Is the X-E Line Done? Fujifilm seems to think so….

“If we decided to stop entry-level products such as X-T200 or X-E4,” Franck Bernard, Fujifilm France Photo Division Director, stated in a recent Phototrend interview, “it is because it is not a promising market. Today, competitors are also deciding to abandon certain more accessible product lines.”

Wow. This seems to be confirmation that the X-E line is done. The X-T200 was discontinued back in 2020, and with that the X-T000 line was abandoned. The Fujifilm X-E4 was discontinued back in March. This appears to be an indication that, in 2023, the X-E series has succumbed to the same fate that the X-T000 line did three years ago.

Of course, in other interviews, Fujifilm has kind of tiptoed around this topic and even hinted that the X-E line hasn’t been axed. They never expressly communicated one way or the other with certainty, but now they have. Sort of. They used fuzzy language—“if we decided”—and Mr. Bernard isn’t a corporate manager (he’s regional), so perhaps he didn’t have the authority to state what he said and it might not be exactly what HQ wanted made public. In other words, this might not be the official position of Fujifilm.

I think that his comment is factual and simultaneously must be taken with a large grain of salt. He’s likely saying something that’s largely understood within the company, but also something that Fujifilm doesn’t want to outright state, because they want to reserve the right to change their mind in a quickly shifting market and with dynamic corporate directives. They don’t want to officially kill off the X-E line, only to discover that they should have made an X-E5; instead, if they quietly cancel it, then it’s a bit easier to bring back at a later date if market conditions allow.

Pacific Poppies – Montaña de Oro SP, CA – Fujifilm X-E4 – Pacific Blues Recipe

Franck Bernard goes on to provide a little context to his comment: “I believe that Fujifilm has made the industrial choice for more than 5 years now to turn to high-end products and we will not return to entry-level products.”

I’ve heard this said a few times from Fujifilm managers. They believe the future of the brand is not with low-end models, or even with what we once thought of as the mid-range bodies, but with the higher-tier cameras. The X-H line, the X-T0 line, the X100 series, X-S00 line (which was made slightly more higher-end with the X-S20), and X-Pro, along with GFX. That’s where Fujifilm wants to focus their efforts. That’s where Fujifilm sees the future of their digital camera brand. The X-E series just doesn’t fit in, no matter how in-demand the X-E4 was at the time of its discontinuance. Camera brands don’t axe a line that has a lot of demand and a waitlist to buy—unless it was simply impossible to secure the necessary parts to manufacture more, or the higher-ups shifted priorities to other things. I think the latter explains the X-E4’s sudden and inexplicable discontinuation. Fujifilm doesn’t want to offer models in the X-E class. It’s beneath them now. Or, perhaps, for whatever reason, they believe the market is about to dry up for it, despite the demand (which, by the way, still exists more than six months after its discontinuation).

“Logically,” Mr. Bernard continued, “there should be a successor to the X-T30. We would like to maintain older, affordable products that correspond to a certain purchasing power. But we have no visibility on future ranges.” This is a bit after he stated that, “…our flagship product remains the X-T5, the standard model of the range. Comes behind the X-T30 II, and then follows the X-S10/X-S20.”

I think he was saying that, in France, the X-T5 is Fujifilm’s top selling model, followed by the X-T30 II, then the X-S00 series. Because of the demand for the X-T30 II, there should logically be a successor. Fujifilm France wants to be able to offer products that those with a more limited budget can afford. But, Fujifilm Japan has not provided them with a timeline when such a camera will come, if at all. That’s my interpretation, but I don’t know if that’s what he really meant. It’s a bit confusing.

As best as I can tell from all of this, the X-E line is done (but Fujifilm wants to reserve the right to change their minds) and an X-T30 II successor is desired by certain people within Fujifilm (and they believe logically it should happen) but HQ hasn’t provided any information to them on when or if that will happen. This is because—beginning five years ago—Fujifilm began to shift away from lower-end gear and towards higher-end products. This is all a part of the long-term plan, more or less.

Evening Charge – Santa Rosa, NM – Fujifilm X-E4 – Kodak Portra 400 v2 Recipe

Will an X-T40 (perhaps it will be called X-T30 III or X-T50) happen? It sounds like eventually it will happen, but not necessarily soon. Don’t be surprised if it is given new features (IBIS? 40mp?) and a higher price tag. Will an X-E5 happen? Probably not. If a lot of people speak up and state that they’d buy one, maybe. But still probably not. There’s been a large vocal desire for an X80, but that hasn’t happened, nor will it—technically, though, it is still possible, just highly unlikely. I think that’s the unfortunate state of the X-E line.

In a seemingly-unrelated-but-at-closer-look-completely-related article, PetaPixel says that young people are finding digital cameras to be more difficult to use and more time-consuming than cellphone cameras (imagine that!). While it’s easy to dismiss this, I think there are a few points worth considering. First, it’s great that Fujifilm introduced the X App, which is better than their rather mediocre (being kind) Cam Remote App, but the new app is years late and not compatible with older models. If Fujifilm wants to sell cameras to younger folks (which, presumably, generally have a tighter budget and aren’t buying flagship models), having an intuitive and reliable way to transfer the images is a necessity. Unfortunately, Fujifilm has fantastically failed at this, which undoubtedly affects sales of lower-end models. Think about this: film simulations (and especially Film Simulation Recipes) are highly desirable among those who want great results without fuss and without spending a lot of time achieving it. But getting those pictures off the camera can be a pain.

What Fujifilm (and the other camera makers) should have done is create a way to upload directly from the camera to Instagram, X, Facebook, Flickr, text, email, cloud, etc.. Maybe have an Android-like operating system with apps. As it is now, the step in-between that’s time-consuming, frustrating, and unintuitive is one reason why the cellphone is constantly eating away the bottom end of the camera market. Instead of innovating, camera makers just throw their hands up and say “Oh, well.” They blame the cellphone, but really they just concede the fight without trying all that hard to compete with it. Oh, and why did Fujifilm abandon the concept of connecting the camera directly with their Instax printers? That’s another missed opportunity, in a similar vein.

So if Fujifilm were to release an X-E5, but with a whole new way to get the pictures off of the camera and shared wherever the photographer wishes—something that’s easy, fast, and intuitive—I have zero doubts that it would sell well. Yes, there’s the X App, which is a step in the right direction, but ideally there would be no need for an app. It should be a one-step process from the camera itself. As the PetaPixel article illustrates, the hassle of using a digital camera—hassles that don’t need to exist but do, and hassles that aren’t found on the cellphone—is notable enough to go viral. Don’t doubt that the opposite is also viral-worthy. For example, the reason why the X100V suddenly became popular is because it went viral on social media, and a big reason why it went viral is because it could produce analog-looking pictures that didn’t require editing (yes, Recipes!). It produced wonderful results easily, and that caught the attention of so many that the camera is historically long-backordered. Now imagine if those results could be more quickly and intuitively available for sharing. Yes, that’s notable enough to go viral.

Why the Upcoming Nikon Zf won’t be a “Fujifilm Killer”

Apparently, Nikon is about to announce a new retro-style full-frame camera called the Zf. The phrase “Fujifilm killer” has been floated around as if this camera will strike at the heart of Fujifilm’s market share. Let me give you a few reasons why this won’t be the case.

Before I begin, I want to applaud Nikon for creating a new retro-style camera. I believe the Zfc—their APS-C retro-looking model—has been a commercial success. I own one, although I almost never use it (the last time was on a trip to Sedona in May). Nikon hopes to build on the success of the Zfc with the upcoming Zf. Most camera companies don’t have the guts to create a beautifully designed body, so it’s great to see Nikon do it. I probably won’t buy a Zf personally (Nikon, if you want to send me one, I won’t say no!), but I’m sure it will be a very tempting camera for many.

Supposedly, the Zf will be a 24mp full-frame model with two memory card slots (one SD, one Micro-SD). It will be less plasticky than the Zfc, but it is unknown if it will be weather-sealed. Apparently, it will have IBIS and even pixel-shift. While I’m sure the Zf will generate plenty of excitement, it won’t be a “Fujifilm killer” for a few reasons.

First—and this is Nikon’s mistake—is there aren’t any Nikkor Z-mount lenses with aperture rings. I do believe that some of their lenses can be customized to make the manual-focus ring an (unmarked) aperture ring, but then you don’t have a manual focus ring. That’s not an ideal setup. Because the lenses don’t have aperture rings, Nikon will likely include a PASM dial or switch (like on the Zfc) to toggle on-and-off the knobs on the top plate, which is awkward and seemingly unnecessary. The best solution is to use a third-party lens that has an aperture ring and shoot in manual mode. Nikon should released a series of prime lenses with aperture rings along with the Zf (or, even better, back when they announced the Zfc), but I don’t think that will happen. This oversight means that you’ll have a really hard time replicating the Fujifilm shooting experience; if you want that, you’d better buy a Fujifilm camera instead.

Nikon Zfc + TTArtisan 35mm f/1.4 + Vintage Color Recipe – Sedona, AZ

Another important piece of the puzzle that Nikon lacks are JPEG Recipes. A lot of people buy Fujifilm cameras for Film Simulation Recipes, which can save you a lot of time and frustration while providing a more enjoyable experience. There are some Recipes for Nikon Z cameras (here, here, and here), but nothing like what’s available for Fujifilm. A community has even sprung up out of these Recipes, with photographers that are often extremely kind and welcoming. I don’t think there’s a better community in all of photography!

A number of people have said, “If only Fujifilm made a full-frame camera!” With Fuji, there’s either APS-C or medium-format, but not full-frame. At one time APS-C was for amateurs or hobbyists, while full-frame was for professionals and advanced enthusiasts, but that time has come and gone (yet the stigma doesn’t easily disappear, despite being outdated). Nowadays, there are tons of amazingly talented photographers who shoot with APS-C cameras.

The advantages that a 24mp full-frame sensor provides over Fujifilm’s 26mp or 40mp APS-C sensors are improved high-ISO performance and increased dynamic range, but it should be noted that Fujifilm’s cameras are quite excellent at high-ISO and dynamic range, so it only matters in extreme circumstances—and even then, only a little. People will mention depth-of-field (due to the crop factor), but that’s a bit overstated, as it depends on the lens focal-length and aperture—it’s possible to get a narrow depth-of-field on APS-C similar to full-frame, but not with identical focal-lengths and apertures.

Fujifilm X-T5 + TTArtisan 35mm f/0.95 + 1970’s Summer Recipe – Sedona, AZ

This isn’t to say that APS-C is just as good or better than full-frame. There are some advantages and disadvantages to both sensor sizes, but overall those advantages and disadvantages aren’t huge. In my opinion, the advantages of APS-C (which are size, weight, and cost) outweigh the advantages of full-frame, but each has to determine what makes the most sense to their unique desires and needs. My only point is that full-frame isn’t massively better (if better at all) than APS-C, so just because Nikon offers a similarly-styled model with a full-frame sensor doesn’t mean that Fujifilm should be quaking in their boots.

A fun side-by-side experiment would be the Fujifilm X-T5 with the Fujinon 33mm f/1.4 and the Nikon Zf with the Nikkor 50mm f/1.8. The Fujinon lens is 2/3-stops brighter, while the Nikkor has about 1/3-stop less depth-of-field (f/1.4 on APS-C has a depth-of-filed more similar to f/2 on full-frame, everything else being equivalently equal). Both offer the same field-of-view. While the Zf is full-frame, on paper the X-T5 has several spec-sheet advantages. The X-T5 is smaller, lighter, and cheaper; however, since the Fujinon lens is more expensive, the cost of these two kits will be similar. The “winner” of this experiment would likely depend on the photographer (one might lean Fujifilm while another might lean Nikon), but I bet it would be a very close call.

The yet-to-be-announced Nikon Zf will certainly be an excellent camera, and I think it’s smart for Nikon to make it. I don’t believe it will have any significant impact on Fujifilm sales. In fact, if it does well enough, it could even boost Fujifilm’s sales (similarly to how the X100V’s success has caused a spike in Ricoh GR III sales). Most of those who buy the Zf will likely be those already in the Z system. There might be some disgruntled Sony or Canon shooters who are considering switching brands who could be attracted to Nikon by the Zf. There might even be some Fujifilm X-T3 owners who are peeved that Fujifilm left their camera on an island who take a long look at the Zf. Overall, though, I don’t think the Zf will be a “Fujifilm killer” because—while it might have some lovely retro styling similar to what Fujifilm has become known for—it doesn’t offer the same shooting experience, due to the lack of an aperture ring, the inclusion of a PASM switch or dial, and the small number of JPEG Recipes available for it (plus the community built around that). The Nikon Zf will certainly be a popular model, but so is the Fujifilm X-T5—they both can exist simultaneously, and not step on each other’s toes.

