Five Film Simulation Recipes Every Social Media Influencer Should Try on Their Fujifilm X100V

The Fujifilm X100V is a popular camera with social media influencers—so much so that it’s become hard to find and expensive. One of the main reasons why social media influencers love the camera is its retro design, which gives it a timeless and stylish look that stands out in a sea of modern and generic-looking camera bodies. The X100V’s sleek and compact form factor also makes it easy to carry around, which is ideal for influencers who are often on the go and need a camera that they can take with them wherever they go.

Another reason why the X100V is popular with social media influencers is its image quality. The camera is equipped with a 23mm f/2 lens, which produces sharp and detailed images. The X100V also features a 26-megapixel APS-C sensor that, thanks to the X-Trans array and processor, delivers excellent low-light performance and a wide dynamic range. These features, combined with Fujifilm’s renowned color science, produce images that are rich and vibrant with a film-like quality that is highly sought after by influencers.

The X100V is also popular with influencers because of its advanced manual controls. Unlike most compact cameras, the X100V provides users with the ability to effortlessly manually adjust settings—such as shutter speed, aperture, and ISO—giving them more creative freedom and control over their images. This makes the X100V an ideal camera for influencers who want to take their photography to the next level and produce professional-looking content.

And, of course, Film Simulation Recipes allow social media influencers to quickly get finished photographs straight-out-of-camera that are ready to share the moment that they are captured. This not only makes photography easier (and perhaps more fun), but it also saves a lot of time over post-processing RAW files. While there are literally hundreds of recipes that you could use, below are five Film Simulation Recipes that every influencer should try on their Fujifilm X100V.

Kodak Portra 400 v2

Once Was a Gas Station – Avondale, AZ – Fujifilm X100V – “Kodak Portra 400 v2”

Kodak Portra 400 is one of the most popular film stocks available today, so it shouldn’t be surprising that the Kodak Portra 400 Film Simulation Recipes are some of the most popular. Of these, Kodak Portra 400 v2 is my personal favorite. One film can produce many different looks depending on a host of factors—including how it was shot, developed, and scanned—and this recipe closely mimics the aesthetic of one photographer’s Portra pictures—feel free to also try Kodak Portra 400, Kodak Portra 400 Warm, and Reggie’s Portra. This Kodak Portra 400 v2 recipe produces bright and warm images, and is particularly great for portraits and golden hour photography. Use it in daylight natural light situations for best results.

Pacific Blues

Fox Holding Flower – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X100V – “Pacific Blues”

The Pacific Blues recipe mimics the aesthetic of Lucy Laucht‘s Spirit of Summer series, particularly the Positano Blues photographs. It is especially well suited for a summer day at the beach, but it is also great for many other situations, including shade, fog, and even night photography. It’s a bold recipe, yet is still good for portraits. Use it for travel, or even just snapping pictures around the house.

Kodachrome 64

Open Warning – Butte, MT – Fujifilm X100V – “Kodachrome 64”

Kodachrome is such an iconic film that once graced the covers of National Geographic, Arizona Highways, and most travel magazines. Sadly it has been long-discontinued; however, thanks to Fujifilm cameras, you can still shoot a reasonably close facsimile of the film today! Kodachrome 64 is one of my favorite recipes for travel photography, producing results reminiscent of classic images from the ’70’s, ’80’s and ’90’s.

Vintage Color

Sentinel & Merced – Yosemite NP, CA – Fujifilm X100V – “Vintage Color”

“This is an artist’s recipe!” That’s what I said of the Vintage Color Film Simulation Recipe. It produces painterly results that are reminiscent of famed Hudson River School painter Albert Bierstadt, particularly his Yosemite paintings. While not modeled after any film stock, it does have a vintage film-like quality that’s easy to appreciate. It’s best suited for sunny daylight situations, yet it is also a good option for shade or overcast.

Kodak Tri-X 400

Motel – Panguitch, UT – Fujifilm X100V – “Kodak Tri-X 400”

Kodak Tri-X 400 is probably the most well-known black-and-white film stock, so it should be no surprise that the most popular black-and-white recipe is Kodak Tri-X 400. While color recipes tend to be much more popular than monochrome, if you want to emulate a classic photographic aesthetic, this recipe should be one of your top considerations. Producing moody images, Kodak Tri-X 400 allows you to focus on the elements within the frame without the distraction of color. In one word, Timeless is how I would best describe this recipe.

Find these Film Simulation Recipes and over 250 more on the Fuji X Weekly — Film Recipes App!

This post contains affiliate links, and if you make a purchase using my links I’ll be compensated a small amount for it.

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Fujifilm X100V (X-Trans IV) Film Simulation Recipe: Timeless Negative

Cold Morning Light – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X100V – “Timeless Negative”

I purchased the Fujifilm X-T5 specifically to try the Nostalgic Neg. film simulation, then, after using it, I discovered Nostalgic Neg. has a lot in common with Eterna. I initially stated that the new film simulation is as if Classic Chrome and Eterna had a baby—it has some similarities to both—but it is more like Eterna than Classic Chrome. If a Nostalgic Neg. recipe calls for minus Color, it’s possible to fairly closely approximate it with Eterna. One difference is that Nostalgic Neg. has more warmth and vibrancy in the shadows, which is unique to the new film simulation, but otherwise you can get pretty close.

This Film Simulation Recipe is a facsimile of Timeless Negative for X-Trans V cameras, using Eterna instead of the Nostalgic Neg., as only the latest cameras have the new film simulation. I think many of you are going to like it because it produces very lovely images in a variety of situations. It’s great for daylight, nighttime, golden hour, overcast, indoor, portraits, landscapes, etc., etc.. Once you program this one into your camera, you might not ever replace it, since it does so well in a lot of scenarios.

Holiday Ball – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X100V – “Timeless Negative”

This version of Timeless Negative is intended for the Fujifilm X-Pro3, X100V, X-T4, X-S10, X-E4, and X-T30 II cameras. You can use this on X-Trans V cameras, too, if you want (although I would suggest the recipe with Nostalgic Neg.) by setting Color Chrome FX Blue to Off. For the X-T3, X-T30, if you ignore Grain size, Color Chrome FX Blue, and Clarity (or, even better, use a 5% CineBloom diffusion filter in lieu of Clarity), you’ll still get similar results, but it will look slightly different (give it a try anyway). I am currently working on a Nostalgic Neg.-like recipe for the X-T3 and X-T30 (and possibly the X-H1, too); if you are a Fuji X Weekly App Patron, there is an Early-Access Recipe (actually, two) called Vintage Eterna that unintentionally has some similarities to Nostalgic Neg., and I invite you to give that a try, too.

Eterna
Dynamic Range: DR200
Highlight: +1
Shadow: -1
Color: +3
Noise Reduction: -4
Sharpness: 0
Clarity: -2
Grain Effect: Weak, Small
Color Chrome Effect: Strong
Color Chrome Effect Blue: Weak
White Balance: Auto, +4 Red & -5 Blue
ISO: Auto, up to ISO 6400
Exposure Compensation: -1/3 to +1/3 (typically)

Example photographs, all camera-made JPEGs using this “Timeless Negative” Film Simulation Recipe on my Fujifilm X100V:

Candle – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X100V
Drab Pink Blossom – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X100V
Rainy Day Lightbulb – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X100V
Joyful Corridor – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X100V
Coffee, Waiting – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X100V
Dear Santa – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X100V
Oh Christmas Tree – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X100V
North Pole Post – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X100V
Saint Nicholas – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X100V
Metalic Pinecone – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X100V
Oleander Evening – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X100V
Downtown Dusk – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X100V
Color Transparencies – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X100V
Night Lights – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X100V
O Tannenbaum – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X100V
Fountain – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X100V
Green Leaf – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X100V
Aslan – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X100V
Upward Abstract – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X100V
Palm Sky Vapor – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X100V
Autumn Gold – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X100V
Transition – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X100V
Bougainvillea & Changing Weather – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X100V
Bougainvillea in Autumn – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X100V

Find this Film Simulation Recipe and over 250 more on the Fuji X Weekly — Film Recipes App!

