The SOOC Revolution

Fence & Desert – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5 & Fujinon 35mm f/2 – “Vintage Bronze” Recipe

“The effect of one-step processing on both amateur and professional creative photography has been revolutionary.”

—Ansel Adams, Polaroid Land Camera

I woke up this morning unsure what to write about. It just so happened that I had a handful of exposures I captured yesterday evening still sitting on the SD Card in my Fujifilm X-T5. Using Fujifilm’s Cam Remote App, I transferred the pictures from the camera to my iPhone, cropped and straightened a few of them, and uploaded the images to cloud storage. It took maybe 10 minutes tops start-to-finish, and I don’t even think it was that long. One-step photography, which removes the second-step (the editing step), is truly revolutionary, just as Ansel Adams stated. Of course he was talking about instant film—something he was a big fan of—and we’re talking about straight-out-of-camera JPEGs, something that I’m a big fan of. Now I know what to write about today!

First Sign of Spring – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5 & Fujinon 35mm f/2 – “Vintage Bronze” Recipe

Why is shooting straight-out-of-camera (SOOC) JPEGs revolutionary?

First, it allows for a faster, more streamlined workflow. When you use Fujifilm cameras and Film Simulation Recipes, the camera does all the post-processing work for you. You don’t have to spend hours and hours sitting in front of a computer fiddling with images. This can save you an extensive amount of time and effort, which can significantly increase your productivity, plus make photography more enjoyable. It’s not only a faster workflow, but an easier workflow. Achieving a desired aesthetic is as simple as programming the correct recipe into your camera.

Yellow Wildflowers – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5 & Fujinon 35mm f/2 – “Vintage Bronze” Recipe

Next, SOOC JPEGs allow you to be more consistent. Because the camera is applying the recipes, the photographer doesn’t have to worry about inconsistencies in their editing process. This makes achieving cohesive results for a photo series or project much easier.

Also, JPEGs are more efficient than RAW in terms of storage space. You don’t need to buy a larger SD Card or external hard drive or pay for more cloud storage nearly as quickly. Upload and download times are faster. You have a ready-to-share photo the moment that it’s captured—you don’t have to wait for a program to process it first.

Jon at the Fishin’ Pond – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5 & Fujinon 35mm f/2 – “Vintage Bronze” Recipe

Finally, SOOC JPEGs might be considered more authentic. Film Simulation Recipes often replicate the look and feel of classic film stocks and processes, and seem less digital-like in their rendering. There is a growing sentiment among photography consumers (not photographers, but those who view pictures) that “Photoshop” is bad, and picture manipulation equals people manipulation; however, unedited images don’t carry that stigma, and can come across as more authentic.

All of this and more are why there is a revolution in photography right now. More and more photographers—from first-camera beginners to experienced pros with recognizable names—are using Film Simulation Recipes and shooting SOOC JPEGs. It’s a growing trend, and I believe it will become much bigger in the coming years. I’m truly honored to be a part of it, and I’m glad that you’ve come along for the ride.

Budding & Blooming – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5 & Fujinon 35mm f/2 – “Vintage Bronze” Recipe

This post contains affiliate links, and if you make a purchase using my links I’ll be compensated a small amount for it.

Fujifilm X-T5 in black:  Amazon  B&H  Moment
Fujifilm X-T5 in silver:  Amazon  B&H  Moment
Fujinon 35mm in black:  Amazon  B&H  Moment
Fujinon 35mm in silver:  Amazon  B&H  Moment

Find this Film Simulation Recipe and over 250 more on the Fuji X Weekly — Film Recipes App!

CineStill 400D v2 — A Fujifilm X-Trans IV & V Film Simulation Recipe

Orange & Blue – Phoenix, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5 – “CineStill 400D v2”

CineStill 400D is a cinematic color negative film meant for C41 processing that’s been around for less than a year. Unlike other cinematic films, the “D” doesn’t apparently stand for “Daylight” (even though it is Daylight balanced), but “Dynamic” because it has a large latitude for push processing. I’ve had a number of requests to create a Film Simulation Recipe that mimics the aesthetic of CineStill 400D. The problem I encountered is that this emulsion has a lot more variance than most films. All films can produce different looks depending on a host of factors, including how shot, developed, and scanned, but CineStill 400D seems especially so. As I understand, this film “scans flat” and some degree of post-processing is necessary, which likely accounts for some of that variance, as each photographer will manipulate the file to their own tastes to produce a final image.

No one recipe will ever come close to replicating all of the possible aesthetics from CineStill 400D, so instead I’m publishing a series of CineStill 400D Film Simulation Recipes, each a facsimile of a different look produced by the film. This recipe—CineStill 400D v2—has less contrast and leans more red/purple than the previous version. I think it is especially well suited for “golden hour” photography, but it is also a good option for overcast, shade, and midday sun. While it is certainly usable for many genres of photography, I particularly appreciate this one for urban and street photography.

