, fine-grain, black-and-white negative film. It has the punchiness of a mid-ISO film, but is very clean, and can be printed large and still appear crisp and fine-detailed. Of course, how a film is exposed, developed, scanned and/or printed will affect the exact aesthetic. Ilford Pan F 50 Plus is one of the best black-and-white films you can buy today, and this recipe is a pretty darn good facsimile of it.

Sugar House Traffic District – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X100V – “Ilford Pan F Plus 50”

“This one needs some care,” Anders wrote of this recipe, “and really soft light is recommended for portraits, but the reward is wonderful! If you’re looking for drama, this is it. Great in studio where lighting can be controlled, but can sometimes also work nicely for certain kinds of street photography. High contrast with a really classic black and white look, emphasis on the black.”

I modified Anders recipe a little. His version calls for Shadows to be +2 and Clarity set to 0, but he says that +2 Shadow can sometimes be too strong, and that +1 is not always strong enough, but +1.5 (for those cameras that are capable) is probably just right. I wanted to use this recipe on my Fujifilm X100V, which isn’t capable of .5 Shadow adjustments, so I set Shadow to +1 and Clarity to +2 (to increase the contrast, similar to what +1.5 Shadow might be)… alternatively, Shadow +2 and Clarity -2 is an option, too, but I didn’t like it quite as much. Because of Clarity, I decreased Sharpening to 0 from +1 (what the original recipe calls for). Instead of -3, I set Noise Reduction to -4, which is my preference. If you want to use Anders full recipe, set Shadow to +2 (or +1.5 if your camera is capable), Clarity to 0, Sharpness to +1, and Noise Reduction to -3. Otherwise, you’ll find my slightly modified version below. This recipe is compatible with the Fujifilm X-Pro3, X100V, X-T4, X-S10, X-E4 and X-T30 II cameras.

Monochrome
Dynamic Range: DR100
Highlight: 0
Shadow: +1
Noise Reduction: -4
Sharpening: 0
Clarity: +2
Grain Effect: Weak, Large 
Color Chrome Effect: Off
Color Chrome Effect Blue: Off
White Balance: Daylight, +1 Red & -6 Blue
ISO: Auto, up to ISO 6400 (for best results, try to limit the ISO to 1600 and lower when able)
Exposure Compensation: -1/3 to +1/3 (typically)

Example photographs, all camera-made JPEGs using this “Ilford Pan F Plus 50” film simulation recipe on my Fujifilm X100V:

Item Number – Bountiful, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Snow on Seat – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Wheelchair Shopping – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Face Masks For Everyone – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Can, Baskets & Baby Seats – Bountiful, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Watching Her Brothers Catch Carp – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Boots – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Salty Pavement – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Street Puddle – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X100V
To Cross – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Open – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Central Book Exchange – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Parley’s Creek in Winter – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X100V

Find this film simulation recipes and over 200 more on the Fuji X Weekly — Film Recipes App!

Fujifilm X-E4 (X-Trans IV) Film Simulation Recipe: Kodak High Definition Plus 200

Evergreen Tops – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4 – “Kodak High Definition Plus 200”

This Kodak High Definition Plus 200 film simulation recipe was a fun one to make. My wife, Amanda, was looking through an old box of pictures when she came across a group of prints that she thought looked interesting, so she showed them to me. The images were captured in the Sierra Nevada mountains, largely in the Sequoia National Forest, in 2006. I had no idea what film I used, but after locating the negatives, I discovered it was Kodak High Definition Plus 200. The pictures were printed on Fujicolor Crystal Archive paper. Not surprisingly, Fujifilm paper produces a different aesthetic than Kodak paper, so if this film had been printed on Kodak paper the pictures would look a little different. Back then, the rule of thumb for best results was that Kodak negatives should be printed on Kodak paper, Fujifilm negatives should be printed on Fujifilm paper, etc., but obviously I broke that “rule” with these travel pictures.