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Fujifilm X100V (X-Trans IV) Film Simulation Recipe: Fujicolor 100 Gold

Morning Mist – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X100V – “Fujicolor 100 Gold

I get asked frequently to create Film Simulation Recipes that mimic the aesthetic of a certain film stock or the look of a particular photographer. In this case, it was the look of a specific photographer that I was asked to recreate. After viewing this person’s images, I thought that they had a lot of similarities with my Kodak Gold 200 recipe except with Superia greens and reds. So I programmed that recipe into my Fujifilm X100V, except with Classic Negative instead of Classic Chrome, plus I made a couple of small modifications. After testing it out, I felt that it produced pictures that were, in fact, quite similar to the photographer’s look. A few days went by, and by chance I stumbled upon some photographs captured with Fujicolor 100 film, and they looked pretty similar to this new recipe. After digging a little deeper, I found some more Fujicolor 100 pictures, and in the description of a few that seemed particularly similar, the photographer mentioned that they used an 81A warming filter.

I’ve heard it said that Fujifilm has historically saved their “best” films for Japan. Indeed, there are Fuji emulsions that, for whatever reasons, aren’t sold outside their home country. Fujicolor 100 is a one of those. I don’t know a whole lot about it (or if it is even still manufactured), but it is a consumer-grade color negative film. I believe that it’s a little warmer than most Fujicolor stocks, but that could also be a result of a warming filter, lens used, how shot, how developed, and/or how scanned, so I’m not completely certain of it. I didn’t model this recipe after Fujicolor 100, but it does seem at times to resemble it surprisingly closely.

Gated Camera Store – Phoenix, AZ – Fujifilm X100V – “Fujicolor 100 Gold”

Because this Fujicolor 100 Gold Film Simulation Recipe uses the Classic Negative film simulation, it’s not compatible with the Fujifilm X-T3 or X-T30, or any other camera without Classic Negative. It is intended for the Fujifilm X-Pro3, X100V, X-T4, X-S10, X-E4, and X-T30 II models. Because X-Trans V renders blue deeper, if you use it on an X-T5, X-H2, or X-H2S it will look slightly different, which you might like or dislike or be indifferent to—give it a try and see what you think.

Classic Negative
Dynamic Range: DR400
Highlight: -2
Shadow: +1
Color: +3
Noise Reduction: -4
Sharpness: -2
Clarity: -2
Grain Effect: Strong, Small
Color Chrome Effect: Off
Color Chrome Effect Blue: Off
White Balance: Daylight, +4 Red & -5 Blue
ISO: Auto, up to ISO 6400
Exposure Compensation: +2/3 to +1 1/3 (typically)

Example photographs, all camera-made JPEGs using this “Fujicolor 100 Gold” Film Simulation Recipe on a Fujifilm X100V:

Foto Forum – Phoenix, AZ – Fujifilm X100V
Gas Station Turned Diner – Williams, AZ – Fujifilm X100V
American Shooting Experience – Williams, AZ – Fujifilm X100V
66 Gifts – Williams, AZ – Fujifilm X100V
Hot Hare – Williams, AZ – Fujifilm X100V
Someday Sony – Phoenix, AZ – Fujifilm X100V
One of These is Not Like the Others – Phoenix, AZ – Fujifilm X100V
Self Reflection – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X100V
Confused Santa – Williams, AZ – Fujifilm X100V
Look at this Flower – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X100V
Girl by a Fountain – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X100V
Water Feature – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X100V
Fujifilm X-T5 in a Plant – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X100V
A Pink Bloom – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X100V
Garden Trumpets – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X100V
Small Boats at a Dock – Lynx Lake, AZ – Fujifilm X100V
Seven Mile Gulch – Lynx Lake, AZ – Fujifilm X100V
Log in the Water – Lynx Lake, AZ – Fujifilm X100V

Find this Film Simulation Recipe and over 250 more on the Fuji X Weekly — Film Recipes App!

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A Chance Encounter on a Rainy Day in May

Chuck Drummond – Pawhuska, OK – Fujifilm X100V – “Kodak Tri-X 400

I just learned that Chuck Drummond passed away this last Friday at 79-years-old. I met him once, and he was very kind. My deepest sympathies go out to the Drummond family, who I’m sure are still mourning.

This last summer my family and I embarked on an epic roadtrip that took us through Oklahoma. Pawhuska was a little out of the way, but we made sure to detour through it so that we could visit The Mercantile, the restaurant/coffee shop/bakery/gift store owned by Ree Drummond, who is also known as The Pioneer Woman.

For those unfamiliar, Ree Drummond became famous for her cooking blog, where she shared recipes used to feed her family and the hungry ranchmen, which turned into books, television shows, product lines, and The Mercantile, among other things. She lives on a large ranch in rural Oklahoma. Pawhuska was barely on the map before Ree became famous—now it’s still barely on the map, although it certainly has seen a significant resurgence, and it can become quite busy with tourists. Yes, for The Pioneer Woman fans, Pawhuska is a destination.

I’ve written about Pawhuska before, and I don’t want to rehash that; instead, I want to share a serendipitous encounter while in the small town, which I’ll remember for some time to come.

We awoke to steel grey sky and light rain. After getting ourselves put together, my family and I strolled around the small town of Pawhuska, which was almost deserted—the weather seemed to scare people off, or at least keep them indoors. We explored the streets, and I captured photographs with my Fujifilm X100V using the Kodak Tri-X 400 Film Simulation Recipe—black and white seemed especially appropriate for the weather. Eventually we made our way inside The Mercantile for breakfast, something that everyone should experience at least once in their lives—to say that it’s good is as big of an understatement as saying the Grand Canyon is big; both are true, but neither truly describe it.

Mercantile – Pawhuska, OK – Fujifilm X100V – “Kodak Tri-X 400”

While waiting for our food, an old man wearing a cowboy hat walked in by himself. He appeared weathered and worn, but in good spirits, with a smile on his face. My wife stated in a whisper just loud enough for our children to hear, “Look, there’s a real cowboy.” A true ranchman. An iconic stature of the American west. He sat at a small table near ours.

My wife knew right away who he was. This was Chuck. Ladd’s dad. Ree’s father-in-law. When the waitress came by, my wife asked if it would be alright to say hi to him. “Oh, sure,” she answered with a wink, “he loves the attention.” So my wife stood up, walked to his table, and introduced herself.

Chuck grinned, and he, too, stood up. He shook my wife’s hand, then he shook mine. He noticed my little girl’s cowboy boots, and made a comment to her about how nice they were and that he liked them. The waitress asked if she could take our picture, so with my wife’s phone she snapped one with Chuck, myself and my wife standing together. It was all very quick. Then we sat back down. Our food came, and we ate. His food came, and he ate alone, although other people also recognized him and he would pause to shake their hands and maybe take a picture. Chuck was a celebrity of sorts.

Our encounter was brief, but memorable. His kindness was obvious. His cheerfulness contagious. We met a genuine cowboy in rural Oklahoma. Just now I showed my daughter the picture I captured of Chuck Drummond (at the top of this article), and asked if she remembered him. “Oh, yeah,” she stated without hesitation, “that man said he liked my boots.” We’ll forever remember this chance encounter on a rainy day in May.

I’d yet to share any of these pictures, which were all captured on that drizzly morning in Pawhuska. I hope that you enjoy them!

Open All Year – Pawhuska, OK – Fujifilm X100V – “Kodak Tri-X 400”
Zoltar & Aliens – Pawhuska, OK – Fujifilm X100V – “Kodak Tri-X 400”
Empty Cup of Tea – Pawhuska, OK – Fujifilm X100V – “Kodak Tri-X 400”
Smoking Area – Pawhuska, OK – Fujifilm X100V – “Kodak Tri-X 400”
Do Not Lock – Pawhuska, OK – Fujifilm X100V – “Kodak Tri-X 400”
Gas Pipes – Pawhuska, OK – Fujifilm X100V – “Kodak Tri-X 400”
Rooftop Access – Pawhuska, OK – Fujifilm X100V – “Kodak Tri-X 400”
Now Open Windows – Pawhuska, OK – Fujifilm X100V – “Kodak Tri-X 400”
Reserved for Ree – Pawhuska, OK – Fujifilm X100V – “Kodak Tri-X 400”
Raindrop Windshield – Pawhuska, OK – Fujifilm X100V – “Kodak Tri-X 400”
Tree & Wet Seats – Pawhuska, OK – Fujifilm X100V – “Kodak Tri-X 400”
Empty Crosswalk – Pawhuska, OK – Fujifilm X100V – “Kodak Tri-X 400”
Mercantile Parking – Pawhuska, OK – Fujifilm X100V – “Kodak Tri-X 400”
Charlie’s – Pawhuska, OK – Fujifilm X100V – “Kodak Tri-X 400”
Inside Looking Out – Pawhuska, OK – Fujifilm X100V – “Kodak Tri-X 400”
5¢ Biscuit Co – Pawhuska, OK – Fujifilm X100V – “Kodak Tri-X 400”
Love Mugs – Pawhuska, OK – Fujifilm X100V – “Kodak Tri-X 400”
Coffee – Pawhuska, OK – Fujifilm X100V – “Kodak Tri-X 400”
Super Easy – Pawhuska, OK – Fujifilm X100V – “Kodak Tri-X 400”
Mercantile Shoppers – Pawhuska, OK – Fujifilm X100V – “Kodak Tri-X 400”
Jo & Charlie – Pawhuska, OK – Fujifilm X100V – “Kodak Tri-X 400”
Ranch Truck – Pawhuska, OK – Fujifilm X100V – “Kodak Tri-X 400”
Power Wagon – Pawhuska, OK – Fujifilm X100V – “Kodak Tri-X 400”
Bull – Pawhuska, OK – Fujifilm X100V – “Kodak Tri-X 400”
Dog & Table – Pawhuska, OK – Fujifilm X100V – “Kodak Tri-X 400”
Chair & White Table – Pawhuska, OK – Fujifilm X100V – “Kodak Tri-X 400”
Couch by Windows – Pawhuska, OK – Fujifilm X100V – “Kodak Tri-X 400”
MMM MMM MMM – Pawhuska, OK – Fujifilm X100V – “Kodak Tri-X 400”
Yum! – Pawhuska, OK – Fujifilm X100V – “Kodak Tri-X 400”
Yum, Too! – Pawhuska, OK – Fujifilm X100V – “Kodak Tri-X 400”
Jitter Juice – Pawhuska, OK – Fujifilm X100V – “Kodak Tri-X 400”
Breakfast – Pawhuska, OK – Fujifilm X100V – “Kodak Tri-X 400”