This post contains affiliate links, and if you make a purchase using my links I’ll be compensated a small amount for it.

Fujifilm X-T5 in black:  Amazon  B&H  Moment
Fujifilm X-T5 in silver:  Amazon  B&H  Moment
Nikon Zfc:  Amazon   B&H

Getting that ’90’s Film Look with Fujifilm Cameras

Captured with a Fujifilm X100V + Kodak Max 800 Recipe + 10% CineBloom filter + Flash

A lot of people are interested right now in achieving a 1990’s film look. If you’re unfamiliar, the specific aesthetic is that of cheap 35mm point-and-shoot and disposable cameras. You know, the 4″ x 6″ prints from the 1-hour photo lab that’s in your (or your parent’s) photo album or picture box. If you are older than 25 (and maybe as young as 20) there might be some nostalgia associated with this look. If you own a Fujifilm model, it’s not too difficult to achieve the ’90’s film aesthetic straight-out-of-camera.

While Kodak was king of film, a surprisingly significant extent of this aesthetic was influenced by Fujifilm. There are a few key reasons for this.

First, Fujifilm’s QuickSnap disposable cameras were a huge hit, and Kodak was often playing catch-up with their FunSaver line. While both were really popular, odds are that if you are looking at a disposable camera picture, it was captured on a QuickSnap, which often used a Fujicolor Superia film.

Second, for those pictures captured on reloadable point-and-shoot cameras, while Kodak sold more film, Fujifilm sold a heck-of-a-lot, too. The majority of pictures were likely shot on Kodak emulsions, but a very large chunk were captured with Fujicolor film.

Third, a lot of 1-hour photo labs used Fujifilm’s machines, chemicals, and paper. Even if the film was Kodak, Fujifilm still had an influence in the final picture aesthetic. The majority of snap-shooters in the 1990’s in the U.S. were dropping their film off at cheap labs inside drug stores or box stores, such as (for example) Walmart. Because Fujifilm sold their photo development equipment and supplies at a slightly lower price than Kodak, many of these labs went with Fujifilm over Kodak. Also, if you had the film scanned by the 1-hour lab (and placed on a CD), it was likely done with a Frontier scanner by Fujifilm.

If you want to recreate this ’90’s film aesthetic on your Fujifilm camera, the best starting point is the Classic Negative film simulation, because it is closely based off of Fujicolor Superia film. Any Film Simulation Recipe that uses Classic Negative as the base is going to get you halfway there. For those who own a Fujifilm camera that doesn’t have Classic Negative (X-Trans III and older, plus X-T3 & X-T30), look for Recipes with Classic Chrome (such as Kodak Gold 200 and Kodacolor) for a retro Kodak look or PRO Neg. Std (such as Fujicolor Superia 800 and Fujicolor 100 Industrial) for a Fujicolor look.

I shot with 10 different Film Simulation Recipes that use Classic Negative as the base for this article. As of this writing, there are over 45 Recipes that use Classic Negative, so there are many more to choose from—just because I didn’t use a particular Recipe here doesn’t mean that it wouldn’t work well or that you shouldn’t try it (finding Classic Negative Recipes on the Fuji X Weekly App is easy for Patron subscribers). I do think these 10 are all good options, and they produce a variety of characteristics. Some are more contrasty and some less. Some are more warm and others more cool. Some are more vibrant and some less so. Take a look at each, and if you are drawn more to the pictures in a particular Recipe, give that one a try for yourself.

10 Film Simulation Recipes

Kodak Max 800

Fujicolor Analog

Fujicolor Superia 100

Superia Premium 400

Fujicolor Superia 1600

Fujicolor Natura 1600

Fujicolor NPS 160 Pulled

Pulled Fujicolor Superia

Nostalgia Color

Agfa Ultra 100

Gear

Fujifilm X100V

We discussed Film Simulation Recipes before talking about gear because choosing the right Recipe is more critical than the gear you use. With that said, gear is important, too. One critical component is flash. While not all ’90’s film snapshots were captured using a flash, a lot were, and so it has become associated closely with the aesthetic. I used flash in all of the Recipe example pictures above.

The Fujifilm X100V has a great fill-flash built into the camera, making it an ideal choice for this style. It also has a leaf shutter, which makes flash photography much easier. There are other Fujifilm cameras that also have a flash and leaf shutter, such as the X100F, X70, and XF10 (to name a few), but the X100V is the only one that also has Classic Negative.

One problem with using the X100V is that the fixed lens is too good. It’s not really believable as a ’90’s point-and-shoot (although there are some examples that have high-quality glass). To tone it down a little, I used a 10% CineBloom diffusion filter, which helps to produce a more analog-like rendering.

When using the Fujifilm X100V, choose the Classic Negative Recipe of your preference, screw a diffusion filter onto the lens (you’ll need an adapter if you don’t have one already), and turn the flash On (TTL). You’re now good to go!

Fujifilm X-E4 + Lens + Flash

Of course, you don’t need a camera with a built-in flash to do this. My Fujifilm X-E4 doesn’t have a flash, for example, but by attaching an external unit, such as my Godox Lux Junior, to the hot-shoe on top of the camera, I can now do flash photography. This is a lot trickier than using the X100V, and takes some practice if you don’t have experience with a flash, but it is certainly one way to do it.

What I do appreciate about this approach is that the camera is interchangeable-lens, which means you can use a more lofi option, such as the 7Artisans 18mm f/6.3 II. This is softer glass with strong vignetting, and perhaps not one you’d use much for other purposes; however, for replicating the aesthetic of a cheap point-and-shoot it is great!

Combining the Fujifilm X-E4 with the 7Artisan 18mm f/6.3 II lens and using the Godox Lux Junior flash is an affective way to replicate a ’90’s film aesthetic. All of the Fujicolor Analog and Agfa Ultra 100 examples above were captured with this combination, as well as some of the other pictures. If you don’t have a built-in flash on your Fujifilm camera, this is a good way to achieve the look.

While the picture quality from cheap point-and-shoot and disposable cameras were not considered great, this is how many important memories and ordinary life moments where captured in the 1990’s. Many people look back with fondness on these photographs. The image aesthetics conjure up nostalgic feelings, so it should not be too surprising that this look is currently in-style. You can achieve it yourself on your Fujifilm camera without much fuss—it’s mostly just choosing the right Film Simulation Recipe and turning the flash on.

This post contains affiliate links, and if you make a purchase using my links I’ll be compensated a small amount for it.

Fujifilm X100V — Amazon   B&H  Moment
Fujifilm X-E4 — Amazon   B&H  Moment
7Artisans 18mm f/6.3 II — Amazon   B&H
Godox Lux Junior — Amazon   B&H

Find these Film Simulation Recipes and many more on the Fuji X Weekly App! Consider becoming a Patron subscriber to unlock the best App experience and to support Fuji X Weekly.

Travel: Central Coast of California “En Plein Air” — w/Ken Rockwell & Dave Wyman — Day 3

House on the Seaside Cliffs – Pismo Beach, CA – Fujifilm X100V – Urban Dreams

Day 1Day 2

Day 3 — June 7, 2023 — Pismo Beach & Avila Beach

En plein air is a French expression that means outside or outdoors. Specific to art, it was made popular by Pierre-Henri de Valenciennes in 1800, who encouraged artists to immerse themselves into the landscapes that they were creating by painting the scene while at the scene, and not in a studio (the most common practice at the time). The en plein air philosophy was embraced by impressionist painters, such as Claude Monet, Pierre-Auguste Renoir, Alfred Sisley, and others.

Dave Wyman calls the Central Coast of California tour “En Plein Air” because there’s no classroom or lecture portion—everything happens while out in the landscape actively capturing photographs. It’s about learning to see and interpret the scene around you by being immersed in it. Additionally, this part of California has some similarities to some French and Italian regions, so applying the en plein air expression seems appropriate.

While this was Day 3 for me, for everyone else on the tour it was Day 1. This was their travel day. Once settled into their hotel, they spent the evening photographing San Luis Obispo and Pismo Beach; however, I did not join them yet. The prior day was busy, and I knew the next several days would be, too, so I kept this one low-key with my family. We did make it to the ocean a few different times at various locations around Pismo Beach and Avila Beach, but I purposefully did less with my cameras and tried to just be in the moment more often.

Shell – Pismo Beach, CA – Fujifilm X100V – Superia Premium 400

The camera gear that I used on Day 3 (you can read the entirety of the gear that I brought with me in my Ultimate Travel Compact Camera Kit article) was a Fujifilm X100V with a 5% CineBloom filter, a Fujifilm X-E4 with a Meike 35mm f/1.7 lens, a Ricoh GR III, and the RitchieCam App on my iPhone 11. I did not use a tripod at any point on this trip, including the night shots below.

For Day 3, the Film Simulation Recipes that I used on my Fujifilm cameras (which can be found in the Fuji X Weekly App) were Kodak Tri-X 400Kodachrome 64Kodak Portra 400 v2Superia Premium 400, The Rockwell, Urban DreamsXpro ’62, and Serr’s 500T. On the GR III, I used the Monochrome Film Recipe (which can be found in the Ricoh Recipes App) for the entirety of the trip, treating the camera as a monochrome-only model. For the iPhone, I used my Night Negative filter on RitchieCam. As always, these pictures are camera-made JPEG’s that are unedited, aside from cropping and straightening sometimes—my workflow is so quick and easy!

Regarding the order, the top picture, House on the Seaside Cliffs, was the very first photo of the day, while Shell fits in-between Hanging Ice Plant and Camera Fight with Jon. Although I used my cameras less on this day, and despite the drab overcast weather, I still was able to capture a few good shots. I hope that you enjoy these pictures!

Seaweed on the Seashore – Pismo Beach, CA – Fujifilm X100V – Kodak Tri-X 400
Grey Coast – Pismo Beach, CA – Fujifilm X100V – Kodak Tri-X 400
Hanging Ice Plant – Pismo Beach, CA – Fujifilm X100V – Superia Premium 400
Camera Fight with Jon – Avila Beach, CA – Fujifilm X-E4 & Meike 35mm – Kodachrome 64
Green Dodge Van – Avila Beach, CA – Fujifilm X-E4 & Meike 35mm – Kodachrome 64
Dodge – Avila Beach, CA – Fujifilm X-E4 & Meike 35mm – Kodachrome 64
Old Man & the Sea – Avila Beach, CA – Fujifilm X-E4 & Meike 35mm – Kodak Portra 400 v2
Waiting to Rescue – Avila Beach, CA – Fujifilm X-E4 & Meike 35mm – Xpro ’62
Sibling at the Seashore – Avila Beach, CA – Fujifilm X-E4 & Meike 35mm – Xpro ’62
Incoming Surf – Avila Beach, CA – Ricoh GR III – Monochrome Film
Prelaunch – Avila Beach, CA – Fujifilm X-E4 & Meike 35mm – Kodak Portra 400 v2
Preparing to Launch – Avila Beach, CA – Fujifilm X-E4 & Meike 35mm – The Rockwell
Dry Dock – Avila Beach, CA – Fujifilm X-E4 & Meike 35mm – The Rockwell
Little Giant – Avila Beach, CA – Ricoh GR III – Monochrome Film
Violet Night – Pismo Beach, CA – Fujifilm X100V – Serr’s 500T
Dee’s Pizzeria – Pismo Beach, CA – Fujifilm X100V – Serr’s 500T
Lonely Lamp – Pismo Beach, CA – Fujifilm X100V – Serr’s 500T
Empty Pier – Pismo Beach, CA – iPhone 11 – RitchieCam App – Night Negative
Ocean Airstream – Pismo Beach, CA – Fujifilm X100V – Serr’s 500T
Pier View – Pismo Beach, CA – Fujifilm X100V – Serr’s 500T
Town, Reflected – Pismo Beach, CA – Fujifilm X100V – Serr’s 500T
Spirit of the Sea – Pismo Beach, CA – Fujifilm X100V – Serr’s 500T
Pismo Beach at Night – Pismo Beach, CA – Fujifilm X100V – Serr’s 500T

Day 4, Part 1Day 4, Part 2Day 5, Part 1Day 5, Part 2Day 6

This post contains affiliate links, and if you make a purchase using my links I’ll be compensated a small amount for it.