This CineStill 400D v2 recipe was a joint effort between myself and Nestor Pool (Instagram, TikTok, Facebook, YouTube). We went back-and-forth on the settings, trying to match some examples of the film. After a few attempts, we decided it was best to focus on the “right feel” for what we wanted than an exact replication of the emulsion, especially since there was so much variance. After more fine-tuning, this is the recipe we created together. Nestor recommends using a 5% Moment CineBloom filter with these settings, although I didn’t do that with these pictures because my filter doesn’t have the right thread size for the lenses I used. It was a real honor to work with Nestor Pool, and I want to give him a special “thank you” for his efforts on this!

City of Grace Tower – Phoenix, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5 – “CineStill 400D”

This CineStill 400D v2 Film Simulation Recipe is compatible with “newer” Fujifilm X-Trans IV cameras—X-Pro3, X100V, X-T4, X-S10, X-E4, and X-T30 II—and all X-Trans V models—as of this writing, X-T5, X-H2, and X-H2S. Unfortunately, it is not compatible with the X-T3 and X-T30. Those with newer GFX models should be able to use it, too, but the rendering will be slightly different (try it anyway). Click here for CineStill 400D v1.

Film Simulation: Astia
Grain Effect: Strong, Small
Color Chrome Effect: Strong
Color Chrome FX Blue: Weak
White Balance: Fluorescent 1, -2 Red & +4 Blue
Dynamic Range: DR200
Highlight: -2
Shadow: 0
Color: +2
Sharpness: -2

High ISO NR: -4
Clarity: -4
ISO: Auto, up to ISO 6400
Exposure Compensation: +1/3 to +1 (typically)

Example photographs, all camera-made JPEGs using this “CineStill 400D v2” Film Simulation Recipe on my Fujifilm X-T5:

Hiker, Birdwatcher & Fisherman – Gilbert, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Faded Trail Sign – Gilbert, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Masonic Walker – Phoenix, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Waiting in Yellow – Phoenix, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Alleyway Bike – Phoenix, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Green Land Rover – Phoenix, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
No P – Phoenix, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Urban Palms – Phoenix, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Cross Palms – Phoenix, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Closed Church – Phoenix, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Building Blue – Phoenix, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Orange Reflection – Phoenix, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Building Within a Building – Phoenix, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Arrogant – Phoenix, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Vegan – Phoenix, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Haircut – Phoenix, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
11 – Phoenix, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Sidewalk Dog – Phoenix, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Boarded Doors – Phoenix, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Cars & Closed Church – Phoenix, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Urban Skateboarder – Phoenix, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Orpheum – Phoenix, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Spanish Baroque Tower – Phoenix, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Night Beacon – Phoenix, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5

This post contains affiliate links, and if you make a purchase using my links I’ll be compensated a small amount for it.

Fujifilm X-T5 in black:  Amazon  B&H  Moment
Fujifilm X-T5 in silver:  Amazon  B&H  Moment

Find this Film Simulation Recipe and over 250 more on the Fuji X Weekly — Film Recipes App!

Help Fuji X Weekly

Nobody pays me to write the content found on fujixweekly.com. There’s a real cost to operating and maintaining this site, not to mention all the time that I pour into it. If you appreciated this article, please consider making a one-time gift contribution. Thank you!

$5.00

CineStill 400D v1 — A Fujifilm X-Trans IV & V Film Simulation Recipe

Illumination in the Dark Desert – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5 – “CineStill 400D v1”

CineStill 400D is a cinematic color negative film meant for C41 processing that’s been around for less than a year. Unlike other cinematic films, the “D” doesn’t apparently stand for “Daylight” (even though it is Daylight balanced), but “Dynamic” because it has a large latitude for push processing. I’ve had a number of requests to create a Film Simulation Recipe that mimics the aesthetic of CineStill 400D. The problem I encountered is that this emulsion has a lot more variance than most films. All films can produce different looks depending on a host of factors, including how shot, developed, and scanned, but CineStill 400D seems especially so. As I understand, this film “scans flat” and some degree of post-processing is necessary, which likely accounts for some of that variance, as each photographer will manipulate the file to their own tastes to produce a final image.

No one recipe will ever come close to replicating all of the possible aesthetics from CineStill 400D, so instead I will publish a series of CineStill 400D Film Simulation Recipes, each a facsimile of a different look produced by the film. This recipe—CineStill 400D v1—has more contrast and leans more green/yellow than the other versions that will follow. I think it is especially well suited for sunny daylight conditions, but it is also a good option for dreary overcast days. While it is certainly usable for many genres of photography, I particularly appreciate this one for landscapes.

