Fujifilm X-Trans II Film Simulation Recipe: Kodak Platinum 200

Bicycle 88 – West Valley City, UT – Fujifilm X-T1 – “Kodak Platinum 200”

Fuji X Weekly reader Corey Steib (Instagram here and here) shared with me an X-Trans II recipe that he created called Kodak Platinum 200. Corey named it this because it reminds him of vibrant Kodak film captured with a Panaflex Platinum motion picture camera, and because the best results are found at or near ISO 200. This recipe is nothing like the Eterna film simulation, but it does have a slight cinematic feel to it nonetheless thanks to the Shadow setting. It looks really nice, with vibrant colors and soft shadows, and is a great all-purpose recipe. Thank you, Corey, for creating this and allowing me to share it!

I have the ISO in my camera set to Auto, with the upper limit set to ISO 3200. I’m happy with the results from my X-T1 all the way to ISO 3200, but the intention of this recipe is to keep the ISO lower when you can. In bright light, depending on the contrast in the scene, because of the DR-Auto setting, the camera might select ISO 200 or ISO 400, and the idea is to use this recipe at those ISOs when practical. As the available light decreases, it’s perfectly fine to increase the ISO, and I feel good going as high as ISO 3200 when necessary.

Touch of Red – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-T1 – “Kodak Platinum 200”

This film simulation recipe is compatible with all Fujifilm X-Trans II cameras. You can use it on X-Trans I and Bayer sensor cameras, too, but the results will be a little different (feel free to try, though).

Provia
Dynamic Range: DR-Auto
Highlight: +1 (Medium-High)
Shadow: -2 (Low)
Color: +2 (High)
Sharpness: +1 (Medium-High)
Noise Reduction: -2 (Low)
White Balance: Daylight/Fine, 0 Red & 0 Blue
ISO: Auto up to ISO 3200
(but… the lower the better)
Exposure Compensation: -1/3 to +1/3 (typically)

Example photographs, all camera-made JPEGs captured with my Fujifilm X-T1 using this “Kodak Platinum 200” film simulation recipe:

Snack – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-T1
Yellow Rope – West Valley City, UT – Fujifilm X-T1
Unicorn Jo – West Valley City, UT – Fujifilm X-T1
Curved Trunk – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-T1
Log Bridge & 3 Trees – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-T1
Bridge & Stump – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-T1
Pine Needles – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-T1
Tree Canopy – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-T1
Plastic Plants – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T1

Find this film simulation recipe on the Fuji X Weekly — Film Recipes App!

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Fujifilm X-Trans I (X-Pro1, X-E1 & X-M1) Film Simulation Recipe: Provia

Cradle Tree Branch – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-M1 – “Provia”

This film simulation recipe reminds me of a filter that I used frequently on a photo editing app on my old Nokia Lumia 1020 phone (sorry, I don’t remember the app name, it’s been many years). It produces a nice vintage feel, with perhaps a cross-processed aesthetic. I especially like how it renders green and blue. Because it uses the Provia film simulation, I’ve named this recipe simply “Provia” even though it doesn’t look all that much like real Provia film. Cameras that are older than the Fujifilm X-Pro3 can’t save White Balance Shifts with each Custom Preset, so it’s helpful to have recipes that use different White Balance options. That’s how this recipe began, and why it uses the Incandescent White Balance option.

This “Provia” film simulation recipe has been a Patron early-access recipe on the Fuji X Weekly app since January, but now it’s available to everyone! There’s a new Patron early-access recipe for X-Trans I cameras on the app that replaced this one. This recipe is compatible with the Fujifilm X-Pro1, X-E1 or X-M1 camera. If you have a Bayer or X-Trans II camera, this recipe will still work, although it won’t look the same; however, I invite you to try it anyway.

