Fujifilm X70 vs Fujifilm XF10 vs Ricoh GR …in 2022

Fujifilm X70

This post is by popular demand! Ever since I started sharing pictures captured with my new-to-me Fujifilm X70, I’ve been bombarded with requests to compare the camera with the XF10 and the Ricoh GR models. And I fully understand why: there aren’t very many truly pocketable APS-C fixed-lens cameras, yet these are perfect for travel, street, and to just carry everywhere and use literally every day. There’s definitely a draw to them, and I can’t fathom why they’re not even more popular. Every photographer should want one of these, or something like them, but they often stay in a state of obscurity. I find it odd, but that’s the way it is.

We’ll start this off with a comparison of the two Fujifilm models: X70 and XF10. What’s similar and what’s different? Which one is better? Of the two, which should you buy?

At first glance you might think they’re the same camera, because they look very similar, and have nearly identical dimensions. The XF10 is lighter than the X70 because it has more plastic in its construction, and it feels like a cheaper camera (which it is). The lens is optically the same, but the X70 has an aperture ring while the XF10 doesn’t. The X70 also has a tilting rear screen, something not found on the XF10. And then there’s the dial: PASM vs Shutter Knob—regular readers of this blog know already that I don’t prefer PASM (putting it mildly), but maybe you do. The XF10 doesn’t have a hot shoe, or C1-C7 Custom Presets. The X70 has a 16-megapixel X-Trans II sensor, while the XF10 has a 24-megapixel Bayer sensor—I think, as far as image quality goes, they’re pretty similar, and I wouldn’t call one output “better” than the other. The XF10 is newer, released more than two-and-a-half years after the X70.

Fujifilm XF10

There are some things, such as Snapshot, that I like about the XF10, but there are some things, such as a generally sluggish performance, that I don’t. Between the two, it’s clear that the X70, despite being an older model released in 2016, is the more premium option, and it is the camera that I prefer of the two. The X70 is a keeper if you’ve got one; the XF10 is dispensable. With that said, the X70 can be hard to find (those who own them rarely sell them) and are often expensive. The XF10 is much easier to find, but finding a bargain on one can still be a challenge. If you are on a tight budget or don’t have much patience (and don’t mind the limitations of this model), the XF10 is a very good runner-up, but if you want the better option of these two, the X70 is the one to go with. Both models have been long discontinued, so don’t expect to find one brand-new, and if you somehow do, know that it will come with a premium price tag; otherwise, you’ll have to be satisfied with something that isn’t new but is new to you.

How does the X70 (and XF10) compare to the Ricoh GR cameras? I’m most known for my Fujifilm Film Simulation Recipes, but lesser known are my Ricoh GR Recipes; I know a thing or two about both brands. I own a GR and a GR III. The GR II is essentially the same camera as the GR (just minor improvements), so everything that I say about the GR in this discussion will apply to the GR II. The GR IIIx has a different focal-length lens, but is otherwise very similar to the GR III, so what I say about the GR III applies also to the GR IIIx. I hope this makes sense and helps to simplify things a little.

The Ricoh GR models are not as pretty as the Fujifilm models, but what they lack in beauty they make up for in compactness. While the X70 and XF10 are small, the GR cameras are really small, which makes them even easier to carry with you everywhere. The GR III is just a little smaller than the GR I & II. Functionality and feature wise, all of the GR models are more similar to the XF10 than the X70. The rear screens are fixed. There’s a PASM dial. There’s no aperture ring around the lens. The GR cameras aren’t laggy like the XF10, though, plus there’s a hot shoe.

Ricoh GR

Image quality on the GR cameras are similarly good compared to the Fujifilm models. My opinion is that the GR, which was released in 2013 and features a 16-megapixel camera, has the “worst” technical image quality of all of these cameras, but there’s some sort of pixie dust that gives it a special quality—I’m not exactly sure what it is, but there’s an unexpected appealing quality to the images (this applies also to the GR II, released in 2015). The GR III, which has a 24-megapixel sensor and was released in 2019, has superior technical image quality over the GR, but lacks a little of that pixie dust. Is technical image quality more important, or that hard-to-define special quality? Your answer will reveal which GR camera to consider. I personally like the GR III a little more than the GR.

What’s better, though: Fujifilm or Ricoh? That’s a really tough decision. I do like Fujifilm’s JPEGs a little more than Ricoh’s, but they’re both very good; the “color science” and approach to JPEG output is different, so you might prefer one over the other (I personally prefer Fujifilm’s, no surprise, but everyone is different). Between the XF10 and any of the GR models, I would go with Ricoh, but Ricoh isn’t the hands-down winner—the XF10 is nearly as good, but the GR cameras are slightly better, in my opinion. Between the X70 and Ricoh, I give the X70 the edge, because the design and shooting experience is superior. Even though the GR models are noticeably smaller and fit just a little easier into my pockets, I’d choose to take the X70 with me instead, as it’s more fun to shoot with. The GR III is the only model that you can still buy brand-new, so if you don’t want to purchase a used camera, it’s your only option.