Bougainvillea Warm – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5 – “CineStill 400D v1”

This CineStill 400D v1 Film Simulation Recipe is compatible with “newer” Fujifilm X-Trans IV cameras—X-Pro3, X100V, X-T4, X-S10, X-E4, and X-T30 II—and all X-Trans V models—as of this writing, X-T5, X-H2, and X-H2S. Unfortunately, it is not compatible with the X-T3 and X-T30. Those with newer GFX models should be able to use it, too, but the rendering will be slightly different (try it anyway). Click here for the CineStill 400D v2 recipe.

Film Simulation: Astia
Grain Effect: Strong, Small
Color Chrome Effect: Strong
Color Chrome FX Blue: Strong
White Balance: Fluorescent 1, -6 Red & -3 Blue
Dynamic Range: DR200
Highlight: +3
Shadow: +1
Color: +2
Sharpness: -2

High ISO NR: -4
Clarity: -4
ISO: Auto, up to ISO 6400
Exposure Compensation: -1/3 to +2/3 (typically)

Example photographs, all camera-made JPEGs using this “CineStill 400D v1” Film Simulation Recipe on my Fujifilm X-T5:

Red Pipe – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Dreary Bougainvillea – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Raindrop on Curled Leaf – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Fujifilm X100V on a Wet Table – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Autumn Sidewalk – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Suburban Bush – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Reflection on the Floor – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Dog Waste – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Stone Blooms – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Tree in the Cloudy Desert – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Suburban Stop Sign – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Joy – Gilbert, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Saguaro Storm – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Reflecting on Perspective – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Evening in the Desert – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Cactus Reflected – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Light & Clouds on Mountain Ridges – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Sunset Clouds – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Desert in Shadow & Light – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Last Sunlight Pouring Through a Pass – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Saguaro Fingers – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Dark Saguaro – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Cactus in Golden Light – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5

This post contains affiliate links, and if you make a purchase using my links I’ll be compensated a small amount for it.

Fujifilm X-T5 in black:  Amazon  B&H  Moment
Fujifilm X-T5 in silver:  Amazon  B&H  Moment

Find this Film Simulation Recipe and over 250 more on the Fuji X Weekly — Film Recipes App!

Help Fuji X Weekly

Nobody pays me to write the content found on fujixweekly.com. There’s a real cost to operating and maintaining this site, not to mention all the time that I pour into it. If you appreciated this article, please consider making a one-time gift contribution. Thank you!

$5.00

Kodak Ultramax 400 — A Film Simulation Recipe for the Fujifilm X-T5 (X-Trans V)

Spring is a Dream – Gilbert, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5 – “Kodak Ultramax 400”

This isn’t a new Film Simulation Recipe, but simply a tweak of the X-Trans IV Kodak Ultramax 400 recipe to make it compatible with X-Trans V cameras. Because blue in Classic Chrome is rendered deeper on X-Trans V than X-Trans IV, Color Chrome FX Blue needs to be set to Off instead of Weak. Otherwise, this recipe is identical to the X-Trans IV version. For those with an X-T3, X-T30, or X-Trans III camera, there’s a version for you, too.

Kodak Ultramax 400 is a consumer grade ISO 400 color negative film. Kodak has sold Ultramax 400 under many different names, beginning in 1987 with Kodacolor VR-G 400, rebranded Gold 400 one year later, called simply GC at one point, and finally, in 1997, Kodak settled on Ultramax 400. Kodak still sells Ultramax 400, although it’s not the same film as Kodacolor VR-G 400. This film has been tweaked and updated at least nine times over the years; however, the overall aesthetic is still substantially similar between all variations.

Kissed by Light – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5 – “Kodak Ultramax 400”

This Kodak Ultramax 400 Film Simulation Recipe is intended for Fujifilm X-Trans V models, which (as of this writing) include the X-H2, X-H2S, and X-T5 cameras. It’s compatible with newer GFX models too, but will likely render slightly different on those cameras. This recipe is highly versatile—a great option for daylight, overcast, indoor, nighttime, landscapes, portraits, etc.—really, it’s good most any type of photography.