Fujifilm X100V — Amazon   B&H  Moment
Fujifilm X-E4 — Amazon   B&H  Moment
Ricoh GR III — Amazon  B&H  Moment
Meike 35mm f/1.7 — Amazon   B&H

The Curious Case of the Upcoming Fujifilm X-S20

Fujifilm X-S10

On May 24th, Fujifilm will announce some new products, and, according to Fujirumors, who is almost always right, the headliner will be the Fujifilm X-S20. What initially seemed like a mild update to an entry-level model is now becoming a little more interesting as details emerge of what exactly the X-S20 will be.

I had actually typed out quite a bit, but decided to delete it (11 paragraphs!) after my second cup of coffee. If you want to know the leaked specs so far, definitely visit Fujirumors. From my perspective, the biggest upgrade from the X-S10 will be the bigger NP-W235 battery. The improvements to autofocus and video specs will be nice, too, I’m sure, but probably not a big deal for a lot of people in practical use. It will have a Vlog mode complete with faux-bokeh and product-tracking-autofocus. Otherwise, there will be a lot more similar than dissimilar between the X-S10 and X-S20, but the price will be significantly divergent, as the X-S20 will be $300 more!

I realize that the X-S20 is not intended for me. It’s probably not intended for you, either. Who, then, is it for? The X-S20 is specifically for YouTubers or TikTokers who are making unboxing videos or how-to tutorials or things like that. I think Fujifilm intends the X-S20 to compete against the Sony ZV-E1, as a similar yet cheaper camera. The biggest difference between the X-S10 and X-S20 is that Fujifilm has defined a little more clearly who exactly the camera is for.

So if you are a YouTube or TikTok content creator looking for something a little more advanced than the cellphone or GoPro that you’ve been using so that you can step up your game, the X-S20 is for you, and quite a bit cheaper than Sony’s offering. Even though this camera is intended for that group, it will still be a capable photographic tool no matter who is using it.

Captured with a Fujifilm X-E4 in Sedona, AZ, last week using the Fujicolor Natura 1600 Recipe

Unfortunately, it won’t have the traditional tactile controls or striking retro design that Fujifilm is known for. Or, used to be known for, as six out of the last nine Fujifilm cameras will have been PASM models—X-S10, GFX100S, GFX50S II, X-H2S, X-H2, and X-S20—while one of the three non-PASM models (X-T30 II) wasn’t much more than a firmware update (so essentially 3/4 of Fujifilm’s latest releases have been PASM). The three most recent traditional Fujfilm cameras are the X-E4, which is nearly two-and-a-half years old, the X-T30 II (the firmware-update model), and the X-T5. The only retro-designed tactile control cameras currently offered by Fujifilm are the X-T5 and the three-year-old-and-impossible-to-find X100V, all the rest have been discontinued, including the X-E4 and X-T30 II. Oh, and apparently Fujifilm is experiencing a shortage of X-T5’s…. In other words, if you want to buy a traditional Fujifilm camera, good luck with that—you’ll probably have to go the used route, and even that can be tough.

Fujifilm had previously stated that they are working on some “wow” products; the X-S20 isn’t one of those—or, if it is, their idea of “wow” and mine are two entirely different things.

If you had been thinking about buying a Fujifilm X-S10, but then thought maybe to wait for the X-S20 and get that instead… unless you just need the new Vlog mode or battery life, or just have-to-have the improved autofocus and video specs (which, on paper, sound wonderful, but aren’t a huge deal in practical use for most people), I’d consider saving a few hundred bucks and buying the X-S10 instead. That’s just my opinion.

The good news, though, is that on May 24, according to Fujirumors, Fujifilm will announce a new app to replace the terrible Cam Remote app. That’s exciting! Much more exciting than the X-S20, in fact.

This post contains affiliate links, and if you make a purchase using my links I’ll be compensated a small amount for it.

Fujifilm X-S10:  Amazon  B&H  Moment

My Digital Camera Journey

My journey to Fujifilm wasn’t a straight path. Like many worthwhile adventures, there were a lot of twists and turns, and even moments where I nearly gave up. I’ve yet to chronicle this camera odyssey, so I thought I’d share it with you today. Perhaps you can relate, or maybe it will somehow assist you on your own journey.

In autumn of 1998 I enrolled in Photography 101 in college, where I learned to develop and print film in a darkroom. My first camera was a Canon AE-1, which I absolutely loved. Digital photography was in its infancy back then; I could tell a digital picture from film very easily, so I steered clear of it. I was one of those “holdouts” who stubbornly refused to go digital, and continued to shoot film even though it was no longer popular.

In 2009 I was asked to photograph my uncle-in-law’s wedding, which would happen the following spring. Realizing that the cost of film and development wouldn’t be that much less than the price of a new DSLR, I figured the time was finally right to give digital photography a try. My first DSLR was a Pentax K-x. I had a couple of Pentax SLRs, and I could use those K-Mount lenses on any Pentax DSLR—being able to use lenses that I already owned was a big upside. While the K-x was a budget model (not the cheapest, though), it was their newest, so I took a chance and went for it.

Pentax K-x — 2011 — Grand Canyon, AZ

I didn’t realize how much of a learning curve there would be. Photography is photography, I thought, but I was very wrong. I had never used PASM—on my film cameras, if I wanted to adjust the aperture, I turned a ring on the lens; if I wanted to adjust the shutter speed, I turned a knob on top of the camera; and ISO was set by the film. Choosing the shooting mode and using command wheels to adjust aspects of the exposure triangle was foreign to me. Crop-sensor was another new concept, which affects focal lengths and depth-of-field, something I didn’t even consider. With film, it’s often better to overexpose a little than underexpose, but with digital it is the opposite, because you can lift shadows but you cannot unclip clipped highlights. Post-processing with software… I had a lot of experience in the darkroom, but Lightroom… curves and sliders and layers and masking, that was all new to me, and it was not easy. I did not enjoy any of this.

Still, I had that wedding to photograph, so I begrudgingly trudged ahead, trying to become competent with my K-x.

Samsung NX200 — 2012 — Victorville, CA

For the next couple of years I was shooting more film than digital, but the film canisters were piling up in my refrigerator. My wife was getting tired of sharing fridge space with my film, but money was tight and I could only afford to get a couple of rolls developed here and there. I almost sold my K-x to fund the development of the film, but instead decided to just shoot more digital until my current stash of exposed film could be processed.

In 2012 I purchased my second model: a Samsung NX200. Yes, Samsung briefly had a line of mirrorless interchangeable-lens APS-C cameras that were actually quite innovative. By this time I had accumulated enough experience with digital photography—both operating digital cameras and post-processing with software—that it was becoming more comfortable and enjoyable, which made me want to shoot more.

Pentax K30 — 2012 — Amarillo, TX

I used that Samsung a lot… until one day when someone stole my camera bag from my car. Both the K-x and NX200 and all of my lenses were inside. Thankfully, I had good insurance, which replaced the K-x with a Pentax K30, and the NX200 with an NX210, plus they replaced the lenses. For about a month I didn’t have a digital camera, but once the insurance delivered, I had upgraded gear, and my zest for photography picked up right where it left off.

Funny enough, the stolen camera gear was recovered when the thief tried to pawn it. Because I had kept a record of the serial numbers, when I filed the police report the cameras were added to a list that was distributed to local second-hand shops; the pawn shop clerk saw that the gear was stolen, so they alerted the police. It took awhile, but I was able to acquire my stuff back, and suddenly I had four digital cameras!

Samsung NX210 — 2013 — Tehachapi, CA

I didn’t need four cameras, so I sold both of the Pentax bodies and the Samsung NX210, and used the funds to buy a Sigma DP2 Merrill (plus more NX lenses). I kept the NX200 for when I wanted an interchangeable-lens option. I liked this setup because the Sigma was small and pocketable, and the Samsung was smaller than a DSLR yet just as versatile.

The photographs from the Sigma DP2 Merrill were absolutely fantastic—finally as good as or perhaps even better than many of the film emulsions that I used. It was the first time that I felt this way about the quality of digital images. I finally truly embraced digital photography. I was in love with the pictures; however, the camera was far from perfect. Battery life was similar to a roll of film. You couldn’t stray far from base ISO. The camera itself was uninspiring. The RAW files were a complete pain to process. The photographs were amazing, but it was frustrating, difficult, and often time-consuming to achieve it. It was the epitome of love-hate.

Sigma DP2 Merrill — 2013 — Tehachapi, CA

For the next year, I used the Sigma for about 75% of my photography and the Samsung for about 25%. Man, that DP2 Merrill was a pain, but boy-oh-boy were the pictures good! Even though it had a fixed 30mm (45mm-equivalent) lens, I didn’t feel hindered by that limitation very often, and when I did the Samsung was eager to go.

A friend loaned my their Nikon D3200 to try for a few weeks, then I gave it back. The image quality was impressive for such a cheap body, but I was happy enough with the gear I had that I wasn’t tempted to switch brands.

Nikon D3200 — 2014 — Stallion Springs, CA

While cellphones had had a camera built into them for many years, I never felt that they were useful photographic tools until I got a Nokia Lumia 1020. This cellphone was a legitimate camera! Not a decent cellphone that happens to have a so-so camera, but a decent camera that happens to have a so-so cellphone. While the Sigma was quite compact and easily carried, the Nokia was even more so, which means that I literally always had it with me.

For about another year, I used the DP2 Merrill for about 50% of my photography, the Lumia 1020 for around 35%, and the Samsung was down to roughly only 15%. During this time two things happened: I was getting burnt out on post-processing the Sigma files, which was extraordinarily time consuming, and the Samsung began acting weird sometimes. Perhaps that’s why I used my cellphone so much.

Nokia Lumia 1020 — 2014 — Tehachapi, CA

In 2015 I sold the NX200 (and the lenses for it), and went all-in on the Nikon D3300, returning to the DSLR. This was Nikon’s low-budget model, but (because I had previously tried the D3200) I knew it would work fine for me; I spent more money on lenses instead. I really liked the quality of the pictures from this camera, but it didn’t take me long to remember that I didn’t care much for DSLRs. While the D3300 was very small and lightweight for a DSLR, it was still bulky, and less convenient to carry around.

I preferred the D3300 process—the shooting experience and especially the editing—over the Sigma, so I used the DP2 Merrill less and less. I have several thousand unprocessed RAW Sigma files still sitting on an old computer that’s in a box in the closet, and I’m sure they’ll be lost to time soon enough. Within a few months of purchasing the Nikon, I was only using the D3300 and cellphone, and not the DP2 Merrill.

Nikon D3300 — 2015 — Cambria, CA

It was a tough decision that I occasionally regret, but I reluctantly sold the Sigma DP2 Merrill. I set out to replace it with something somewhat equivalent—good image quality in a small, pocketable body—but with easier images to deal with. I wanted something that would be better than a DSLR for travel or just carrying around. I landed on the Sony RX100 II, which had a smaller sensor and a zoom lens.

It was definitely good to have a smaller option; however, while the camera certainly was good, I was never really happy with it. Perhaps I was too closely comparing the images to the Sigma, which was unfair to do. Sadly, despite trying, the RX100 II never found its place in my workflow, and was often underutilized.

Sony RX100 II — 2015 — Tejon Ranch, CA

I didn’t even own the Sony RX100 II a whole year before I sold it. During this time I was photographing less, while simultaneously shooting more film than I had the previous few years. Soon the D3300 and my cellphone were the only digital cameras that I owned, and I was using the Lumia 1020 more than the Nikon.

My wife had a Canon PowerShot N digicam. This little weird square camera actually took interesting pictures. I borrowed it on several occasions, including a trip to the eastern Sierras and Yosemite National Park, where I often chose it over the Nikon.

Canon PowerSot N — 2015 — Yosemite National Park, CA

I realized that I don’t enjoy big cameras. I appreciate smaller models because they’re easier to carry around and don’t get in the way of whatever else is happening around you. I feel sometimes that one has to choose whether they’ll be a photographer or just a regular person in the moment; however, small cameras allow you to be both, but often the compromise is image quality.

Even though some of my favorite pictures (up to that point) were captured on the Nikon D3300, in early 2016 I sold it, and seriously contemplated getting out of digital photography completely, and just shoot film. Instead, I purchased a Panasonic Lumix ZS40, which was similar to the RX100 but cheaper and not as good. For about four months my only digital models were this and my cellphone.

Panasonic Lumix ZS40 — 2016 — Gray Mountain, AZ

I also replaced my aging Nokia Lumia 1020 with an LG G4. The Nokia was barely being supported, so the phone side of it was becoming less practical. While the LG phone was not terrible for photography, I did not like it as a camera nearly as much as the Nokia; however, it was a much better phone overall.

