New Fujifilm X-E4 (X-Trans IV) FXW App Patron Early-Access Film Simulation Recipe: Expired ECN-2 100T

Palm Trunk & Arches – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4 – “Expired ECN-2 100T”

The Fuji X Weekly App is free, yet becoming a Fuji X Weekly Patron unlocks the best App experience! One benefit of being a Patron is you get early access to some new Film Simulation Recipes. These Early-Access Recipes will eventually become available free to everyone in time, including this new one. In fact, many Early-Access Recipes have been publicly published on this blog and the App, so now everyone can use them! Patrons help support Fuji X Weekly and, really, without them there would be no App. So I want to give a special “thank you” to all of the Patrons!

Eastman Color Negative II 100T, which was also known as ECN-2 Type 5247/7247, was a 100 ASA Tungsten-balanced motion picture film made by Kodak between 1974 and 1983 (although, apparently, it could still be found and was used into the early 1990’s). A lot of iconic movies used this film for at least some shots, including Star Wars, Back to the Future, Raiders of the Lost Ark, and many more. This Film Simulation Recipe is intended to mimic the aesthetic of this film stock that’s expired and developed in C41 chemistry after having the Remjet layer removed. This recipe isn’t intended to look like the film as it’s seen in the movies, but expired film that’s been developed in C41 chemistry instead of the ECN-2 process.

Truck Tire – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4 – “Expired ECN-2 100T”

This “Expired ECN-2 100T” Patron Early-Access Recipe is compatible with the Fujifilm X-T4, X-S10, X-E4, and X-T30 II cameras. I believe it will also work on the X-H2 and X-H2s cameras, although I have not tried it myself to know for certain. If you are a Fuji X Weekly Patron, it’s available to you right now on the Fuji X Weekly App! If you don’t have the App, download it for free today. A side-note: this is the 250th Film Simulation Recipe in the App!

Example photographs, all camera-made JPEGs captured using this “Expired ECN-2 100T” film simulation recipe on my Fujifilm X-E4:

Saguaro Green – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4
Stop, All Ways – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4
Truck Mirror – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4
Lightning McQueen’s Home – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4
Truck – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4
Texting & Walking – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4
Bougainvillea Over Wall – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4
Backlit Bougainvillea & Lens Flare – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4
Light Pink Blooms – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4
Sunlit Trumpets – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4
Shaded Hummingbird Feeder – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4
Sidewalk Chalk & Red Bucket – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4
Red Soccer Ball – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4
Friendly Skeleton – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4
Kodak Instamatic Camera – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4

Fujifilm X-E4 (X-Trans IV) Film Simulation Recipe: September Summer

Peak of Sunlight – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4 – “September Summer”

I get asked frequently to create Film Simulation Recipes that mimic various films, and occasionally the aesthetic of specific photographers. In the case of this recipe, someone wanted me to recreate the look of photographer Brian Chorski. While Brian’s images seem to have a cohesive style at first glance, upon closer inspection one can spot several subtle variations. After much research, I discovered that he primarily shoots film—both 35mm and medium-format—and he prefers Kodak emulsions, especially Portra 160, Portra 400, Portra 800, and Ektar 100. I believe that he uses a warming filter at least some of the time, perhaps most of the time. I think he tends to overexpose (a common color negative film technique), and (obviously) his scanning and post-editing play a role in the final outcome. Also, he shoots primarily in the warm summer months.

I believe that several already existing Film Simulation Recipes at times come close to Brian’s look (some more than others), including Kodak Portra 160, Kodak Portra 400 v2 (this one, too), Kodak Portra 400 Warm, Kodak Portra 800 v2, Kodak Ultramax 400, Kodak Max 800, Kodak Ektar 100, Vintage Vibes, Pacific Blues, Bright Summer, and Bright Kodak. I’m sure there are others, too. Still, some of Brian’s pictures don’t seem to match any of those recipes, so I came up with a new one. This recipe, which I’m calling September Summer, is intended to replicate the aesthetic of some of Brian Chorski’s photographs. It seems best suited for sunny conditions, producing warm images that will remind you of seemingly endless summer days (which are now waning).

Chill Vibes – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4 – “September Summer”

This “September Summer” Film Simulation Recipe is compatible with the Fujifilm X-Pro3, X100V, X-T4, X-S10, X-E4, and X-T30 II cameras, but not the X-T3 and X-T30, unfortunately. I believe it is also fully compatible with the X-H2 and X-H2s, but I have not tried it to know for sure. Those with newer GFX cameras can use it, too, but it will render slightly different. I don’t think this is a recipe that most will use regularly, but I believe some of you will really appreciate it in the right conditions.

Classic Negative
Dynamic Range: DR400
Highlight: -1
Shadow: -1
Color: +1
Noise Reduction: -4
Sharpness: 0
Clarity: -4
Grain Effect: Weak, Small
Color Chrome Effect: Off
Color Chrome Effect Blue: Weak
White Balance: 5500K, +3 Red & -7 Blue
ISO: Auto, up to ISO 6400
Exposure Compensation: 0 to +1 (typically)

Example photographs, all camera-made JPEGs using this “September Summer” Film Simulation Recipe on a Fujifilm X-E4:

First Day of Fall – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4
Saguaro Among Trees – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4
Dead Agave – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4
Bougainvillea in the Light & Shadow – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4
Trumpets & Wall – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4
Empty Pot – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4
Summer Frog – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4
Intersection – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4
Little Leaves, Little Blooms – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4
Cluster of Bougainvillea – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4
Blossom, Hiding – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4
September Blossom – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4

Find this Film Simulation Recipe and nearly 250 more on the Fuji X Weekly — Film Recipes App!

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Fujifilm X-E4 (X-Trans IV) Film Simulation Recipe: GAF 500

Urban Rhino – Phoenix, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4 – “GAF 500”

Hold onto your hats, because, for this Film Simulation Recipe, we’re going to dive deep into the obscure and practically forgotten history of a unique film called GAF 500. We’re going to explore the intriguing history of GAF, discover what made this film unique, and discuss how this new GAF 500 Film Simulation Recipe came to be. You are in for a treat today!