Film Simulation: Classic Chrome
Grain Effect: Strong, Large
Color Chrome Effect: Weak
Color Chrome FX Blue: Off
White Balance: Auto, +1 Red & -5 Blue
Dynamic Range: DR-Auto
Highlight: +1
Shadow: +1
Color: +4
Sharpness: 0

High ISO NR: -4
Clarity: +3
ISO: Auto, up to ISO 6400
Exposure Compensation: +1/3 to +1 (typically)

Example photographs, all camera-made JPEGs using this “Kodak Ultramax 400” Film Simulation Recipe on my Fujifilm X-T5:

Watching Firecrackers – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Red, Fire & Blue – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Sparkler – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Dressed for the Holiday – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Mango – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Days – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Rainy Day Window – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Happiness and Wondering – Gilbert, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Wet Bougainvillea – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Sunny Day Bougainvillea – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Lakeside Saguaro – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Cactus Bird – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Cactus on a Hill – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Rocks Among Clouds – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Victory Mountain – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Desert Ridge with Lifting Clouds – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Blue Sky Moon – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Dusk Sky – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5

This post contains affiliate links, and if you make a purchase using my links I’ll be compensated a small amount for it.

Fujifilm X-T5 in black:  Amazon  B&H  Moment
Fujifilm X-T5 in silver:  Amazon  B&H  Moment

Find this Film Simulation Recipe and over 250 more on the Fuji X Weekly — Film Recipes App!

Help Fuji X Weekly

Nobody pays me to write the content found on fujixweekly.com. There’s a real cost to operating and maintaining this site, not to mention all the time that I pour into it. If you appreciated this article, please consider making a one-time gift contribution. Thank you!

$5.00

Vintage Bronze — Fujifilm X-T5 (X-Trans V) Film Simulation Recipe

Autumn Rainbow – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5 – “Vintage Bronze”

This Vintage Bronze Film Simulation Recipe was an accident. It came about when Fuji X Weekly reader Dan Allen was first trying Anders Lindborg‘s Ilford FP4 Plus 125 recipe, and he accidentally selected the Eterna Bleach Bypass film sim instead of Monochrome. The results were pretty interesting, with a vintage alternative-process aesthetic—which I happened to really like—so I decided to make it an official recipe.

The Eterna Bleach Bypass film simulation is intended to replicate the look of motion picture film that has had the bleach step reduced or skipped. With this Vintage Bronze Film Simulation Recipe, there are some similarities to that (Michael Radford’s 1984 comes to mind), but it also reminds me a little of Kodak ColorPlus film cross-processed in E6 chemistry. Obviously, it’s not modeled after any specific film or process, so any similarities are simply happy accidents. I don’t think this recipe is necessarily a close facsimile to bleach-bypassed motion picture film or cross-processed ColorPlus, and not really an exact match to anything that I have seen, but it’s in the general neighborhood of those alternative-process aesthetics. I think an argument could be made that Kodacolor that’s faded a little is also somewhat similar.

Paperflowers – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5 – “Vintage Bronze”

Because of the blue color rendering difference between X-Trans IV and V, this Vintage Warm Film Simulation Recipe is only compatible with (as of this writing) the Fujifilm X-T5, X-H2, and X-H2S. You can use it on those X-Trans IV cameras with Eterna Bleach Bypass, but the rendering will be slightly different (give it a try anyway). I assume that the GFX100S and GFX50S II can also use this recipe, but that it will render slightly different—I don’t have either of those cameras to test it to know for certain.

Film Simulation: Eterna Bleach Bypass
Grain Effect: Weak, Large
Color Chrome Effect: Off
Color Chrome FX Blue: Off
White Balance: Daylight, +6 Red & -8 Blue
Dynamic Range: DR200
Highlight: 0
Shadow: -1
Color: 0
Sharpness: -2

High ISO NR: -4
Clarity: -2
ISO: Auto, up to ISO 6400
Exposure Compensation: -2/3 to 0 (typically)

Example photographs, all camera-made JPEGs using this “Vintage Bronze” Film Simulation Recipe on my Fujifilm X-T5:

Sunset Over White Truck – Surprise, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Ford Wagon – Surprise, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
5 & 6 – Surprise, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Cart Lock – Avondale, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Bus – Goodyear, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Jon in December – Surprise, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Johanna & Lens Flare – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Outdoor Lightbulbs – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Projector – Surprise, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Abstract Snow – Surprise, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Christmas Song – Surprise, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Winter Guitar – Surprise, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
A Gift For You – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Joy, Unsure – Goodyear, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Reading the Paper in December – Goodyear, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Sprinkled Donut – Goodyear, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Softdrinks – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Rudolph – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5

This post contains affiliate links, and if you make a purchase using my links I’ll be compensated a small amount for it.

Fujifilm X-T5 in black:  Amazon  B&H  Moment
Fujifilm X-T5 in silver:  Amazon  B&H  Moment

Find this Film Simulation Recipe and over 250 more on the Fuji X Weekly — Film Recipes App!

