Fujifilm X100V Film Simulation Recipe: Ilford Ortho Plus 80

760 – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V – “Ilford Ortho Plus 80”

Many years ago I used to develop my own black-and-white film. It required removing the film from the cassette, winding it around a developing reel, and placing the reel into a developing canister—all in complete darkness! It was very tricky. If you didn’t get the film wound onto the reel quite right, it could ruin the film during development. When people think of darkrooms, they often think of dipping photosensitive papers into tubs of chemicals in dim amber light. This red light is called a safelight, and it’s safe for photographic paper, but not safe for undeveloped photographic film—that’s why you have to get the film from the cassette to the canister in complete darkness.

Ilford Ortho Plus 80 film is different, as it’s orthochromatic, which means it’s sensitive to blue and green light but not red, making it possible to transfer the film from the cassette to the canister under a safelight. This film was introduced in 2019, so it hasn’t been around very long. It produces sharp, fine-grain images that are fairly contrasty for a low-ISO film, and reds will be rendered dark. I’ve never used this film myself, so I relied on pictures I found on the internet to create this recipe. With film, how it’s shot, developed, and printed or scanned can have a big impact on how it looks, and that’s certainly a challenge for creating a facsimile on Fujifilm cameras, but I think this one is pretty close from the pictures I’ve seen. It also seems to be in the neighborhood of Washi S 50.

Monochrome Country – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X100V – “Ilford Ortho Plus 80

I set Monochromatic Color (Toning) to WC +1 because many of the examples that I found had some warm toning (not sure if it’s in-software after scanning or from toned prints or both), but it’s completely optional, you can set WC to 0 if you prefer. This recipe is intended for newer X-Trans IV cameras, such as the Fujifilm X100V, X-T4, X-Pro3 and X-S10, and isn’t compatible with other cameras; however, if you disregard Clarity you can achieve something similar on the X-T3 and X-T30, but it won’t be exactly the same (feel free to try).

Monochrome+G
Dynamic Range: DR400
Highlight: +2
Shadow: +3
Noise Reduction: -4
Sharpening: +2
Clarity: -2
Toning: WC +1, MG 0

Grain Effect: Weak, Small
Color Chrome Effect: Strong
Color Chrome Effect Blue: Off
White Balance: 7000K, -5 Red & 0 Blue
ISO: Auto, up to ISO 6400
Exposure Compensation: +1/3 to +1 (typically)

Example photographs, all camera-made JPEGs using this Ilford Ortho Plus 80 film simulation recipe on my Fujifilm X100V:

Thorns of Nature – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Monochrome Berries – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Icy River – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Zipping – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Playground Boy – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Silhouette Playground – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Canvas Moon – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Cat & Salmon – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Fedex Delivery – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Locked Box – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Emotion Through Glass – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Tablet Play – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Arizona Film – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

See also: Film Simulation Recipes

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Fujifilm X100V Film Simulation Recipe: Color Negative 400

Wind Rewind – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V – “Color Negative 400”

I ran across a picture in an article about coffee, and that picture reminded me a lot of the Classic Negative film simulation. I don’t think the picture was captured with Classic Negative; perhaps a VSCO (or some other brand) preset was used that was intended to look something like Superia film. So, with one picture as my guide, I set out to recreate the look with my Fujifilm X100V. Ideally you want more than one sample picture to study, but that’s all I had. These settings look pretty darn close to that picture, but it’s difficult to know if it’s truly accurate because I only had one sample to work with, and I don’t know how it should look in various situations. Still, I’m happy with how it turned out.

Initially I was going to name this recipe “Fujicolor Negative” because it has a Fujicolor Superia-like look, but then I stumbled across some Kodak ColorPlus 400 photographs, and they looked quite similar to these pictures. Even though the resemblance to ColorPlus 400 is completely accidental, I thought that calling it “Color Negative 400” was more appropriate because it is in the general ballpark of a film that’s not Fujicolor. Or, more accurately, it is similar to both a Kodak stock and a Fujifilm stock, and not exactly like either. I do think, no matter how close it may or may not be to an actual film, it has a nice film-like aesthetic to it that many will appreciate.

Ability – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V – “Color Negative 400”

This recipe is dark and contrasty, and can be used to create a certain moody look. I think it works best in low-contrast scenes, and does well both indoors and outdoors. This recipe is only compatible (as of this writing) with the Fujifilm X100V, X-Pro3, X-T4 and X-S10 cameras.

Classic Negative
Dynamic Range: DR400
Highlight: 0
Shadow: +4
Color: +4
Noise Reduction: -4
Sharpening: 0
Clarity: -5
Grain Effect: Weak, Large
Color Chrome Effect: Weak
Color Chrome Effect Blue: Weak
White Balance: Auto, -2 Red & -4 Blue
ISO: Auto, up to ISO 6400
Exposure Compensation: +1/3 to +1 (typically)

Example photographs, all camera-made JPEGs using this Color Negative 400 film simulation recipe on my Fujifilm X100V:

Succulent Faux – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Fabric Leaf – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Holga 120N & Ilford HP5 Plus – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Table Bolsey – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Three Indoor Plants – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Face Masks Are Required – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Speed Stars – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Fish on a Wall – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Waiting for Fish – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Contemplation – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Stroller Ride – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Leaning into the Frame – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Bicycle Here – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Birds in a Dormant Tree – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

See also: Film Simulation Recipes

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Fujifilm X100V Film Simulation Recipe: Kodak Portra 400 v2

Sage Sunset – Antelope Island SP, UT – Fujifilm X100V – “Kodak Portra 400 v2”

One film can have many different looks depending on how it’s shot, developed, scanned or printed. This new Portra 400 film simulation recipe, called Kodak Portra 400 v2, is an alternative aesthetic, created by studying examples of actual Portra 400 film (thanks to Julien Jarry). The “other” Fujifilm X100V Kodak Portra 400 recipe was also created by studying examples of actual film (thanks to Thomas Schwab). They’re both good options for achieving a Portra look, and neither is more “right” than the other.

This isn’t exactly a brand-new recipe. It was published as a Patron early-access recipe on the Fuji X Weekly App back on December 1st, and now another early-access recipe has replaced it, so this one is now available to everyone! You might remember that this Kodak Porta 400 v2 recipe was mentioned in the Kyle McDougall preset comparison article.

Ford Truck – Centerville, UT – Fujifilm X100V – “Kodak Portra 400 v2”

If you like my other Portra recipes, you’re sure to like this one, too. Because it uses Clarity, it slows down the camera considerably. I hope that Fujifilm speeds this up with a firmware update at some point, but in the meantime, if you can, my recommendation is to embrace the slowdown. This recipe is only compatible with the latest Fujifilm X cameras: the X-Pro3, X100V, X-T4 and X-S10.

Classic Chrome
Dynamic Range: DR400
Highlight: 0
Shadow: -2
Color: +2
Noise Reduction: -4
Sharpening: -2
Clarity: -2
Grain Effect: Strong, Small
Color Chrome Effect: Strong
Color Chrome Effect Blue: Weak
White Balance: 5200K, +1 Red & -6 Blue
ISO: Auto, up to ISO 6400
Exposure Compensation: +1/3 to +1 (typically)

Example photographs, all camera-made JPEGs using this new Kodak Portra 400 v2 film simulation recipe on my Fujifilm X100V:

Stacked Pallets – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Now Hiring – Centerville, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Double-Double – Centerville, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Burger Roof – Centerville, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Julien Jarry with RED Camera – Antelope Island SP, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Julien Filming – Antelope Island SP, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Yellow Rabbitbrush – Antelope Island SP, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Frary Peak Peeking – Antelope Island SP, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Desert Brush – Antelope Island SP, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Light Log – Big Fork, MT – Fujifilm X100V
Sunlight Through the Forest Trees – Big Arm, MT – Fujifilm X100V
One Lane Bridge – Big Fork, MT – Fujifilm X100V
String of Lightbulbs – Flathead Lake, MT – Fujifilm X100V
Dock at Night – Flathead Lake, MT – Fujifilm X100V
Moon Over RV – Antelope Island SP, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Sunset RED – Antelope Island SP, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Buffalo Point Sunset – Antelope Island SP, UT – Fujifilm X100V

See also: Film Simulation Recipes

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Fujifilm X100V Film Simulation Recipe: Superia Premium 400

Ivy Leaves – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V – “Superia Premium 400”

After publishing film simulation recipes for Superia 100, Superia Xtra 400, Superia 800 and Superia 1600 film stocks, as well as Reala 100 and Luis Costa’s Classic Negative (which are both in the Superia realm), I’ve been asked a few times to create a Superia Premium 400 recipe. I’ve never shot actual Premium 400 film, and had to rely on the internet, which isn’t ideal, especially since there are limited examples for this particular film, but I think these settings are pretty good.