How I Inadvertently Made The Fujifilm X100V So Expensive

Let’s be clear: the Fujifilm X100V has skyrocketed in price because Fujifilm cannot make enough copies due to the global parts shortage. But, when you combine that shortage with an increased demand, you get ridiculously inflated prices. Supply and demand. But what caused the demand to increase?

A few people shared with me a recent Petapixel article entitled Used Fujifilm X100 Series Camera Prices Are Surging Thanks to TikTok. This article is based off of a Fujiaddict article entitled TikTokers Drive Up Fujifilm X100 Prices Across The Lineup. Both are interesting reads and basically say the same thing: social media influencers, particularly those on TikTok (by the way, you can find me on TikTok…), are causing an increased interest in (and demand for) the X100—from the original to the latest version—by raving about the camera. It should be noted that the X100-series is a gateway into the Fujifilm world for a lot of people—it’s easier to dip your toes with a fixed-lens than to dive into a whole interchangeable-lens system. Many people have told me that an X100-series camera was their first Fujifilm, sometimes their very first camera, period.

Sentinel & Merced – Yosemite NP, CA – Fujifilm X100V – “Vintage Color

There are quotes in the article describing what’s great about the X100V, including “zero editing” and “digital camera that mimics film” and “shoot photos that need no editing.” That made me wonder if these social media influencers are using Film Simulation Recipes. Makes sense, right? I mean, it kind of sounds like they do, and the photographs seem to confirm it, but I’m not really sure. I reached out to a couple of those mentioned in the article, but have yet to receive a response, which is not surprising because I’m sure they’re absolutely inundated with messages—I get a ton, and I’m nowhere near as popular as they are. I saw in the comments on one of the videos that it was just default Classic Chrome and not a recipe. Oh, well. Then I searched #fujifilmx100v on both TikTok and Instagram (follow me on Instagram, if you don’t already), and I found a bunch of similar videos and posts by others that do, in fact, mention specifically using Film Simulation Recipes. I think it’s quite plausible—perhaps probable—that the recipes are a significant factor in the rise in popularity of the X100V and other X100-series cameras, and maybe Fujifilm in general. So while I’m not directly responsible, it appears that I might be indirectly responsible for the rise in cost of the X100V, at least partially and to a small extent. If you’re trying to purchase an X100-series camera and you’re finding it overpriced, I’m sorry. I didn’t mean for that to happen, and I apologize for my part in it.

Putting the humor aside, I am incredibly honored that so many are using my Film Simulation Recipes and that they’re helping lots of people achieve the looks they’re after without fussing with editing—from those just getting started with their first “real” camera to recognizable names doing pro work, and all sorts of people in-between. You’re having more fun, potentially increasing your productivity, and spending more time doing what’s important to you, because you’re spending less time in front of a computer. That’s all so wonderful! It’s unreal to me that I’m having such a large impact on photography, something that I never imagined would ever happen. I’m incredibly grateful and appreciative to all of you for visiting this website and trying the recipes and being a part of this great community. Thank you!

And, I suppose, that makes you accomplices in the rise in cost of the X100, too….

Edit: The moment that I published this, I received a message from Edward Lee Films (who is mentioned in the articles), and he does in fact have the Fuji X Weekly App on his phone and uses Film Simulation Recipes. Check him out on Instagram and TikTok!

Fujifilm X100V (X-Trans IV) Film Simulation Recipe: Fujichrome Provia 100F

Berry Behind the Baseball Diamond – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V – “Fujichrome Provia 100F”

This Film Simulation Recipe is called “Fujichrome Provia 100F” after the film that it is intended to mimic. Fujifilm introduced Provia 100, a color reversal film, in 1994, and replaced it with the much improved Provia 100F in 2001. I’ve only shot a couple of rolls of Provia 100F. I remember that it had a cool color cast (especially when compared to Kodak films), it had a fair amount of contrast, moderate saturation, and tended to render blues strongly. This recipe has been in the works for awhile, with a lot of failed attempts. I think it does pretty well at reproducing the aesthetic of the film, but there are definitely a few compromises—more of the “memory color” that Fujifilm talks about than perhaps a 100% accurate rendition. Still, I believe that it turned out pretty well overall.

You might be surprised that this recipe doesn’t use the Provia film simulation as its base, but instead uses Classic Chrome. The Provia film simulation doesn’t actually resemble very well the film that it was named after—Fujifilm used it more as a marketing name on the X series than anything else. Velvia was the Fuji slide film that I most often shot with, but Provia was probably their most popular because it wasn’t nearly as wild as Velvia, and produced more true-to-life (yet still fairly vibrant) colors.

Actual Fujicolor Provia 100F 35mm film. Chicago, 2005.

This Fujicolor Provia 100F Film Simulation Recipe has been a Patron Early-Access Recipe on the Fuji X Weekly App since January, but it has been replaced by a new Early-Access Recipe, so now it’s available to everyone. It’s compatible with the Fujifilm X-Pro3, X100V, X-T4, X-S10, X-E4, and X-T30 II cameras. It should be fully compatible with X-Trans V cameras, but I’ve yet to be able to test it to know if it renders the same or not. Those with newer GFX cameras can use this recipe, too, but it will render slightly different.

Classic Chrome
Dynamic Range: DR400
Highlight: -1
Shadow: +3
Color: +4
Noise Reduction: -4
Sharpening: -1
Clarity: -3
Grain Effect: Weak, Small
Color Chrome Effect: Strong
Color Chrome Effect Blue: Strong
White Balance: Daylight, -2 Red & +5 Blue
ISO: Auto, up to ISO 6400
Exposure Compensation: +1/3 to +1 (typically)

Example photographs captured using this “Fujichrome Provia 100F” film simulation recipe on my Fujifilm X100V and Fujifilm X-E4 cameras:

Mushos for 5$ – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4
Truck Dodging the Sunlight – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4
Sunlight Pouring on Leaves in Early Autumn – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4
Wasatch Front – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Blue Sky Reeds – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Branch Berries – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Baseball Sky – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Windsock – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Field 3 – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Skateboard & Runner – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Creek Under Branches – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Trail Through the Trees – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Fence Along Path – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Josh at the Court – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

Find this Film Simulation Recipe and over 250 more on the Fuji X Weekly — Film Recipes App!

Help Fuji X Weekly

Nobody pays me to write the content found on fujixweekly.com. There’s a real cost to operating and maintaining this site, not to mention all the time that I pour into it. If you appreciated this article, please consider making a one-time gift contribution. Thank you!