Creating Your Own Film Simulation Recipe for a Unique Look + Emulsion ’86, a Fujifilm X-T5 (X-Trans V) Film Simulation Recipe

Dreary Beach – Oceanside, CA – Fujifilm X-T5 – “Emulsion ’86”

Many Fujifilm photographers use Film Simulation Recipes, which are JPEG camera settings that produce a specific look (often based on classic film stocks) straight-out-of-camera, no editing required. I have published over 250 Film Simulation Recipes on this website, which can also be found on the Fuji X Weekly App for easy access on the go. Using recipes on Fujifilm cameras is a great way to streamline your workflow while still getting great results that appear as though you post-processed or perhaps even shot with film.

Some advantages of using recipes on Fujifilm cameras are simplicity (quickly and easily achieve a desired aesthetic with little or no editing), authenticity (film-like quality that doesn’t appear heavily manipulated), consistency (a single recipe over a series of pictures produces a cohesive visual style), and productivity (not editing pictures saves a lot of time). Because there are so many recipes to choose from, it can be difficult to know which recipe to use when; perhaps none of them are precisely what you are looking for, or you are just feeling adventurous, so you want try your hand at crafting your very own Film Simulation Recipe.

A lot of people don’t have an interest in creating recipes; instead, they want one that’s already been perfected and matches their style. For most people, a Film Simulation Recipe currently exists that works well for them, it’s just a matter of figuring out which one (or ones, as it could be several, situationally dependent). Or maybe you enjoy trying them all! There’s no singular approach to using recipes with your Fujifilm camera.

Those who do want to try to make their very own recipe—because they haven’t found “the one” yet, or because they want a look that’s unique to them, or because they’re feeling creative and adventurous—might not know how to do it or even where to start. This article is intended to help with that. I will walk you through the process of crafting a Film Simulation Recipe, so that you know how to make your own.

Don’t Climb on the Bikes – Oceanside, CA – Fujifilm X-T5 – “Emulsion ’86”

Each Film Simulation Recipe has its own origin story. Very rarely did two come about the exact same way. Most, however, begin with an aesthetic idea—what look do I want the recipe to resemble? A lot of times it’s a specific film stock, usually specific images from a certain film. One film can usually produce many different looks depending on a whole host of factors, including (but not limited to) how it was shot, developed and scanned. I study pictures to get a good sense of what the aesthetic is, so that I can recreate it as closely as possible on my Fujifilm camera. It’s never a perfect facsimile because the tools on the camera are limited, film and digital behave divergently, and one film can produce many looks; however, I surprise myself sometimes just how close one recipe can come to the aesthetic I was trying to mimic. There’s a lot of trial-and-error involved. A lot of testing. But the beginning is almost always an idea or inspiration. For the Film Simulation Recipe example in this article—Emulsion ’86—the origin was the pilot episode of Little House on the Prairie. I was really attracted to the cinematography, and wanted to recreate the look.

Once you know the aesthetic that you want to achieve, the next step is figuring out a base starting point—the Film Simulation. I decided the film simulation that most closely matched the cinematography was Nostalgic Neg., which is only found on the newest cameras, including the Fujifilm X-T5. Eterna is similar, too, but I felt not vibrant enough or warm enough in the shadows—it could also be a good starting point, and I considered using it, but opted for Nostalgic Neg. instead. Each film simulation produces a different look, so you want to find the best base film simulation for your recipe. If you want to learn more about the various film simulations, there is a video by Vistek that’s definitely worth watching (click here).

Once you have the base figured out, it’s time to fine-tune it to achieve your desired look. There are a lot of different settings, some of which are only available on the newer models. We’ll only briefly discuss each, because I don’t want to get bogged down in the details. I’ll link to an article or video for the settings, in case you need further explanations. You can find these settings in the IQ Menu subset and in Edit/Save Custom Settings. If you are unsure of how to program a Film Simulation Recipe into your Fujifilm camera, click here and here.

Dynamic Range. Choose either DR-Auto (the camera will choose either DR100 or DR200), DR100, DR200, or DR400 (note: D-Range Priority or HDR can be used in lieu of a DR setting, and can also be considered). The Dynamic Range settings are primarily for protecting highlights, but affect the luminosity curve. DR100 protects highlights from clipping the least, while DR400 protects the highlights from clipping the most; however, DR400 requires a higher ISO and produces a lower-contrast image. Click here, here, here, here, and here to learn more. For my recipe, I wanted to protect highlights the most because I planned to expose the image more, so I chose DR400.
Grain. Only X-Trans III and newer cameras have a faux Grain option (Off, Weak, or Strong), and only the X-Pro3 and newer have the option for Grain Size (Small or Large). The Acros film simulation is the only one with built-in grain (the faux Grain options can be used in addition to the built-in Acros grain). High-ISO digital noise on Fujifilm cameras can produce a film-grain-like effect, too, and is something else to be considered. Click here, here, here, and here to learn more. For this recipe, I decided I like Grain set to Strong/Small after testing a couple options.
Color Chrome Effect and Color Chrome FX Blue. These settings deepen the tonality of certain colors (renders them darker) so that they retain more details when they are especially vibrant. For each, the options are Off, Weak, or Strong. For more information, click here, here, and here. I chose Color Chrome Effect set to Strong (for darker reds) and Color Chrome FX Blue set to Off (for lighter blues).