Superia Premium 400 is a variant of Superia Xtra 400, sold only in Japan, intended to better replicate Japanese skin tones. It seems to have more of an orange color-cast. Premium 400 doesn’t have the “4th cyan color layer” that every other Superia film has, and that seems to be the biggest difference between it and Xtra 400. The way that this recipe came about is a Fuji X Weekly reader (sorry, I forgot who, and I can’t find the message) sent me his or her best guess of some settings to replicate Premium 400, and wanted advice on how to improve it. I took a look, made some changes, and sent it back, but it wasn’t right, so I kept working on it. After a couple weeks of experimenting, I settled on these settings, which I’m quite satisfied with.

Amanda’s Camera – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V – “Superia Premium 400”

There are a whole bunch of options for achieving a Superia look with your Fujifilm camera. Even though this recipe is based on a more obscure variation, the results are quite interesting, and I think a lot of people are going to really appreciate it. It’s compatible with the Fujifilm X100V, X-Pro3, X-T4 and X-S10 cameras.

Classic Negative
Dynamic Range: DR200
Highlight: -2
Shadow: 0
Color: +4
Noise Reduction: -4
Sharpening: -1
Clarity: -2
Grain Effect: Strong, Small
Color Chrome Effect: Strong
Color Chrome Effect Blue: Weak
White Balance: 4700K, +4 Red & -3 Blue
ISO: Auto, up to ISO 6400
Exposure Compensation: +2/3 to +1 (typically)

Example photographs, all camera-made JPEGs using this Superia Premium 400 film simulation recipe on my Fujifilm X100V:

Masked Reflection – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Waiting Girl – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Shrub & Fountain – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Nutcracker – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Cinemark Sun – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Hill House – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Jon on a Bridge – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Setting Sun Forest – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Rural Fence – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Forget Me Knots – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Chainlink Berries – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Yellow Blackberry Leaf – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Rural Autumn Leaves – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Late Autumn Sunstar – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Neighborhood in Evening Light – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Intent – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Fujifilm X100V Film Simulation Recipe: Superia Xtra 400

Red Leaf – Fruit Heights, UT – Fujifilm X100V – “Superia Xtra 400”

I’ve had a lot of requests for a Superia Xtra 400 film simulation recipe. Fujifilm introduced Superia Xtra 400, a consumer-grade color negative film, in 1998, replacing Super G Plus 400. This film has been updated a couple of times, first in 2003 and again in 2006. It’s been widely used, thanks to its low cost and versatility. I’ve shot several rolls of this film over the years.

Thomas Schwab, who has invented a few film simulation recipes, and who I’ve collaborated with on a number of others, created this Superia Xtra 400 recipe. He did this by capturing a roll of actual Superia Xtra 400 film with a film camera while capturing identical exposures with his Fujifilm cameras, then, using X RAW Studio, worked on the settings until he found a match. As you can imagine, he put a lot of time and effort into creating this! He shared with me some of his side-by-side pictures—comparing the film with this recipe—and it was tough to figure out which was which, they looked so close!

Creek Through Autumn Forest – Fruit Heights, UT – Fujifilm X100V – “Superia Xtra 400”

What I find interesting is that this recipe isn’t all that much different than Luis Costa’s Classic Negative recipe. I said of Luis’ recipe, “It reminds me a lot of Superia Xtra 400 with a warming filter, or maybe Superia 200 pushed one stop.” Turns out it was pretty darn close to Xtra 400. This recipe by Thomas is even closer! But, of course, with film, so much depends on how it’s shot, developed, and scanned or printed, and the aesthetic can vary significantly. So, really, both recipes mimic Xtra 400, but this one proudly carries the name, as it is a very close match to the film.

Thank you, Thomas, for creating this recipe and sharing it! I know that many of you will love it. I love it! This Superia Xtra 400 film simulation recipe is compatible with the Fujifilm X100V, X-Pro3, X-T4, and X-S10.

Classic Negative
Dynamic Range: DR400
Highlight: 0
Shadow: -1
Color: +4
Noise Reduction: -4
Sharpening: -1
Clarity: -2
Grain Effect: Strong, Small
Color Chrome Effect: Off
Color Chrome Effect Blue: Strong
White Balance: Auto, +3 Red & -5 Blue
ISO: Auto, up to ISO 6400
Exposure Compensation: 0 to +1 (typically)

Example photographs, all camera-made JPEGs using this Superia Xtra 400 film simulation recipe on my Fujifilm X100V:

Eats & Treats – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Fireplace – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Brick & Fire – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Red & Yellow Fire Hydrant – Layton, UT – Fujifilm X100V
November Pumkin – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Fall Leaf in a Forest – Fruit Heights, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Forest Creek – Fruit Heights, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Autumn Branch Over Creek – Fruit Heights, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Autumn Creek – Fruit Heights, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Golden Path – Fruit Heights, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Trail Through the Forest – Fruit Heights, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Three Leaves – Fruit Heights, UT – Fujifilm X100V

See also: X-Trans IV Film Simulation Recipes

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Fujifilm X100V Film Simulation Recipe: Kodak Portra 800

November Cherries – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V – “Kodak Portra 800”

Kodak introduced Portra 800 in 1998. The Portra line has seen a number of revisions and updates over the years, but I couldn’t find any information if the current Portra 800 film is the exact same emulsion from 1998, or if it’s gone through some changes over the years like the ISO 400 and 160 versions. Portra 800 is one of the best options for high-ISO color photography, but I’ve never shot it myself.

There are some good online resources that are helpful when creating film simulation recipes for films that I’ve never used, which I did consult, but that’s not how these settings came about. You see, there’s a new version of my Portra 400 recipe (which I know you’ll love) that’s coming soon, and this recipe is a variant of that. Thomas Schwab, who I’ve collaborated with on a number of different recipes (including Portra 400), and who has actually shot Portra 800, helped me out with this one. Thanks, Thomas!

Cabela’s Boy – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V – “Kodak Portra 800”

I know that many of will love this Kodak Portra 800 film simulation recipe! It’s really nice, and has a good film-like aesthetic. Does it faithfully resemble real Portra 800? I think it does, but film can look different depending on how it’s shot, developed, scanned or printed, and this recipe won’t mimic every aspect of the film. Even so, I think this one will be quite popular, and many of you will use it regularly. It’s only compatible (as of this writing) with the Fujifilm X100V, X-Pro3, X-T4 and X-S10 cameras.

Classic Chrome
Dynamic Range: DR400
Highlight: +1
Shadow: 0
Color: +3
Noise Reduction: -4
Sharpening: -2
Clarity: -4
Grain Effect: Strong, Large
Color Chrome Effect: Strong
Color Chrome Effect Blue: Weak
White Balance: 5200K, +1 Red & -5 Blue
ISO: Auto, up to ISO 6400
Exposure Compensation: +1/3 to +1 (typically)

Example photographs, all camera-made JPEGs using this new Kodak Portra 800 film simulation recipe on my Fujifilm X100V:

Brown Tree Leaves – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Small Shrub – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Backyard Tree Leaves – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Yellow House – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Suburban Mailboxes – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Red Fire Hydrant – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Suburban Peek – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Evening Commute – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Smith’s – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Drug – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Suburban Dusk – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Parked Car in the Dark – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Tunnel Bench – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Night Mall Architecture – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Empty Sidewalk at Night – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Christmas Decor Display – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Succulent & Globe – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Jon Wearing Cabela’s Hat – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Potted Plant on End Table – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Accidental Exposure – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Sunlight Through a Tree – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

See also: Fujifilm X-Trans IV Recipes

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Fujifilm X100V Film Simulation Recipe: B&W Superia

White House – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V – “B&W Superia”

Sometimes it’s fun to experiment with the settings on different film simulation recipes—make small changes and see what the results are. My Ektachrome 100SW recipe come about because someone took my Kodachrome II recipe and used Velvia instead of Classic Chrome. I did a similar experiment recently with my Kodachrome 64 recipe. This B&W Superia film simulation recipe came about that same way.

Fuji X Weekly reader Thomas Schwab took my Fujicolor Superia 1600 recipe and made a few changes, most notably Acros instead of Classic Negative. There are a few other differences, such as Grain and White Balance, but it’s mostly the Superia 1600 recipe, yet in monochrome instead of color. There never was a black-and-white Superia film, but it is possible to develop Superia in black-and-white chemistry as a monochrome film (technically, this is cross-processing). While there might be some similarities to Superia film developed as B&W and this recipe, they’re completely coincidental, as these settings aren’t intended to mimic anything specific.