GAF actually began in 1886 as the Standard Paint Company of New Jersey. After acquiring a holding company in 1928 that had (among other things) majority ownership of AGFA, the company changed its name to General Aniline & Film—GAF for short. Also in 1928, AGFA merged with Ansco, so in addition to acquiring AGFA, GAF also got ownership of Ansco, which was founded in 1842. Originally named E. Anthony & Co., after merging with Scovill Manufacturing in 1901 it was renamed Ansco (“An” from Anthony and “sco” from Scovill). Ansco was headquartered in New York, and was Kodak’s biggest competitor for many decades. The merger with AGFA was intended to bring Ansco’s photography products to a global market, which would allow them to better compete against Kodak.

Then World War II happened, and in 1941 the U.S. government seized and took ownership of GAF and Ansco (separating it from AGFA, which was a German-owned business), and officially merged Ansco into GAF. The U.S. government retained ownership of GAF until 1965, when it sold all of its shares.

Morning Sunlight on a Curtain – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4 – “GAF 500”

In 1967 GAF introduced a revolutionary new film: GAF 500. It was a high-ISO 35mm color transparency (slide) film—the highest ISO color film during its time; the second-highest color ISO film (another GAF emulsion) was rated at ISO 200, so it was more than twice as “fast” (as they called it back then) as the second fastest. 30 years prior to the introduction of GAF 500, the highest ISO color film was rated at ISO 8, so having an ISO 500 option was unthinkable back then, and a lot of people wondered why anyone would need such a high-ISO film. While it was mostly sold under the brand name GAF, it was sometimes sold as Anscochrome 500. Was GAF/Anscochrome 500 any good?

From all accounts, you either loved GAF 500 or hated it. The grain was extremely pronounced. Colors were “good” yet muted (a.k.a. “neutral” or “natural”) and generally considered to be not as “nice” as Kodak’s. It didn’t push-process nearly as well as, it wasn’t quite as sharp as, and it didn’t pair with color correction filters as well as Kodachrome or Ektachrome. It was inferior to all other color emulsions except for one fact: it was fast! You could use it when other films wouldn’t work due to low light. If it was dark and you wanted to shoot color, GAF 500 was your best bet.

GAF 500 had a warm color cast—some described it as orange, some said red-orange, and others stated that it was red—not as warm as some Kodak emulsions, but warm nonetheless. The shadows tended to lean blue. If you pushed the film, it had a purple cast across the frame. Some people liked how it looked when shooting under fluorescent lights or stage lights, and was a popular choice for concert photography.

Illuminated Cat & Sleeping Child – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4 – “GAF 500”

What people seemed to like most about GAF 500 is that it was gritty yet soft. It was grainy, like a high-ISO black-and-white film, and it was contrasty with a very narrow exposure latitude—it was easy to blow out the whites or block up the blacks; however, it also had low color saturation (or was “more neutral” as some put it) , and the gradations were gentle. It was like a biker ballerina, if you will. Some people loved the aesthetic of GAF 500, and would use it even in bright-light situations just for the look that it produced. Many photographers steered clear of it just because there were “better” options, such as push-processing lower ISO films.

There was a time in the 1970’s that GAF was everywhere. It was the official film of Disneyland, and, for a time, was the only brand of film that you could purchase inside the park. Sears sold GAF cameras and film. Henry Fonda was the spokesman. Despite that, GAF struggled to be profitable competing against Kodak, Fujifilm, and other brands.

GAF made a few minor “improvements” to their ISO 500 film over the years, and (from what I read) it seemed to get “better” towards the mid-1970’s. In 1977, due to sluggish sales, GAF decided to get out of the photography business altogether. GAF/Anscochrome 500 was discontinued, along with all of the other GAF films. The Ansco brand name was licensed out to other companies for years to come, although it was largely used for rebranded films and not original emulsions. GAF 500 was gone forever.

Garden Spiderweb – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4 – “GAF 500”

Perhaps thanks to Alien Skin Exposure software, there’s been a renewed interest in GAF 500. Alien Skin has a GAF 500 preset that is supposed to allow you to mimic the aesthetic of the film with your digital images. I’ve used it before, and that’s the closest I’ve come to shooting GAF 500. It’s been awhile since I’ve used Exposure software, so I don’t recall too much about the preset (other than it was grainy). So, for this Film Simulation Recipe, I spent significant time studying whatever I could find on the film. There’s a lot of written information out there, but photographs were hard to come by. Still, I found some, and did my best to emulate the look with my Fujifilm X-E4.

Recreating GAF 500 on my Fujifilm camera was tricky for several reasons. First, I wouldn’t have considered Eterna as the best base (just because it lacks the necessary contrast to emulate a contrasty slide film), but after trying Classic Chrome, PRO Neg. Low, and Eterna Bleach Bypass, I decided to give Eterna a go. Bingo! This one had the right tonality (those “gentle gradations”); however, I do wish that Shadow could be set to +5 to get deeper blacks, but that’s not an option. Another tricky aspect was achieving the warm, reddish/orangish color cast that could still produce a hint of blue in the shadows. Fujifilm cameras aren’t capable of split-toning, so I did my best to approximate this with the white balance; I do wish the shadows were just a little more blue, but it’s not possible without sacrificing the overall warmth. Another challenge was replicating the grain. Fujifilm’s option of Grain Strong Large wasn’t nearly as pronounced as it needed to be, so I set out to supplement it with digital noise using high-ISO. But how high? ISO 1600 wasn’t nearly enough. ISO 3200 wasn’t enough, either. ISO 6400… much closer, but not quite there, either. Should I dare try ISO 12800? Yes, that’s it! More importantly, it looks good, which I had my doubts about.

With slide film, depending on the emulsion, you had to nail the exposure exactly, as the dynamic range was extraordinarily narrow. You didn’t know what you had until you got the film back from the lab (or developed it yourself at home); some frames would be underexposed, some frames would be overexposed, and some frames (hopefully) would be correctly exposed—I found examples of all three when searching for GAF 500 photographs. You can achieve similar aesthetics with this recipe if you want, by either dropping the exposure a little or increasing it a little—the exact look of this recipe will vary some depending on the exposure. While I couldn’t replicate every potential GAF 500 aesthetic with this one recipe, and no recipe will ever be 100% spot-on accurate (because of the limited tools available on the camera, and because the results of one film can vary significantly depending an a whole host of factors), I do believe that this recipe is pretty close to replicating the look and feel of GAF 500 film—at least from the perspective of someone who was born after the film was discontinued, so I never had a chance to use it myself.