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Fujifilm X100V (X-Trans IV) FXW App Patron Early-Access Film Simulation Recipe: Kodak Royal Gold 400

This Old House is now a Business – Avondale, AZ – Fujifilm X100V – “Kodak Royal Gold 400”

This Film Simulation Recipe began as an attempt to achieve a “memory color” aesthetic of photographic prints from the 1990’s and early 2000’s; when creating this recipe I wasn’t concerned about the specific films or processes. After shooting with this recipe and reviewing the results, I was reminded of Kodak Royal Gold 400 film… sometimes. Of course, one film can produce many different aesthetics, depending on (among other things) how it was shot, developed, scanned and/or printed. Royal Gold 400 didn’t always or even usually look like this, but sometimes it did, and I found some examples in a photo-box and online that were quite similar—I’m not sure why, but my suspicion is that the film was mishandled, either from being stored improperly (possibly exposed to too much heat) or waiting too long to develop after exposing. Film can be finicky, but that serendipity is something that makes it special.

Royal Gold 400 was introduced by Kodak in 1994 as a replacement to the original Kodak Ektar 400 film. The Royal Gold line, which also came in ISO 100 and 200 versions, was marketed as a “step up” from Kodak Gold, with finer grain and more vibrant colors. It was more-or-less an updated Ektar emulsion that was renamed for marketing reasons (Gold sold a lot more than Ektar). In the early 2000’s Royal Gold was replaced by the High Definition/Royal Supra line. This Kodak Royal Gold 400 Film Simulation Recipe is a “happy accident” facsimile of one (of many) possible aesthetics from the film.

Bougainvillea Among Trumpets – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X100V – “Kodak Royal Gold 400”

The Fuji X Weekly app is free, yet becoming a Fuji X Weekly Patron unlocks the best App experience! One benefit of being a Patron is you get early access to some new Film Simulation Recipes. These Early-Access Recipes will eventually become available free to everyone in time, including this new one. Patrons help support Fuji X Weekly and, really, without them there would be no App, so I want to give a special “thank you” to all of the Patrons!

This Kodak Royal Gold 400 Film Simulation Recipe is compatible with the Fujifilm X-Pro3, X100V, X-T4, X-S10, X-E4, and X-T30 II cameras. It should also be compatible with X-Trans V models, but I’ve not tested it myself to know for certain. Those with newer GFX models can use it, too, although it will render slightly different. If you are a Fuji X Weekly App Patron, this recipe is available to you right now on the App!

Example photographs captured using this “Kodak Royal Gold 400” Film Simulation Recipe on my Fujifilm X100V:

Mending Blue – Avondale, AZ – Fujifilm X100V
Quality Auto Service – Avondale, AZ – Fujifilm X100V
A-Town Garage – Avondale, AZ – Fujifilm X100V
Clubhouse – Avondale, AZ – Fujifilm X100V
A Little Red – Avondale, AZ – Fujifilm X100V
4 Sale – Avondale, AZ – Fujifilm X100V
Shapes – Avondale, AZ – Fujifilm X100V
Cactus Liquor – Avondale, AZ – Fujifilm X100V
Sideways Saguaro Stop – Avondale, AZ – Fujifilm X100V
Library – Avondale, AZ – Fujifilm X100V
Lock & Safe – Avondale, AZ – Fujifilm X100V
Going to the Dentist – Avondale, AZ – Fujifilm X100V
Sidewalk Bicyclist – Avondale, AZ – Fujifilm X100V
Red Car & Wine Bar – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X100V
Americana Icon – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X100V
Avon – Avondale, AZ – Fujifilm X100V
N Recep – Avondale, AZ – Fujifilm X100V
Park Hoop – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X100V
Outfield – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X100V
Bougainvillea Among Trumpets 2 – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X100V
Butterfly Cage – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X100V
Pink Bloom in the Garden – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X100V
Sunlit Table Corner – Avondale, AZ – Fujifilm X100V
Orange Soda Cup – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X100V

Find this Film Simulation Recipe and over 250 more on the Fuji X Weekly — Film Recipes App!

15 Frames: Fujifilm X100V + Fujichrome Sensia 100 — A Train Ride Through the Desert

Cat Engine – Glendale, AZ – Fujifilm X100V – “Fujichrome Sensia 100”

Every Sunday from October through April, the Maricopa Live Steamers model railroad club offers free 7 1/2″ gauge train rides through the desert in north Glendale, Arizona. My kids love trains (what kids don’t?), and so my wife and I took them out on an excursion. The club has an extensive setup in the desert—over 18 miles of track—and members from across several states come to operate their scale equipment there. One day each week, except during the heat of summer, the club is open to the public, giving free train rides to anyone who wishes to traverse through the creosote and sand.

I brought along my Fujifilm X100V to capture the experience, with the Fujichrome Sensia 100 Film Simulation Recipe programmed into the camera. To make this recipe compatible with the X100V, I set Grain size to Small, Color Chrome FX Blue to Off, and Clarity to 0. The X100V is such a great camera for adventures like this, being compact and quiet, yet completely capable of fantastic image quality. My Fujifilm X70 would have worked just as well, but one advantage of the X100V is the viewfinder, which came in handy in the harsh midday light.

Fujichrome Sensia 100 was an inexpensive general-purpose daylight-balanced slide film made by Fujifilm from 1994 through 2011. There were three different iterations of the emulsion during that time. It was a popular film for cross-processing (developing in C41 chemistry); otherwise, it was primarily used for documenting family vacations, and was marketed to amateurs and hobbyists. My Film Simulation Recipe mimics the film only as a happy accident, as I wasn’t trying to create a facsimile of Sensia, but it is surprisingly similar nonetheless.

Below are camera-made JPEGs captured with the Fujichrome Sensia 100 Film Simulation Recipe on my Fujifilm X100V while at the Maricopa Live Steamers model railroad club:

RR Crossing – Glendale, AZ – Fujifilm X100V
54 – Glendale, AZ – Fujifilm X100V
Old Switch Stand – Glendale, AZ – Fujifilm X100V
Signal Tower – Glendale, AZ – Fujifilm X100V
View Through Signal Stand – Glendale, AZ – Fujifilm X100V
Outdoor Television – Glendale, AZ – Fujifilm X100V
Junk on the Platform – Glendale, AZ – Fujifilm X100V
Train Bridge – Glendale, AZ – Fujifilm X100V
Tiny Town on the Prairie – Glendale, AZ – Fujifilm X100V
Rails Through the Desert – Glendale, AZ – Fujifilm X100V
Rusty Train Wheel & Signal – Glendale, AZ – Fujifilm X100V
Southern Pacific 8183 – Glendale, AZ – Fujifilm X100V
Ghost Train – Glendale, AZ – Fujifilm X100V
Yellow Water Tower – Glendale, AZ – Fujifilm X100V

This post contains affiliate links, and if you make a purchase using my links I’ll be compensated a small amount for it.

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On October 20, Nathalie and I will be introducing the Fujichrome Sensia 100 Film Simulation Recipe on SOOC as the next recipe-of-the-month. Mark your calendars now, and I hope to see you then!

Find this Film Simulation Recipe and 250 more on the Fuji X Weekly — Film Recipes App!

Fujifilm X100V & Kodak Portra 400

Fujifilm X100V – “Kodak Portra 400” (X-Trans III version)

Six months ago I turned my Fujifilm X100V into a monochrome-only camera, and just shot black-and-white Film Simulation Recipes with it, which was a lot of fun! I hope that someday Fujifilm makes a B&W-only model. Recently I started shooting color pictures on my X100V again, and the first three color recipes I programmed into the camera were Kodak Portra 400—three different versions of it!

My very first Kodak Portra 400 recipe is for Fujifilm X-Trans III cameras, which I published in May of 2018. It requires a hard-to-explain-and-get-right custom white balance measurement. I have had some luck in the past getting it “right” and at times not-so-much luck. I think this time I was able to get it pretty close but not exactly correct. I made three different attempts (using the three custom white balance slots), and went with the best of the three; however, I think the white balance should be slightly warmer than it is. It’s a tricky thing, and I wish it was more easily repeatable. To use this recipe on my X100V I set Grain size to Small, Color Chrome Effect to Off, Color Chrome FX Blue to Off, and Clarity to 0.

The next Kodak Portra 400 recipe is for the Fiujifilm X-T3 and X-T30, which I published in May of 2020. This one is easier to program (and probably more accurate to the film) than the X-Trans III version. To use it on my X100V I set Grain size to Small, Color Chrome FX Blue to Off, and Clarity to 0.

Fujifilm X100V – “Kodak Portra 400” (X-T3/X-T30 version)

The third Kodak Portra 400 recipe is for the “newer” X-Trans IV cameras, including the X-Pro3, X100V, X-T4, X-S10, X-E4, and X-T30 II cameras, which I published in June of 2020. Of the three versions, this one is probably the most “accurate” to actual Portra 400 film, but it is extremely similar to the X-T3/X-T30 recipe—only very subtly different.