Green Tree & Blue Sky – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-Pro1 – “Provia”

Provia
Dynamic Range: DR200
Highlight: -2 (Low)
Shadow: -1 (Medium-Low)
Color: +1 (Medium-High)
Sharpness: 0 (Normal)
Noise Reduction: -2 (Low)
White Balance: Incandescent, +6 Red & -9 Blue
ISO: Auto, up to ISO 3200
Exposure Compensation: +1/3 to +2/3 (typically)

Example photographs, all camera-made JPEGs captured using this “Provia” film simulation recipe:

Sun over Country Horses – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-M1
Target – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-M1
Bricks in the Wall – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-M1 – Photo by Joy Roesch
Strollin’ Jo – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-M1
Green Canopy – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-Pro1
Bunch of Little Blooms – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-Pro1
White Bloom in a Green Bush – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-Pro1
Park Path – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-Pro1
Looking up Through The Trees – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-Pro1

Find this film simulation recipe on the Fuji X Weekly — Film Recipes App!

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Fujifilm GFX-50S Film Simulation Recipe: Provia 400

Big Sky Over Yellow House – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm GFX-50S – “Provia 400”

This film simulation recipe was a failed attempt to create a certain look, but I liked the results anyway. It reminds me of Fujichrome Provia 400, but it isn’t intended to mimic that film, it just looks a little similar by chance. As Lefty Gomez said, “I’d rather be lucky than good.” This Provia 400 recipe was indeed a lucky discovery.

Provia 400 is a color reversal (slide) film that actually dates back to 1980. It was originally called Fujichrome 400 Professional D, and had a couple emulsion updates before Fujifilm renamed it Fujichrome Provia 400 in 1994, Fujichrome Provia 400F in 2000, and Provia 400X in 2006. With each emulsion change the aesthetic of the film evolved slightly, which isn’t uncommon. This recipe might be closest to the 400X version. Fujifilm discontinued ISO 400 Provia in 2013.

Tiny Niagara – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm GFX-50S – “Provia 400”

This film simulation recipe is intended for GFX-50S and GFX-50R cameras. I assume that it will also work on the GFX100 and GFX100S, but I’m not certain of that. Additionally, it is compatible with X-Trans IV; I tried it on my Fujifilm X-T30 and it looked pretty close, only ever-so-slightly different. On newer X-Trans IV cameras, which have some different JPEG options, consider setting Grain size to Small, Color Chrome FX Blue to Weak, and Clarity to -2.

Provia/STD
Dynamic Range: DR400
Highlight: +1
Shadow: +2
Color: +4
Color Chrome Effect: Strong
Sharpening: -2
Noise Reduction: -4
Grain Effect: Strong
White Balance: Fluorescent 2, -2 Red & -2 Blue
ISO: Auto up to ISO 6400
Exposure Compensation: +1/3 to +2/3 (typically)

Sample photographs, all camera-made JPEGs, captured with a Fujifilm GFX-50S using this Provia 400 recipe:

Reeds & Birds – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm GFX-50S
Three Wood Poles – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm GFX-50S
Cattails & Reeds – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm GFX-50S
Fallen Down – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm GFX-50S
Boat Ramps Are Built – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm GFX-50S
Muddy Shore – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm GFX-50S
Bridge Over Shallow Water – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm GFX-50S
Closed Red Door – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm GFX-50S
Red Can Topper – Weber Canyon, UT – Fujifilm GFX-50S
Tree & Cold River – Weber Canyon, UT – Fujifilm GFX-50S
Hastings Cutoff – Weber Canyon, UT – Fujifilm GFX-50S
Reflection on the Cold Wet Road – Weber Canyon, UT – Fujifilm GFX-50S

This post contains affiliate links, and if you make a purchase using my links I’ll be compensated a small amount for it.

Fujifilm GFX-50S  Amazon  B&H
Fujinon GF 23mm f/4  Amazon  B&H

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New X-Trans I Patron Early-Access Film Simulation Recipe on App!

Cradle Tree Branch – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-M1 – “Provia”

There’s a new Fuji X Weekly Patron early-access film simulation recipe available now on the Fuji X Weekly app! If you are a Patron, you can use it today! This new recipe is for X-Trans I cameras (X-E1, X-Pro1 and X-M1), and it replaces the Classic Analog recipe, which was a Patron early-access recipe, but is now available to everyone. Yea!