This period of my photography is a bit of an empty hole. I nearly stopped. I was burnt out by a lot of things—some photography related and some not—and there just wasn’t the same joy in it that there once was.

LG G4 — 2016 — Promontory Summit, UT

But, then everything changed. I always had an interest in Fujifilm cameras since the original X100 was released, but never purchased one. In the summer of 2016, after months of not owning a “real” camera (aside from several analog models), I found a good deal on a used X-E1, so I bought it. When I first tried the X-E1, I instantly fell back in love with photography! The design—the retro tactile dials like my film cameras—just made so much sense to me. Why weren’t all digital cameras like this?!

Because I loved the camera so much, I was suddenly photographing a lot. I mean, a lot. The old problem of spending hours and hours editing pictures was returning, but at least the joy of photography was back. I sold the Panasonic, and used the X-E1 pretty much exclusively. Even the film cameras were going unused.

Fujifilm X-E1 — 2016 — Mirror Lake, UT

After one year, I traded out my beloved X-E1 for a Fujifilm X100F. Because the Sigma DP2 Merrill held such a special spot in my soul, I had high hopes that the X100F could basically do the same for me. It could be my “DP2” without the ridiculous editing hassle and without the shortcomings of that camera. At base-ISO the DP2 Merrill is really difficult to beat, but overall I found that I like the X100-series better. Much better, in fact.

Something very important happened at this time that must be pointed out: I figured out that the Fujifilm JPEGs were actually really good. I realized that the unedited straight-out-of-camera JPEGs didn’t look all that much different than my post-processed RAW files, and by tweaking the settings I could get even closer. Why was I spending all of this time editing RAW files when the camera could do the work for me? This realization literally changed my life. This was when I began making Film Simulation Recipes, which saves me so much time, and has allowed me to become a much more prolific photographer, while avoiding getting bogged down in the stuff that sucks the fun out of it.

Fujifilm X100F — 2017 — Seattle, WA

This article is already much too long, so I want to skip over my journey within Fujifilm. Maybe I’ll save that for another time. Currently I own a number of X-series models—nine bodies, to be exact—and I have owned or used a number of others. In a moment I’ll tell you what I’m shooting with in 2023.

I have had the opportunity to try several non-Fujifilm cameras over the last few years. I’m a proud Fujifilm fanboy, but that does not mean I’m not curious about or are not interested in other brands. I’ve tried Canon, Sony, Nikon, Ricoh, and Apple. They’re all good. They all have positive attributes. For me it’s no contest: Fujifilm is hands-down the best—I love Fujifilm cameras, and I cannot envision being a photographer without at least one; however, everyone has their own tastes and appreciations, and you might disagree with my assessments.

Canon 5DS R — 2021 — Huntsville, UT

So what am I shooting with now? Which cameras am I currently using?

Below are my top-ten most-used models so far in 2023, half of which are Fujifilm, which means five are not Fujifilm. I’ve placed them in order of most-used to least-used. As the year goes on I’m sure this list will change, at least a little. Without further ado, here are the camera’s I’ve been shooting with in 2023:

Fujifilm X-T5

Fujifilm X-T5 — 2023 — Vulture City, AZ

Fujifilm X100V

Fujifilm X100V — 2023 — Bisbee, AZ

Fujifilm X-E4

Fujifilm X-E4 — 2023 — Litchfield Park, AZ

Ricoh GR III

Ricoh GR III — 2023 — Buckeye, AZ

iPhone 11

iPhone 11 — 2023 — Gilbert, AZ

Fujifilm X70

Fujifilm X70 — 2023 — Tucson, AZ

Fujifilm X-H1

Fujifilm X-H1 — 2023 — Buckeye, AZ

Samsung ST76

Samsung ST76 — 2023 — Buckeye, AZ

Nikon CoolPix S7c

Nikon CoolPix S7c — 2023 — Buckeye, AZ

Fujifilm FinePix AX350

Fujifilm FinePix AX350 — 2023 — Glendale, AZ

See also:

Fuji X Weekly App
Ritchie’s Ricoh Recipes
RitchieCam iPhone Camera App

Classic DigiCams

This post contains affiliate links, and if you make a purchase using my links I’ll be compensated a small amount for it.

Fujifilm X-T5 in black:  Amazon  B&H  Moment
Fujifilm X-T5 in silver:  Amazon  B&H  Moment
Fujifilm X100V in black:  Amazon   B&H  Moment
Fujifilm X100V in silver: Amazon   B&H  Moment
Fujifilm X-E4 in black:  Amazon   B&H  Moment
Fujifilm X-E4 in silver:  Amazon   B&H  Moment
Ricoh GR III:  Amazon  B&H  Moment

Fujifilm Discontinues the X-E4?!?

According to Fujirumors, some camera stores are beginning to mark the Fujifilm X-E4 as discontinued. It’s not uncommon for cameras to be marked as such prior to the announcement of its successor, but I don’t think that’s the case here.

I own and love my X-E4. I’ve always had a special place in my heart for the X-E line because my very first Fujifilm camera was an X-E1, which was my gateway into the Fujifilm family. The X-E4 was my most-used camera body in 2022. It’s an especially great camera for travel photography due to its small size and minimalistic design, and I’m so glad that I preordered it when it was announced.

Of course, it wasn’t without controversy. Fujifilm probably went a step or two too far in their attempt at minimalism, removing a couple of things they probably shouldn’t have. No camera is perfect. Despite that, the X-E4 has been in-demand since its release, with sales often exceeding Fujifilm’s ability to manufacture new bodies. The camera has been on backorder for the majority of the time since its release a little over two years ago. If you are a camera maker, best case scenario is that a camera’s demand exceeds your ability to make them, and they are already sold before they even reach the end of assembly. The X-E4 was one such model.

Evening Charge – Santa Rosa, NM – Fujifilm X-E4 – Kodak Portra 400 v2 Recipe

So why, then, is it being discontinued?

The reason why Fujifilm couldn’t keep up with demand is the global parts shortage that affected so much within the industry. Fujifilm didn’t prioritize securing parts and manufacturing efforts for the X-E4 for two reasons, I believe: 1) other models were even more in-demand, and 2) other models have higher profit margins. I don’t have any proof of that, it’s just my assumptions. Cameras like the X100V and X-T5 are more in-demand than the X-E4, and more money is made per camera sold than the X-E4, so less of an effort was made to produce more X-E4 bodies. Instead of trying to fulfill the full demand, Fujifilm prioritized other models. It’s fine that they did that, because something had to give somewhere, and Fujifilm made their tough decisions.

My guess is that parts are running especially thin now for the X-E4, so Fujifilm is telling camera stores that they cannot fulfill more orders. I think more bodies have been made and are en route to the stores, and possibly more are on the assembly line right now, but after that there will be no more. Some of those who have it backordered will get their camera, and some won’t. That’s all just a guess and so take it with a large grain of salt. I have zero inside information.

Coastal Blooms – San Simeon, CA – Fujifilm X-E4 – Pacific Blues Recipe

Instead of trying to secure more parts and manufacture more copies of the X-E4, I think Fujifilm is trying to move onto X-Trans V as quickly as they can. I suspect that the X-Pro3 is no longer manufactured, and Fujifilm and camera stores are waiting for the current stock to dry up. I think the X-T30 II is on it’s last production run, and will soon be discontinued. My guess is that all of the X-S10’s that will be made have been already, and it’s a matter of the current stock running out. Same for the X-T4. The X100V is another story. I think Fujifilm will continue to manufacture it as long as demand remains sky-high, which will likely be until the day the X100Z (or whatever they will call it) is released; however, I do think they are giving manufacturing priority to the X-T5, X-H2, and X-H2S. Again, this is all speculation and nothing more.

Supposedly, the next Fujifilm camera to be announced will be the X-S20 sometime next month, but Fujifilm cancelled their April X Summit. Maybe they weren’t as ready for the X-S20 as they thought they would be. I think Fujifilm should prioritize the next X100-series camera, but my suspicion is that 2024 will be the year of the X-Pro4 and X100Z, and not 2023. I do think the plan is for one more X camera to be announced this year (aside from the X-S20, in or around September), but it will likely be an affordable (budget) model, such as the X-T40 (they might call it X-T50).

Old Saguaro – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4 – Arizona Analog Recipe

Fujifilm has three low-budget lines: X-S, X-E, and X-T00. They used to have other lower-budget lines, but that end of the camera market dried up so they discontinued them. I don’t believe that Fujifilm will continue with three models competing against each other. My guess is that either the X-T00 or X-E line is done for. Since Fujifilm has flirted in the past with discontinuing the X-E line, that series is likely on the chopping block, or at least being discussed as such within Fujifilm management. Don’t be surprised if there is no X-E5.

If the autumn camera isn’t the X-T40, what could it be? Fujifilm would be smart to prioritize the next X100-series model. That should be near the very top of their to-do list (after fixing the Cam Remote app). I wouldn’t be surprised if Fujifilm introduced a new mid-tier PASM line in-between the X-S20 and X-H2/X-H2S—I have no idea if that’s in their plans or not, but it does seem like a gap in the lineup. I’ve heard of plenty of demand for a non-PASM flagship model, but I don’t think that’s currently in the cards. Of course, I’d love to see an X80 or monochrome-only model—those are the only cameras that I’m personally interested in right now—but I’m not holding my breath. Most likely, 2023 is the year for the X-S20 and X-T40.

I hope the X-E line isn’t done for. I hope there is an X-E5. If they do make it, the series has historically been announced near the end of a sensor’s lifecycle, so perhaps we will see one in 2025, just before X-Trans VI is introduced. We’ll see.

This post contains affiliate links, and if you make a purchase using my links I’ll be compensated a small amount for it.

Fujifilm X-E4 in black:  Amazon   B&H  Moment
Fujifilm X-E4 in silver:  Amazon   B&H  Moment

Fujifilm GFX 4:3 Aspect Ratio

Shot with the 4:3 aspect ratio

The native aspect ratio of Fujifilm GFX cameras is 4:3. An aspect ratio is simply a mathematical expression of the shape of a sensor, film, picture, or screen. I’ve mostly shot with the 3:2 aspect ratio, which is the shape of 35mm film and many digital camera sensors, including Fujifilm X cameras, so the native GFX ratio isn’t something I’m used to.

The 4:3 aspect ratio has been around for a long time, and was the original shape of motion picture film beginning in the 1890’s. It would later become the standard shape of television screens and computer monitors for many decades, and today is the aspect ratio of most tablets, such as the iPad. It’s also the standard aspect ratio of Micro-Four-Thirds and digital medium-format cameras, and most old digicams and cellphone cameras use this ratio. 120 medium-format film can be (but isn’t always) shot in this aspect ratio, too.

While 4:3 is more square-like than 3:2, it is still a rectangle, yet I find it more challenging to compose within its shape. I personally like 3:2 and I’m quite comfortable with it. I even prefer to shoot 1:1 square instead of 4:3. The GFX aspect ratio just isn’t natural to me. It doesn’t seem like this should be a big deal, but for some reason it is for me. Over the last year I’ve challenged myself to use 4:3 more, so that I can be better at it.

Shot on an iPhone using my RitchieCam App in the 4:3 aspect ratio

Mainly I’ve used the 4:3 aspect ratio on my iPhone, which is the native shape of most cellphone cameras. My RitchieCam iPhone camera app does have many other ratios to choose from, and I don’t always use 4:3, but I’ve forced myself to use it more than ever before. This has certainly helped me not only refine my compositions within that shape, but become more accustomed to using it and seeing it. It has been becoming a bit more normalized for me. If you’ve used this ratio for years, that might seem like an odd statement, but I haven’t used it much ever (especially when compared to 3:2), so it has been outside of my comfort zone.

Fujifilm should add 4:3 as an aspect ratio choice on their X-series cameras. The current options are 3:2, 1:1, and 16:9. Why not add 4:3, 5:4, and 65:24? It doesn’t seem like it would take much programming effort to do so. Instead, if you want 4:3, you have to shoot GFX.

What about that top picture? What about the five pictures below? Which camera did I use for those to get a 4:3 aspect ratio? I didn’t crop them. They’re straight out of a Fujifilm camera—captured over the last two days and completely unedited—and they are all 4:3. Did I just buy a GFX camera, and, if so, which one? You’ll have to keep scrolling down to find out!

I did not buy a GFX camera, which you probably already guessed based on the photographs’ image quality. While I would certainly love to own one, it’s just not something that it’s in my budget. If Fujifilm ever wanted to give me one, I’d certainly accept the offer, but I’m definitely not holding my breath on that one!

