Fujifilm X-T20 (X-Trans III) + X-T30 Film Simulation Recipe: Kodak Ultramax

Street Lamp Sunset – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 – “Kodak Ultramax”

I’ve received a lot of positive feedback from my Fujifilm X100V Kodak Ultramax 400 film simulation recipe, which I published two weeks ago. I’ve had a ton of requests to make a version of this recipe that’s compatible with X-Trans III sensor cameras, plus the X-T30 and X-T3. Well, I’ve done it, and here it is!

This version of the Ultramax recipe is pretty close to the original, but not precisely the same. Because the new cameras—the X100V, X-T4 and X-Pro3—have different tools, that recipe isn’t compatible with “older” Fujifilm cameras, but I made some adjustments and changes, and created this new version, which produces similar results. It’s fully compatible with the X-Pro2, X100F, X-E3, X-T2, X-T20, X-H1, X-T3 and X-T30 cameras. While not 100% exactly the same as the original recipe, it definitely has the same overall Ultramax aesthetic.

Sunstar Through Peach Leaves – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T20 – “Kodak Ultramax”

Ultramax 400 is Kodak’s consumer grade ISO 400 color negative film. Kodak has sold Ultramax 400 under many different names, beginning in 1987 with Kodacolor VR-G 400, rebranded Gold 400 one year later, called simply GC at one point, and finally, in 1997, Kodak settled on Ultramax 400. Kodak still sells Ultramax 400, although it’s not the same film as Kodacolor VR-G 400. This film has been tweaked and updated at least nine times over the years; however, the overall aesthetic is still substantially similar between all variations.

Classic Chrome
Dynamic Range: DR400
Highlight: +2
Shadow: +2
Color: +4
Sharpening: +2
Noise Reduction: -4
Grain: Strong
Color Chrome Effect: Off or N/A
White Balance: Auto, +1 Red & -6 Blue
ISO: Auto up to ISO 6400
Exposure Compensation: +1/3 to +1 (typically)

Example photographs, all camera-made JPEGs captured using this Kodak Ultramax film simulation recipe on a Fujifilm X-T20 and X-T30:

Creek – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T20
Shadow Catcher – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30
Boy by a Window – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30
Jonathan in Window Light – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30
Pencils on the Table – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30
Balcony – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T20
Panda Express – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T20
Window Flag – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30
American Tree – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30
Green Mountain Summer – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30
Summer Pear Tree – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30
Greens of Summer – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30
Backyard Tree Evening – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T20
Backyard Aspen Leaves – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

See also:
Fujifilm X-Trans III Film Simulation Recipe Compatibility
Fujifilm X-Trans IV Film Simulation Recipe Compatibility

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12 comments

  1. Pingback: Film Simulation Recipe Compatibility: X-Trans IV | Fuji X Weekly
  2. Pingback: Film Simulation Recipe Compatibility: X-Trans III | Fuji X Weekly
  3. Allan Bramsen · August 25

    This one has become one of my top 3 favorit on the X100V.
    Wishlist is Kodak Gold for X-T3 and the Superia.
    Great work and keep it coming.

    Like

  4. Russel · August 30

    Hi, I’m finally at a point where I can upgrade my X100 (original) with a used X100F for $540 and I could use some advice. The problem is, I can also buy either an X-T2 or X-T30 for $570 (+$265 for the 18-55/2.8-4) so now, spoilt for choice I am, lol.

    Undoubtedly the XT30 is the better camera, albeit a bit small and I’d have to buy a thumbgrip to use it properly, but I am wondering if it’s performance is that much better than the X100F? As for the X-T2, the only things the XT2 has going for it, IMO, are the bigger EVF, heavier body with the option for a battery grip.

    Considering the price difference, would you go with the X-T30?

    Liked by 1 person

    • Ritchie Roesch · August 31

      They are both great cameras. Obviously the X100F has a fixed lens while the X-T30 is interchangeable. I feel like the X100F is a camera you’ll love, but is perhaps less versatile or practical, while the X-T30 is less “lovable” but more versatile or practical. The question is maybe more of a conflict between the heart and brain. I cannot tell you which one to go with, but if you really love the X100, you’ll love the X100F even more.

      Like

  5. Russel · August 31

    Thanks for the advice Richie. I’m going to lean on the side of versatility, I think that’s a good point you made. An X-T2 has also come up for the same price as the XT-30. I’ve handled an XT20 in the past and found it to be way too light and not very “grippable” and the evf is smaller. So I think the T2 is the way to go. Cheers.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Ritchie Roesch · August 31

      Glad that you figured out what might work best for you. I’m sure you’ll love the X-T2. I have the X-T1 and it’s great.

      Like

      • Russel · September 6

        Hi Richie, how’s your weekend going? I took the plunge and traded in all my M43 gear towards an X-T2; and a butt-ugly 35/2. I’m very happy with my purchase and will blog about it later.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Ritchie Roesch · September 6

        Awesome! Glad you are happy with it! I’m sure it will be much fun.

        Like

  6. Pixarte (@Pixarte1) · October 31

    wow, this was my go to film. the first time I shot this film was on Christmas day and never went back.

    Liked by 1 person

  7. Pingback: Film Simulation Recipe Cards, Part 2! | FUJI X WEEKLY

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