Below are a few examples of this new recipe, which is simply called Provia, captured with a Fujifilm X-M1. Bricks in the Wall (below) was captured by my daughter, Joy, who I let use the camera.

Sun over Country Horses – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-M1
Target – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-M1
Bricks in the Wall – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-M1 – Photo by Joy Roesch
Strollin’ Jo – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-M1

Fujifilm X-M1 (X-Trans I) Film Simulation Recipe: Classic Analog

Sticks & Dry Leaves – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-M1 – “Classic Analog”

I wanted to create a Portra recipe for X-Trans I cameras, such as the Fujifilm X-M1. All of my Portra recipes are based on the Classic Chrome film simulation, but X-Trans I cameras don’t have Classic Chrome. I did create a recipe for mimicking Kodachrome without Classic Chrome, but that’s intended for X-Trans II cameras, and, while the results are similar, it doesn’t look exactly the same on X-Trans I. This recipe was my attempt at Portra without Classic Chrome, but it’s not quite Portra enough for me to name it Portra. It’s close but no cigar, but it does look nice nonetheless, and I like how it renders pictures on my X-M1.

This was a Patron early-access recipe on the Fuji X Weekly app. Fuji X Weekly Patrons have had the opportunity to use it since December 1st, but now it’s available to everyone! There’s a new Patron early-access recipe for X-Trans I on the app in its place. If you have the app, go check it out!

E.T. – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-M1 – “Classic Analog”

This recipe also marks the first one that includes a photograph captured by my 11-year-old son, Jonathan. I let him use my X-M1, and I liked one of the pictures he made, which you’ll find further down this article, entitled Frozen Pond Scum. The Fujifilm X-M1 can be found for cheap, and would make a great “first real camera” for a kid. Maybe I’ll give him mine at some point in the future.

Provia/STD
Dynamic Range: DR400
Highlight: -2
Shadow: -1
Color: -2
Sharpness: 0
Noise Reduction: -2
White Balance: Daylight/Fine, +1 Red & -6 Blue
ISO: Auto, up to ISO 3200
Exposure Compensation: +1/3 to +2/3 (typically)

Example photographs, all camera-made JPEGs made using this Classic Analog film simulation recipe on a Fujifilm X-M1:

Thin Ice – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-M1
Falling Water – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-M1
Autumn Overcast – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-M1
Night at the Lake – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-M1
Frozen Drain – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-M1
Frozen Pond Scum – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-M1 – Photo by Jonathan Roesch
Irrigation Cover – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-M1
Quadruple U’s – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-M1
Improbable – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-M1
Evening Euonymus – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-M1
Blue Sky Reeds – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-M1
Yellow, Lamp – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-M1
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Fujifilm X-T200 (Bayer) Film Simulation Recipe: Analog Cool

Squash Leaves – Sunset, UT – Fujifilm X-T200 – “Analog Cool”

This new film simulation recipe, which is for Fujifilm cameras with a Bayer sensor, isn’t meant to mimic any specific film. I wanted to create something with a cool color cast, perhaps similar to Tungsten film. Kind of the opposite of my Golden Negative recipe. I call it Analog Cool.

I can’t tell you how many requests I’ve had for recipes compatible with Fujifilm Bayer cameras, such as the X-T200, X-T100, X-A7, X-A5 and XF10, but it’s been a lot! I don’t have very many recipes for these cameras, partly because you cannot save custom presets like you can on X-Trans models. You more-or-less have to use one recipe for a period of time, and only switch occasionally. This recipe will work on X-Trans I & II cameras, but it won’t look exactly the same.

Leaves & Thistle – Fruit Heights, UT – Fujifilm X-T200 – “Analog Cool”

This “Analog Cool” film simulation recipe works well in warm light, because it balances with that lighting condition. I didn’t test it under artificial light or for night photography, but I imagine it would be good for those situations. In cool light conditions, it will produce a pronounced blue cast that is similar to using Tungsten film in daylight, which is something you can try for creative effect or avoid if you don’t like it. Overall this is a pretty good recipe that produces interesting results under the right conditions, and I think some of you are going to really appreciate it.