Offroad Tricycle – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4 – “GAF 500”

Because this “GAF 500” recipe uses Clarity and Color Chrome FX Blue, it is compatible with the Fujifilm X-Pro3, X100V, X-T4, X-S10, X-E4, and X-T30 II cameras, and is not compatible with the X-T3 or X-T30. Those with X-Trans V cameras can also use it, and it should render identically, although I have no first-hand experience to verify that. Those with newer GFX cameras can use it, too, although it will render differently. Because of the ultra high-ISO that’s required, I recommend using your electronic shutter and a small aperture (like f/8, f/11, or even f/16) when shooting in bright light outdoors.

Eterna
Dynamic Range: DR100
Highlight: +2
Shadow: +4
Color: 0
Noise Reduction: -4
Sharpness: -3
Clarity: -2
Grain Effect: Strong, Large
Color Chrome Effect: Off
Color Chrome Effect Blue: Strong
White Balance: 2900K, +9 Red & -9 Blue
ISO: 12800
Exposure Compensation: -2/3 to +2/3 (typically)

Example photographs, all camera-made JPEGs captured using this “GAF 500” Film Simulation Recipe on my Fujifilm X-E4:

Eat – Phoenix, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4
Bird Scooters – Phoenix, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4
Orange Lighter & Abandoned Home – Phoenix, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4
FAO JUG – Phoenix, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4
Why Love? – Phoenix, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4
Twin Dumpsters – Phoenix, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4
Garfield – Phoenix, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4
Overhead Crane – Phoenix, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4
Oversized Load – Phoenix, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4
And So It Begins – Phoenix, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4
Air Garage & Graffiti – Phoenix, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4
Can in the Sage – Phoenix, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4
Suburban Barrel Cacti – Phoenix, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4
Double Peace – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4
Table Roses – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4
Sunlit Curtain – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4
Yellow Trumpets & Sunstar – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4
Bougainvillea Branch in the Blue – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4
Orange Trumpet Flower Blossoms – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4
Two Yellow Trumpets – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4
Joy – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4

Grain examples:

Big crop to show the “grain” in the image.
Big crop to show the “grain” in the image.
Big crop to show the “grain” in the image.

Find this Film Simulation Recipe and nearly 250 more on the Fuji X Weekly — Film Recipes App!

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Fujifilm X-E4 (X-Trans IV) Film Simulation Recipe: Kodak Max 800

Ice Cold Pepsi – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4 – “Kodak Max 800”

This Film Simulation Recipe is modeled after some prints I found in a box that I thought looked interesting. I didn’t initially know what film had been used, but after locating the negatives I discovered it was something called Kodak GT 800-3, and I had no idea what that was. After much sleuthing, I found out it was Kodak Max Zoom 800, also known as Max 800. The film was shot in 2006 (I believe by my wife), and it was the third and final iteration of the emulsion (this version was introduced in 2000). Max Zoom 800 was replaced in 2006 by the similar Max Versatility Plus 800 (which was around for five or six years before its discontinuation).

Kodak made Max 800 film for point-and-shoot and disposable cameras—specifically, they marketed it for point-and-shot cameras with a zoom lens, which exaggerated camera shake. It was a cheap high-ISO consumer color negative film intended for the novice. It had a large latitude for underexposure and (especially) overexposure, but color reproduction was a little different (some have said “bland” or “weird”) when compared to other Kodak films. Kodak intended the film to be printed on Ektacolor Edge paper, but my samples were printed on Fujicolor Crystal Archive paper (which certainly affects the aesthetic)—this recipe is modeled after my samples.

Winter Greenhouse – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4 – “Kodak Max 800”

This Kodak Max 800 recipe is compatible with the Fujifilm X-Pro3, X100V, X-T4, X-S10, X-E4, and X-T30 II cameras. Because it uses the Classic Negative film simulation and Clarity, it is not compatible with the X-T3 and X-T30, unfortunately. For those with the X-H2s, it’s my understanding that this recipe is completely compatible and renders near identically, but I have not tested it to know for certain. Those with newer GFX cameras can use it, too, although it will render a little differently.

Classic Negative
Dynamic Range: DR400
Highlight: -2
Shadow: +1
Color: -1
Noise Reduction: -4
Sharpness: -2
Clarity: -4
Grain Effect: Strong, Small
Color Chrome Effect: Strong
Color Chrome Effect Blue: Off
White Balance: 7300K, -5 Red & -2 Blue
ISO: Auto, up to ISO 6400
Exposure Compensation: 0 to +2/3 (typically)

Example photographs, all camera-made JPEGs captured using this “Kodak Max 800” Film Simulation Recipe on my Fujifilm X-E4:

Frozen Ponds at a Bird Refuge – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Winter Gate – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Open Gate – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Icy Marshland – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
What Remains of Summer – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Winter Water – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Frozen Marsh Pond – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Nature Trail – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Green Truck – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Santa’s Sled – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Neighborhood Path in Winter – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Trail Closed – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
No Shooting Past the Fence – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Pallets – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Inside Abandoned Shed – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Walking Tunnel – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Farm in the City – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Barnes & Noble Window – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Building Top in Last Light – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Buildings & Palms – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4
Backyard Garden Trumpets – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4
Illuminated Desert Shrub – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4

Find this Film Simulation Recipe and over 200 more on the Fuji X Weekly — Film Recipes App!

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Fujifilm X-E4 (X-Trans IV) Film Simulation Recipe: Pure Negative

Gold Coast – Pismo Beach, CA – Fujifilm X-E4 – “Pure Negative”

This “Pure Negative” Film Simulation Recipe was created by Thomas Schwab, who has made several recipes published on this website, including Superia Xtra 400Fujicolor NPS 160 Pulled, Urban Vintage ChromeKodachrome IIKodak Portra 800 v2Kodak Brilliance, Classic MonochromeB&W Superia, and Monochrome Kodachrome. Thomas has also collaborated on other recipes, playing an important role in getting them right, including Kodak Portra 800Kodak Ektar 100Kodachrome 1Kodak Portra 400, and Kodak T-Max 400. I’m sure I’ve missed a few, and for that I apologize.