One film can produce a variety of looks depending on a whole host of factors, including (among other things) how it was shot, developed, and scanned—even the pH balance and temperature of the water can affect it. It’s not possible for one recipe replicate all possible aesthetics. Also, different Fujifilm cameras have different JPEG options, and different sensor generations have slight variances in rendering; even though one recipe might be more “accurate” to the film, it’s certainly not always so—the variables are pretty significant. What’s more important than accuracy is finding the recipe that works best for you and your photography.

I’ve published many other Portra recipes, including Kodak Portra 160 (X-Trans II), Kodak Portra 160 (X-T3/X-T30), Kodak Portra 400 v2 (X-T3/X-T30), Kodak Portra 400 v2 (X-Pro3 & newer), Kodak Portra 400 Warm (X-Pro3 & newer), Reggie’s Portra (X-Pro3 & newer), Portra-Style (X-Pro3 & newer), Kodak Portra 800 (X-Pro3 & newer), Kodak Portra 800 v2 (X-pro3 & newer), and Portra v2 (X-Trans II). There are others recipes that aren’t necessarily modeled specifically after Portra film, but have a Portra-like aesthetic nonetheless, such as Bright Summer, Bright Kodak, Jon’s Classic Chrome, and Classic Kodak Chrome. There are plenty to choose from!

Let’s take a look at some photographs that I captured with the three Kodak Portra 400 Film Simulation Recipes on my Fujifilm X100V.

Kodak Portra 400 (original recipe, for X-Trans III)

Kodak Portra 400 (2nd recipe, for X-T3/X-T30)

Kodak Portra 400 (3rd recipe, for X-Pro3 & newer X-Trans IV)

Comparison

“Kodak Portra 400” (X-Trans III version)
“Kodak Portra 400” (X-T3/X-T30 version)
“Kodak Portra 400” (X-Pro3 & newer version)

I hope that seeing these three Kodak Portra 400 Film Simulation Recipes together helps you decide which to try. Maybe one stands out more to you than the others. Perhaps the camera you own is more of a determining factor than the recipe itself. I personally like all three of them, and have enjoyed shooting with them on my (no-longer-B&W-only) X100V.

Also, as a reminder, these three Kodak Portra 400 recipes are the current SOOC recipes-of-the-month. Fujifilm X-Photographer Nathalie Boucry and I will conclude our discussion of these recipes in the next broadcast (be sure to watch the last episode if you missed it!), which will be live on October 20th. Upload your images (click here) captured with one (or more) of these Kodak Portra 400 recipes by October 18th to be included in the next show. I hope to see you then!

Breathing Fresh Air into Your Photography with Fujifilm — An Interview with Matt Giesow of VAST Media

Photo by Matt Giesow

I wanted to follow-up my interview with Troy Paiva (click here to read it), which wasn’t directly related to Fujifilm cameras and Film Simulation Recipes (although it was highly relatable), with something directly connected to the topics that are typically found on the Fuji X Weekly blog. Just as I was contemplating who I was going to interview and what the exact subject might be, I received a message from Matt Giesow of VAST Media, a photo and video production company in Tulsa, Oklahoma. “I have been running my production company for nearly five years now,” Matt told me, “and picking up a Fuji has been a breath of fresh air.” He stated that using Film Simulation Recipes on his camera allowed him to deliver some images immediately to the client, and that his JPEG workflow is “so nice.”

His words echoed in my head for the rest of that day. I felt similarly when I first started in Fujifilm: it was like a breath of fresh air—cool, crisp, mountain air. That was before I had even discovered the great JPEG output of the cameras, and before I had begun to make recipes. It must be even more refreshing nowadays, with so many resources available—such as Fuji X Weekly. It’s an honor to help others also experience that “fresh air” that Fujifilm cameras can provide. I knew that I wanted the next interview to be with Matt, so the following morning I asked if he’d be willing. Thankfully, he was very enthusiastic, and we were able to accomplish it rather quickly. So, without any further delay, here’s my interview with Matt Giesow!

Photo by Matt Giesow

FXW: Hi, Matt! Thank you so much for taking time out of your day today to do this interview! Let’s begin at the beginning. Tell me how you got started in photography?

Matt Giesow: Hey, Ritchie! I’m a self-taught photographer, dating back to 2017 from “YouTube University”—that, and being on staff at a pretty creative church in Tulsa, Oklahoma, created a great launching pad into the world of photography and videography. 

FXW: What was your first camera?

Matt Giesow: An iPhone 4 and the VSCO app. My first camera purchased to learn photography on was the Canon 80D.

Photo by Matt Giesow

FXW: What were your early photographic interests?

Matt Giesow: I remember when instagram first came out, I tried to make my shots look like film using Insta’s built-in filters [laughter]. Today and I’m still interested in photographing people, places, and things with a nostalgic vintage look. 

FXW: What are your current photographic interests? What do you shoot just for fun?

Matt Giesow: I enjoy street photography. Exploring cities—both ones I know and ones that I’ve not yet been to—and finding hidden gems to capture. I also enjoy photographing my family (I’m a proud dad), documenting all of our memories.

Photo by Matt Giesow

FXW: Tell me about your production company. How did you get started with that?

Matt Giesow: VAST Media started about four years ago with a desire for me to create what could exist. We primarily focus within architecture and the real estate market. I have grown the business from a solo entrepreneur to a full team and a full service company now. It’s been amazing to be a part of it from day one—with the vision of the company—to now continuing to work within the company and have several people alongside me helping to move it forward.

Photo by Matt Giesow

FXW: What services do you provide?

Matt Giesow: VAST provides real estate listing marketing, brand advertising, and full-scale video production for anyone—from a business owner to a real estate agent to major organizations—that need to share their brand and story.

FXW: What else would you like people to know about VAST Media?

Matt Giesow: What I want people to know is that VAST Media is more than a single person with a camera. From the moment it launched, my goal was to make it not about me but about we. Often people get stuck relying on one solo creative. I wanted to create a brand that, no matter who showed up from my team, was consistent, and the brand was apparent—it’s all under one umbrella, and the product was not contingent upon a single person.

Photo by Matt Giesow

FXW: What made you pick up a Fujifilm camera?

Matt Giesow: Shooting with Sony cameras throughout most of my professional career, I always wondered about owning a Fuji. This last year I began to experiment with 35mm film photography. I realized very quickly that I love the process of shooting film, but I always want my images right away [laughter]. I found the solution to my problem on the Fuji X Weekly website, where I discovered Film Simulation Recipes. I began to see what shooters like me were doing to scratch that itch. I headed to eBay and quickly found an overpriced Fujifilm X100V and went for it. The X100V is my first and only Fujifilm camera at the moment.

Photo by Matt Giesow

FXW: What do you like most about it?

Matt Giesow: It’s been a dream to shoot with! So small—it’s a daily carry. I find myself pulling the car off numerous times throughout the day to get out and snap something that, in the past, I would have used my iPhone to capture. I love shooting straight out of camera with the film simulations baked in. It’s totally changed the way I shoot! Enjoying the process now, something that only 35mm film had given me before. 

FXW: Which Film Simulation Recipes do you like best and why?

Matt Giesow: Classic Negative is my go-to recipe in most scenarios for color. It fits the vibe and style that for years I tried to edit my Sony photos to look like. It’s perfect for street photography, travel—the reds are just gorgeous! Reggie’s Portra and Kodak Gold 200 are some other big favorites. For black-and-white, Ilford XP2 Super 400 is my go-to for darker, punchier pictures, and Ilford HP5 Plus 400 is my favorite for slightly softer, less contrasty black and white photos. 

Photo by Matt Giesow

FXW: How has using Fujifilm cameras impacted your professional photography and your personal photography?

Matt Giesow: Honestly, picking up a FujiFilm camera has been a breath of fresh air. Over the years I’ve invested a great deal in filling our gear lockers at VAST Media, but I’ve never had a personal connection with a camera quite like I do with my X100V. For me, shooting with a fixed focal length, and working so hard to nail the perfect shot in-camera is causing me to sharpen areas of my craft that I didn’t even realize were dull.  This in turn has kindled a new passion for photography that makes me feel like I did back in the beginning. The X100V doesn’t replace my ”professional” arsenal, but it’s a happy addition to every set I am on. The ability to take incredible behind-the-scenes photos on-set straight out of camera and deliver something right to the client’s hands before leaving is something very new—and I love it!

Photo by Matt Giesow

FXW: In wrapping this up, is there anything else you’d like to say?