Lamp Shadow – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V – “B&W Superia”

Even though this B&W Superia recipe isn’t intended to look like any particular film, it nonetheless produces very nice results. It calls for a little Toning, which resembles a quick Sepia bath, a common archival technique in monochrome printing, but that’s optional. The Clarity setting will slow down the camera considerably, so be aware of that. This recipe is only compatible (as of this writing) with the Fujifilm X100V, X-Pro3 and X-T4 cameras.

Acros (+Y, +R, +G)
Dynamic Range: DR400
Highlight: 0
Shadow: +2
Noise Reduction: -4
Sharpening: -1
Clarity: -4
Grain Effect: Weak, Large
Color Chrome Effect: Strong
Color Chrome Effect Blue: Strong
White Balance: Auto, 0 Red & 0 Blue
ISO: Auto, up to ISO 12800
Exposure Compensation: +1/3 to +2/3 (typically)

Example photographs, all camera-made JPEGs using this B&W Superia film simulation recipe on my Fujifilm X100V:

Sunlight & Structure – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Urban Canopy – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Bakery Thriftshop – Ogden, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Curved Corner – Ogden, UT – Fujifilm X100V
We’re Open! – Ogden, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Oct 09 – Ogden, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Window Vase – Ogden, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Monochrome Leaf – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Fujifilm X100V Film Simulation Recipe: Agfa Vista 100

Daisies at the Dock – Big Arm, MT – Fujifilm X100V – “Agfa Vista 100”

In the film era, Agfa was not as big as Fujifilm or especially Kodak, but they were popular nonetheless, particularly in Europe. Vista 100 was a general purpose color negative film made by Agfa between 2001 and 2005. It was preceded by Agfacolor HDC+ 100, which produced similar (but not identical) results. There were two films, AgfaPhoto Vista 100 and AgfaPhoto Vista Plus 100, that were manufactured for a time, neither of which are the same emulsion as Agfa Vista 100. Similar names, different films.

This Agfa Vista 100 film simulation recipe came about after someone asked for settings similar to an Agfa Vista 100 Lightroom preset. It was sample pictures from that preset that I most consulted for this recipe, but I did look at examples of the film that I found online. This recipe produces results similar to the film, but is closer to the preset than the film. This might be more similar to Agfa Vista 200, which had a bit more saturation, contrast and grain; really, it’s in the ballpark of both the ISO 100 and 200 versions of the film, as they’re both pretty close to each other.

Newstand – Polson, MT – Fujifilm X100V – “Agfa Vista 100”

Because this requires the Classic Negative film simulation, as well as Clarity (which will slow your camera down, unfortunately) and Color Chrome Effect Blue, this film simulation recipe is only compatible (as of this writing) with the Fujifilm X100V, X-T4 and X-Pro3. I think many of you are going to really appreciate this recipe and it will be an instant favorite for some of you.

Classic Negative
Dynamic Range: DR200
Highlight: +1
Shadow: -2
Color: +2
Noise Reduction: -4
Sharpening: -0
Clarity: +3
Grain Effect: Strong, Small
Color Chrome Effect: Weak
Color Chrome Effect Blue: Weak
White Balance: 5600K, -4 Red & -5 Blue
ISO: Auto, up to ISO 6400
Exposure Compensation: 0 to +2/3 (typically)

Example photographs, all camera-made JPEGs using this Agfa Vista 100 film simulation recipe on my Fujifilm X100V:

Lake McDonald Driftwood – Glacier NP, MT – Fujifilm X100V
Vuja de – Big Arm, MT – Fujifilm X100V
Boy, Fishing – Big Arm, MT – Fujifilm X100V
Shore of Wild Horse Island – Flathead Lake, MT – Fujifilm X100V
Evening at the Lake – Big Arm, MT – Fujifilm X100V
Three Sailboats – Big Arm, MT – Fujifilm X100V
Yellow Kayak – Big Arm, MT – Fujifilm X100V
Green Canoe – Big Arm, MT – Fujifilm X100V
Lunch Date – Polson, MT – Fujifilm X100V
Man in the Hat – Polson, MT – Fujifilm X100V
Brick & Metal – Polson, MT – Fujifilm X100V
Bank Building – Butte, MT – Fujifilm X100V
Cafe Open – Butte, MT – Fujifilm X100V
Drinking Fountain – Layton, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Circle Slide – Layton, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Yard Sale – Layton, UT – Fujifilm X100V
If a Tree Falls in the Forest – Glacier NP, MT – Fujifilm X100V
Cabin Flowers – Polebridge, MT – Fujifilm X100V

See also: Film Simulation Recipes

This post contains affiliate links, and if you make a purchase using my links I’ll be compensated a small amount for it.

Fujifilm X100V Black    Amazon   B&H
Fujifilm X100V Silver   Amazon   B&H

Help Fuji X Weekly

Nobody pays me to write the content found on fujixweekly.com. There's a real cost to operating and maintaining this site, not to mention all the time that I pour into it. If you appreciated this article, please consider making a one-time gift contribution. Thank you!

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Fujifilm X100V Film Simulation Recipe: Kodachrome 1

Kodak Blossoms – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V – “Kodachrome 1”

Kodachrome
They give us those nice bright colors
They give us the greens of summer
Makes you think all the world’s a sunny day

Kodachrome is probably the most iconic photographic film ever made. It was legendary, and many people saw the world through its colors. Kodak produced Kodachrome film from 1935 through 2009, when it was suddenly discontinued.

The Kodachrome name has been used for many different films over the years. The first Kodachrome product was a two-glass-plate color negative that was introduced in 1915. Like all other color photography methods of its time, the results weren’t particularly good and the product not especially successful.

Forest Brooks – Fruit Heights, UT – Fujifilm X100V – “Kodachrome 1”

In 1935 Kodak released its next Kodachrome, which was a color transparency film with an ISO of 10. This Kodachrome was the first color film that produced reasonably accurate colors and was the first commercially successful color film. It became the standard film for color photography for a couple decades, and was even Ansel Adams’ preferred choice for color work. The December 1946 issue of Arizona Highways, which was the first all-color magazine in the world, featured Barry Goldwater’s Kodachrome images.

Kodak made significant improvements to Kodachrome, and in 1961 released Kodachrome II. This film boasted more accurate colors, sharper images, finer grain, and a faster ISO of 25. While it was still similar to the previous Kodachrome, it was better in pretty much every way. A year later Kodachrome-X was introduced, which had an ISO of 64.

Another generation of Kodachrome, which came out in 1974, saw Kodachrome II replaced by Kodachrome 25 and Kodachrome-X replaced by Kodachrome 64. The differences between this version and the previous weren’t huge with nearly identical image quality. The biggest change was going from the K-12 to the K-14 development process (which was a little less complex, but still complex). This generation of Kodachrome is what most people think of when they picture (pun intended) the film, gracing the pages of magazines like National Geographic.

CPI – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V – “Kodachrome 1”

I personally have shot plenty of Kodachrome, mostly Kodachrome 64. It was a good general use film that produced sharp images and pleasing colors. I haven’t used it in more than a decade. Its days are gone. Even if you can find an old roll of the film, there are no labs in the world that will develop it.

This Kodachrome 1 film simulation recipe is meant to mimic that first era of Kodachrome. This isn’t your parent’s or grandparent’s Kodachrome, it’s your great-grandparent’s. This Kodachrome 1 recipe is actually an updated version of my Vintage Kodachrome recipe. Since the new Fujifilm cameras have more JPEG options, such as Clarity, Color Chrome Effect and Color Chrome Effect Blue, it’s possible to get more accurate or at least different looks out-of-camera. This recipe is very similar to the original version, but I hope this one is just a tad better. It’s only compatible with the X100V, X-Pro3 and X-T4 cameras; if you don’t have one of those cameras, give the Vintage Kodachrome recipe a try. Both the old and this new version have a great vintage analog look that I’m sure many of you will appreciate. I want to give a big “thank you” to Fuji X Weekly reader Thomas Schwab for his help with updating this recipe.