So which Fujifilm camera did I shoot those images with? It couldn’t have been an X-series, right? Actually, the 2/3″ sensor X cameras—X10, X20, X30, XQ1, XQ2—do shoot naively in the 4:3 aspect ratio. But it wasn’t any of those models. And it wasn’t GFX. So what was it?

I used a lowly Fujifilm AX350 point-and-shoot digicam. This camera was number one in my The 5 Worst Fujifilm Cameras That You Should Never Own list, which was a tongue-in-cheek look at Fujifilm’s lesser appreciated models. Of course, any camera is “good enough” in the hands of a skilled photographer, including the AX350.

Interestingly, these old pocket point-and-shoot digicams are all the rage right now, particularly among Gen-Z. Why? There is a nostalgic aesthetic to their image quality. If you existed between 2000 and 2012, there’s a good chance that some of your most important or favorite life moments were captured on one of those cameras. These types of cameras were around before 2000, but film was still king by far. These types of cameras existed well after 2012, too, but more and more they were replaced by cellphones. If you were young between 2000 and 2012, you’re childhood memories are in part viewed through the aesthetic of cheap point-and-shoot digicams, so it makes sense that there would be some nostalgic feelings about it.

You can pick up these old digicams for next to nothing. If you don’t have one sitting in an old box or drawer somewhere, they commonly show up at thrift stores or yard sales for just a few dollars. I got mine from Goodwill about three-and-a-half years ago. It was in a box of various film and digital models, which I paid $40 for. I sold the two film cameras on eBay, and that paid for the lot. There were two kids cameras, which I kept—my youngest two children still play with them. There were two other point-and-shoot digital cameras that didn’t work, so they got tossed in the trash. The AX350 is the only thing that I kept for myself. I don’t use it often at all, but it’s fun to dust off every once in awhile. Although simple to operate, it’s a challenge to get quality results, so I find it to be a good photographic exercise.

Why I Haven’t Published a Fujifilm X-T5 Camera Review

I purchased my Fujifilm X-T5 when it was released back in November. I’ve received several messages lately asking why I haven’t published a review of the new camera. I think it’s because they are considering buying one themselves, and they want to know if it’s actually “worth” upgrading to or if there is something they should be aware of. Basically, some people want to either be talked into buying it or talked out of buying it, as it’s a lot of money and a big decision—which can be paralyzing—and you want to be wise with it. Lots of research is essential, and finding opinions from those you trust can be invaluable. I’m honored and flattered that many of you consider this website to be trustworthy.

At the beginning of each year, I like to take some time to consider how things went the prior year, what the current trajectory is, and where I want things to go. For Fuji X Weekly, I really feel that a slight shift in trajectory is needed, and in some ways I began moving towards that last year, even if I wasn’t sure the why and where. After much consideration, I have a clearer vision of where I want this website to go in 2023, and how to achieve it. I haven’t communicated these changes to you (until now, I suppose), but you’ve probably already noticed some.

There’s actually a lot going on behind the scenes. Many different projects are in the works. I’m juggling quite a bit right now. When the time is right, there are many exciting things that I look forward to announcing and sharing with you. Some projects might never work out, which has happened before (that’s just they way it goes sometimes), but I do believe that most of these will come to fruition. Some will take much longer than others, so stay tuned for these announcements over the coming weeks and months.

Lemon Bowl – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5 – “Superia Xtra 400

One thing that I haven’t announced (but you might have already picked up on) is that I’m doing more to explain and suggest when to use various Film Simulation Recipes. There are so many to choose from, and it can be difficult to know which to try. Then, when you find one you like, maybe the weather or light changes, and you don’t like it nearly so much in that situation. Now what do you do?

The trouble with suggesting Recipes is that, while one person might love one for a certain light and situation, another person might hate it for the same light and situation. For example, in the very same day, one photographer told me that they used the Kodak Portra 400 Recipe for a professional portraiture photo shoot and they couldn’t be more happy with the results, while another photographer told me that they tried that same Recipe for portraits and the results were horrible. Each person has their own tastes and style, and what will work for one person won’t work for another. I could suggest to you the Recipes that I think are good for various situations, but you might completely disagree with my assessment. Still, it can be helpful have a starting point.

Some of the articles that I’ve published so far in 2023 to help out with this are Five Film Simulation Recipes Every Social Media Influencer Should Try on Their Fujifilm X100V, Using Film Simulation Recipes to Recreate Vintage Looks — 10 Recipes to Try Today!, Elevating Your Street Photography with Fujifilm Film Simulation Recipes + 5 Recipes to Try Today!, Creative Collective 040: FXW Zine — Issue 15 — February 2023 (with the article: 10 Film Simulation Recipes for Cloudy Days), The 10 Best Film Simulation Recipes on the Fuji X Weekly App, and 5 Film Simulation Recipes every Fujifilm X-T5 Photographer Should Try. This actually started late last year with the Which Film Simulation Recipe, When? series. You can expect a lot more similar content moving forward because this is where I want to focus more of my time and energy. Even when I’m publishing new Recipes, I’m trying to do a better job of briefly explaining what situations or light they might work best in. Hopefully this is helpful to you.

None of this is completely new. For example, in the SOOC Live broadcasts, not only have we discussed at length a Film Simulation Recipe in each show, but for awhile now we’ve suggested several Recipe for use in specific situations or for various genres of photography. Without giving away what’s in store of Season 3, which kicks off tomorrow, I can tell you that we’re doubling-down on that concept. Be sure to tune in, and subscribe to the new SOOC Live YouTube channel.

What does any of this have to do with a review of the Fujifilm X-T5? Simple: I’m moving away from product reviews. For now—and I don’t know if this will last forever or if it’s just for a time—I won’t be publishing any camera or lens reviews. I want to focus a lot less on telling you what is good or bad about various gear, and focus more on how to use your get to achieve the aesthetics you want straight-out-of-camera. I’m not going to publish a review of the X-T5, but instead publish more articles on using Recipes with that camera (and other camera, too, definitely not just or even mostly the X-T5). I want to help you get the results you want out of your camera, and product reviews, which take a lot of time to put together, get in the way of that. Besides, there are so many reviews of the Fujifilm X-T5 already, what could I possibly add? The only things I would say is that X-Trans V renders the color blue slightly deeper on some film simulations, Auto White Balance can be quirky, Nostalgic Neg. is similar to Eterna, and if you are doing long broadcasts the camera might overheat. Those are the only things that I would add to what others have discussed, and I’ve already said them. If you have been waiting patiently for my review (that won’t come), I hope this is somehow helpful to your decision to buy or not buy; mostly I would say trust your gut, because deep down you know whether or not you actually “need” that new camera, or if it’s just Gear Acquisition Syndrome, New Camera Envy, or Fear of Missing Out.

While not publishing camera and lens reviews might be seen as negative, I hope that the revised vision for Fuji X Weekly is very positive, and that the benefits of the changes far outweigh what must be left behind. I invite you to come along for the ride, and let’s see where all of this goes.

This post contains affiliate links, and if you make a purchase using my links I’ll be compensated a small amount for it.

Fujifilm X-T5 in black:  Amazon  B&H  Moment
Fujifilm X-T5 in silver:  Amazon  B&H  Moment

5 Ways to Master that Vintage Film Look

Going Out of Business – Prescott, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5 – “1970’s Summer” Recipe

What a wonderful surprise! Leigh & Raymond Photography (formally known as The SnapChick) posted a video explaining five ways to get a vintage film look from digital cameras. One of their tips is to shoot Fujifilm cameras and use Fuji X Weekly Film Simulation Recipes (that, of course, is an oversimplification of the tip, so be sure to watch the video). Another tip is to use the RitchieCam App on your iPhone. Whoa! I was very surprised by this unexpected double-shoutout.

For those who don’t know, I have my very own iPhone camera app called RitchieCam. The intention of it is to streamline your mobile photography workflow. It’s easy to use thanks to its intuitive design, making it useful for both novices and pros. It embraces a one-step philosophy, as the analog inspired filters deliver images that don’t require editing. If you have an iPhone, download it from the Apple App Store for free today!

Most of you are here, though, not for iPhone photography, but because you have a Fujifilm camera. Back in 2021 I published No Edit Photography: 7 Tips To Get The Film Look From Your Digital Photos, in which I gave some tips for achieving a film-like-look from your non-analog pictures. My advice was:
– Shoot with a Fujifilm camera
– Use Film Simulation Recipes
– Use diffusion filters, such as Black Pro Mist or CineBloom
– Shoot with vintage lenses
– Don’t be overly concerned with perfectly sharp pictures
– Use high-ISOs
– Overexpose and underexpose sometimes

Read the article to learn more about each tip. I recommend starting with both of the first two (Fujifilm cameras and Film Simulation Recipes), and then add one or two of the other five tips. For example, if you have a Fujifilm X-T20, you might use the Kodachrome II recipe plus a vintage lens. Or, if you have a Fujifilm X100V, you might use the Fujicolor Superia 800 recipe plus a 5% CineBloom filter. Anyway, you have to find what works best for you, but if you are not sure, that article is meant to provide some direction, which is hopefully helpful to you in some way.

Thank you, Leigh and Raymond, for all the kind words and support! Your video is much appreciated by me. To those of you reading this, be sure to visit their channel, watch the video, give it a thumbs-up, and subscribe if you don’t already.

Thoughts on the Upcoming X-S20

According to Fujirumors, who has a reputation for being quite accurate, the next Fujifilm model will be the X-S20, which will be announced at the X-Summit in April. What are my thoughts on this upcoming camera?

First of all, I want to state that I have zero inside information. Fujifilm doesn’t tell me anything. I haven’t spoken with anybody who has knowledge about upcoming cameras. What I state about the X-S20—or any unreleased model—is my opinion (nothing more) and should be consumed with a grain of salt.

The X-S10 was a successful model for Fujifilm, doing what it was intended to do: attract those unsatisfied with their Canikony camera who have an interest in Fujifilm but are intimidated by the traditional dials because they have only ever used PASM. I have no doubt that the X-S20 will be just as successful, if not more so.

I believe it will have the same 40-megapixel sensor as the X-H2 and X-T5. It won’t be weather-sealed. It will be 95% the same camera as the X-S10, just with the new sensor and processor. I would be surprised if there were any big surprises. If the X-H2 is too expensive for you, or if you have an X-H2 but want a smaller and cheaper second body, the X-S20 will be the one to consider.

What will separate the X-S20 from the X-S10? Megapixels. Autofocus. Improved IBIS algorithm. Nostalgic Neg. 6K video. I don’t expect the new version to be head-and-shoulders better, but an improvement nonetheless, but with some give-and-take, so an argument could be made that the X-S10 is actually “better” (subjectively, of course), just like the X-T4 might be considered better than the X-T5 by some.

I do wonder if Fujifilm has intentions of introducing a mid-level PASM model. The X-H2/X-H2S cameras are “flagship” cameras that are true “hybrid” models (excellent for both stills and video), but unfortunately those are PASM models, which means long-time Fujifilm photographers were left out in the cold—the X-T4 and X-H1 are the only “flagship hybrid” cameras for you to choose from (yes, an argument could be made for the X-T5, but it is clear Fujifilm intends it for those who primarily are still photographers, not videographers). The X-S10 and X-S20 are entry-level (as in the new entry-level, which used to be mid-level). What’s in-between the high-end X-H2 and the low-end X-S20? For the PASM shooter, nothing. I’m not certain if something is needed, but I wouldn’t be surprised if Fujifilm is exploring that possibility, or even in the process of creating it.

I don’t think, in the current market, that it makes sense to have three entry-level models. That means either the X-E line or X-T00 line is likely on the way out. The X-T00 has historically been more popular, but the X-E line is beloved, and the X-E4 has been especially successful. I’m not sure what might get the ax or when, but it’s possible that the X-T30 II or X-E4 was the last in their respective series. Or maybe the X-T40 (or X-T50… they might skip using four because it is an unlucky number in Japan) or X-E5 will be the last. I hope I’m wrong about this, and both lines continue for years to come, but I don’t think that will be the case.

I’m disappointed that the X-S20 is the next camera to be announced. Six out of the last nine Fujifilm cameras will have been PASM models—X-S10, GFX100S, GFX50S II, X-H2S, X-H2, and X-S20—while one of the three non-PASM models—X-T30 II—wasn’t much more than a firmware update (so essentially 3/4 of Fujifilm’s latest releases have been PASM). I think it’s clear that Fujifilm is more interested in becoming a part of Canikony (Canikonyfilm?), which they see as their future growth potential, than to embrace and better communicate what makes them unique (and why that uniqueness is desirable). Shame. But, at the same time, the X-S line was due for an update, so I’m not too surprised that this is their next model. Still, I think with the current demand for the X100V, which Fujifilm cannot keep up with due to parts shortages, that they would expedite the X100Z (or whatever it will be called). To me, that would have made more sense.