Thomas told me that this “Pure Negative” recipe is basically a modification of his X-Trans I Kodachrome II recipe for use on X-Trans IV cameras. Because X-Trans I doesn’t have Classic Chrome, Thomas used the PRO Neg. Std film simulation to emulate a Kodachrome aesthetic as best as possible, and his recipe does a good job of that for the X-Pro1 and X-E1 cameras. There are already several excellent Kodachrome options for X-Trans IV; this recipe isn’t intended to replicate Kodachrome, but instead produce good natural-looking results—perhaps there is a little unintentional Kodachrome 25 resemblance, too. Thank you, Thomas, for creating this recipe and allowing me to share it on Fuji X Weekly!

Cactus Scar – Goodyear, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4 – “Pure Negative”

This Film Simulation Recipe is a great general-purpose option. It’s very versatile, delivering excellent results in a variety of situations. The only modification that I made to Thomas’ recipe is Dynamic Range: he prefers DR-Auto, but I set it to DR200. That’s not a big change, as DR-Auto chooses DR200 whenever there is bright highlights in the frame. Select whichever you prefer—either DR-Auto or DR200 is fine. For the Fujifilm X-T3 and X-T30 cameras, ignore Grain size and use a 5% CineBloom in lieu of Clarity (or just ignore Clarity)—the results will be similar. For X-Trans III, you’ll additionally have to ignore Color Chrome Effect, since your camera doesn’t have it. This recipe should be fully compatible with the new X-H2s, although I have not tested it to know for certain.

PRO Neg. Std
Dynamic Range: DR200
Highlight: +1
Shadow: +2
Color: -4
Noise Reduction: -4
Sharpness: +1
Clarity: -2
Grain Effect: Weak, Small
Color Chrome Effect: Weak
Color Chrome Effect Blue: Off
White Balance: Auto, +1 Red & -2 Blue
ISO: Auto, up to ISO 6400
Exposure Compensation: 0 to +1/3 (typically)

Example photographs, all camera-made JPEGs using this “Pure Negative” Film Simulation Recipe on a Fujifilm X-E4:

Bougainvillea Branch – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4
One Blossom Remains – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4
Prickly Pear – Goodyear, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4
Arching Palms – Goodyear, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4
Veiled Wasatch – Layton, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtle – Layton, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Pismo – Pismo Beach, CA – Fujifilm X-E4
Brad’s – Pismo Beach, CA – Fujifilm X-E4
Turbulent Waters – Pismo Beach, CA – Fujifilm X-E4
Wave Rider – Pismo Beach, CA – Fujifilm X-E4
Surfer – Pismo Beach, CA – Fujifilm X-E4
Standing on Water – Pismo Beach, CA – Fujifilm X-E4
Golden Ocean – Pismo Beach, CA – Fujifilm X-E4

This post contains affiliate links, and if you make a purchase using my links I’ll be compensated a small amount for it.

Fujifilm X-E4 Black    Amazon   B&H
Fujifilm X-E4 Silver   Amazon   B&H

Find this film simulation recipes and over 200 more on the Fuji X Weekly — Film Recipes App!

Fujifilm X-E4 Film Simulation Recipe: Old Kodak

No Trespassing – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4 – “Old Kodak”

I was inspired to create this film simulation recipe after viewing some old pictures captured on various Kodak films. These pictures reminded me of the Vintage Kodachrome and Kodachrome 1 film simulation recipes, but they weren’t exactly the same. I thought if I tweaked those recipes I could get closer to mimicking the aesthetic of the old Kodak pictures that I was looking at (which is why I call this recipe Old Kodak). If you like the Vintage Kodachrome and Kodachrome 1 recipes, you’ll really appreciate this one, too!

Old Kodak was a Patron Early-Access recipe on the Fuji X Weekly App, and App Patrons have had access to it for nine months; however, it’s been replaced by a different Early-Access recipe, so now it’s available to everyone! The best App experience is reserved for Patrons, and early-access to some new film simulation recipes is one of the Patron benefits. If you are a Patron, be sure to look for the new Early-Access recipe that replaced this one.

Wet Radio Flyer – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4 – “Old Kodak”

Because this recipe uses 0.5 adjustments to Highlight and Shadow, plus the Auto White Priority white balance, it’s only compatible with the Fujifilm X-T4, X-S10, X-E4, and X-T30 II cameras. If you have an X-Pro3 or X100V, if you set Highlight to +3, Shadow to -1, and white balance to Auto, it will be similar but not exactly the same (don’t be afraid to try it anyway). While the “typical exposure compensation” is between -1/3 and +1/3, in situations with strong highlights you might have to go -2/3 or even -1 on occasion to prevent the highlights from clipping.

Classic Chrome
Dynamic Range: DR400
Highlight: +3.5
Shadow: -0.5
Color: +3
Noise Reduction: -4
Sharpening: -2
Clarity: -2
Grain Effect: Strong, Small
Color Chrome Effect: Strong
Color Chrome Effect Blue: Strong
White Balance: Auto White Priority, +1 Red & -6 Blue
ISO: Auto, up to ISO 6400
Exposure Compensation: -1/3 to +1/3 (typically)

Example photographs, all camera-made JPEGs using this “Old Kodak” film simulation recipe on my Fujifilm X-E4:

Salt Lake Marsh Evening – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Big Sky Over Marsh – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Rural Red Barn – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Holland Deere – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4

Open Gate – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Old Wheel – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Rusty Bolts In A Fence – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Suburban Storm – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
The Joy of Writing – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Gumby on a Table – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Blue Pallets – Kaysville, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Kaysville Pond – Kaysville, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Sunset Light on Winter Mountain – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4

Find this film simulation recipe and over 200 more on the Fuji X Weekly — Film Recipes App!