Classic Chrome
Dynamic Range: DR400
Highlight: +4
Shadow: -2
Color: +4
Noise Reduction: -4
Sharpening: -2
Clarity: +1
Grain Effect: Strong, Small
Color Chrome Effect: Strong
Color Chrome Effect Blue: Weak
White Balance: Auto, +2 Red & -4 Blue
ISO: Auto, up to ISO 6400
Exposure Compensation: -1/3 to -1 (typically)

Example photographs, all camera-made JPEGs using this Kodachrome 1 film simulation recipe on my Fujifilm X100V:

Reel 2 Reel – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Behind the Grocery Store – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
American Neighborhood – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Open Window Blinds – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Playing Cards – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Summer Bloom – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Forest Edge – Fruit Heights, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Dead Tree Trunk – Fruit Heights, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Trees of Life & Death – Fruit Heights, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Sunlight & Leaves – Fruit Heights, UT – Fujifilm X100V

See also: Film Simulation Recipes

This post contains affiliate links, and if you make a purchase using my links I’ll be compensated a small amount for it.

Fujifilm X100V Black    Amazon   B&H
Fujifilm X100V Silver   Amazon   B&H

Help Fuji X Weekly

Nobody pays me to write the content found on fujixweekly.com. There's a real cost to operating and maintaining this site, not to mention all the time that I pour into it. If you appreciated this article, please consider making a one-time gift contribution. Thank you!

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Fujifilm X100V Film Simulation Recipe: Bright Summer

Yellow Shack – Syracuse, UT – Fujifilm X100V – “Bright Summer”

I get asked frequently to create film simulation recipes for many different film aesthetics, but sometimes I get asked to recreate the look of a photographer and not a film. This recipe falls into the latter category, as it is intended to resemble the aesthetic of Preet (Instagram), a photographer from Dubai. Preet uses a Fujifilm X-Pro3, but he shoots RAW and edits in Lightroom. In fact, he told me that he will soon be releasing his own Lightroom presets so that you can get his aesthetic in-software. I wanted to get close tp his look in-camera without the need for RAW editing, so I created this film simulation recipe, which is modeled after Preet’s pictures. It’s not an exact match, but probably as close as you can get straight-out-of-camera.

I can recognize Preet’s images without even seeing his name. They are bright, low-contrast (but typically of high-contrast scenes), and vibrant with a warm yellow-ish cast. They are almost kodak-esque, but not exactly like any specific film, and clean without grain. This film simulation recipe is pretty close to that aesthetic. Preet photographs a lot of beach scenes, buildings, and cars. I’m reminded of a bright summer day, which is why I call this recipe “Bright Summer.”

Roof – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V – “Bright Summer”

I found with this recipe that sometimes Color should be set to +3 instead of +4 to better match Preet’s look, but oftentimes +4 is better, and occasionally +5 would be most correct if such a setting existed. If you prefer Color set to +3 don’t be afraid to do it. White Balance Shift occasionally looks more correct with Red set to -5, but I found -4 to be better for most pictures. It’s a similar situation for Blue: -3 is sometimes a better match, but most often -2 is most correct. You’ll have to decide if you prefer the recipe as stated below, or if -5 Red & -2 Blue, or -5 Red & -3 Blue, or -4 Red and -3 Blue works better for you. It might vary from picture-to-picture. Although I have Grain set to Off, I would consider setting it to Weak and Small, but that’s just my taste. To get even closer to Preet’s look, bring down the highlights and lift the shadows very slightly with a curves adjustment in-software (which, of course, is completely optional). This film simulation recipe is only compatible with the Fujifilm X100V, X-Pro3 and X-T4.

Classic Chrome
Dynamic Range: DR400
Highlight: -2
Shadow: -2
Color: +4
Noise Reduction: -4
Sharpening: 0
Clarity: -5
Grain Effect: Off
Color Chrome Effect: Strong
Color Chrome Effect Blue: Off
White Balance: 7100K, -4 Red & -2 Blue
ISO: Auto, up to ISO 6400
Exposure Compensation: +1 to +2 (typically)

Example photographs, all camera-made JPEGs using this “Bright Summer” film simulation recipe (without any modifications) on my Fujifilm X100V:

Free Flu Shot – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
No, No, No! – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Chopstix – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Twin Garage Doors – Layton, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Roof Slant 1– Layton, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Roof Slant 2 – Layton, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Roof Ladder – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Lemon Ice Cream Truck – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Suburban Flowerbed – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Construction Truck – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Burger King Parking Lot – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Crown Burgers – Layton, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Notice: Stop – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Lamp & Sky – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Yellow House – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Yellow Tree Summer – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
American Tree – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Outdoor Succulent – Layton, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Parking Lot Reflections – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Light Sphere – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

See also: Film Simulation Recipes

This post contains affiliate links, and if you make a purchase using my links I’ll be compensated a small amount for it.

Fujifilm X100V Black    Amazon   B&H
Fujifilm X100V Silver   Amazon   B&H

Help Fuji X Weekly

Nobody pays me to write the content found on fujixweekly.com. There's a real cost to operating and maintaining this site, not to mention all the time that I pour into it. If you appreciated this article, please consider making a one-time gift contribution. Thank you!

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With Other Film Simulations: Kodachrome 64

Classic Chrome

Here’s a unique idea that was suggested to me: apply different film simulations to different recipes, just to see what you get. Actually, that’s how My Ektachrome 100SW recipe came to be: a Fuji X Weekly reader took my Kodachrome II recipe and replaced Classic Chrome with Velvia. I’m going to make a series out of this, which I’m calling With Other Film Simulations, and maybe something interesting will come out of it.

I’ll start with the Fujifilm X100V Kodachrome 64 film simulation recipe. The original picture (at the top of this post), which you might recognize from my Rover Mini YouTube video, was made using Classic Chrome, the film simulation that the Kodachrome 64 recipe requires. The idea here is to keep every setting the same except for the film simulation. In case you don’t remember, the settings are:

Dynamic Range: DR200
Highlight: 0
Shadow: 0
Color: +2
Noise Reduction: -4
Sharpening: +1
Clarity: +3
Grain Effect: Weak, Small
Color Chrome Effect: Strong
Color Chrome Effect Blue: Weak
White Balance: Daylight, +2 Red & -5 Blue

Let’s look at the pictures:

Provia
Velvia
Astia
PRO Neg. Hi
PRO Neg. Std
Classic Negative
Acros
Monochrome
Sepia

The color images are surprisingly similar. Velvia stands out for being the most vibrant. PRO Neg. Std stands out for having the lowest contrast. Classic Negative stands out for its color shift. The original version, which uses Classic Chrome, is still my favorite, but it is interesting to see how the other film simulations affect the picture. The Monochrome film simulation with these settings might prove to be a good low-contrast black-and-white recipe, something I’ll have to take a closer look at.

I hope that you enjoyed this quick article! We’ll do some more of these in the coming weeks and months. Which film simulation did you find most interesting with the Kodachrome 64 settings? Let me know in the comments!

Fujifilm X100V Film Simulation Recipe: Kodak T-Max 400

Tree Behind Bars – North Salt Lake, UT – Fujifilm X100V – “Kodak T-Max 400”

Kodak introduced T-Max black-and-white negative film back in 1986, and they dubbed it “the finest-grained black-and-white film in the world.” While it certainly has fine-grain, particularly the low-ISO version, I don’t know how accurate Kodak’s proclamation was. It’s available in ISO 100, 400 and 3200 variants. This film simulation recipe is intended to resemble the ISO 400 version.

T-Max 400 is a popular B&W film. I’ve used it, although it has been many, many years. Kodak updated the film in 2007 to be sharper and have finer grain; it’s the old version that I have personal experience with. With any film, but perhaps especially with black-and-white negative film, so much can be altered in the darkroom to customize the aesthetic, and one film can produce many different looks, so creating a recipe can be controversial because it might not look exactly like what someone thinks it should. Still, I hope that you will recognize this as T-Max-esque.

You might find that this recipe looks familiar. Actually, it began as Kodak Tri-X 400. Fuji X Weekly readers Thomas Schwab (who has helped with several recipes) and Anders Linborg (who invented the Tri-X recipe) worked together to modify that recipe into this one. I added a couple of small revisions, and now we have Kodak T-Max 400! It really was a group effort, but mostly Thomas and Anders. Thanks, guys!

Night Clouds – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V – “Kodak T-Max 400”

This Kodak T-Max 400 film simulation recipe is intended for the Fujifilm X100V, X-Pro3 and X-T4 cameras; however, with a couple small modifications, it can be used on any X-Trans III or IV camera. First, if your camera doesn’t have Clarity, consider using +1 Highlight and +4 Shadow instead, although you can certainly keep those settings as they are in the recipe below. If your camera doesn’t have the option for Grain size (only strength), set it to Strong. I used Toning on this recipe, which is completely optional, but on the X-T3 and X-T30, which has a different Toning menu, consider using +1 (warm). Back when I shot film I would often give my prints a quick Sepia bath, both for warmth and archival reasons, and the Toning option on your X-Trans IV camera does a good job of mimicking that.