This post contains affiliate links, and if you make a purchase using my links I’ll be compensated a small amount for it.

Fujifilm X-S10:  Amazon  B&H  Moment

Want to be a Wedding Photographer? Your Opportunity Awaits!

Pay attention!

The day after Christmas I saw an article by Charissa Cheong on Insider.com, Professional TikTok creators are charging couples to film their weddings in a bid to help them go viral on their special day. Despite the long title, I read the article, but I didn’t pay much attention. The next day someone shared it with me and told me that I should, in fact, pay careful attention to it.

Why should I? I’m not a wedding photographer. Sure, like many who carry a camera, I have been asked a few times to capture the big day for family and friends. But that’s not something I’m interested in doing as a career. It’s too much work. Oftentimes, the wedding photographer is the first to arrive and one of the last to leave. Twelve hours of photography might equal 24 hours of culling and editing. Besides that, people sometimes don’t like pictures of themselves, because they see their own perceived flaws as flaws in the pictures, which is an unfortunate predicament for the photographer who photographs people. I’m also not a TikTok influencer. Yeah, I have social media accounts, and my Instagram has nearly 35,000 followers; while I never thought it would ever grow anywhere near that big, it’s still small-potatoes to be considered within “influencer” territory.

The article—what I missed the first time I read it—is about the power of swiftness. People are turning to TikTok creators to capture their wedding day because they can get ready-to-share pictures and videos quickly. People nowadays are less interested in a photo-book or DVD of their big day; instead, they want something that they can post to their social media accounts. Yeah, those polished products with a one or two week turnaround are great, but by the time the married couple receives them, the wedding is old news. Instant can be better than perfection. The younger generation in particularly would rather sacrifice “quality” for quickness.

Something else the article brings up is that people are interested in intimate and genuine content. “[Taylor Richardson] focuses on taking ‘raw footage’ and ‘candid’ images,” the article states, “which have a more ‘personal’ and ‘organic’ feel.” Richardson is then quoted, “The results end up looking like I was attending the wedding myself, like an amazing friend who never put her phone down the entire day.” It’s like the whole blurry picture trend—imperfections make it seem more true, more real, less staged. That’s what the younger crowd wants—authenticity. Or, at least, perceived authenticity.

What does any of this have to do with Fujifilm? Well, you all have a huge advantage! You can shoot straight-out-of-camera pictures using Film Simulation Recipes, and deliver amazing edited-looking pictures very quickly. Because you don’t need to edit, aside from perhaps some cropping, straightening, and maybe occasional very minor touchups, your biggest challenge is culling and delivery, not post-processing. That’s huge! Remember, it’s not perfection the client wants, but authentic pictures, quickly.

It’s not just photographs that the newlyweds want, but also ready-to-share videos. Video editing is even more slow and cumbersome than photo editing, but it doesn’t have to be. You can use Film Simulation Recipes for video, too (note that Grain, Clarity, and Color Chrome Effects are unavailable in video mode), so no need to color grade. You will have to splice clips to make under-a-minute short videos that are oriented tall and not wide. Consider having one camera dedicated to video and another for stills. If you don’t have much experience filming and editing short-form videos, that’s something you’ll want to get comfortable with well before the wedding day, and I suppose that’s why TikTokers have a leg up on everyone else. Storytelling is much more important than perfection, so consider ahead of time which clips you want to get to tell the story that you want to create.

Some people will look at the Insider article with disappointment. Those darn social media influencers with their iPhones and TikToks are ruining wedding photography! Some people will look at it with indifference. Why should I care? I’m not a social media influencer or wedding photographer. For some, though, who pay close attention, there’s a great opportunity for you, and the time is now to jump on it. You are already ahead of the curve because you own a Fujifilm camera and shoot with Film Simulation Recipes. Worry less about perfection and more about authentic in-the-moment images that are perhaps more raw and candid. The quicker that you can get these pictures into the hands of the client, the better.

The real advantage that you have over “TikTok Wedding Content Creators” is quality. While the iPhone is a good photographic and videographic tool—and don’t forget the RitchieCam App (a shameless plug)—it pales in comparison to what your Fujifilm camera is capable of. Your image and video quality can be so much superior while equally quick. The fruit is ripe for you, all you have to do is harvest it. Yes, it’s easier said than done, but if this is something you’ve been thinking about, it’s time to be decisive with your decision. If you want to be a wedding photographer, your opportunity awaits.

I Was Never Meant to Like the Provia Film Simulation + Other Fun Film Sim Facts

Oak Autumn – Pine, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4 – Provia film sim – “KodaNeg VC” recipe

I’ve never really cared for Fujifilm’s Provia film simulation. I mean, it’s alright, but I like most of the other options better, and I wondered why they made it the “standard” film simulation. It doesn’t much resemble real Provia film—why even call it Provia?—yet it is front-and-center on all Fujifilm models.

I Recently stumbled across a fascinating article that helped me better understand why I don’t like Provia, and why the other film sims look the way they do. Exibartstreet.com translated and summarized an interview of two Fujifilm managers who discussed at length the different film simulations found on Fujifilm cameras (the original interview articles can be found here and here, and is two years old). I now have a little better understanding of Fujifilm’s philosophy behind the creation of their profiles.

Truck Stop Cross Process – Bowie, TX – Fujifilm X100F – Provia film sim – “Cross Process” recipe

Specifically to Provia, I discovered that I was never supposed to like it. It wasn’t designed for me. “When it comes to Provia,” one of the Fujifilm managers stated, “photographers that started with film find it hard, but photographers that only shoot digitally find it just right.” Well, I started with film; I don’t know if I’d describe it as “hard” but it is far from “just right” for me personally. “Provia aims at the greatest common denominator that makes you feel ‘beautiful’ at a glance.” In other words, they weren’t trying to mimic any emulsions, but create a profile that looks nice to those who have only ever shot with digital cameras. “In my personal opinion, I would like to change the name ‘film simulation,'” the Fujifilm manager said. “Film simulation is not film imitation.”

Diving into the interview, we discover that Velvia was, in fact, modeled after the film of the same name, but digital sensor and processor limitations have made it difficult to reproduce the film’s aesthetic; however, beginning with X-Trans III, Fujifilm has been able to get closer. Enabling Color Chrome Effect allows you to achieve the appropriate color depth.

Wind from the West – Hammond, OR – Fujifilm X-E4 – Astia film sim – “CineStill 50D” recipe

The Astia film simulation looks so much different than real Astia film. “We often receive comments that ‘reproducibility is different from Astia of silver salt,'” the manager explained. “The reason for this is that ‘the image quality design is not aimed at silver salt Astia.’ You may wonder what it means to bear the name of Astia even though it is different, but it is not completely unrelated. In fact, both film and digital are aiming at the same place. In other words, the film simulation ‘Astia’ was developed to bring it closer to the ‘ideal Astia’ that the development team aimed for when developing the silver salt film Astia.” Put more simply, the film simulation is the aesthetic that Fujifilm would have produced with the film if they could have.

Classic Chrome was modeled after an unmentioned slide film… they can’t say Kodak.

Pilot – Cordes Lakes, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5 – Classic Chrome film sim – “Kodachrome 64” recipe

PRO Neg. Std and PRO Neg. Hi were not modeled after any specific emulsions, but are for faithful color reproduction. “The main difference is the tone curve. PRO Neg. Hi is adjusted to tighten the shadows and tighten the highlights. On the other hand, the color design is the same.”

The Eterna film simulation was modeled after Eterna motion picture film. Regarding Eterna Bleach Bypass, “This setting is equivalent to ‘half of the silver remaining’ on film….”

Coastal Blooms – San Simeon, CA – Fujifilm X-E4 – Classic Negative film sim – “Pacific Blues” recipe

“Classic Negative is a very special kind of film simulation, designed so that the appearance of colors changes depending on the brightness. Therefore, I make adjustments so that dark tones are cyan, and bright tones are magenta. Classic Negative… was originally ‘Superia.'” It’s clear that this film simulation was carefully crafted to closely mimic Superia film. “To tell you the truth, I feel that Classic Negative was a little too bold.” I think Fujifilm should consider going “too bold” more often!

There’s a heck-of-a-lot more said in the interview that’s quite fascinating. I think Fujifilm doesn’t want its users to interpret “film simulation” as “film imitation” because not all of their film sims are intended to mimic film. Some are, and some are not. But, even the ones that are not, the digital side teamed up with the film side to assist in designing all of the film simulations—including Provia/Std—and I think their careful attention to detail and vast film experience translates into profiles that can be made to resemble film, even if the film sim was never intended to. Still, the film simulations that are, in fact, modeled after film are my favorites.

I Have A Fujifilm X-T5!

Wow! It’s been crazy the last several days. Fujifilm released the X-T5 on the 17th. Not everyone got their orders.

Let’s back this up. Amazon apparently listed the X-T5 too early on announcement day. By contract, everyone is supposed to go live no earlier than a certain time, but Amazon jumped the gun. I preordered an X-T5 on Amazon because I had reward points that I wanted to use. When the 17th came around, some people received their preorders that day. For others it shipped that day, and arrived in the next day or two. For me? Nothing. Those who ordered on Amazon were left in the dark. What I didn’t know is that Fujifilm decided to punish Amazon for their sins and not give them any cameras to sell; sadly, only Fujifilm photographers who ordered through Amazon were actually punished. Is it Amazon’s fault? Yes. Is it Fujifilm’s fault? Sure—they could have done something else to teach Amazon a lesson, while still allowing people to receive the cameras they ordered. Is it my fault? No. Is it your fault? No. But you and I didn’t get our gear when others did. I know this is a first-world problem, and in the grand scheme of things it doesn’t matter, but it is something that many people have experienced.

Amazon is a huge company, and Fujifilm sales are a tiny drop in a massive bucket. If Fujifilm stopped selling to Amazon altogether, it wouldn’t hurt Amazon in any way, shape, or form. I get that Fujifilm has to hold them accountable. I get that it wasn’t fair to their other retail customers. But let’s be real: crap rolls down hill. Who ended up with the crap? Me. You, if you, too, ordered through Amazon. Fujifilm’s customers are who got punished, not Amazon. I’m sure Amazon gave two seconds to this situation, and hasn’t cared one iota since. When they get their cameras, they’ll sell every single copy, and it will have such a small impact on the bottom line that you need a powerful magnifying glass just to see it. Those trying to be patient with their Amazon preorders might have to be extremely patient—I’ve heard that it might be sometime in January before orders are shipped. I don’t know that for a fact, but it’s what I have heard, and it may or may not be true—I hope it isn’t true.

So how did I get my X-T5? I called around to local camera stores, and I found one in stock. Luckily, Foto Forum in Phoenix had a body-only copy, plus one bundled with the 18-55mm f/2.8-f/4 kit zoom. I purchased the one with the lens. If you are still waiting for yours to ship, maybe call around to local camera stores to see if they still have an X-T5 in stock, and if so purchase from them instead.

That’s my story. What about you? Did you buy a Fujifilm X-T5? Did it arrive or are you still waiting?

People have already begun asking me for my impressions on this camera. I think a number of you are waiting to learn a little more about it before spending so much money. It’s way too soon to provide you with anything valuable. I’ll tell you my way-too-soon initial impressions, but please take them with a large grain of salt. I’ve only barely begun to use the camera and really haven’t had a chance to properly test it. I’ll give a full review later.

First, let’s talk about megapixels. Do you need 40? If you crop deeply, print posters, or just love to pixel-peep, then maybe. But if you don’t crop deeply, don’t print posters, or don’t pixel-peep, then you definitely don’t need 40mp—it’s way overkill. Fortunately, it doesn’t seem to negatively affect the speed of the camera or even the file transfer speed when using the Fujifilm Cam Remote app. Unfortunately, it does take up more space on the SD Card, phone/computer, and storage, and uploads to my cloud storage are noticeably slower. There’s pluses and minuses to 40mp; I don’t anticipate the pluses coming in handy for me very often. For some of you, though, it is an important upgrade.

I haven’t put the autofocus improvements to the test whatsoever, but through three days of shooting, I haven’t noticed it being any more snappy than my X-E4. The only thing I noticed is that face detection locked onto a face that was far away, which I wouldn’t expect to happen on my X-E4. Since I wasn’t trying to photograph the person, it actually wasn’t a positive thing, but I can see this being an improvement. I haven’t even attempted continuous tracking or anything like that yet, so I can’t speak of it.