Provia
Dynamic Range: DR400
Highlight: +1
Shadow: -1
Color: +2
Noise Reduction: -2
Sharpening: 0
White Balance: 4200K, -2 Red & -5 Blue
ISO: Auto, up to ISO 6400
Exposure Compensation: -1/3 to +1/3 (typically)

Example photographs, all camera-made JPEGs using this “Analog Cool” film simulation recipe on a Fujifilm X-T200:

Thistle Alone – Fruit Heights, UT – Fujifilm X-T200
Green Forest Leaves – Fruit Heights, UT – Fujifilm X-T200
Better Days Behind – Fruit Heights, UT – Fujifilm X-T200
Suburban Sunflowers – Sunset, UT – Fujifilm X-T200
Red Fruit in a Green Tree – Fruit Heights, UT – Fujifilm X-T200
Pear Tree – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T200
Wasatch Ridge & Contrail – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T200
Summer Garage – Sunset, UT – Fujifilm X-T200
Signs – Layton, UT – Fujifilm X-T200
Pillow on a Chair – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T200

See also: Film Simulation Recipes

This post contains affiliate links, and if you make a purchase using my links I’ll be compensated a small amount for it.

Fujifilm X-T200   Amazon   B&H

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Fujifilm XQ1 (X-Trans II) Film Simulation Recipe: Kodachrome Without Classic Chrome

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Red Greens – Kaysville, UT – Fujifilm XQ1 – “Kodachrome”

I’ve made a lot of Kodachrome film simulation recipes for Fujifilm cameras (click here, here, here, here, here and here), and they’re very popular. Kodachrome was an iconic slide film made by Kodak for many, many years, so it’s no surprise that people want to get that look out of their Fujifilm camera. All of my Kodachrome recipes use Classic Chrome because it has a Kodak-esque slide film aesthetic, but some cameras don’t have Classic Chrome, such as the Fujifilm XQ1. Yes, the XQ1 is an X-Trans II camera, and most X-Trans II cameras have Classic Chrome, but this one doesn’t, only Provia, Velvia, and Astia for color images.

I created this recipe by capturing an image on my X-T1 using my Kodachrome 64 recipe for that camera, and then as best as possible recreated the look not using Classic Chrome. While I tried Velvia and Astia, I ended up using Provia. It’s a surprisingly close match, although not exact. I think you’ll like this Kodachrome recipe if your camera doesn’t have Classic Chrome.

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!!! Ride !!! – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm XQ1 – “Kodachrome”

Provia
Dynamic Range: DR200
Highlight: +2 (Hard)
Shadow: +1 (Medium-Hard)
Color: -2 (Low)
Sharpness: 0 (Standard)
Noise Reduction: -2 (Low)
White Balance: Daylight (Fujifilm calls it “Fine” for some reason), -1 Red & -4 Blue
ISO: Auto, up to ISO 1600
Exposure Compensation: +1/3 to +2/3 (typically)

Example photographs, all camera-made JPEGs made using this “Kodachrome Without Classic Chrome” film simulation recipe on a Fujifilm XQ1:

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Lights & Reflections – Kaysville, UT – Fujifilm XQ1

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Flag Poles – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm XQ1

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Drive Thru Gas & Wash – Kaysville, UT – Fujifilm XQ1

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Flowers in a Pot on Concrete – Kaysville, UT – Fujifilm XQ1

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Horse Ranch – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm XQ1

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Closed Umbrella, Threatening Clouds – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm XQ1

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Drawing Jonathan – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm XQ1

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Breakfast – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm XQ1

See also: Film Simulation Recipes

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Fujifilm XQ1 (X-Trans II) Film Simulation Recipe: Cross Process