One difference that you might notice between this recipe and Tri-X is ISO. On that recipe I suggest using ISO 1600 to 12800. I think for this recipe the best results are found between ISO 1600 and 3200, but anything from ISO 320 to 6400 looks good. I feel like ISO 12800 is a bit too much, but feel free to try it and see what you think.

Monochrome (+Y, +R, +G)
Dynamic Range: DR200
Highlight: 0
Shadow: +3
Noise Reduction: -4
Sharpening: +2
Clarity: +3
Toning: WC +2, MG 0

Grain Effect: Strong, Small
Color Chrome Effect: Strong
Color Chrome Effect Blue: Off
White Balance: Daylight,+9 Red & -9 Blue
ISO: Auto, up to ISO 6400
Exposure Compensation: +1/3 to +1 (typically)

Example photographs, all camera-made JPEGs using this Kodak T-Max 400 film simulation recipe on my Fujifilm X100V:

Hanging Leaves Silhouette – North Salt Lake, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Light Through The Dark Forest – North Salt Lake, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Ghosts – North Salt Lake, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Tree Trunks & Ground Cover – North Salt Lake, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Tree at Forest Edge – North Salt Lake, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Paved Forest Path – North Salt Lake, UT – Fujifilm X100V
People Shadows – North Salt Lake, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Happy Jon – North Salt Lake, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Fish in the Net – Hyrum Reservoir, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Tired Old Dock – Hyrum Reservoir, UT – Fujifilm X100V
A Boy & His Fishing Pole – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Lake Water – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Flower Photo – North Salt Lake, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Monochrome Wildflower – North Salt Lake, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Photo by Thomas Schwab – Husum, Germany – Fujifilm X100V

See also: Film Simulation Recipes

This post contains affiliate links, and if you make a purchase using my links I’ll be compensated a small amount for it.

Fujifilm X100V Black    Amazon   B&H
Fujifilm X100V Silver   Amazon   B&H

Help Fuji X Weekly

Nobody pays me to write the content found on fujixweekly.com. There's a real cost to operating and maintaining this site, not to mention all the time that I pour into it. If you appreciated this article, please consider making a one-time gift contribution. Thank you!

$2.00

Fujifilm X100V Film Simulation Recipe: Black & White Infrared

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Stop Here on Infrared – Yellowstone NP, WY – Fujifilm X100V – “Black & White Infrared”

Infrared photographing is capturing light beyond the visible spectrum. It requires special film, or a digital sensor that has had the infrared filter removed. Any digital camera has the potential to be infrared sensitive, but the process isn’t easy or cheap. Full spectrum photography is similar to infrared, but also includes ultraviolet and visible light (not just infrared light). With full spectrum photography you can choose by the use of filters which light you want to capture. You can use filters with infrared, too, to control what light comes through, but not to the extent of full-spectrum. A characteristic of both infrared and full-spectrum in black-and-white is deep contrast, with dark skies and white foliage. One of my favorite photographers is Mitch Dobrowner, who converted his Canon cameras to full-spectrum for dramatic monochrome storm photography.

When I purchased my Fujifilm X-T1, I had the intentions of converting it to full-spectrum, but the cost of the conversion has prevented me from doing it. I still hope to do so, maybe later this year or perhaps next year. We’ll see. But I figured out a way to simulate something that’s in the neighborhood of infrared or full-spectrum on my Fujifilm X100V without any conversions. In the right light and with the right subject, it can be quite convincing! Even though you are only using the visible spectrum of light, it can appear as though you are actually doing infrared photography. Amazing!

Even in situations where this recipe doesn’t resemble infrared or full-spectrum, it will still produce a dramatic, high-contrast look that you might find appealing. Those who have said that Acros+R doesn’t actually resemble the use of a red filter on black-and-white film will appreciate these settings. Many landscape photographers, including Ansel Adams, employed a red filter to achieve a dark sky (for example, Moonrise Over Hernandez).

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White Tree Black Sky – West Valley City, UT – Fujifilm X100V – “Black & White Infrared”

The trick is to use a low Kelvin white balance in conjunction with a dramatic white balance shift when using Acros+R. I got the idea from Fuji X Weekly reader James Clinich, who uses between 3800K and 4500K with a 0 Red & +8 shift to achieve a darker sky, which is something you can apply to other B&W recipes if you’d like to better mimic the use of a red filter. I just took his idea a step further to make it even more dramatic for this recipe.

My Black & White Infrared film simulation recipe can be difficult to use. I find that it doesn’t always work well. It can be very tough to gauge the best exposure, and I’ve had to go anywhere from -1 to +3 on the exposure compensation dial to get it right. It’s one of the more difficult to use recipes that I’ve created, yet it is highly rewarding. If you like dramatic black and white photographs, you’ll want to give this one a try! As of this writing, it’s only compatible with the Fujifilm X100V, X-Pro3 and X-T4 cameras.

Acros+R
Dynamic Range: DR200
Highlight: +4
Shadow: +3
B&W Toning: 0
Noise Reduction: -4
Sharpening: -4
Clarity: +5
Grain Effect: Strong, Large
Color Chrome Effect: Off
Color Chrome Effect Blue: Off
White Balance: 2750K, -5 Red & +9 Blue
ISO: Auto, up to ISO 6400

Example photographs, all camera-made JPEGs using this Black & White Infrared film simulation recipe on my Fujifilm X100V:

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Crafts & Hobbies – West Valley City, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Cloud Above The Wall – Draper, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Flags Over IKEA Infrared – Draper, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Pinnacle – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Suburban Abstract – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Suites – West Valley City, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Paved Paradise – West Valley City, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Accessible Parking – West Valley City, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Done Shopping – West Valley City, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Soda Glass – West Valley City, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Couch Stripes – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Flowers in the Sky – Big Sky, MT – Fujifilm X100V

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Grey Hills – Red Rock Lakes NWR, MT – Fujifilm X100V

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Abandoned Dream Infrared – Red Rock Lakes NWR, MT – Fujifilm X100V

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Abandoned House by the Hill IR – Red Rock Lakes NWR, MT – Fujifilm X100V

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Henry’s Fork River – Island Park, ID – Fujifilm X100V

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Upper Red Rock Lake IR – Red Rock Lakes NWR, MT – Fujifilm X100V

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Red Rock Road Monochrome – Red Rock Lakes NWR, MT – Fujifilm X100V

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Aspen Leaves Infrared – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Illuminated Tree – West Valley City, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Infrared Tree – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

See also: Film Simulation Recipes

This post contains affiliate links, and if you make a purchase using my links I’ll be compensated a small amount for it.

Fujifilm X100V Black    Amazon   B&H
Fujifilm X100V Silver   Amazon   B&H

Help Fuji X Weekly

Nobody pays me to write the content found on fujixweekly.com. There's a real cost to operating and maintaining this site, not to mention all the time that I pour into it. If you appreciated this article, please consider making a one-time gift contribution. Thank you!

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Fujifilm X100V Film Simulation Recipe: Fujicolor Superia 800

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Flags of IKEA – Draper, UT – Fujifilm X100V – “Fujicolor Superia 800”

One of the earliest film simulation recipes I created that was intended to mimic a specific film was Fujicolor Superia 800, which I made on a Fujifilm X100F about two-and-a-half years ago. This is a recipe that I’ve used often; I especially like it on overcast days. When I published the Superia 800 recipe, I stated, “It’s not a 100% match [to the film], but I feel like it’s convincing enough….” I think that’s a true statement, but with the new tools available on the X100V, could I create a closer match, one that might be even more convincing?

Classic Negative needed to be the starting point for a new Fujicolor Superia 800 recipe since this new film simulation is “modeled after” Fujicolor Superia with “Superia-like” colors. I incorporated the new Clarity and Color Chrome Effect Blue features into this recipe. Unfortunately, Clarity slows down the camera considerably, so you’ll either have to accept the slow speed (which is what I do) or add Clarity later by reprocessing the RAW file. I think this new recipe is indeed a closer match to actual Superia 800—in fact, you could likely convince people that you shot film!

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Horse Boarding – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X100V

I think this recipe might be my favorite of the Superia recipes that I’ve created thus far. If you like my Superia 100, Reala 100, and Superia 1600 recipes, you’ll certainly like this one, too! It has a great analog aesthetic. It’s pretty amazing that you can get this look straight out of camera. This Fujicolor Superia 800 recipe is (as of this writing) only compatible with the Fujifilm X100V, X-Pro3 and X-T4.