I was really excited for HEIF, but discovered that it disables Clarity. That’s disappointing. No HEIF for me, since I use Clarity a lot. Speaking of Clarity, I was also very disappointed that it isn’t any faster on the X-T5, and the Storing pause is identical to X-Trans IV. Fujifilm should have spent some time speeding this up, in my opinion. Oh, and somehow I keep bumping the drive switch, and accidentally switching to CL or HDR, both of which disable Clarity—I’ll have to figure out how to not bump that switch.

While the X-T5 is smaller than the X-T4, and just a little bigger than the X-T1 and X-T30, it is definitely heavy. Seems like a similar weight to the X-T4—not sure if it is or isn’t, but it’s hefty. I personally prefer the weight of the X-T1 or X-T30, but if you use large lenses a lot, you might appreciate the solid base of the X-T5.

The reason that I purchased the Fujifilm X-T5 is because this camera has the new Nostalgic Neg. film simulation. What do I think of it so far? If Eterna and Classic Chrome had a baby, it would be Nostalgic Negative. It has some similarities to both of those film simulations, with soft gradations in the shadows similar to Eterna and with some Eterna-like colors (particularly the warm colors), and with contrast, saturation, and an overall palette more similar to Classic Chrome. I’m not a huge fan of default straight-out-of-the-box Nostalgic Neg.—I was actually initially disappointed—but with some adjustments it can become magical. I love it! Nostalgic Neg. is another analog-esque film sim from Fujifilm that’s sure to become a classic. Expect some recipes soon!

I don’t have any other observations yet. I hope to do some more serious experimentations soon, and when I do I’ll share those impressions with you. In the meantime, here are some straight-out-of-camera Nostalgic Neg. pictures that I captured with my Fujifilm X-T5:

Two Ducks – Lynx Lake, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
311 – Lynx Lake, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Caution: Nature – Lynx Lake, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Believer – Lynx Lake, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Cat Clock – Prescott, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Dusk Blazer – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Spiderweb Rocks – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Don’t Shoot – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Warning – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Golden Light Chair – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Red & Gold – Prescott, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Going Out of Business – Prescott, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Hyundai – Prescott, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Short Train – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Around the Bend – Arlington, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Lakeview – Lynx Lake, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Log on the Lake – Lynx Lake, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Private Dock – Lynx Lake, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Can’t See the Forest – Lynx Lake, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Irrigation Mist – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5

This post contains affiliate links, and if you make a purchase using my links I’ll be compensated a small amount for it.

Fujifilm X-T5 in black:  Amazon  B&H
Fujifilm X-T5 in silver:  Amazon  B&H

Fujifilm X-T1 Short-Term Project, Update 1

Tiny Purple Blossoms – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T1 – “Classic Kodak Chrome” – Day 5

In my article, Did I Buy the Fujifilm X-T5? Should You?, I mentioned that I began a new short-term photography project: photographing only with my Fujifilm X-T1 from the announcement of the Fujifilm X-T5, which was November 2, until the release date, which will be November 17. I’m not using any other camera during this 16 day period, only the X-T1.

Why am I doing this? First, even though the Fujifilm X-T1 is eight-years-old (and approaching nine), it is still such a great little camera. It took three years for Fujifilm to bring this model to the market because they wanted to get it right, and it was one of their most important cameras ever released. The Fujifilm X-T1 was one of the first, if not the first, Fujifilm cameras that widely appealed to professional photographers. It was Fujifilm’s most successful model at the time—outselling all the previous cameras—and launched the extremely successful X-T line. The X-T5 is the latest iteration. This project will give me a better understanding of how the X-T5 has evolved from the original model.

More importantly than any of that, the Fujifilm X-T1 was a good camera on the day it was released, and is still a good camera in 2022. There’s no reason that it cannot be used today. The image quality is excellent. The camera is pretty quick overall (look at the sports pictures!). It has one advantage over all other X-T cameras: 16mp. The files are smaller, which means I can capture more pictures on an SD card, it takes less time to transfer the pictures from the camera to my phone, the pictures take up less space on my phone, the pictures upload more quickly to my cloud storage, the pictures use less cloud data, and the pictures download from cloud storage more quickly. Less is more sometimes. I’ve really appreciated this quickness lately. The Fujifilm X-T1 is a camera that I’ve thoroughly enjoyed shooting with over the last week, and I think I’ll be a little sad when I put it back on the shelf after my X-T5 arrives in the mail.

Day 1

Birdcage on a Wall – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T1 – “Classic Kodak Chrome” – Day 1
A Pink Rose in the Garden – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T1 – “Classic Kodak Chrome”
Autumn Colors – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T1 – “Classic Kodak Chrome”

Day 2

Hummingbird Feeder Along a Wall – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T1 – “Classic Kodak Chrome”
Running on Air – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T1 – “Classic Kodak Chrome”
Inflatable Obstacle – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T1 – “Classic Kodak Chrome”
Duck and Run – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T1 – “Classic Kodak Chrome”
Obstacle Athlete – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T1 – “Classic Kodak Chrome”

Day 3

Morning Roofline – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T1 – “Classic Kodak Chrome”
Bougainvillea Bush – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T1 – “Classic Kodak Chrome”
Green Tree Leaves – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T1 – “Classic Kodak Chrome”

Day 4

An Arizona Autumn – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T1 – “Kodak Portra 160
Lots of Pink Blossoms – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T1 – “Kodak Portra 160”
Bent Do Not Enter Sign – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T1 – “Kodak Portra 160”
Tower – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T1 – “Kodak Portra 160”
Backyard QB – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T1 – “Kodak Portra 160”
Football Catcher – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T1 – “Kodak Portra 160”

Day 5

Cranes – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T1 – “Kodak Portra 160”
Monkeys on the Bars – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T1 – “Kodak Portra 160”
Flower Among Flowers – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T1 – “Kodak Portra 160”
Hidden Logs – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T1 – “Kodak Portra 160”
Bones – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T1 – “Kodak Portra 160”
Saguaro Skeleton – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T1 – “Monochrome
Dead Saguaro – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T1 – “Monochrome”

This post contains affiliate links, and if you make a purchase using my links I’ll be compensated a small amount for it.

Preorder your Fujifilm X-T5 in black:  Amazon  B&H
Preorder your Fujifilm X-T5 in silver:  Amazon  B&H

Part 2

Did I Buy the Fujifilm X-T5? Should You?

Just yesterday Fujifilm announced the brand-new X-T5, and I’ve been inundated with questions of whether I’ve preordered it or not. Before I give my answer to that, I want to share my opinion (and it’s just an opinion) on who should buy the X-T5 and why, and who should pass on it. I’m sure many of you are considering purchasing it and are on the fence, so hopefully this helps you.

I think it’s important to have some perspective. New cameras come out all of the time, and each time there’s a lot of hype, which causes FOMO (fear of missing out) and GAS (gear acquisition syndrome), neither of which are good things. I’ve often said that it’s better to invest in experiences than gear—what kind of epic journey could you embark on with $1,700?—and the gear you already have is more than good enough. “Better” gear will never make you a better photographer, but using your gear more often will, especially if you can make an honest evaluation of your photographs and really consider what lessons they have to offer—each exposure, whether failed or successful, is a learning opportunity if you are open to it. It’s always a good idea to take the new-camera hype with a large grain of salt by keeping a healthy perspective.

The Fujifilm X-T5 looks like and seems like a very wonderful camera. Fujifilm listened to those who complained about the X-T4, and made the X-T5 more like the X-T3. That’s good, unless you like the X-T4 more than the X-T3 (there are some who do), then you might not appreciate the X-T5; otherwise, you’re likely to consider the X-T5 to be a nice improvement. Are those nice improvements enough that you should consider purchasing it?

If you print your pictures poster-sized, the X-T5 is for you, because it has all that extra resolution. If you crop extensively, the X-T5 is for you, because—you know—40mp and all. If you find the autofocus on your current model to be insufficient, then the X-T5 is for you, because they improved that. Need to shoot 6K video? The X-T5 is for you. Need IBIS? The X-T5 has it. If your camera is too big and you’d prefer something smaller, depending on the camera you have and how small you want to go, the X-T5 might be for you. Just got to have Nostalgic Negative and “improved” Auto White Balance? Well, the X-T5 has it. None of those things apply to you? Then I would suggest passing on the X-T5.

A lot of times when a new camera is released, it takes two steps forward and one step backwards. I think this is so some future iteration of it can add it back in and call it a new feature or improvement. For the X-T5 it is the optional vertical battery grip, which isn’t an option for the new camera. For most people this is no big deal, but for some this is a dealbreaker, so it is worth pointing out. I have a feeling that once the X-T5 is released, we’re going to start getting reports of overheating issues, so keep that in mind, too.

Hummingbird Feeder Along a Wall – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T1 – “Classic Kodak Chrome” – I captured this picture today

I started a new short-term project: I’m photographing exclusively with my Fujifilm X-T1 from the announcement date of the X-T5 (yesterday) until the release date (the 17th). The X-T1 started the X-T line and is such an important camera in Fujifilm’s X-series heritage. It’s eight-years-old now (almost nine), so it can’t be any good, right? Well, no surprise to me, it’s still a highly capable camera worthy of use in 2022. In fact, the X-T1 has one advantage over all other X-T cameras, including the X-T5: the file sizes are smaller. That means I can capture more pictures on an SD card, it takes less time to transfer the pictures from the camera to my phone, the pictures take up less space on my phone, the pictures upload more quickly to my cloud storage, the pictures use less cloud data, and the pictures download from cloud storage more quickly. Less is more sometimes. Even though the X-T5 is capable of saving in HEIF, which saves space, the files will still be significantly bigger than those from the X-T1. Certainly, though, the pictures from the X-T1 aren’t good enough for printing, though, right? Nonsense! Some of my favorite pictures that I’ve ever printed were captured on a Fujifilm X-E1, which is even older than the X-T1.

Now I’ll answer the opening question: did I preorder the Fujifilm X-T5? Yes, I did. The silver one. Why? One reason, and one reason alone: Nostalgic Negative. I don’t think this new film simulation is going to be my favorite. I don’t think I’ll like it as much as Classic Negative, Classic Chrome, Eterna, or Acros. But I really want to try it and see what Film Simulation Recipes I can create with it. I think it will be fun to do that. Which brings me to another point: if some new gear will bring you joy, even if it isn’t meeting any other need, then it might be worth it. Maybe. It could be short term joy, and later you’re asking yourself why you didn’t use the money to visit a National Park or something instead, so you better be sure that you’ll really enjoy it for some time to come. The X-T5 doesn’t meet any other need for me. I don’t need the extra resolution, and, in fact, I’m not looking forward to that aspect of it. I don’t need the improved autofocus, as I find the autofocus of the X-T1 to be good enough for me, and the X-H1, X-T30, X100V, and X-E4 that I own are even better. I don’t shoot video (my wife does on her X-T4), and I have no need for 6K. I don’t consider IBIS to be important for any of my photography, but if for some reason I do need it (such as a long telephoto lens in dim light), I use my X-H1, which has IBIS. I have a lot of smaller camera bodies already, so I don’t need another—in fact, I suspect that bigger and heavier lenses will balance better on the X-T3 and (especially) X-T4 than the X-T5. The new and improved Auto White Balance is intriguing, and I’m curious how that affects recipes, but that’s definitely not a selling point for me. The only thing about the X-T5 that makes me want to buy it is Nostalgic Negative, which I’m really uncertain if that’s a good reason to spend so much money (my brain says no, my heart says yes), but I really look forward to using Nostalgic Negative and experimenting with it—I’m quite excited for that!

Should you buy the X-T5? That’s a question only you can answer. I can offer my best advice, but you should take it with a grain of salt, because everyone’s wants and needs are different. I can offer my perspective, but I would recommend getting advice from others, and go with whichever one makes the most sense to you.

This post contains affiliate links, and if you make a purchase using my links I’ll be compensated a small amount for it.

Preorder your Fujifilm X-T5 in black:  Amazon  B&H
Preorder your Fujifilm X-T5 in silver:  Amazon  B&H

Fujifilm Cameras In Stock Right Now

I’ve had a lot of people tell me lately that they’re frustrated the Fujifilm camera they want to purchase is out of stock, and has been for some time. Unfortunately, Fujifilm (like a lot of companies) has been plagued by global supply chain issues and parts shortages. On top of that, I believe that Fujifilm is ready to fully move onto X-Trans V, which means that X-Trans IV models will get harder and harder to find. So I thought I’d look at what is out there in stock on Amazon, and share what I find.