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A Fuji X Weekly reader sent me his camera, a Fujifilm XQ1, so that I might create some film simulation recipes for it. For those who don’t know, the XQ1 is a premium compact-zoom that Fujifilm made six or seven years ago, and it has a 2/3″ 12-megapixel X-Trans II sensor. While the sensor is much smaller than APS-C, it has the same processor and software as other X-Trans II cameras, although it is missing some options (Classic Chrome, PRO Neg. Hi and PRO Neg. Std, for instance). I discovered that some of the X-Trans II recipes I’ve created, such as Ektachrome 100SW, Agfa Optima, Velvia and Monochrome, all work great on the XQ1. My intentions are to create some more recipes that will work on this camera, and, really, all X-Trans II cameras.

The first film simulation recipe that I created for the XQ1 (and, again, it’s compatible with all X-Trans II cameras) is Cross Process. I have a couple Cross Process recipes that I’ve created for newer camera models (here and here), but never for older models. This one was rather easy to make, and so that’s why I started with it. While I set the maximum ISO to 1600, if you are using an APS-C X-Trans II camera, I’d go as high as ISO 3200. Feel free to try this recipe on X-Trans I or Bayer cameras, if you have one of those, and see how it turns out.

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Summer Evening Dream – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm XQ1 – “Cross Process”

Cross processing is a technique where you develop a film in chemicals intended for another film. For example, the most common cross process is to develop color transparencies, which require the E-6 process, using color negative film chemicals, which is known as C-41 process. For slide film, the photographs typically increase in contrast and grain and the colors shift dramatically. There are other types of cross processing, as well. I’ve done cross processing before, and the results can be fun. Different films will look different when they are cross processed. Overexposing or underexposing or even how the development is handled can effect how the image is rendered. The aesthetic can vary significantly, but usually you can spot a cross processed photograph when you see it.

Provia
Dynamic Range: DR200
Highlight: +2 (Hard)
Shadow: +2 (Hard)
Color: +2 (High)
Sharpness: -1 (Medium-Soft)
Noise Reduction: -2 (Low)
White Balance: Auto, -3 Red & -9 Blue
ISO: Auto, up to ISO 1600
Exposure Compensation: +1/3 (typically)

Example photographs, all camera-made JPEGs made using this Cross Process film simulation recipe on a Fujifilm XQ1:

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SkyWest Sunset – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm XQ1

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Eagle TT-12 – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm XQ1

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SkyWest Carts – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm XQ1

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Ford Truck – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm XQ1

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Ranger – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm XQ1

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Warehouse Deliveries – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm XQ1

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Stop! – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm XQ1

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Cross Process Red Roses – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm XQ1

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Yellow Stump – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm XQ1

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Sand Toys Without Sand – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm XQ1

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Spirit of Photography – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm XQ1

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Blessed – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm XQ1

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Message From Space – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm XQ1

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Green Leaves – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm XQ1

See also: Film Simulation Recipes

Help Fuji X Weekly

Nobody pays me to write the content found on fujixweekly.com. There's a real cost to operating and maintaining this site, not to mention all the time that I pour into it. If you appreciated this article, please consider making a one-time gift contribution. Thank you!

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Fujifilm X-T1 Agfa Optima (Provia) Film Simulation Recipe


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Reeds & Mountain – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T1 “Agfa Optima”

The film simulation recipe in this article is my Agfa Optima recipe, which is compatible with X-Trans III & IV cameras, converted for use on my Fujifilm X-T1. While the X-T1 is an X-Trans II camera, you can also use this recipe on X-Trans I and Bayer sensor cameras. Agfa Optima is a color negative film that was around from the mid-1990’s to the mid-2000’s.