Pink Blossom Bush – San Diego, CA – Fujifilm X-T5 – “Emulsion ’86”

White Balance and Shift. This is an important tool for altering the aesthetic of the base film simulation. First, it’s important to understand that most color films were either Daylight balanced (around 5500K) or Tungsten balanced (around 3200K), so if you want to mimic film, choosing a similar white balance is a good option. You can significantly manipulate the cast using white balance and shift together. Unfortunately, cameras older than the X-Pro3 cannot save a WB Shift within C1-C7 Custom Settings Presets. Click here, here, and here to learn more. After much experimenting, I landed on Daylight White Balance with a Shift of +2 Red & -1 Blue.
Highlight and Shadow. This is found within Tone Curve on newer cameras. Highlight and Shadow is what adjusts the luminosity curve. -2 is the least (least highlight, least shadows), and +4 (or +2 on older models) is the most (strongest highlights, deepest shadows). This also highly affects contrast. To learn more, click here and here. I set Highlight to -2 to soften them and protect them from clipping, and I set Shadow to +2 to deepen shadows and increase contrast.
Color. This sets the vibrancy, from -4 (least vibrant) to +4 (most vibrant). For more information, click here. I wanted more highly saturated colors, so I went with +4.
Sharpness and Noise Reduction. Choose between -4 and +4 (-2 and +2 on older models). On newer cameras, Noise Reduction is renamed High ISO NR, but it’s the same thing. I typically (but not always) stay within -2 and +2 Sharpness (-1 and +1 on older models). I feel that Fujifilm’s Noise Reduction is too strong, so I like to use a minus setting. Click here, here, and here to learn more. I set Sharpness to -2 and Noise Reduction to -4 for this new recipe.
Clarity. This is a micro-contrast adjustment, either more (+1 to +5) or less (-1 to -5), with 0 being Off. Using a minus Clarity setting is similar to using a diffusion filter. Clarity does slow down the camera, as there is a “Storing” pause after each exposure, and continuous shooting modes (CL and CH) disable this setting. Only the X-Pro3 and newer models have Clarity. Click here and here for more information. I wanted a softer look, so I set Clarity to -3.

There are two other important parts of a recipe. First, you have to decide the maximum (and maybe minimum) ISO. I like to use Auto-ISO the majority of the time. For color photography, I feel most Fujifilm cameras do well up to ISO 6400, but that’s just my personal tolerance. You might want to top it out at ISO 3200 or ISO 12800, or whatever you prefer. To learn more, click here, here, and here. For this recipe I set Auto-ISO to be up to ISO 6400. Finally, you have to decide how much Exposure Compensation you typically want. Do you want brighter or darker results? This works hand-in-hand with the luminosity curve you’ve created with DR, Highlight, and Shadow. A word of caution is that each exposure should be judged individually, and typical exposure compensation is merely a starting point, and not a rule. Click here and here to learn more. For my recipe, I wanted a brighter picture, so I usually increase the exposure over what the meter says, typically by +2/3 to +1-1/3 stop.

The very last step is to give your new Film Simulation Recipe a name. Even though the pilot episode of Little House on the Prairie was the initial inspiration for my recipe, after visiting Balboa Park in San Diego, I had a change of perspective. You see, Balboa Park has hosted two different World Expositions (in 1915 and 1935)—remnants of which are still prominent to this day—which reminded me of my own World’s Fair experience: when I was six years old, my family and I went to Expo ’86 in Vancouver, Canada. I found many old pictures of that event—personal, in books, and online—and this recipe was highly reminiscent of some of those photographs. This Film Simulation Recipe produces a nostalgic analog aesthetic that is similar to some pictures from the mid-1980’s (presumably primarily Kodak emulsions, but I’m not certain), so I named it Emulsion ’86.

If you like your recipe creation, consider sharing it with the Fujifilm community so that others can use it, too. If you don’t have a place to share it, the Fuji X Weekly Community Recipes page is for you!

Old California Architecture – San Diego, CA – Fujifilm X-T5 – “Emulsion ’86”

This Emulsion ’86 Film Simulation Recipe is only compatible with (as of this writing) the Fujifilm X-T5, X-H2, and X-H2S. I assume that the GFX100S and GFX50S II can also use this recipe, but that it will render slightly different—I don’t have either of those cameras to test it to know for certain. This recipe does well for both sunny daylight and rainy overcast photography.