Matt Giesow: A big “thank you” to you, Ritchie, for Fuji X Weekly! The Fuji community is just a different breed—friendly, helpful, and encouraging. It’s so great.

FXW: Thanks again, Matt, for allowing me to interview you!

Matt Giesow: Cheers!

Please visit VAST Media’s website, VAST Media’s Instagram, and Matt Giesow’s Instagram! Be sure to give him a follow, and tap the heart on some of his pictures.

All of the photographs in this article are © Matt Giesow, who captured them using his Fujifilm X100V and various Film Simulation Recipes.

Fujifilm X100V vs Sigma DP2 Merrill

Fujifilm X100V + Kodak Tri-X 400 recipe
Sigma DP2 Merrill

I recently visited Pismo Beach, California, and used my Fujifilm X100V to capture some pictures. As I was photographing, I remembered a previous trip to this same location eight years ago—at that time I was shooting with a Sigma DP2 Merrill camera. I was curious how my X100V pictures would compare to those captured with the Sigma camera

For those who don’t know, the DP2 Merrill was introduced in 2012. It has Sigma’s unique three-layer APS-C Foveon sensor with a whopping 46 megapixels (15.3 megapixels on each layer); while a lot of megapixels were advertised, the resolution is more equivalent to 30 megapixels (compared to 26 megapixels on the Fujifilm camera). It has a 30mm (45mm equivalent) f/2.8 lens permanently attached to the front—the X100V has a 23mm (34.5mm equivalent) f/2 lens. There are plenty of similarities between these two models, but there are many differences, too.

Fujifilm X100V + Kodak Portra 160 recipe
Sigma DP2 Merrill

The Sigma DP2 Merrill produces wonderful images within a very narrow window: ISO 100 or ISO 200. You can get a decent black-and-white up to ISO 800, but at all costs going higher should be avoided, especially for color photography, where ISO 400 is pushing the envelope. The battery only last about as long as a 36-exposure roll of film. The camera is not particularly stylish or user-friendly.

The Fujifilm X100V can be used at much higher ISOs—for example, the Kodak Tri-X 400 Film Simulation Recipe requires a minimum of ISO 1600, and maxes out at ISO 12800. For color photography, I’m comfortable going as high as ISO 6400 (that purple flower picture above was ISO 1600). I will typically carry a spare battery, but oftentimes one fully-charged battery will last the whole day. The X100V is one of the most beautiful and best-designed cameras, in my humble opinion.

Fujifilm X100V + Kodak Tri-X 400 recipe
Sigma DP2 Merrill (yeah, that’s the same kid… my son, Jon)

The biggest difference between the Sigma DP2 Merrill and Fujifilm X100V is workflow. With the Sigma, I’d have to load the massive files onto my computer, which would take forever (I’m sure it would be quicker now with modern computers), then I’d have to do an initial edit with their mediocre software (which, again, has likely improved), save as a TIFF, and then finish editing in another program (sometimes a thirty-minute process per picture). With the Fujifilm, I use Film Simulation Recipes to get the look I want straight-out-of-camera, download the pictures from the camera to my phone, crop and straighten if needed, and then upload to storage. My post-processing workflow is so much quicker and easier with the X100V!

Obviously I’m not doing any sort of serious comparison between a still-new model and one that’s a decade old. That’s not fair, and that’s not the point. I’m just looking back, and seeing what has changed in eight years. Obviously my kids have grown a whole bunch. The other big change is that my workflow has simplified and become much less intrusive to my life. The Sigma camera was good for a season, but now I’m very happy to be shooting with Fujifilm.

Creative Collective 022: FXW Zine — Issue 08 — July 2022

The eighth issue of FXW Zine is out, and if you are a Fuji X Weekly Creative Collective subscriber, you can download it now!

What’s in the July issue? The cover story is A Whale of a Tale, which is a photoessay of a recent whale-watching boat excursion, as captured with a Fujifilm X100V using the Kodak Tri-X 400 Film Simulation Recipe. There are a total of 28 photographs this month, including the cover image (above). I hope that you find it enlightening, entertaining, and inspiring!

If you haven’t joined the Creative Collective, consider subscribing today to get access to bonus articles and the FXW Zine—not just this issue, but the first seven issues, too!

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Crossing the California Desert with Fujifilm X100V + Kodak Tri-X 400

Welcome to California… Maybe – Blythe, CA – Fujifilm X100V – “Kodak Tri-X 400”

For those keeping up with my move (from Utah to Arizona) and adventure: I’m on the road again. The long story is that we found a home in Arizona, but the moving company can’t deliver our stuff for a couple of weeks. The short story is that we’re off on a new adventure! Among some other stops, we’re enroute to the central California Coast—one of the most beautiful places in the world, in my opinion—while we wait for our furniture and such.

A lot of times I’m the driver on road trips, but as we crossed the Mojave Desert along Interstate 10 in California, I was in the passenger seat. Of course, as a photographer I took full advantage of it, and documented the trek in black-and-white; specifically, I photographed with my Fujifilm X100V using the Kodak Tri-X 400 Film Simulation Recipe. I’ve been using this camera as a monochrome-only model lately.

Shooting out a dirty window at 75 miles-per-hour isn’t ideal; however, in whatever situations that I find myself, I try to do the best I can with what I have. That’s all anyone can do. I’m not always successful, but I thought this series was decent enough to share. I hope that you enjoy!

Storm in the Mirror – Somewhere Along I-10, CA – Fujifilm X100V – “Kodak Tri-X 400”
Driving Backwards – Somewhere Along I-10, CA – Fujifilm X100V – “Kodak Tri-X 400”
Objects Are Closer – Somewhere Along I-10, CA – Fujifilm X100V – “Kodak Tri-X 400”
Freight Flight – Somewhere Along I-10, CA – Fujifilm X100V – “Kodak Tri-X 400”
Dash Cam – Somewhere Along I-10, CA – Fujifilm X100V – “Kodak Tri-X 400”
Desert Center 16 – Somewhere Along I-10, CA – Fujifilm X100V – “Kodak Tri-X 400”
Cars – Somewhere Along I-10, CA – Fujifilm X100V – “Kodak Tri-X 400”
Parked Truck – Somewhere Along I-10, CA – Fujifilm X100V – “Kodak Tri-X 400”
Fasten Seatbelt & Dead Palms – Somewhere Along I-10, CA – Fujifilm X100V – “Kodak Tri-X 400”
Life is a Highway – Somewhere Along I-10, CA – Fujifilm X100V – “Kodak Tri-X 400”
Exit 146 – Coachella, CA – Fujifilm X100V – “Kodak Tri-X 400”
Expensive Gas – Coachella, CA – Fujifilm X100V – “Kodak Tri-X 400”

Photographing Panguitch — Fujifilm X100V + Kodak Tri-X 400

Empty Lumber Yard – Panguitch, UT – Fujifilm X100V

The first stop on the epic road trip that I’m currently on was Panguitch, a small town in southern Utah. Panguitch is close to Bryce Canyon National Park, not too far from Zion National Park, and within reach of Capital Reef National Park. Tourism is the main reason Panguitch is even on the map. People eat, sleep, and get gas here, while visiting the various natural wonders of the region. That’s why we were there.

I only stayed one night in Panguitch, but I was able to get out with my camera and photograph the quaint town. It’s obvious that Panguitch has seen better days—it seems to be just hanging on. The town has a lot of character, though. It was a great location for photography—if I had a few weeks, it would make for an incredible photo project—but alas I only had one night, as we left early the next morning.

For the pictures in this article I used my Fujifilm X100V loaded with the Kodak TRi-X 400 Film Simulation Recipe. I also had a 5% CineBloom filter attached to the camera. The X100V is such the perfect travel tool (and my “desert island” camera), and I always make sure that I have it with me. I love black-and-white photography, and the Kodak Tri-X 400 recipe is my favorite. The camera and recipe combo were ideal for Panguitch, and I’m quite happy with this set of pictures; however, I realize that I need to go back. This town (and so many others) are yearning for the camera’s attention. There is so much photographic potential, and I barely scratched the surface.

Thanks For Shopping Local – Panguitch, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Auto Entrance – Panguitch, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Chairs Along A Fence – Panguitch, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Fake News – Panguitch, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Folding Chairs – Panguitch, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Window Canopy – Panguitch, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Souvenir & Gift – Panguitch, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Delicious Dinner – Panguitch, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Raya – Panguitch, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Condiments – Panguitch, UT – Fujifilm X100V
The Duke – Panguitch, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Henrie’s – Panguitch, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Old Sign – Panguitch, UT – Fujifilm X100V
House Roof – Panguitch, UT – Fujifilm X100V
One Way Garage – Panguitch, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Motel – Panguitch, UT – Fujifilm X100V

This post contains affiliate links, and if you make a purchase using my links I’ll be compensated a small amount for it.