Classic Negative
Dynamic Range: DR400
Highlight: -1
Shadow: +1
Color: -1
Noise Reduction: -4
Sharpening: -1
Clarity: -4
Grain Effect: Strong, Large
Color Chrome Effect: Strong
Color Chrome Effect Blue: Weak
White Balance: Daylight, -1 Red & -3 Blue
ISO: Auto, up to ISO 6400
Exposure Compensation: +1/3 to +2/3 (typically)

Example photographs, all camera-made JPEGs using this Fujicolor Superia 800 film simulation recipe on my Fujifilm X100V:

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Line Begins Here – Draper, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Fire Suppression – Draper, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Trash – Draper, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Family Friendly Parking – Draper, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Waiting for Hope? – Draper, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Waiting to Enter – Draper, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Waiting Reflection – Draper, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Keeper of the Door – Draper, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Entrance – Draper, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Cloud Above Yellow Wall – Draper, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Two Flag Poles – Draper, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Home Furnishings – Draper, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Upplaga – Draper, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Track Closed – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Artificial – Draper, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Hanging Patio Lights – Draper, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Two Step – Draper, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Red Light – Draper, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Rainbow Spirit – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Chair Back – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Joshua Eating – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Brother & Sister on the Couch – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Balcony Railing – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Umbrella Unopened – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Sunlight Sky & Green Leaves – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Ripening Soon – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Fallen Log in the Forest – Monte Cristo, UT – Fujifilm X100V

See also: Film Simulation Recipes

This post contains affiliate links, and if you make a purchase using my links I’ll be compensated a small amount for it.

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Help Fuji X Weekly

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Fujifilm X100V Film Simulation Recipe: The Rockwell (Velvia)

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Abandoned Dream – Red Rock Lakes NWR, MT – Fujifilm X100V – “The Rockwell”

Ken Rockwell likes to say that Fujifilm cameras aren’t good for landscape photography because the JPEG colors aren’t “wild” enough for him. Even on his review of the X100V, he says, “The as-shot JPG color palette and contrasts are quite sedate,” and, “the X100V won’t amp-up colors if they aren’t strong to begin with.” He adds, “The Velvia film simulation modes don’t look any better; certainly not like real Velvia.” He’s entitled to his opinion, but I think he just hasn’t used the “right” recipe, and he might change his mind if he did. This recipe is one that Ken Rockwell might approve of, as it’s inspired by him, and that’s why I call it The Rockwell.

Ken mentions that the Velvia film simulation isn’t like real Velvia, and he means Velvia 50. There are, in fact, a few different films that share the Velvia name. Straight out of the box, the film simulation differs a little from the film. My X-T30 Velvia recipe is intended to get the film simulation closer to actual Velvia 50 film. “The Rockwell” recipe is also in the ballpark of Velvia 50 film, although it might actually exceed it. I’ve heard it said that Fujifilm’s short lived Fortia film (which Color Chrome Effect and Color Chrome Effect Blue are inspired by), which is like Velvia 50 on steroids, was a mistake. Supposedly it (or at least the original Fortia 50) was a botched Velvia run, but instead of trashing it Fujifilm sold it as a new film. This recipe isn’t as crazy as Fortia, but it’s every bit as crazy as Velvia 50 and perhaps slightly more. Another film that is in the general vicinity of this aesthetic is Kodak’s Ektachrome 100VS, which was essentially Kodak’s closest film to Velvia, but this recipe is a little off from that film. No, “The Rockwell” isn’t an exact match to any film, it’s just a recipe that Ken might use on his X100V if he ever read this article.

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Gibbon Falls – Yellowstone NP, WY – Fujifilm X100V – “The Rockwell”

This film simulation recipe is definitely not for everyone. Just like the person it was named after, it’s bold yet sometimes over-the-top. Many of you will find it to be much too much for your photography. But some of you are going to love it. In the right situations, this recipe is stunning! It uses Clarity, which slows down the camera considerably, but this is a recipe that you might want to work slow with anyway, so it should be alright. This recipe is only compatible (as if this writing) with the X100V, X-Pro3 and X-T4.

Velvia
Dynamic Range: DR200
Highlight: -1
Shadow: -1
Color: +4
Noise Reduction: -4
Sharpening: +4
Clarity: +5
Grain Effect: Weak, Small
Color Chrome Effect: Strong
Color Chrome Effect Blue: Strong
White Balance: Auto, +1 Red & -1 Blue
ISO: Auto, up to ISO 6400
Exposure Compensation: +1/3 to +2/3 (typically)

Example photographs, all camera-made JPEGs using this “The Rockwell” film simulation recipe on my Fujifilm X100V:

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Lake McDonald Shore Trees – Glacier National Park, MT – Fujifilm X100V

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Driftwood Shore – Glacier National Park, MT – Fujifilm X100V

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McDonald Lake & Rocks – Glacier National Park, MT – Fujifilm X100V

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Lake McDonald – Glacier National Park, MT – Fujifilm X100V

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Flathead Lake – Flathead Lake, MT – Fujifilm X100V

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Clear Blue Water – Glacier National Park, MT – Fujifilm X100V

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Tree & Snake River – Idaho Falls, ID – Fujifilm X100V

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McDonald Creek Behind Pines – Glacier National Park, MT – Fujifilm X100V

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Trees Obscuring the River – Glacier National Park, MT – Fujifilm X100V

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McDonald Creek – Glacier National Park, MT – Fujifilm X100V

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Green Trees – Glacier National Park, MT – Fujifilm X100V

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Forest Flowers – Glacier National Park, MT – Fujifilm X100V

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Lake Daisies – Flathead Lake, MT – Fujifilm X100V

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Blossomed Bush by the Lake – Flathead Lake, MT – Fujifilm X100V

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Upper Red Rock Lake – Red Rock Lakes NWR, MT – Fujifilm X100V

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Red Lake Light – Flathead Lake, MT – Fujifilm X100V

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Morning Rays – Canyon Ferry Lake, MT – Fujifilm X100V

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Sunset Through The Trees – Island Park, ID – Fujifilm X100V

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Aspen Sunstar – Island Park, ID – Fujifilm X100V

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Johnny Sack Cabin – Island Park, ID – Fujifilm X100V

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Hanging Flower Pot – Big Sky, MT – Fujifilm X100V

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Mountain Wildflowers 1 – Red Rock Lakes NWR, MT – Fujifilm X100V

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Mountain Wildflowers 2 – Red Rock Lakes NWR, MT – Fujifilm X100V

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Rural Blossoms – Island Park, ID – Fujifilm X100V

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Mountain Springtime – Island Park, ID – Fujifilm X100V

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Blossom by the River – Island Park, ID – Fujifilm X100V

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River Grass – Island Park, ID – Fujifilm X100V

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Grassy Hills – Wild Horse Island State Park, MT – Fujifilm X100V

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Pine in the Field – Wild Horse Island State Park, MT – Fujifilm X100V

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Abandoned Rural Building – Wild Horse Island State Park, MT – Fujifilm X100V

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Pop of Color Cabin – Polebridge, MT – Fujifilm X100V

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Birdhouse Fence – Island Park, ID – Fujifilm X100V

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Playground at the Edge of Nowhere – Island Park, ID – Fujifilm X100V

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Hot Water – Yellowstone National Park, WY – Fujifilm X100V

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Blue Eye – Yellowstone National Park, WY – Fujifilm X100V

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Red Rock Turtle – Island Park, ID – Fujifilm X100V

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Colorful Pallets – Bozeman, MT – Fujifilm X100V

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Westfield – Idaho Falls, ID – Fujifilm X100V

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Pink – Island Park, ID – Fujifilm X100V

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Stop for the Pink Bus – Silos, MT – Fujifilm X100V

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18 – Silos, MT – Fujifilm X100V

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Stop Here – Yellowstone National Park, WY – Fujifilm X100V

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Blue Trailer – Rexburg, ID – Fujifilm X100V

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Grease Work – Rexburg, ID – Fujifilm X100V

See also: Film Simulation Recipes

This post contains affiliate links, and if you make a purchase using my links I’ll be compensated a small amount for it.

Fujifilm X100V Black    Amazon   B&H
Fujifilm X100V Silver   Amazon   B&H

Help Fuji X Weekly

Nobody pays me to write the content found on fujixweekly.com. There's a real cost to operating and maintaining this site, not to mention all the time that I pour into it. If you appreciated this article, please consider making a one-time gift contribution. Thank you!

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Fujifilm X100V Film Simulation Recipe: Bleach Bypass

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Rose on a Table – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V – “Bleach Bypass”

The Fujifilm X-T4 has a new film simulation called Bleach Bypass. At this time, the X-T4 is the only camera that has it. It might come to the X-Pro3 and X100V at some point via a firmware update, but it’s difficult to know for sure if or when that will happen. Hopefully Fujifilm will add Bleach Bypass to the other cameras at some point.