The best case scenario is if you can own multiple cameras, because each have their advantages and disadvantages. There are times when each of the models discussed in this article could be the best choice. If you own a Fujifilm camera and a GR camera, that allows you to choose which one you think will work best for you in the situations you anticipate encountering. However, if it can only be one, I recommend the Fujifilm X70 (even though I’ve only owned it for a short time), followed very closely by the GR III, then followed very closely by the GR or GR II (get the GR II if the price is the same), then followed very closely by the XF10. Some might disagree with that ranking, but that’s my opinion. I do hope this article is helpful for those trying to decide which one to get.

None of these cameras are perfect by any means, but they are all perfect for shoving into a pocket and carrying with you everywhere. Can’t afford any of them? Don’t worry, just use your phone—if you have an iPhone, be sure to try my RitchieCam camera app! This can serve a similar purpose, and since you already have your phone on you, it’s not necessary to also carry a camera. While I have a phone with RitchieCam in my pocket, I’ll often have a Fujifilm X70 or Ricoh GR III in a pocket, too.

Fujifilm X70

Monochrome Red” recipe
Kodak Color Negative” recipe
Kodak Color Negative” recipe

Fujifilm XF10

Velvia” recipe
Classic Chrome” recipe
Monochrome” Recipe

Ricoh GR

Monochrome Negative” recipe
Negative Film” recipe
Color Chrome” recipe

Ricoh GR III

Americana Color” recipe
Vibrant Analog” recipe
Analog Film” recipe

RitchieCam

Instant Color 3” filter
Faded Film” filter
MetroColor” filter

This post contains affiliate links, and if you make a purchase using my links I’ll be compensated a small amount for it.

Ricoh GR III Amazon B&H
Ricoh GR IIIx Amazon B&H

Download the Fuji X Weekly App for free today! Apple Android
Download the Ricoh Recipes App for free today! Apple Android
Download the RitchieCam App for iPhone for free today! Apple

8 comments

  1. Francis.R. · 17 Days Ago

    My Fujifilm DL SuperMini destroys all of these three cameras B-), just kidding, is a very good and small 35mm film camera with a fixed 28mm lens, to be perfect I’d wish it had a bulb mode and well, for me, I am always wishing it had a 24mm lens. Or if it isn’t going to be that wide then the X100 or the GR IIIx would be my personal choice. Is not that I dislike the 28mm focal length, my favorite photographer that uses that focal length is Sam Abell, maybe I have been used to very wide focal lengths due smartphones.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Ritchie Roesch · 16 Days Ago

      For general photography I prefer the focal-length of the X100 series over the X70, and (even more than that) the focal length of the Fujinon 27mm f/2.8. My preference is more closer to the nifty-fifty mark, and to go telephoto before wide angle… I often find wide-angle to be challenging, but it’s a worthwhile challenge, I think. Thanks for the comment!

      Liked by 1 person

  2. Ian G · 17 Days Ago

    Can you expand a bit on the “lag” you mention with the XF10? I have one, use it daily, and can honestly say I have no clue where you are experiencing lag.

    Like

    • Ritchie Roesch · 16 Days Ago

      Slow autofocus, slow response in the menu, etc. Maybe I just had a “bad” copy (or maybe Fujifilm “fixed” it via firmware after I sold mine). But I think if you read reviews, most will mention it, so I’m certain I’m not the only one—if yours is free from it, perhaps you got really lucky. This is what I said in my review:
      “It’s the general responsiveness to adjustments that’s noticeably slow. My fingers can fly through the menus and buttons faster than the camera can keep up. The camera can be painfully slow if it’s writing to the SD card, as it seems to have a hard time doing that and other functions simultaneously.”
      https://fujixweekly.com/2018/09/15/review-fujifilm-xf10-the-best-camera/

      Like

  3. wolverineinnc · 16 Days Ago

    My “carry everywhere” camera is my X-E3 with the Fuji 27mm pancake lens on it. Small, great lens, and when I NEED to I can swap lenses. Sold my X100V because I missed being able to change lenses on it. LOVED the looks of it, and liked the camera, but found my X-Pro2 and X-E3 models to be more versatile for me. I also carry the X-E3 with the XF-16mm f/2.8 lens attached a lot, a razor sharp tiny, very lightweight beauty.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Ritchie Roesch · 16 Days Ago

      The X-E3 with the 18mm f/2 might be a decent “alternative” to the X70 (although not as pocketable). The 27mm f/2.8 is my favorite lens—I wish Fujifilm would make another pancake option or two. Thanks for the input!

      Like

      • wolverineinnc · 16 Days Ago

        I am not sorry I sold all my Nikon gear and switched to these cool little Fuji bodies and lenses. : )

        Liked by 1 person

      • Ritchie Roesch · 15 Days Ago

        I’m not sorry, either 😀

        Like

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