Fujifilm X100V Black    Amazon   B&H
Fujifilm X100V Silver   Amazon   B&H
CineBloom 5% Filter 49mm Amazon B&H

Creative Collective 023: Easy Double Exposure Photography

In Camera Double Exposure – Fujifilm X100V – “Kodak Tri-X 400

Sometimes I get into a double exposure mood. It might seem difficult to create good double exposure pictures—thankfully, Fujifilm cameras make double exposure photography easy! In this article I’ll explain just how simple it is to do it, and also explain why it’s difficult to do it well.

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Creative Collective 021: Introducing the Fujifilm X100V Acros Edition

The Fujifilm X100V Acros Edition

I’ve said for awhile now that Fujifilm should make a black-and-white only camera. There’s actually an advantage to a monochrome sensor. With a typical Bayer color array, only 50% of the light-sensitive sensor elements are recording luminosity information, while the other 50% are recording color information. With an X-Trans sensor, 55% of the light-sensitive sensor elements are recording luminosity information while 45% are recording color information. With a monochrome sensor, 100% of the light-sensitive sensor elements are recording luminosity information. Because of this, you get a higher perceived resolution, as pictures will appear more richly detailed, and there’s more shadow latitude, which also improves high-ISO capabilities. You can also use color filters like with black-and-white film.

Fujifilm has said that they have no plans currently to make a monochrome camera. You can actually convert any Fujifilm camera to be black-and-white only, but it is expensive and extreme. I’ve wanted a monochrome-only Fujifilm camera for awhile, but I’m not willing to convert one, and I’m impatient waiting for an official model to come out. So what did I do? I made my own.

Introducing the Fujifilm X100V Acros Edition!

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Fujifilm X-Trans IV Film Simulation Recipe: Moody Monochrome

Apocalyptic Pavillion – Layton, UT – Fujifilm X100V – “Moody Monochrome”

Of the different faux filter options for Acros, +Y is the one I use the least. I think it goes back to my film days when I used color filters with B&W film. I would select Orange or Red before Yellow, because Yellow is fairly subtle, but the advantage of the Yellow filter is that it doesn’t block as much light. Of course, the faux filters on Fujifilm cameras don’t affect the exposure like real filters with film. Anyway, recognizing that I infrequently use Acros+Y, I set out to make a Film Simulation Recipe that uses +Y and produces an aesthetic that I like. I think it is important to challenge myself sometimes, so if there’s some setting or gear or option that I don’t use often, forcing myself to use it helps me to grow as a photographer. That’s why I made this recipe.

I wanted something with an overall darker curve, so that it would produce a moody look. Maybe deep blacks reminiscent of Tri-X, and maybe a push-process feel. I didn’t have any specific film in mind, but I’m reminded of this time that I push-processed a roll of Ilford Delta 400, but inadvertently got it wrong—I underexposed two stops, and only had the lab push it by one stop, so the pictures were largely underexposed, and they were darker and moodier (yet less contrasty and grainy) than I had intended. This isn’t exactly the same as that, but not too dissimilar, either, so that’s why I call this recipe Moody Monochrome.

Early Blossoms – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V – “Moody Monochrome”

Because this film simulation recipe uses Clarity, it is compatible with the Fujifilm X-Pro3, X100V, X-T4, X-S10, X-E4, and X-T30 II cameras. If you have an X-T3 or X-T30 or X-Trans III camera, ignore Clarity and Grain size, and use a diffusion filter, like a 10% CineBloom or 1/4 Black Pro Mist, to get similar results.

Acros+Y
Dynamic Range: DR400
Highlight: -1
Shadow: +4
Noise Reduction: -4
Sharpness: -2
Clarity: -3
Grain Effect: Strong, Large 
Color Chrome Effect: Off
Color Chrome Effect Blue: Off
White Balance: Fluorescent 3, -4 Red & -9 Blue
ISO: 3200
Exposure Compensation: +1/3 to +1 (typically)

Example photographs, all camera-made JPEGs using this “Moody Monochrome” Film Simulation Recipe on my Fujifilm X100V:

Stop West – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Watch For Falling Bikes – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Sun Beams – Layton, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Tower in the Middle of Nowhere – Layton, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Path Through The Grass – Layton, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Wetland Boardwalk – Layton, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Wetland Grass – Layton, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Creek in the Trees – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Creek, Stick & Vines – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Log Above The Water – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Grey Brush – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Cat on a Log – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

This post contains affiliate links, and if you make a purchase using my links I’ll be compensated a small amount for it.

Fujifilm X100V Black    Amazon   B&H
Fujifilm X100V Silver   Amazon   B&H

Find this film simulation recipes and over 200 more on the Fuji X Weekly — Film Recipes App!

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Do Fujifilm Photographs Look Like Film?

The Big Ocean – Fort Stevens SP, OR – Fujifilm X-E4 – “Fujicolor Super HG

Do straight-out-of-camera JPEGs from Fujifilm X cameras actually resemble film?

I used to shoot film. I learned photography at the height of film, in the late-1990’s. I disliked digital when it began to get popular. Yes, I was a film snob for at least a decade, almost two. I don’t want to rehash my journey (you can read about it here), but I simply want to convey that for a long time I was a film-only guy, and I have a lot of experience with it. Now I rarely shoot film (only occasionally); instead, I use Fujifilm X cameras. I make Film Simulation Recipes that often mimic various film stocks and analog processes. I know a thing or two about film, Fujifilm, and making Fujifilm resemble film.

But does it? Can SOOC JPEGs really resemble film?

Horsetail Falls from Bridge – Columbia River Gorge, OR – Fujifilm X100V – “Improved Velvia

Why I’m writing this post is because I stumbled upon two articles on The Phoblogger: Fujifilm vs Film Photography and We Challenge You to Identify the Fujifilm Negative Film vs Simulation. Neither of these articles are particularly profound, and Film Simulation Recipes are not mentioned, and I’m pretty sure not used. I don’t know if any of my tips for achieving a film-look in-camera were implemented, but probably not. However, as I read these two articles I began to contemplate: what makes a film photograph special, why do we even want our digital pictures to look like film, and can they?

The answer to the first question—what makes film photographs special?—is soul. Digital and film, while very similar, have unique attributes—there are advantages and disadvantages for each. Digital is often very mathematical and clinical, which certainly serves a purpose. Film is more random and serendipitous, which is the character that gives it soul. With digital, the possibilities for an exposure are endless, but with film it is much more limited—yes, there’s a lot that can be done in the darkroom, but you’re still limited by the film itself and how it was shot. You get what you get—especially if it’s slide film—but that’s the fun of it.

You might want your digital pictures to look like film for that analog soul. How can you get the best of both worlds and achieve a film-soul in a digital picture? How can you leave some of that clinical-ness behind and replace it with randomness and serendipity? My first advice is to use Fujifilm cameras, as Fujifilm has sought to use their vast film experience to infuse a little of that soul into their digital cameras. Next, I suggest shooting JPEG using Film Simulation Recipes, which make it a you-get-what-you-get process more similar to film. Then try some of my tips for achieving a film-look in-camera, such as diffusion filters, vintage glass, high-ISO, etc., etc.. This isn’t the only method, but simply what I use and recommend.

Desert Snow – Canyonlands NP, UT – Fujifilm X-Pro3 – “Old Ektachrome

Can you capture digital pictures that resemble film? Could they actually trick someone into thinking you shoot film when you don’t? While I think the answer to both questions is “yes” (at least to some extent), I think they’re the wrong questions. Instead, the questions should be: what process works for me? And: do my pictures have soul?

If your process doesn’t really work for you, then change it. It took me years to figure out what process works for me: shooting SOOC JPEGs using Film Simulation Recipes on Fujifilm cameras. I don’t edit (aside from minor cropping, straightening, and very occasional small adjustments), which saves me tons of time. The three pictures in this article are recently captured camera-made JPEGs using different recipes on different cameras. That process is great for me, and it might be for you, too, but it’s not for everyone because people are different. You have to do what works for you and not worry about what others are doing.