Kodak High Definition Plus 200 was a color negative film that was also sold under the name Kodak Royal Supra 200. At the time, Kodak claimed that it was the sharpest and finest-grained ISO 200 color negative film on the market. Originally there were ISO 100, 200, 400 and 800 varieties, but since this film line was introduced right at the beginning of the decline of film, it didn’t take Kodak long to discontinue all but the ISO 200 and 400 versions, and even those didn’t last all that long. I shot a few rolls of the film, and after digging through that photo box, I found two sets of negatives, both exposed around that same timeframe. I honestly don’t remember all that much from the experience, but it was fun to rediscover these long-forgotten pictures and recreate the aesthetic on my Fujifilm X-E4 camera.

A picture of Kodak High Definition Plus negatives, captured with this recipe.
A picture of Kodak High Definition Plus 200 prints, captured with this recipe.
A poor quality scan of one of the prints. Sorry. I really need to buy a better scanner.

For ISO 200 color negative film, Kodak High Definition Plus 200 was indeed pretty sharp and fine-grained. It was moderately vibrant (just a little above “true to life”) and contrasty but not overly contrasty. From what I can tell, it didn’t have as large of an exposure latitude as some of Kodak’s other color negative films. It was warm, but seemed to lean more towards green than red when printed on Fujicolor paper. Obviously, how the film is shot, developed, printed and/or scanned will affect how it looks (I apologize for my poor quality scan above, which doesn’t do the picture justice whatsoever, but I wanted to share it anyway). This recipe mimics how I shot the film in 2006, printed on Fujicolor paper. It is compatible with the Fujifilm X-Pro3, X100V, X-T4, X-S10, X-E4, and X-T30 II cameras.

Classic Chrome
Dynamic Range: DR400
Highlight: 0
Shadow: +1
Color: +2
Noise Reduction: -4
Sharpening: 0
Clarity: -3
Grain Effect: Weak, Small
Color Chrome Effect: Weak
Color Chrome Effect Blue: Weak
White Balance: 4800K, -2 Red & -7 Blue
ISO: Auto, up to ISO 6400
Exposure Compensation: +1/3 to +2/3 (typically)

Example photographs, all camera-made JPEGs using this Kodak High Definition Plus 200 film simulation recipe on my Fujifilm X-E4 & Fujifilm X100V:

Walking Bridge – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Hollow Building – Bountiful, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Leaves that Left – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Flag & Evergreen – Layton, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Green Pine Needles – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Red Roof – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Lonely Table – Orem, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Night Shopping Carts – Draper, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Pillow on Couch – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Fake Succulent – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Evening Clouds Over Wasatch Mountains – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Disappearing Light on Francis Peak – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4

Find this film simulation recipe and many more on the Fuji X Weekly — Film Recipes App!

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If You REALLY Want to be a Photographer, THIS Should be Your First Camera: The Fujifilm X100V (Video)

I share this video with you for three reasons: 1) it’s really good, 2) this website and the Fuji X Weekly App are mentioned in it, and 3) it’s definitely the coolest video that I’ve ever been highlighted in. So be sure to watch it! Also, big thanks to GxAce for the shout-out! You should check out his channel, for sure, because he has many intriguing videos.

You can read my review of the Fujifilm X100V here.

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Fujifilm X100V Black    Amazon   B&H
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Fujifilm X100V (X-Trans IV) Film Simulation Recipe: Pulled Fujicolor Superia

Salt Lake Shorelands – Layton, UT – Fujifilm X100V – “Pulled Fujicolor Superia”

After creating the Scanned Superia and Portra-Style film simulation recipes, which use D-Range Priority Auto, I wanted to create a recipe that utilized D-Range Priority Strong. You might recall that Anders Lindborg made an interesting discovery that D-Range Priority (DR-P) is essentially the same thing as Hypertone on Fujifilm Frontier scanners. In my own experiments, I’ve come to the conclusion that D-Range Priority Weak is more practical for everyday photography than D-Range Priority Strong, because, unless there is a bright light in the frame, DR-P Strong tends to be too flat, since it maximizes dynamic range. Undeterred, I set out to create a nice recipe that utilizes DR-P Strong.