Back in February I created a “Bleach Bypass” film simulation recipe for the X-T30 and X-T3 utilizing the double-exposure feature of the camera. The results are great, but the process is tricky, and the subject has to be completely still because it requires two exposures. The Fujifilm X100V and X-Pro3 cameras don’t (yet) have the new Bleach Bypass film simulation, but they do have the new Classic Negative film simulation, which makes a “bleach bypass” look possible with just one exposure.

Bleach bypass is a darkroom technique where you skip or limit the bleach during development of color film, which causes it to retain the silver. Results will vary greatly depending on the film used and exactly how you develop it, but generally speaking what you get with bleach bypass is a high-contrast, low-saturation, grainy picture that appears as if a black-and-white and color picture were combined together. This technique is more common for motion picture film than still photography, but some people do bleach bypass with C-41 film.

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Thistle Color – Fruit Heights, UT – Fujifilm X100V – “Bleach Bypass”

I don’t know how accurate this recipe is to the Bleach Bypass film simulation that’s on the X-T4. I wasn’t trying to mimic that film simulation, but instead mimic actual bleach bypass film. I know some of you will really appreciate this look, but it’s certainly not going to be everyone’s cup of tea. You can use this recipe if you have a Fujifilm X100V, X-Pro3 or X-T4.

Classic Negative
Dynamic Range: DR100
Highlight: +2
Shadow: +4
Color: -4
Noise Reduction: -4
Sharpening: -1
Clarity: +3
Grain Effect: Strong, Large
Color Chrome Effect: Weak
Color Chrome Effect Blue: Strong
White Balance: Daylight, -1 Red & +1 Blue
ISO: Auto, up to ISO 6400
Exposure Compensation: 0 to +2/3 (typically)

Example photographs, all camera-made JPEGs using this “Bleach Bypass” film simulation recipe on my Fujifilm X100V:

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Silver Aspen Leaves – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Greenberries – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Back Wall – Fruit Heights, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Turkey – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Umbrella Below a Tree – Fruit Heights, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Instamatic Light – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Kodak Instamatic Shelf – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Pronto Polaroid – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Dead Yellow Roses – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Coffee & Book – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Morning Time – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Vase on a Table – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Suburban Grey – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Leaf in the Wet Grass – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Water on a Red Slide – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Lavender Lily – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Sunlight in the Trees – Layton, UT – Fujifilm X100V

See also: Film Simulation Recipes

This post contains affiliate links, and if you make a purchase using my links I’ll be compensated a small amount for it.

Fujifilm X100V Black    Amazon   B&H
Fujifilm X100V Silver   Amazon   B&H

Help Fuji X Weekly

Nobody pays me to write the content found on fujixweekly.com. There's a real cost to operating and maintaining this site, not to mention all the time that I pour into it. If you appreciated this article, please consider making a one-time gift contribution. Thank you!

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Fujifilm X100V Film Simulation Recipe: Fujicolor Superia 1600

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Red Rose – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V – “Fujicolor Superia 1600”

For some of you, this new Fujicolor Superia 1600 film simulation recipe will be your favorite! It is so good! It’s very analog-esque, and does a great job of mimicking the film in a number of circumstances. If you love my Fujicolor Superia 100 and my Fujicolor Reala 100 recipes, you’re bound to love this one, too!

For high-ISO color photography, Superia 1600 film was your best bet if you needed to go faster than ISO 800. It has higher contrast and lower saturation than other Superia films, and is also more grainy, but with a very nice look. There are people who use Superia 1600 just for its aesthetic. Fujifilm discontinued Superia 1600 in 2016, but supposedly Fujicolor Natura 1600 and Press 1600 are the same film, just sold to different markets.

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Sephora – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V – “Fujicolor Superia 1600”

I didn’t include a “typical” exposure compensation with this recipe because you can get some very interesting looks by underexposing and (especially) overexposing—don’t be afraid to try -1 all the way to +2! This recipe is only compatible with the Fujifilm X100V, X-Pro3 and X-T4 (hopefully someday the X-T3 and X-T30, too—Fujifilm, please!).

Classic Negative
Dynamic Range: DR400
Highlight: 0
Shadow: +2
Color: -3
Noise Reduction: -4
Sharpening: -1
Clarity: -4
Grain Effect: Strong, Large
Color Chrome Effect: Strong
Color Chrome Effect Blue: Strong
White Balance: Daylight, +3 Red & +1 Blue
ISO: 1600 to 6400

Example photographs, all camera-made JPEGs using this Fujicolor Superia 1600 film simulation recipe on my Fujifilm X100V:

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Electric Sunset – Kaysville, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Evening Overlook – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Sunlight Tree – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Country Fence – Kaysville, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Rose Bush Shadow – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Red Rose Bush – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Yellow Flower – South Ogden, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Not Yet Blackberries – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Backyard Girl – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Evening Light Tunnel – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Building in Evening Light – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Head On Illusion – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Walking Reflection – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Indoor/Outdoor Restaurant – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Carbonaro – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Vegetables – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Dessert – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Willards – Layton, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Thank You For You Patronage – South Ogden, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Wall Pipes – South Ogden, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Closed Gas Station Store – South Ogden, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Abandoned Drive Thru Window – South Ogden, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Abandoned Gas Station Overhang – South Ogden, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Light at the Top – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Blue in the Middle – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Moon Above – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Suburban Sunstar – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Bike 48 – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Sunstar in the City – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Strength and Endurance – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

See also: Film Simulation Recipes

This post contains affiliate links, and if you make a purchase using my links I’ll be compensated a small amount for it.

Fujifilm X100V Black    Amazon   B&H
Fujifilm X100V Silver   Amazon   B&H

Help Fuji X Weekly

Nobody pays me to write the content found on fujixweekly.com. There's a real cost to operating and maintaining this site, not to mention all the time that I pour into it. If you appreciated this article, please consider making a one-time gift contribution. Thank you!

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Fujifilm X100V Film Simulation Recipe: Fujicolor Reala 100

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Amusement Poles – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V – “Fujicolor Reala 100”

Fujicolor Reala 100 was Fujifilm’s first Superia film, even though initially it did not have Superia in the name. Superia films shared Fuji’s “4th layer technology” and Reala was the first to have it, but Reala was marketed towards “pro” photographers while Superia was marketed towards “consumer” photographers. Eventually Fujifilm added Superia to Reala’s name. There were several different versions of Reala manufactured, including a high-ISO Tungsten one made for motion pictures, but Reala 100 was the most popular.

The Classic Negative film simulation is “modeled after” Superia with “Superia-like” colors, so it’s the best starting point for a Reala recipe. Reala 100 was very similar to Superia 100, but Superia 100 was intended for “general purpose” photography while Reala 100 was intended for portrait photography (interestingly, my wedding photos were shot on Reala). Colors are rendered a little differently between the two films, especially blue, which is deeper and more saturated on Reala, despite Reala being overall slightly less saturated than Superia 100. You’ll find that this recipe and my Fujicolor Superia 100 recipe replicate these differences quite nicely. Reala film was discontinued in 2013.

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Tunnel & Fountain – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V – “Fujicolor Reala 100”

This Fujicolor Reala 100 film simulation recipe is a great all-around option. It looks good under many circumstances. The aesthetic of this recipe is very close to my Superia 100 recipe, and I’m not sure which one I like better. This one is better for stronger blues, and the other is better for stronger reds, but they’re not far apart from each other. Unfortunately, as of this writing, this Reala recipe is only compatible with the Fujifilm X100V, X-Pro3 and X-T4 cameras.

Classic Negative
Dynamic Range: DR400
Highlight: -1
Shadow: -1
Color: +0
Noise Reduction: -4
Sharpening: -2
Clarity: -3
Grain Effect: Weak, Small
Color Chrome Effect: Strong
Color Chrome Effect Blue: Strong
White Balance: Daylight, 0 Red & 0 Blue
ISO: Auto, up to ISO 6400
Exposure Compensation: 0 to +1 (typically)

Example photographs, all camera-made JPEGs using this Fujicolor Reala 100 film simulation recipe on my Fujifilm X100V:

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Ferris Wheel – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Ferris Wheel Through The Trees – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Hands Raised – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Blue Coaster – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Waterless Waterslides – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Umbrella Ride – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Green Trees, Blue Sky – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Cat Statue – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Ride Operator – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Waiting to Fly – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Sunstar Tree – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Backlit Fountain – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Flowerbed – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Field of Wildflowers – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Potted Blooms – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Flowers in a Garden – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Blossoms Along a Fence – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Red Blossoms – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Covered Wagon – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Man Waiting – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Standing, Waiting – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Corner – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Puddle Reflections – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Stroller – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Almost – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Please Unload Children – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Lying on a Bench – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Pink Hair Bow – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Backpack – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Josh Riding Carousel – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Happy Jon – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Map on a Fence – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Woodford, Iowa – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Forest Trees – Fruit Heights, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Windshield Rain – Fruit Heights, UT – Fujifilm X100V

See also: Film Simulation Recipes

This post contains affiliate links, and if you make a purchase using my links I’ll be compensated a small amount for it.