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Fujifilm X-E4 (X-Trans IV) Film Simulation Recipe: Muted Color

Evening Hoop – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4 – “Muted Color”

A Fuji X Weekly reader asked me to mimic the look of some photographs that he shared with me. These were digital pictures that had been edited with software, but he was hoping to achieve this look straight-out-of-camera, if at all possible. It turns out that it is possible (although I only had three images to study, so I’m not completely certain this is an exact match, but I believe it is pretty close); however, it requires the Eterna Bleach Bypass film simulation, which, unfortunately, his camera does not have. If your camera does have Eterna Bleach Bypass, than you are fortunate because you can use this very interesting recipe!

What film does this recipe most closely mimic? The most similar film might be the (now discontinued) Konica Impresa 50, although it is certainly not an exact match. There are also some similarities to Portra that’s had the bleach skipped, although I wouldn’t say that this is an exact match for that, either. I don’t think this film simulation recipe is a faithful facsimile of any film, yet it produces a nice analog aesthetic anyway. It has strong contrast and very muted colors—almost monochrome. In a way, it’s the closest thing to black-and-white in color photography.

First Light on the Ridge – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4 – “Muted Color”

This recipe is only compatible with the Fujifilm X-E4, X-S10, X-E4, and X-T30 II cameras. If you have one of those cameras, I invite you to give this recipe a try! I know that it will be an instant favorite for some of you.

Eterna Bleach Bypass
Dynamic Range: DR400
Highlight: -0.5
Shadow: +1
Color: -4
Noise Reduction: -4
Sharpening: 0
Clarity: -2
Grain Effect: Weak, Small
Color Chrome Effect: Strong
Color Chrome Effect Blue: Weak
White Balance: Auto, +3 Red & -8 Blue
ISO: Auto, up to ISO 6400
Exposure Compensation: 0 to +2/3 (typically)

Example photographs, all camera-made JPEGs captured using this “Muted Color” film simulation recipe on my Fujifilm X-E4:

Girl in Beanie – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Just Hangin’ Around – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
At the Schoolyard – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Monkey Bars – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Neighborhood Fire Hydrant – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Grass & Leaves – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Berry Bush – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Pink Rose – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Single Rose – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Red Leaf – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Cross – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Mountain Trees in Autumn – Layton, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Autumn Forest – Layton, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Fernwood Trail – Layton, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Sunlit Fall Leaves – Layton, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
October Leaves – Layton, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Leaf Canopy – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Sky Riders – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4

Find this film simulation recipe and many more on the Fuji X Weekly — Film Recipes App!

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Fujifilm X-E4 (X-Trans IV) Film Simulation Recipe: Silver Summer

Wrong Way Shadow – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4 – “Silver Summer”

This film simulation recipe, called Silver Summer, was a Patron early-access recipe on the Fuji X Weekly App, and Patrons have had access to it since July. One benefit of being an app Patrons is that you get early-access to some new film simulation recipes, and this was one of them, but now it is available to everyone, since a different early-access recipe is now on the app. The Silver Summer recipe has some unintentional similarities to Lomography Cine 200, but it’s definitely not an exact match. I wasn’t intending to mimic a specific film, but a specific aesthetic that I was asked to create. While it’s not modeled after a specific film, it definitely has an analog look. I really like how this one turned out, and I think some of you will really appreciate it, too!

I found that this recipe is particularly well suited for sunny days. It uses the Eterna Bleach Bypass film simulation, and produces a silvery look similarly to film that’s had the bleach skipped. If you are looking for a film-like-look that’s a bit “different” than what everyone else is shooting, this is a recipe you’ll want to try.

Summer Slide – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4 – “Silver Summer”

This film simulation recipe is compatible with the Fujifilm X-T4, X-S10, X-E4, and X-T30 II X-Trans IV cameras. Unfortunately, because it requires Eterna Bleach Bypass, it’s not compatible with the X100V or X-Pro3, and because it uses Clarity and Color Chrome FX Blue, it’s not compatible with the X-T3 or -T30.

Eterna Bleach Bypass
Dynamic Range: DR400
Highlight: -1
Shadow: +1
Color: +4
Noise Reduction: -4
Sharpening: -2
Clarity: -3
Grain Effect: Strong, Small
Color Chrome Effect: Strong
Color Chrome Effect Blue: Strong
White Balance: 5300K, -3 Red & -6 Blue
ISO: Auto, up to ISO 6400
Exposure Compensation: +1/3 to +1 (typically)

Example photographs, all camera-made JPEGs captured using this “Silver Summer” film simulation recipe on my Fujifilm X-E4:

Bee on a Thistle – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Lily – Sundance, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Tree Branch and Creek – Sundance, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Mountain Sky – Sundance, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Zigzag Sky – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Concessions – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Wood Coaster – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Don’t Stand – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Summer Swing – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Chains – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4

Find this film simulation recipe and many more on the Fuji X Weekly — Film Recipes App!

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Fujifilm X-Trans IV Film Simulation Recipe: Super HG Astia (Part 3 of 3)

Cacti Wall – Scottsdale, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4 – “Super HG Astia”

When Thomas Schwab shared with me his Fujicolor Super HG film simulation recipe, he also sent me an alternative recipe that uses Astia instead of Classic Negative. I gave it a try and thought that it worked quite well for landscape photography, particularly in sunny conditions. It can produce interesting results indoors or on cloudy days, but I think it really shines in sunshine. It’s called “Super HG Astia” because it is a modification of the Super HG recipe, but with Astia.

This “Super HG Astia” recipe wasn’t intended to mimic any particular film; however, it does have some resemblance to Fujichrome Provia 100F. For whatever reason, Fujifilm programmed the Provia film simulation to look more like Astia film, and the Astia film simulation to look more like Provia film, although neither are an exact match. This recipe brings the Astia film simulation closer to resembling Provia film (albeit unintentionally). It’s definitely not a perfect facsimile, but it does nonetheless produce a very nice Fuji color-reversal film aesthetic.