While the serendipity of film gives it soul, and some of that soul can also be found in Fujifilm cameras (and even in other cameras and processes), the number one thing that gives a picture soul is the photographer. What you do with your photography gear to craft an image is what’s most important. When you infuse a bit of yourself into your images, that’s what makes it special—much more than anything else. So whether your pictures do or don’t resemble film doesn’t matter, just as long as your process works for you and you are photographing with vision. Capture the images that you want to create in the way that you want to create them. The rest just doesn’t matter.

Fujifilm X-Trans IV Film Simulation Recipe: Ilford HP5 Plus 400

Haystack Driftwood – Cannon Beach, OR – Fujifilm X100V – “Ilford HP5 Plus 400”

This new film simulation recipe comes from Anders Lindborg (Instagram). Anders is the one who created the Kodak Tri-X 400 recipeIlford Pan F Plus 50 recipe, Kodak Gold v2seven Fujicolor Pro 160NS recipesseven Fujicolor Pro 400H recipes, and made an important D-Range Priority discovery. So I know that you’ll love this one, too! He was kind enough to share it with me and allow me to share it with all of you—thank you, Anders!

Anders sent me a lengthy note on his process to create this recipe, and I want to share with you a short snippet just so you get an idea of the effort put into this. “I checked the spectrum sensitivity chart and looked for any significant bumps in the wavelengths,” he wrote. “For the largest bump, I checked what color it represents to try to match it as close as possible with the white balance shift. This recreated the bump in the recipe to make the simulation a bit extra sensitive to that specific color.” This was point four of seven in his process, and shows the kind of effort that can go into creating Film Simulation Recipes.

Specifically about this recipe, Anders noted, “Middle gray is the game here. Soft highlights and things disappearing into deep dark shadows, but never as black as Tri-X. Great for all day shooting in just about any weather. Looks totally awesome on winter shots!” I can add that it looks great on both sunny days and rainy days, too. I think it does especially well in moderate and high contrast situations.

Footbridge & Falls – Multnomah Falls, OR – Fujifilm X100V – “Ilford HP5 Plus 400”

Ilford began the Hypersensitive Panchromatic (HP) series in 1931. HP5 Plus 400 is the latest version, released in 1989, and still available today. This is a classic black-and-white film stock that has stood the test of time, and Anders did a great job mimicking it on Fujifilm cameras. This recipe is intended for use on the X-Pro3, X100V, X-T4, X-S10, X-E4, and X-T30 II cameras; however, for the X-T3 and X-T30, as well as X-Trans III cameras, simply ignore Grain size, and this recipe is compatible with those cameras, so anyone with an X-Trans III or IV camera can use this.

A side note: this recipe is different than my old Ilford HP5 Plus and Ilford HP5 Push Process recipes, which I still quite like, and are both excellent in low and mid contrast situations. Try those or Anders’ version—or all three if you are feeling adventurous!

Monochrome
Dynamic Range: DR400
Highlight: -1
Shadow: +1
Noise Reduction: -4
Sharpness: -2
Clarity: 0
Grain Effect: Strong, Large 
Color Chrome Effect: Off
Color Chrome Effect Blue: Off
White Balance: Daylight, +1 Red & -8 Blue
ISO: Auto, up to ISO 6400
Exposure Compensation: -2/3 to +2/3 (typically)

Example photographs, all camera-made JPEGs using this “Ilford HP5 Plus 400” Film Simulation Recipe on my Fujifilm X100V:

Horsetail Falls From Bridge – Columbia River Gorge, OR – Fujifilm X100V
Horsetail Falls – Columbia River Gorge, OR – Fujifilm X100V
Upper Falls – Multnomah Falls, OR – Fujifilm X100V
36 CFR 261.53(e) – Multnomah Falls, OR – Fujifilm X100V
Use Caution For Slipping Bandits – Multnomah Falls, OR – Fujifilm X100V
No Cars – Astoria, OR – Fujifilm X100V
Two Elk in a Yard – Warrenton, OR – Fujifilm X100V
Spiral Stairs – Fort Stevens SP, OR – Fujifilm X100V
Old Fireplace – Fort Stevens SP, OR – Fujifilm X100V
Stairs in the Forest – Fort Stevens SP, OR – Fujifilm X100V
Astoria & Columbia River – Astoria, OR – Fujifilm X100V
Two Ships in the Columbia River – Astoria, OR – Fujifilm X100V
Tetons, As Seen By Oneskies – Grand Teton NP, WY – Fujifilm X100V
South Jetty – Fort Stevens SP, OR – Fujifilm X100V
Pointing To The Pacific – Cannon Beach, OR – Fujifilm X100V
Haystack Sticks – Cannon Beach, OR – Fujifilm X100V

Find this film simulation recipes and over 200 more on the Fuji X Weekly — Film Recipes App!

Fujifilm X100V vs iPhone, Part 2: Multnomah Falls

iPhone 11 – RitchieCam app – Faded Film filter

Part 1: Grand Tetons

Multnomah Falls is an iconic scenic stop along the historic Columbia River Highway in Oregon. Found within the Columbia River Gorge, it is the tallest year-round waterfall in Oregon, and the most visited natural site in the Pacific Northwest of the United States. The famous footbridge was constructed in 1915, while the gift-shop at the bottom—originally a lodge—was built in 1925, and both are on the National Register of Historic Places. It is an incredible location to experience, with beauty that rivals what one might find within National Parks.

I recently visited Multnomah Falls, and used my Fujifilm X100V and iPhone 11 to photograph this amazing spot. Unsurprisingly, I had several of my Film Simulation Recipes programmed into my X100V, and I used my RitchieCam camera app on my iPhone. Because there is a lot of mist from the falls, and it was a rainy day (as is common there), having weather-sealed cameras was important—both the X100V (as long as a filter is on the front) and the iPhone can handle getting wet, and both did get wet. Really wet.

While it might seem unnecessary to carry both an X100V and an iPhone, that turned out not to be the case for two reasons: focal-length, and ease of sharing. The X100V has a very useful 34.5mm (equivalent) focal-length lens, while the iPhone 11 has a 26mm (equivalent) camera and 13mm (equivalent) camera (if I had the “Pro” version, it would also include a 52mm camera, but alas I don’t have that model). The X100V was wide-angle enough to capture some good photographs of the falls, but the wider-angle lenses on the iPhone 11 were often better options, and I used it more than the Fujifilm camera at this location. To the second point, I was able to text pictures of the falls to some family and friends immediately—before even getting back to the car—and share with you via social media pictures of the falls within minutes. The X100V pictures were pretty quick and easy to share, too—thanks to the wonderful JPEG output of the camera—but not quite as immediate as the iPhone images.

iPhone 11 – RitchieCam app – MetroColor filter

What’s better, X100V or iPhone? For pure image quality, the Fujifilm camera is hands down better, but that only really matters if you are viewing the pictures large. Looking at them on this website or on social media, the quality difference is hard to spot, and even if you can see it, the quality difference is pretty insignificant. If you were viewing 11″ x 14″ prints of the pictures, the quality difference would still be fairly small, although if you compared them side-by-side you could tell without much trouble that the X100V is superior. But if you are viewing 16″ x 20″ prints or larger, the iPhone images just don’t hold up nearly as well as the Fujifilm. So the X100V is definitely the better tool if you might print the pictures large, but the iPhone is a capable tool if you don’t think you’ll be printing large—let’s face it, most pictures don’t get printed large, or even printed at all.

There’s no reason why both the X100V and the iPhone (or other cellphone camera) can’t both live together in peace and harmony. They’re different photographic tools that have different advantages and disadvantages, and they can both serve purposes within your photography. Film Simulation Recipes make the Fujifilm workflow more streamlined and the process more enjoyable. RitchieCam does the same thing for your iPhone photography. One tool might be better in a certain circumstance, and the other might be better in another circumstance, and perhaps both might be useful in a circumstance like Multnomah Falls.

Do you like the Fujifilm X100V pictures better, the iPhone pictures better, some of each, or none at all? Which Film Simulation Recipe that I used do you prefer? Which RitchieCam filter did the best? Let me know what you think in the comments!

Fujifilm X100V – New Recipe Coming Soon
Fujifilm X100V – New Recipe Coming Soon
Fujifilm X100V – Kodachrome 1 recipe
iPhone 11 – RitchieCam app – Vintage Kodak filter
Fujifilm X100V – Vintage Vibes recipe
iPhone 11 – RitchieCam app – B&W Fade filter
Fujifilm X100V – Kodak High Definition Plus 200 recipe
iPhone 11 – RitchieCam app – Faded Film filter
Fujifilm X100V – Vintage Vibes recipe
iPhone 11 – RitchieCam app – B&W Fade filter
iPhone 11 – RitchieCam app – B&W Fade filter

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