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Fujifilm X100V Film Simulation Recipe: Kodak Tri-X 400

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Leaves in the Forest – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V – ISO 3200 – “Kodak Tri-X 400”

The number one black-and-white film simulation recipe that I’ve been asked to create is Kodak Tri-X 400, but I’ve never been satisfied with my own attempts. Thankfully for you, Fuji X Weekly reader Anders Lindborg (Instagram) was able to do it! This is brilliant, and I’m sure you’ll love it. It’s the only B&W recipe I’m using on my Fujifilm X100V right now.

Kodak introduced Tri-X in the early 1940’s, and in the 1950’s they began selling it in 35mm format. Ever since, it has been the “standard” high-ISO black-and-white film for photographers. It’s been made in ISO 160, 200, 320 and 400 versions; this recipe is based on Tri-X 400. Kodak re-engineered Tri-X 400 in 2007 with finer grain and lower contrast, but it’s still nearly identical to the old stock.

Anders actually made three recipes in one: low-contrast, mid-contrast, and high-contrast. Tri-X, like most films, can be made more contrasty or less contrasty based on how it’s developed (chemicals used and/or development times) or printed (contrast filters). The recipe further down this article is the mid-contrast version. For low contrast, set Highlight to -1 and Shadow to +2. For high contrast, set Highlight to +1 and Shadow to +4. This film simulation recipe was designed for the X-T3 and X-T30, but I changed a couple of things for the X100V: I set Clarity to +4 (which isn’t available on the X-T3 and X-T30) and Grain to Strong & Large (on the X-T3 and X-T30, Grain is set to Strong). Because it adds contrast, setting Clarity to +4 actually makes this look more like the high-contrast version. If you are using this on the X100V, X-Pro3 or X-T4, feel free to try all three contrast versions, with or without Clarity, to see which you like better. For X-Trans III cameras, which don’t have Color Chrome Effect, you can still use this recipe; while it won’t look exactly the same, it will still look very similar. In other words, even though the title says “Fujifilm X100V Film Simulation Recipe” you can actually use it on any camera with the Acros film simulation—I’ve tried it on an X-T30 and X-T20, and it looks great!

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Forest Edge – Fruit Heights, UT – Fujifilm X100V – ISO 1600 – “Kodak Tri-X 400”

I found that this recipe looks best when set to ISO 1600 or higher. From ISO 1600 to 3200, the results more resemble newer Tri-X 400 film. From ISO 6400 to ISO 12800, the results more resemble older Tri-X 400 film. I want to give a big thank-you to Anders Lindborg for creating this recipe, sharing it, and allowing me to publish it here—you are appreciated! Thank you!

Acros (+Y, +R, +G)
Dynamic Range: DR200
Highlight: 0
Shadow: +3
Noise Reduction: -4
Sharpening: +1
Clarity: +4
Grain Effect: Strong, Large
Color Chrome Effect: Strong
Color Chrome Effect Blue: Off
White Balance: Daylight,+9 Red & -9 Blue
ISO: ISO 1600 – 12800
Exposure Compensation: +1/3 to +1 (typically)

Example photographs, all camera-made JPEGs using this Kodak Tri-X 400 film simulation recipe on my Fujifilm X100V:

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Fallen Trunk – Fruit Heights, UT – Fujifilm X100V – ISO 1600

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The Forest – Fruit Heights, UT – Fujifilm X100V – ISO 1600

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Light in a Dark Canopy – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V – ISO 1600

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Sunlight & Leaves – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V – ISO 12800

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Monochrome Backlit Leaves – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V – ISO 1600

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Drops on a Window – Fruit Heights, UT – Fujifilm X100V – ISO 1600

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Half Leaf In The Road – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V – ISO 1600

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Footstep – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V – ISO 1600

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Barrier – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V – ISO 1600

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Corner Benches – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V – ISO 6400

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Drinking Fountains – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V – ISO 1600

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Feel Like A Kid Again – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V – ISO 1600

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Walking at an Amusement Park – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V – ISO 1600

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Waiting at the Exit – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V – ISO 3200

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Diagonal Light Boy – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V – ISO 12800

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FED 5c Film Camera – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V – ISO 3200

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Coffee Grounds in a Filter – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V – ISO 3200

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Rainbow Feet on the Floor – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V – ISO 3200

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Girl in Zebra Shirt – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V – ISO 12800

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Rainy Day Siblings – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V – ISO 3200

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Level Up – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V – ISO 12800

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Wet Leaf in the Grass – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V – ISO 5000

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Wet Tree Leaves – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V – ISO 3200

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Leaf of a Different Color – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V – ISO 3200

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Emptiness – Roy, UT – Fujifilm X100V – ISO 3200

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Empty Boxes in an Abandoned Home – Roy, UT – Fujifilm X100V – ISO 12800

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Nobody’s Home – Roy, UT – Fujifilm X100V – ISO 3200

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White Truck – Roy, UT – Fujifilm X100V – ISO 3200

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Dead End Night – Roy, UT – Fujifilm X100V – ISO 12800

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Trolley Bus – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V – ISO 12800

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Wrong Way – Centerville, UT – Fujifilm X100V – ISO 12800

See also:
Film Simulation Recipes
Tri-X Push-Process Film Simulation Recipe

This post contains affiliate links, and if you make a purchase using my links I’ll be compensated a small amount for it.

Fujifilm X100V Black    Amazon   B&H
Fujifilm X100V Silver   Amazon   B&H

Help Fuji X Weekly

Nobody pays me to write the content found on fujixweekly.com. There's a real cost to operating and maintaining this site, not to mention all the time that I pour into it. If you appreciated this article, please consider making a one-time gift contribution. Thank you!

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Fujifilm X100V New Feature: B&W Toning

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With the X-T3 and X-T30, Fujifilm introduced black-and-white toning. With the X100V, X-Pro3 and X-T4, Fujifilm took B&W toning to a whole new level! On the X-T3 and X-T30, you have the option of 0 (for neutral), +1 through +9 for warm, and -1 through -9 for cool. On the new cameras, toning is set up more like white-balance-shift, except you can move as many as 18 spots up or down and left or right. Yes, on the X100V, there are 1,368 possible colors to tone your black-and-white pictures! You can even tone B&W video.

The up-and-down option is called “WC” for warm/cool; plus is warm, minus is cool, and 0 is neutral. The left-and-right option is called “MG” for magenta/green; plus is green, minus is magenta, and 0 is neutral. The further you get from 0, the stronger the color, and the closer you get to 0, the more subtle the color. Most people will likely use subtle toning, but some will appreciate the bold options.

I think there is the potential for some very creative uses of this new feature, especially when paired with multiple exposure photography. I haven’t explored the possibilities yet, but I will! If you are a fan of toning your black-and-white pictures, you’ll love this new option. The only thing missing is split-toning, which Fujifilm very well might add on future models—I hope so, anyway! In the meantime, I’ll explore the potential of this new toning feature on the X100V.

Examples of black-and-white toning on the Fujifilm X100V:

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WC 0 MG 0

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WC +5 MG 0

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WC +5 MG +5

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WC 0 MG +5

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WC -5 MG +5

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WC -5 MG 0

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WC -5 MG -5

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WC 0 MG -5

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WC +5 MG -5

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WC +18 MG 0

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WC +18 MG +18

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WC 0 MG +18

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WC -18 MG +18

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WC -18 MG 0

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WC -18 MG -18

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WC 0 MG -18

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WC +18 MG -18

See also:
Fujifilm X100V New Feature: Clarity
Fujifilm X100V New Feature: HDR

This post contains affiliate links, and if you make a purchase using my links I’ll be compensated a small amount for it.

Fujifilm X100V Black    Amazon   B&H
Fujifilm X100V Silver   Amazon   B&H

Help Fuji X Weekly

Nobody pays me to write the content found on fujixweekly.com. There's a real cost to operating and maintaining this site, not to mention all the time that I pour into it. If you appreciated this article, please consider making a one-time gift contribution. Thank you!

$2.00