Film Simulation: Nostalgic Neg.
Grain Effect: Strong, Small
Color Chrome Effect: Strong
Color Chrome FX Blue: Off
White Balance: Daylight, +2 Red & -1 Blue
Dynamic Range: DR400
Highlight: -2
Shadow: +2
Color: +4
Sharpness: -2

High ISO NR: -4
Clarity: -3
ISO: Auto, up to ISO 6400
Exposure Compensation: +2/3 to +1-1/3 (typically)

Example photographs, all camera-made JPEGs using this “Emulsion ’86” Film Simulation Recipe on my Fujifilm X-T5:

Bobcat on the Beach – Oceanside, CA – Fujifilm X-T5 – “Emulsion ’86”
Rainy Day at the Beach – Oceanside, CA – Fujifilm X-T5 – “Emulsion ’86”
No Lifeguard on Duty – Oceanside, CA – Fujifilm X-T5 – “Emulsion ’86”
Two Surfers Walking – Oceanside, CA – Fujifilm X-T5 – “Emulsion ’86”
Pacific Wave Rider – Oceanside, CA – Fujifilm X-T5 – “Emulsion ’86”
Sahand Nayebaziz – Oceanside, CA – Fujifilm X-T5 – “Emulsion ’86”
Gull View – Oceanside, CA – Fujifilm X-T5 – “Emulsion ’86”
Two Seagulls & Giant Binoculars – Oceanside, CA – Fujifilm X-T5 – “Emulsion ’86”
Bird Can – Oceanside, CA – Fujifilm X-T5 – “Emulsion ’86”
Saltwater Fisherman – Oceanside, CA – Fujifilm X-T5 – “Emulsion ’86”
Red Steps – Oceanside, CA – Fujifilm X-T5 – “Emulsion ’86”
Tag Us – Oceanside, CA – Fujifilm X-T5 – “Emulsion ’86”
Holiday Marlboro – El Centro, CA – Fujifilm X-T5 – “Emulsion ’86”
Noel – San Diego, CA – Fujifilm X-T5 – “Emulsion ’86”
Museum – San Diego, CA – Fujifilm X-T5 – “Emulsion ’86”
Pool Reflection – San Diego, CA – Fujifilm X-T5 – “Emulsion ’86”
Curved Colonnade – San Diego, CA – Fujifilm X-T5 – “Emulsion ’86”
Clouds Above Octagon – San Diego, CA – Fujifilm X-T5 – “Emulsion ’86”
Golden Architecture – San Diego, CA – Fujifilm X-T5 – “Emulsion ’86”
Natural History Museum – San Diego, CA – Fujifilm X-T5 – “Emulsion ’86”
Palm Tree Sky – San Diego, CA – Fujifilm X-T5 – “Emulsion ’86”

This post contains affiliate links, and if you make a purchase using my links I’ll be compensated a small amount for it.

Fujifilm X-T5 in black:  Amazon  B&H
Fujifilm X-T5 in silver:  Amazon  B&H

Find this Film Simulation Recipe and over 250 more on the Fuji X Weekly — Film Recipes App!

Help Fuji X Weekly

Nobody pays me to write the content found on fujixweekly.com. There’s a real cost to operating and maintaining this site, not to mention all the time that I pour into it. If you appreciated this article, please consider making a one-time gift contribution. Thank you!

$5.00

Ilford FP4 Plus 125 — Fujifilm X-T5 (X-Trans V + X-Trans IV) Film Simulation Recipe

Gift Giving – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5 – “Ilford FP4 Plus 125”

Anders Lindborg is, in my opinion, the guru on Fujifilm black-and-white Film Simulation Recipes. After all, he invented the Kodak Tri-X 400, Ilford HP5 Plus 400, and Ilford Pan F Plus 50 recipes, and co-created the Kodak T-Max 400 recipe. These are some of my favorite monochrome options, and Kodak Tri-X 400 is my all-time favorite recipe, period. Anders also created the Kodak Gold v2 recipe, seven Fujicolor Pro 160NS recipesseven Fujicolor Pro 400H recipes, and made an important D-Range Priority discovery. This Ilford FP4 Plus 125 recipe was invented by Anders Lindborg, too, so I know that you will love it! It’s a real honor to publish it on Fuji X Weekly, and I appreciate his willingness to share it with all of you.