Green Pines – McCall, ID – Fujifilm X-E4 – “Super HG Astia”

This recipe is compatible with the Fujifilm X-Pro3, X100V, X-T4, X-S10, and X-E4 cameras. I accidentally used Large grain for some of my pictures, and the results were fine, but Small grain is better in my opinion—feel free to use whichever Grain size you’d prefer. For the X-T3 and X-T30, you can use this recipe by ignoring Grain size, Clarity and Color Chrome FX Blue—the results will be slightly different, but pretty close. For X-Trans III cameras, you’ll have to additionally ignore Color Chrome Effect; again, the results will be a little different but still very similar. If you’ve got an X-Trans III or newer camera, I invite you to try this recipe. I want to give a special “Thank you!” to Thomas for creating and sharing this recipe!

Astia
Dynamic Range: DR400
Highlight: +2
Shadow: +1
Color: +2
Noise Reduction: -4
Sharpening: -1
Clarity: +2
Grain Effect: Weak, Small
Color Chrome Effect: Weak
Color Chrome Effect Blue: Weak
White Balance: Fluorescent 2, -3 Red & -1 Blue
ISO: Auto, up to ISO 6400
Exposure Compensation: +2/3 to +1 (typically)

Example photographs, all camera-made JPEGs using this Super HG Astia film simulation recipe on my Fujifilm X-E4:

Blue Dumpsters – Phoenix, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4
This Sucker’s Electrical – Phoenix, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4
Gas Pipe – Phoenix, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4
Ms Pac-Man – Phoenix, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4
Pen – Phoenix, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4
Missing Boxer – Phoenix, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4
Watching A Two-Screen Movie – Scottsdale, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4
Lake Harbor – McCall, ID – Fujifilm X-E4
Lake Payette – McCall, ID – Fujifilm X-E4
Lake Log – McCall, ID – Fujifilm X-E4

Part 1 – Fujicolor Super HG Film Simulation Recipe
Part 2 -Fujicolor Super HG v2 Film Simulation Recipe

Find these film simulation recipes and many more on the Fuji X Weekly — Film Recipes App!

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Fujifilm X-Trans IV Film Simulation Recipe: Fujicolor Super HG v2 (Part 2 of 3)

Lilac Sun – McCall, ID – Fujifilm X-E4 – “Fujicolor Super HG v2”

When Thomas Schwab sent me his settings that would later be called Fujicolor Super HG, he asked me if there were any changes that I would make. I tried his recipe, and then created a couple of alternate versions. I concluded that I liked his recipe as-is with no changes; however, I thought that one variation I created was interesting, so I shot with it, too, and turned it into its own recipe. I call it Fujicolor Super HG v2. While it’s a collaboration between Thomas and I, he contributed the most to it.

Fujifilm introduced the Super HG line in 1986, with versions in ISOs between 100 and 1600. It saw several iterations and improvements before being replaced by the Superia line is 1998. Thomas Schwab’s Fujicolor Super HG recipe and this Fujicolor Super HG v2 recipe are more similar to Super HG 100 or Super HG 200 film. One film can have many different looks depending on how it was shot, developed, printed or scanned. The differences between the Fujicolor Super HG and Fujicolor Super HG v2 recipes might be like the differences produced by using different film scanners.

Joshua Wall – Scottsdale, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4 – “Fujicolor Super HG v2”

While both Super HG recipes look great, I prefer the Fujicolor Super HG recipe for natural light photography, and I prefer the Fujicolor Super HG v2 recipe for artificial light photography. I invite you to try both, and see which version you like better. You might find that you prefer one in a certain situation and the other in a different situation. Because this recipe uses the new Auto White Priority white balance, it’s only compatible (as of this writing) with the Fujifilm X-T4, X-S10 and X-E4 cameras (and maybe the GFX100S?). If you have the X-Pro3 or X100V, you can use Auto white balance instead, and in natural light you’ll get identical results, although in artificial light it won’t look quite the same.

Classic Negative
Dynamic Range: DR400
Highlight: -1
Shadow: +1
Color: +2
Noise Reduction: -4
Sharpening: 0
Clarity: +2
Grain Effect: Weak, Large
Color Chrome Effect: Weak
Color Chrome Effect Blue: Strong
White Balance: Auto White Priority, -3 Red & -1 Blue
ISO: Auto, up to ISO 6400
Exposure Compensation: +2/3 to +1 (typically)

Example photographs, all camera-made JPEGs using this Fujicolor Super HG v2 film simulation recipe on my Fujifilm X-E4:

Crocodile – Scottsdale, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4
Library Lamp – Scottsdale, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4
Books on a Table – Scottsdale, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4
Wood Workshop – Scottsdale, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4
33 RPM – Scottsdale, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4
Tired Lake Water – McCall, ID – Fujifilm X-E4
Children Playing With Sand – McCall, ID – Fujifilm X-E4
Pink Blooms – Scottsdale, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4
American Renovation – McCall, ID – Fujifilm X-E4
Sisters – McCall, ID – Fujifilm X-E4

Part 1 – Fujicolor Super HG Film Simulation Recipe
Part 3 – Super HG Astia Film Simulation Recipe

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Fujifilm X-Trans IV Film Simulation Recipe: Fujicolor Super HG (Part 1 of 3)

Suburban Home – Scottsdale, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4 – “Fujicolor Super HG”

This Fujicolor Super HG recipe was created by Thomas Schwab, who has made several film simulation recipes published on this website, including Fujicolor NPS 160 PulledSuperia Xtra 400Urban Vintage ChromeKodachrome IIKodak Portra 800 v2Classic MonochromeB&W Superia, and Monochrome Kodachrome. Thomas has also collaborated on other recipes, playing an important role in getting them right, including Kodak Portra 800Kodak Ektar 100Kodachrome 1Kodak Portra 400, and Kodak T-Max 400. Whenever Thomas sends me a new recipe idea, I’m always eager to try it out!

Thomas was photographing using the Provia 400 film simulation recipe, which requires a Fluorescent 2 (also called “Warm White Fluorescent” or “Neon 2”) White Balance. He wanted to see how that not-often-used White Balance would look with some other film simulations, and, after several adjustments, came up with this recipe. He shared it with me, and I shot with it and really liked the results! We wondered if it closely resembled any particular film—it seemed to be in the general ballpark of several Fujifilm emulsions without matching any. After digging a little deeper, and after a chance encounter with a box of prints from 1992, it was determined that Fujicolor Super HG, which is a predecessor to the Superia line, was a surprisingly close match. This recipe wasn’t intended to resemble Fujicolor Super HG film, but fortunately it does!