I was not surprised to see the Fujifilm X100V and Fujifilm X-E4 out-of-stock. Those two cameras haven’t even had a chance to hit the shelves, because they’re already sold the moment the shipment arrives at the store. Fujifilm could have sold a lot more copies of these two models if they had been able to manufacture more, and maybe they’re in the process of doing just that, or maybe they’re retooling for the next iteration—who knows? Whatever the case, a lot of people want an X100V and/or X-E4, and they can’t get one, unfortunately, and maybe buying used (and likely at an inflated price) is their only option.

For all the news that the X-H2S and X-H2 have had more demand than can be filled… they’re apparently in stock, and you can get one (or both) before Thanksgiving. The X-T3 and X-T4 are both in stock, but the X-T5 is apparently coming before Christmas (so watch for that). There are plenty of X-Pro3’s available. Supposedly there’s only one X-S10. Surprisingly, there are several X-T20 and X-E3 bodies, apparently. Shockingly, I found one (supposedly) brand-new X-M1, two refurbished X-T1’s, and one (supposedly) new-but-not-warrantied X100T, if you are interested in an older model.

Fujifilm X-T30 II Amazon

Fujifilm X-T3 Amazon

Fujifilm X-T4 Amazon

Fujifilm X-S10 Amazon

Fujifilm X-H2 Amazon

Fujifilm X-H2S Amazon

Fujifilm X-Pro3 Amazon

Fujifilm X-M1 Amazon

Fujifilm X-T1 Amazon

Fujifilm X100T Amazon

Fujifilm X-T20 Amazon

Fujifilm X-E3 Amazon

This post contains affiliate links, and if you make a purchase using my links I’ll be compensated a small amount for it.

When SOOC Digital Looks Like Film

Evening Charge – Santa Rosa, NM – Fujifilm X-E4 – “Kodak Portra 400 v2

Note: I wrote this article, which I stumbled across today, over two years ago, but for some reason never published it. I replaced many of the original pictures and corrected some words and grammar, but otherwise I kept it the same.

I love film photography, but digital is so much more convenient. The cost of digital photography is paid upfront, while with film there’s a per-frame cost with each exposure, which is just getting more and more expensive. I rarely shoot film anymore, but I like the look of film. The best of both worlds is when I can get a film aesthetic straight out of a digital camera. That might sound pie-in-the-sky or even pretentious; if I like the look of film, why not just shoot film? If I shoot digital, why not just edit like everyone else?

Fujifilm cameras can create something film-like while delivering digital advantages, and that’s incredible! With digital you don’t have to send off your exposures to a lab or have your own lab set up somewhere in your home. You can know immediately if your frame is any good or not—no need to wait hours or days or sometimes longer. And you are not limited to 12, 24, or 36 exposures. There’s a reason why most photographers shoot digital, yet there’s a reason why some still go through the hassle of shooting film. I think Fujifilm is kind of a bridge between the two.

Rainbow in the Woods – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T1 – “Kodak Portra 160

Using software, such as Alien Skin Exposure or any of the many preset filter packs that are available, it’s very easy to turn a RAW file into something that looks analog. I’ve done that for many years, and I appreciate the results. If I can skip the software step and have a finished image straight-out-of-camera, that’s even better. That saves me some serious time! For many people, editing a picture is half the fun, but for me it’s not. I much prefer to not sit at a computer manipulating photographs. That’s just my preference, and it may or may not be yours, and that’s perfectly fine—there’s no right or wrong way, only what works for you. Shooting Fujifilm cameras using recipes to get film-like pictures straight-out-of-camera is what works for me.

I’m amazed at all the different looks that I can get out of my camera using my different Film Simulation Recipes on Fujifilm cameras. Fuji only gives so much control in-camera— they’re constantly providing more customization options with each new generation, but it’s still limited. Despite that, there’s a lot that you can do to create many different looks. It’s possible to mimic various film aesthetics without using any software. Thanks to Fujifilm’s vast experience with film, they’ve been able to infuse into their camera-made-JPEGs an analog soul that’s frankly missing from most digital pictures.

The photographs in this article are all straight-out-of-camera JPEGs that weren’t edited, with the exception of some minor cropping in some circumstances. They’re all from Fujifilm cameras, including an X-E4, X100V, X-T30, X-T20, X-Pro2, X100F and X-T1. In my opinion, in one way or another, they resemble film—an analog look from a digital camera. That’s nothing short of amazing!

10 example pictures, just to illustrate the point:

Classic Mirror – Fort Worth, TX – Fujifilm X-E4 – “Fujicolor Natura 1600
Welcome to Ogden – Ogden, UT – Fujifilm X-T20 – “Kodachrome II
Denny’s Days – Beaver, UT – Fujifilm X-E4 – “Kodachrome 64
Coastal Blooms – San Simeon, CA – Fujifilm X-E4 – “Pacific Blues
Train Crossing – Layton, UT – Fujifilm X100V – “Nostalgia Color
Working – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-E4 – “Kodak Vision3 250D
Tail of a Whale – Morro Bay, CA – Fujifilm X100V – “Kodak Tri-X 400
Dark Cloud Over The Dark Mountain – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 – “Ilford HP5 Plus 400 Push Process
Leather Gloves – Antelope Island SP, UT – Fujifilm X100F – “Kodak Tri-X Push Process
Twisted Tree – Keystone, SD – Fujifilm X-Pro2 – “Acros

Find these Film Simulation Recipes and nearly 250 more on the Fuji X Weekly — Film Recipes App!

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Fujifilm Announced X-H2S + Lenses at X Summit Today

Body Shop – Childress, TX – Fujifilm X-E4 & Fujinon 27mm – “Fujicolor Natura 1600

There was a Fujifilm X Summit today? Guess I missed it.

I’m on a long road trip right now, and I was driving when the big announcements were made. That’s not entirely true. I was actually photographing an abandoned car garage in Childress, Texas, at that time. Originally a gas station built in 1940, this building spent its last active days as an auto body shop. I think it’s been abandoned for at least a couple of years. I suppose I could have tuned into the X Summit instead, but this was a better use of my time, as I prefer to invest in experiences over gear.

I’m sure you’ve heard by now, but Fujifilm announced the X-H2S. Everyone already knew this camera was going to be announced, and what exactly it is. Now it is all official. This is the first of two new “flagship” cameras that will come out later this year. If you need the fastest Fujifilm camera or the best video specs, this is the camera to buy. It’s intended to convince those who are unsatisfied with their current brand to consider Fujifilm instead. I’m not personally interested in this camera, and I already gave my opinions on it.

Ballyhoo – Childress, TX – Fujifilm X-E4 & Vivitar 135mm – “Fujicolor Natura 1600”

Apparently Fujifilm will have two different X-Trans V sensors on their future models: the fast 26mp and the high-resolution 40mp options—the 40mp sensor will be the “normal” one. I wish that Fujifilm would focus on other advancements and improvements instead of resolution. And I’m not talking about autofocus speed, either. People complain about autofocus speed, but consider all of the amazing photographs (and movies) that were made well before autofocus even existed, and in its infancy, too. The X-E1’s autofocus is plenty capable, just so long as the photographer is capable. The autofocus on my X-E4 is amazing, yet some people think it’s not all that good. I’ve come to the conclusion that this complaining is just an excuse, and doesn’t have any true merit. Autofocus could improve by 400% and somebody would complain, because autofocus isn’t the real problem. And it’s definitely reached the point of diminishing returns, as it’s already well beyond what most people need for their photography.

Fujifilm announced two new zoom lenses, too: 18-120mm F/4 and 150-600mm f/5.6-f/8. I’m sure plenty will get excited for the 18-120mm for travel and the 150-600mm for wildlife, but I don’t have a desire for either. I suppose zooms just aren’t my thing. Fujifilm did add an 8mm f/3.5 and 30mm f/2.8 Macro to the roadmap, both of which seem like interesting lenses, but no date was given for when they’ll be released. More than anything, I’m excited for an M42-mount Vivitar 135mm f/2.8 that I found at an antique store for $15. It’s been so much fun to use, yet highly challenging. I’d like to see Fujifilm release a prime longer than 90mm (but less than 200mm)—that would be something to get excited for!

Vivitar 135mm – Fujifilm X100V – “Kodak Tri-X 400

I suppose that I should be more excited than I am at this moment. Maybe once my road trip is over and I’m all settled into my new home, I’ll feel a little more positive about these upcoming releases. I think it’s good to have options. This camera will serve many people very well. These two zooms will open up photographic possibilities for hundreds. That’s truly great! They’re just not for me, and that’s ok, because I don’t need new gear right now. What I “need” is to use what I have, which is what I’ve been doing, and the reason why the X Summit came and went and I didn’t notice.

Why even write this article? It’s 10 PM where I’m at right now. I’m spending the night in a cheap hotel. It kind of smells funny. I have to get up early in the morning and drive for a whole bunch of hours. I could be in bed, and maybe I should be. I’m writing this article because I’ve received a dozen or so messages from people wanting to know my opinions on today’s announcements. A lot has been said already by those on the internet, including those who were given a chance to use the preproduction models. I don’t think I have much to add. If something seems interesting to you, and you believe it might help with your photography (or videography), then by all means get your preorders in. But if you are on the fence, spend the money on experiences instead, and use the gear you already own as best as you can. That’s my advice. Now I’m off to bed.

This post contains affiliate links, and if you make a purchase using my links I’ll be compensated a small amount for it.

Preorder the Fujifilm X-H2S at B&H
Preorder the Fujinon 18-120mm at B&H
Proeorder the Fujinon 150-600mm at B&H

The Forgotten Fujifilm X-H1

Everyone’s talking about the upcoming Fujifilm X-H2 cameras (yes, cameras, as there will be two of them: X-H2 and X-H2s—visit Fujirumors for all of the latest and most accurate details… it is the absolute best source for upcoming Fujifilm cameras and such, and should be one of the websites you visit often), so it’s easy to forget the wonderful Fujifilm X-H1, which is an absolute workhorse that’s easy to love.

Fujifilm introduced the X-H1 four years ago. At the time of its release, the X-H1 was the most premium model in the entire Fujifilm lineup, and the first to have IBIS. They didn’t hold anything back—the X-H1 is a dream to use—but it didn’t sell nearly as well as Fujifilm had hoped. The initial price point was too high for an APS-C camera, and Fujifilm had to steeply discount it for people to buy it. It was the very last X-Trans III camera, and shortly after its release the X-T3 was announced with a new sensor and processor and pretty much identical specs (aside from IBIS), yet cheaper. Once the X-T4 was released two years ago, which seemed to be an X-H camera in an X-T body, it was clear that the X-H1 was done, and some thought that the X-H line was also defunct, and there would be no X-H2 ever.

I got my X-H1 because someone gifted it to me. They didn’t need it anymore, and they knew that I didn’t have any X-Trans III cameras to create Film Simulation Recipes on, so they gave it to me for the benefit of the Fujifilm community. Wow! I had no idea how incredible this camera is! It’s quick and eager, but with unbelievable endurance. Like the Energizer Bunny, it just keeps going and going and going and going. It wants to be used, and used a lot. If you ask anyone who owns a Fujifilm X-H1, even if they have newer models, they’ll tell you that the X-H1 is their workhorse camera.

It’s too bad that the X-H1 didn’t sell as well as it should have. The camera is legendary among those who have used it, and pretty much forgotten by those who haven’t. While I’m just as excited for the new X-H cameras as everyone else, I want to give attention to the original X-H model—the X-H1—which just so happens to be one of my favorite cameras. If you are searching for a used camera, don’t overlook the wonderful X-H1. It’s the one that just gets the job done.

Below are some straight-out-of-camera photographs that I’ve captured on my Fujifilm X-H1 over the last several months.

Highrise, Reflection & Lamp – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-H1 – “Kodak Gold 200
Vespa Mirror Reflection – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-H1 – “Kodak Gold 200”
Suburban Adventures – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-H1 – “Kodak Portra 160
Last Warm Light on Wasatch Front – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-H1 – “Negative Print
Fading Light On Wasatch – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-H1 – “Improved Velvia
Winter Berries – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-H1 – “Negative Print”
Blossom Remnants 1 – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-H1 – “Kodak GT 800-5
Doll – Bountiful, UT – Fujifilm X-H1 – “Analog Monochrome
Lamp & Side Mirrors – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-H1 – “Ilford XP2 Super 400
A Y – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-H1 – “Ilford XP2 Super 400”