Provia
Dynamic Range: DR100
Highlight: -1 (Medium-Low)
Shadow: +1 (Medium-High)
Color: -2 (Low)
Sharpness: 0 (Medium)
Noise Reduction: -2 (Low)
White Balance: Daylight, -3 Red & +1 Blue
ISO: Auto, up to ISO 3200

Example photographs, all camera-made JPEGs using this Agfa Optima recipe on my Fujifilm X-T1:

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Eggs in a Bowl – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T1

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Take a Picture Pronto – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T1

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Fruity Cereal – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T1

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Stealth Mode – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T1

 

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Suburban Alleyway – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T1

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Windows & Shadows – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T1

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Pine Tree & Sky – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T1

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Green & Fence – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T1

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Rural Metal Fence – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T1

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Marshland Sky – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T1

See also: Film Simulation Recipes

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Fujifilm Provia Film Simulation Settings – Or, My Agfa Optima 200 Recipe


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Colorful Chalk – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T20 “Agfa Optima”

With the start of the new year I decided that I wanted to rethink my Fujifilm film simulation settings and make new recipes with each option. I wanted to start with Provia, not only because it’s the “standard” option on Fujifilm X cameras, but also because I’ve been asked many times to create a film simulation recipe that uses Provia as the base. I do have a film simulation recipe that uses Provia, but it’s definitely not for everyone. This one could actually be someone’s standard recipe on their camera.

I’ve never been a fan of the Provia film simulation on Fujifilm X cameras, partly because the film simulation looks very little like the film that it derives its name from. Curiously, Provia film actually more closely resembles the Astia film simulation and Astia film more closely resembles the Provia film simulation (although neither are close to being an exact match). I don’t think Fujifilm ever considered making the Provia film simulation resemble the film that it was named after or really any film, they just wanted to use the trademark name for their standard setting. The Provia film simulation is designed to give generally pleasing results to the masses. Some people love it, but I personally find it to be the least interesting of the color options available.

While I never intended to mimic the look of any specific film with this recipe, I think that it fairly closely resembles Agfa Optima 200. If you are looking for an Agfa Optima recipe, look no further! Agfa made many different films over the years. They were never as big as Kodak or Fujifilm, but they weren’t that far behind, either. Agfa Optima 200 was a color negative film that was introduced in 1996, replacing AgfaColor XRS 200, and was discontinued in 2005. I never used this film myself, but I have seen it in person and on the internet plenty of times, so I have a good idea of what it looks like. Even though I didn’t intend to recreate the look of a film with this recipe, the fact that it happens to resembles one is a very happy accident. Sometimes it’s better to be lucky than good.

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Morning Egg Bowl – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T20 “Agfa Optima”

I’ve found that this particular film simulation recipe looks best when using an ISO between 1600 and 3200. That’s not to say that you shouldn’t use a lower or higher ISO, because I certainly do, but for some reason that ISO range seems to produce the most pleasing result. I have flirted with the idea setting the ISO range to be between 1600 and 3200, but I have yet to do that. This recipe says to set ISO to Auto up to ISO 6400, but please don’t feel like you have to set it to that just because that’s what settings I typed out. As always, choose what works best for you and your photography.

Provia
Dynamic Range: DR100
Highlight: -2
Shadow: +2
Color: -2
Noise Reduction: -3
Sharpening: 0
Grain Effect: Weak
White Balance: Auto, -1 Red & -1 Blue
ISO: Auto up to ISO 6400
Exposure Compensation: +2/3 to +1 (typically)

Example photographs, all straight-out-of-camera JPEGs made using this Provia film simulation recipe:

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Coca-Cola Cans – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T20 “Agfa Optima”

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Bolsey 35 Model B – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T20 “Agfa Optima”

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Mercantile Coffee Cup – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T20 “Agfa Optima”

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Durable Nonstick Pot – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T20 “Agfa Optima”

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Oil Pastels – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T20 “Agfa Optima”

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Table Curve – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T20 “Agfa Optima”

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Window Grass – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T20 “Agfa Optima”

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Indoor Decor – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T20 “Agfa Optima”

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Blinded – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T20 “Agfa Optima”

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Shrub In The Snow – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T20 “Agfa Optima”

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Waiting For Warmer Weather – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T20 “Agfa Optima”

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For Everything There Is A Season – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T20 “Agfa Optima”

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Fading Light On The Ridge – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T20 “Agfa Optima”

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