Smokey Sunrise – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4 – “Fujicolor Super HG”

I thoroughly enjoyed shooting with this recipe, as it produces some great analogue-like results! Because it requires Classic Negative, Color Chrome FX Blue, and Clarity, it is only compatible with (as of this writing) the Fujifilm X-Pro3, X100V, X-T4, X-S10 and X-E4 cameras. I want to give a big “Thank you!” to Thomas Schwab for creating this great recipe and allowing me to share it with you—thanks, Thomas!

Classic Negative
Dynamic Range: DR400
Highlight: 0
Shadow: +1
Color: +2
Noise Reduction: -4
Sharpening: 0
Clarity: -3
Grain Effect: Weak, Large
Color Chrome Effect: Weak
Color Chrome Effect Blue: Strong
White Balance: Fluorescent 2, -3 Red & -1 Blue
ISO: Auto, up to ISO 6400
Exposure Compensation: +1/3 to +2/3 (typically)

Example photographs, all camera-made JPEGs using this Fujicolor Super HG film simulation recipe on my Fujifilm X-E4:

Hole in the Wall – Scottsdale, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4
Locked Bike – Scottsdale, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4
Free College – Scottsdale, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4
College Hunks – Scottsdale, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4
Arizona Neighborhood – Scottsdale, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4
Hidden Home – Scottsdale, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4
Window Desk – Scottsdale, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4
Suburban Patriotism – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Ceiling Lights – Scottsdale, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4
Carousel Top – Scottsdale, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4
Super Shock Control – Scottsdale, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4
Giant Metal Gorilla – Scottsdale, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4

Part 2 – Fujicolor Super HG v2
Part 3 – Super HG Astia

Find these film simulation recipes and many more on the Fuji X Weekly — Film Recipes App!

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Fujifilm X-E4 (X-Trans IV) Film Simulation Recipe: Positive Film

Approaching Storm at Last Light – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4 – “Positive Film”

I was attempting to create a film simulation recipe that mimicked the aesthetic of Saul Leiter. The problem with this task is that Saul used many different films over the years; while he had a unique and recognizable style, his exact aesthetic varied significantly. These settings can sometimes mimic his look, but sometimes not, so I wouldn’t call it a success, but I just love how this recipe looks—that’s why I’m sharing it. If you’re attempting to recreate Saul’s aesthetic, this recipe is a good starting point. Another one to try is “Old Kodak“—available (as of this writing) as a Patron early-access recipe on the Fuji X Weekly app.

I think this recipe is in the ballpark of the “Positive Film Effect” on Ricoh GR cameras—perhaps not an exact match, but definitely a similar feel, which is why I named this recipe “Positive Film.” There’s a likeness to Kodak Elite Chrome or maybe Ektachrome 100G, although (again) it’s more of a similar feel than an exact match. Whether this recipe is close to Saul Leiter’s look, Ricoh Positive Film, or a Kodak transparency is debatable; what’s not debatable is that this recipe looks really, really good!

Blacktop Lines – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-E4 – “Positive Film”

You might notice that I used a similar White Balance and White Balance Shift technique as my Fujicolor 100 Industrial recipe. Because it uses the Classic Negative film simulation, Color Chrome FX Blue, and Clarity, this recipe (as of this writing) is only compatible with the Fujifilm X-E4, X100V, X-Pro3, X-T4 and X-S10 cameras.

Classic Negative
Dynamic Range: DR400
Highlight: +1
Shadow: +2
Color: +4
Noise Reduction: -4
Sharpeness: -2
Clarity: -4
Grain Effect: Weak, Large
Color Chrome Effect: Strong
Color Chrome Effect Blue: Strong
White Balance: 2950K, +7 Red & -9 Blue
ISO: Auto, up to ISO 6400
Exposure Compensation: 0 to +2/3 (typically)

Example photographs, all camera-made JPEGs using this “Positive Film” film simulation recipe on my Fujifilm X-E4:

Sunset Behind Trees – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Mountain Ridge & Rainbow Sky – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Dark Sky Behind Francis Peak – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Blue Ridge Storm – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
White House – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
House in Last Light – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Low Sun Behind Pines – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Light on the Treetop – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Suburb Home – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Turnstile – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Wristbands – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Wet Benches – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Red Rose – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Underground Mini – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Garage Pole – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Sliced – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Empty Chairs – Uintah, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
In Window Light – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Tiny Wet Blooms – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
T – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-E4

Find this film simulation recipe on the Fuji X Weekly — Film Recipes App!

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Fujifilm X-E4 Film Simulation Recipe: Ektachrome 320T

Since 1938 – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4 – “Ektachrome 320T”

The Ektachrome line has been around since the 1940’s, but Kodak didn’t introduced Ektachrome 320T, also known as Ektachrome EPJ 320T, until 1992. This was a high-speed Tungsten color-reversal (slide) film intended for use under artificial light. Tungsten films were never as popular as daylight-balanced films; when used in daylight you get a strong blue cast (unless you have an 80A filter). I’m not completely sure when Kodak discontinued Ektachrome 320T, but I believe it was sometime in the early to mid 2000’s—all Ektachrome films were discontinued by 2013. When Kodak reintroduced Ektachrome in 2018, EPJ 320T was unsurprisingly not included.

This film simulation recipe was not intended to mimic Ektachrome 320T. I was simply trying to create a tungsten film look using the new Eterna Bleach Bypass film simulation. Prior to this I had only one recipe for Eterna Bleach Bypass, LomoChrome Metropolis, so I was eager to create another. The reason for a tungsten-like recipe is because I feel as though I don’t have as many after-dark options as I’d like. This recipe’s similarities to Ektachrome 320T film is coincidental, as I didn’t set out to recreate it, but it does, in fact, resemble the film fairly well.

On – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4 – “Ektachrome 320T”

Even though I didn’t intend to create an Ektachrome 320T recipe, these settings come curiously close. I would consider, when using this recipe under artificial light, setting the White Balance Shift to -7 Red & -6 Blue to more accurately reflect the film (I didn’t make that adjustment for any of the photographs in this article). I wish that +5 was an option for Color—that would likely be more accurate to the film—but unfortunately it tops out at +4. I debated if Grain size should be Small or Large, but I ended up going with Small because that’s what I originally set it to; however, Large grain might be slightly closer to what you’d find on actual Ektachrome 320T, although that’s certainly debatable.