I call this recipe “Pulled Fujicolor Superia” because it is similar to Fujicolor Superia Xtra 400 film that’s been pulled one stop. Of course, how any emulsion is shot, developed, printed and/or scanned has an impact on its aesthetic, and one film can have many different looks. I didn’t set out to recreate the look of pulled Superia film, but, in fact, it does look surprisingly close to some examples I found. It’s better to be lucky than good, right? I wouldn’t say that this is 100% spot-on for pulled Superia 400 film, but it’s not far off at all.

Break – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X100V – “Pulled Fujicolor Superia”

Because this recipe uses the Classic Negative film simulation, Clarity, and Color Chrome Effect Blue, it is compatible with the Fujifilm X-Pro3, X100V, X-T4, X-S10, X-E4, and X-T30 II cameras. I think it works best on sunny days, but I did use it with some success in overcast and indoor situations.

Classic Negative
Dynamic Range: D-Range Priority Strong
Color: +3
Noise Reduction: -4
Sharpening: -2
Clarity: +2
Grain Effect: Weak, Small
Color Chrome Effect: Strong
Color Chrome Effect Blue: Strong
White Balance: Daylight, -4 Red & -2 Blue
ISO: Auto, up to ISO 6400
Exposure Compensation: 0 to +2/3 (typically)

Example photographs, all camera-made JPEGs using this “Pulled Fujicolor Superia” film simulation recipe on my Fujifilm X100V:

Packed Parking Garage – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Dee’s – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Salt Lake Shoreland Preserve Boardwalk – Layton, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Wetland Grass & Mountains – Layton, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Grass – Layton, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Fence & Hidden Building – Layton, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Playing Pokemon – Layton, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Looking Through Binoculars – Layton, UT – Fujifilm X100V
My Four Kids – Layton, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Jonathan at f/3.6 – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Yellow & Green Grass – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Pops of Fall – Fruit Heights, UT – Fujifilm X100V
A Little Splash of Autumn – Fruit Heights, UT – Fujifilm X100V

Find this film simulation recipe and many more on the Fuji X Weekly — Film Recipes App!

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Fujifilm X-Trans IV Film Simulation Recipe: AgfaChrome RS 100

H&M – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4 – “AgfaChrome RS 100”

I was asked to create a film simulation recipe for AgfaChrome RS 100 color transparency film. Agfa made this slide film from 1984 through 1995, with an “improved emulsion” released in 1992. I never used AgfaChrome RS 100, so I have zero experience with the film. It was difficult to find examples of, and old issues of Popular Photography and Photographic magazines were my best resource. Despite the challenges, I was able to create a film simulation recipe that I’m very happy with.

This AgfaChrome RS 100 recipe renders pictures beautifully! It has a great vintage analog feel to it. People might think that the images are old film pictures that you scanned, and they certainly won’t suspect that they’re straight-out-of-camera JPEGs! I’m confident that this recipe will be an instant favorite for many of you.

Flower Garden – Park City, UT – Fujifilm X-E4 – “AgfaChrome RS 100”

Because this X-Trans IV recipe requires Classic Negative, Clarity, and Color Chrome FX Blue, it’s only compatible with the Fujifilm X-Pro3, X100V, X-T4, X-S10 and X-E4 cameras—unfortunately it’s not compatible with the X-T3 and X-T30. I believe that it is compatible with the GFX100S, although results will likely be slightly different. If you have a compatible camera, be sure to give this AgfaChrome RS 100 recipe a try!

Classic Negative
Dynamic Range: DR400
Highlight: +1
Shadow: -1
Color: +2
Noise Reduction: -4
Sharpening: -2
Clarity: -3
Grain Effect: Strong, Small
Color Chrome Effect: Strong
Color Chrome Effect Blue: Strong
White Balance: Daylight, -3 Red & +5 Blue
ISO: Auto, up to ISO 6400
Exposure Compensation: -1/3 to +1/3 (typically)

Example photographs, all camera-made JPEGs using this “AgfaChrome RS 100” film simulation recipe on my X100V and X-E4:

Bowl on a Shelf – Scottsdale, AZ – Fujifilm X100V
Parking Garage – Park City, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Below Deck Parking – Park City, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Smile – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Little Dragon – Scottsdale, AZ – Fujifilm X100V
Free People – Park City, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Towering Cloud – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Drive Slow, But Don’t Park – Park City, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Checkerboard – Scottsdale, AZ – Fujifilm X100V
Patagonia – Park City, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Green Grapes – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Blackberries – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Pink Among Green – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Little Cherries – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Permission to Park – Park City, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
One Way – Park City, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Honey Bucket & Trailer – Park City, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
We Are Open – Park City, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Park City Downtown – Park City, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Buildings in Downtown Park City – Park City, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Church Cans – Park City, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Gas Sign – Park City, UT – Fujifilm X-E4

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Fujifilm X100V + Fujicolor Pro 400H Recipe + Ponderosa State Park + Dreary Day = Photographic Awesomeness

Payette Lake Between Trees – Ponderosa State Park, ID – Fujifilm X100V

I recently visited Ponderosa State Park just outside of McCall, Idaho. It was a dreary day—off-and-on it drizzled rain from the grey overcast sky—with cool temperatures. This might be my favorite weather conditions, and was perfect for a hike through the forest with my Fujifilm X100V, which has some weather sealing, so it’s fine that it got a little wet. I loaded the camera with my Fujicolor Pro 400H film simulation recipe and headed down the trail through the tall trees.

Ponderosa State Park sits on a peninsula on Payette Lake in the middle of Idaho. It’s heavily forested and green. The lake is very clear. As I was exploring, it felt like Ponderosa could be a National Park and not a State Park. It’s missing a headliner feature that would propel it into National Park status, and that’s fine because it wasn’t crowded, so I enjoyed the feeling of being in a National Park without all of the people. At some points it seemed like I had the place all to myself.

The Fujicolor Pro 400H recipe delivered a great analog-like aesthetic on this outing. It captured the scenes how I wanted it to. This recipe does great in sunny conditions, but it also does well on overcast days, like this one. It was a wonderful time for photography, and it was also great to just be in nature, enjoying the sights, sounds and scents of the forest. Enjoy the pictures!

Evergreen Trunks – Ponderosa State Park, ID – Fujifilm X100V
Mossy Trunk – Ponderosa State Park, ID – Fujifilm X100V
Deer In The Forest Ponderosa State Park, ID – Fujifilm X100V
Broken Down – Ponderosa State Park, ID – Fujifilm X100V
Fallen – Ponderosa State Park, ID – Fujifilm X100V
Forest Trail #1 – Ponderosa State Park, ID – Fujifilm X100V
Forest Trail #2 – Ponderosa State Park, ID – Fujifilm X100V
Trees & Pond – Ponderosa State Park, ID – Fujifilm X100V
Curved Trees Over Pond – Ponderosa State Park, ID – Fujifilm X100V
Lily Marsh #1 – Ponderosa State Park, ID – Fujifilm X100V
Lily Marsh #2 – Ponderosa State Park, ID – Fujifilm X100V
V Tree – Ponderosa State Park, ID – Fujifilm X100V
Trees & Lake – Ponderosa State Park, ID – Fujifilm X100V
Rain Clouds Over Payette Lake – Ponderosa State Park, ID – Fujifilm X100V
Lakeshore – Ponderosa State Park, ID – Fujifilm X100V
Above Payette – Ponderosa State Park, ID – Fujifilm X100V

Video: Cherry Blossoms with Fujifilm X100V & Superia Xtra 400

I just posted a new video to the Fuji X Weekly YouTube channel! It’s about photographing cherry blossoms at the Utah State Capital with a Fujifilm X100V using the Superia Xtra 400 film simulation recipe. I hope that you enjoy it!

The Superia Xtra 400 recipe is a good one that I appreciate using. It’s got a great analog aesthetic. I think it did well for the subject and conditions. Every time I use this recipe I wonder why I don’t use it more often.

If you have a few free moments, I invite you to watch the video, which I’ve included above. It’s only a couple minutes long. If you like it, be sure to give it a “thumbs up” and subscribe to the channel if you don’t already. Thanks!