This recipe is the first one to use the new Auto Ambience Priority white balance, which is currently (as of this writing) only available on the Fujifilm X-T4, X-S10 and X-E4 cameras. That means this recipe is only compatible with those three cameras. As a reminder, the camera will take a moment to save each exposure when using Clarity. Also, High ISO NR on the newer camera models is the same as Noise Reduction—Fujifilm renamed it for some reason, but it’s the same thing.

Eterna Bleach Bypass
Dynamic Range: DR400
Highlight: +1
Shadow: -2
Color: +4
Noise Reduction: -4
Sharpening: 0
Clarity: -3
Grain Effect: Strong, Small
Color Chrome Effect: Strong
Color Chrome Effect Blue: Strong
White Balance: Auto Ambience Priority, -6 Red & -5 Blue
ISO: Auto, up to ISO 6400
Exposure Compensation: 0 to +2/3 (typically)

Example photographs, all camera-made JPEGs using this Ektachrome 320T film simulation recipe on my Fujifilm X-E4:

White Tree, Blue Sky – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Thistle Field – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Fake Plant on a Table – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Cage Free Eggs – Bountiful, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Lifted – Bountiful, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Old Navy Carts – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Ghost Mart – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Pot & Bench – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Lights in a Puddle – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Night Blooms – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Old Old Navy – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Cotton Eyed – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4

Find this film simulation recipe on the Fuji X Weekly — Film Recipes App!

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My Fujifilm X-E4 Focus Switch & ISO Dial Exclusion Solution

Ever since I published my review of the Fujifilm X-E4, I have received numerous requests to explain my focus switch and ISO dial exclusion solution. It can be difficult to know how to best set up this new camera, especially with the changes that Fujifilm made, and perhaps most puzzling are focus mode and ISO. I don’t know if my settings are best, but hopefully this will be helpful to some of you.

In case you don’t know, Fujifilm removed from the X-E4 the M/C/S focus selector switch that most X cameras have. This switch allows you to quickly and easily go between Manual Focus (MF), Autofocus Continuous (AF-C), and Autofocus Single (AF-S). Instead of a switch, you now have to dig into the menu to change this, which is an inconvenience, to say the least. Fujifilm programmed the X-E4 so that the Focus Mode can be, or really must be, set and saved with each Custom Preset. I have all of my presets set to Autofocus Single (AF-S) because that’s the Focus Mode that I most commonly use. No matter the C1-C7 preset that I choose, it is set to AF-S, and whenever I change presets the Focus Mode will be automatically set to AF-S, whether that’s what I want or not. Most of the time this works well, but not always.

I have AF+MF set to On. I also have MF Assist set to Focus Peak Highlight (I prefer Red) and Focus Check set to On. This is important because most Fujinon lenses are capable of Manual Focus Override, and if you have one of these lenses, when you are in an autofocus mode, if you half-press the shutter you can turn the manual focus ring on the lens and manually focus. Yes, you read that correctly: you can manual focus while in AF-S or AF-C, without setting the camera to MF! Not only that, but MF Assist will automatically activate, and if you are using Single Point AF Mode, focus zoom will also automatically activate. So it’s like setting the focus selector switch to M, except that you stay in AF-S or AF-C. By the way, this isn’t a new feature, and many other Fujifilm cameras are capable of this. It’s pretty slick, and if you’ve never used it you should give it a try.

That works well for Fujinon lenses, but what if you are using a third-party or vintage lens that is manual-only? No matter the Focus Mode you are in, you can press the Focus Stick in to activate Focus Check. You don’t need to be in MF Mode to manually focus, and Focus Check helps to achieve a properly focused image; however, MF Assist will only activate in MF Mode, so Focus Peak Highlight (or whatever you have it set to) won’t activate unless MF Mode is selected. If you don’t need MF Assist, keeping the camera in AF-S or AF-C focus mode even when using a manual lens, and using the Focus Stick to Focus Check, is a good strategy. If you do like to use MF Assist, you’ll need to set the camera to Manual Focus Mode, which is found in the AF-MF Menu.

You can program one of the buttons on the camera body or one of the touch-screen gestures as a shortcut to activate the Focus Mode menu. I chose the AEL-AFL button on the back, and that works well for me, but it might not work for you. The unmarked Function (Fn) button on the top is another good option. This is not an ideal solution, but it’s better than digging through the menu. Since most of the time I’m using AF-S, it’s only occasionally that I need to change the Focus Mode to AF-C or MF, so it’s not a huge deal, but it would have been better if Fujifilm had kept the M/C/S switch on the camera body.

The X-E line has never had an ISO dial on the camera body. You’ve always had to dig through the menu to find the ISO menu. I had hoped that Fujifilm would add an ISO dial around the Shutter knob like the X100V, but they didn’t. My solution to this lack of an ISO dial is simple: the front wheel, which is called The Command Dial. The little wheel on the front can be programmed for only a few different things, like aperture, shutter speed, and ISO. A long press will allow you to switch what it controls, but I have it set to, and I leave it set to, ISO. Because I most often use Auto ISO, which can be programmed with each Custom Preset, I don’t change ISO often, but when I do this works very well, probably better than a dial around the Shutter knob.

The Fujifilm X-E4 is a great minimalistic camera, and I really appreciate that aspect of it, but the exclusion of the M/C/S switch went just a little too far, in my opinion. But that doesn’t mean the camera isn’t a great tool or that it can’t be worked around. I found that it has a sufficient number of buttons, and the firmware Fujifilm gave it does make up for some of the exclusions. Changing focus modes is more cumbersome than it should be, but it’s not a big problem, just an occasional minor inconvenience.

If you have a Fujifilm X-E4, I hope that you found this article helpful. If you’ve found a different solution to either the missing focus mode selector switch or the non-existent ISO dial, I’d love to hear about it in the comments! I’m fairly satisfied with my focus switch and ISO dial exclusion solution, but maybe you’ve figured out something even better.

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