The story doesn’t end there. Recently, Fuji X Weekly reader Dan Allen wanted to help create an Ilford FP4 Plus 125 recipe, and he purchased some rolls of the film to shoot side-by-side with his Fujifilm camera. When he told me this, I sent him Anders’ recipe to try. After he did his experiment, Dan shared with me the results, which were quite fascinating. It turns out that Dan’s Ilford frames and his Fujifilm digital pictures (using Anders’ recipe) looked similar, but the Ilford frames had less contrast, with softer highlights and shadows, so I made a few small modifications to Anders’ recipe to better match Dan’s pictures. Of course, one film can have many different looks, depending on how it was shot, developed, printed, and/or scanned. “This particular film stock,” Anders told me, “is highly tunable, ranging from super clean to ultra gritty.” No single recipe will ever recreate every possible aesthetic from the film.

“Just like the real thing,” Anders explained to me, “a slight underexposure protects the highlights and improves contrast. Centered around the upper half of the grayscale, this recipe ranges from soft and dreamy to sharp and almost graphic with pencil-like lines. It will almost never go entirely black and is great for shadow details.” Ilford originally introduced FP4 Plus 125 way back in 1968, and in 2014 they improved the emulsion, which is what’s currently available.

Bougainvillea Grey – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5 – “Ilford FP4 Plus 125”

If you want to use Anders Lindborg’s recipe as he created it, set Dynamic Range to DR100, Highlight to 0, and Shadow to -1. He says that you can “really go crazy” with Clarity and Grain—try Clarity anywhere from -2 to +4, with Grain Weak/Small when using less Clarity (for a cleaner look) and Grain Strong/Large when using more Clarity (for a grittier look). Also, feel free to use the different faux filter options (+Ye, +R, +G) with this recipe.

The Ilford FP4 Plus 125 Film Simulation Recipe is compatible with X-Trans V cameras, which (as of this writing) are the Fujifilm X-T5, X-H2, and X-H2S, and newer X-Trans IV cameras: X-T4, X-S10, X-E4, and X-T30 II. If you have an X100V or X-Pro3, you can use Anders’ unmodified version (explained above); for the X-T3, X-T30, plus X-Trans III, additionally ignore Clarity and Grain size. This recipe is especially well suited for mid-to-high contrast scenes, paying careful attention to the highlights so as to not clip them.

Film Simulation: Monochrome
Grain Effect: Weak, Large
Color Chrome Effect: Off
Color Chrome FX Blue: Off
White Balance: Daylight, +6 Red & -8 Blue
Dynamic Range: DR200
Highlight: -0.5
Shadow: -1.5
Monochromatic Color: 0 WC & 0 MG
Sharpness: 0

High ISO NR: -4
Clarity: +2
ISO: Auto, up to ISO 6400
Exposure Compensation: -1 to -1/3 (typically)

Example photographs, all camera-made JPEGs using this “Ilford FP4 Plus 125” Film Simulation Recipe on my Fujifilm X-T5:

Projector Light – Surprise, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Fog Lights – Surprise, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Disco Ball – Surprise, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Christmas Concert – Surprise, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Light Lines – Surprise, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Window Shade Pull – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Window Light on a Small Rug – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Call it a Fuji X Weekly Holiday – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Christmas Gift – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Legos for Christmas – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Was a Rose – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Backlit Petunia – Goodyear, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Dark Bougainvillea – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Lizard on a Wall – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Block Wall – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Gate – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Joy – Goodyear, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Waiting by the Pool – Goodyear, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Butcher – Avondale, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Tamale TV – Avondale, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Reading the Morning Paper – Goodyear, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Coffee Sugar – Goodyear, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Hydrant Top – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Geometric – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Suburban Rooftop – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5

This post contains affiliate links, and if you make a purchase using my links I’ll be compensated a small amount for it.

Fujifilm X-T5 in black:  Amazon  B&H
Fujifilm X-T5 in silver:  Amazon  B&H

Find this Film Simulation Recipe and over 250 more on the Fuji X Weekly — Film Recipes App!

Kodak Negative — Fujifilm X-T5 (X-Trans V) Film Simulation Recipe

Desert Fence – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5 – “Kodak Negative”

This recipe began as an attempt to mimic my “Nostalgic Negative” Film Simulation Recipe for X-Trans IV cameras using the new Nostalgic Neg. film simulation instead of Classic Chrome. I made that recipe before any camera with Nostalgic Neg. had even been released, when there weren’t very many samples available, and little information had been given about it. I observed “something along the lines of Eterna gradation, [with] the Classic Chrome color palette (however, with a warm shift)….” I also stated that it would “likely turn out to be an inaccurate facsimile to the real Nostalgic Negative film simulation….” Turns out that I was right about both.

I set out to see how close I could get to that X-Trans IV Nostalgic Negative recipe using Nostalgic Neg, on my X-T5. I was hoping that I could get a close match, but unfortunately I was only able to get it to be about 90% similar. Even though it wasn’t an exact match, I still liked the aesthetic. From there I gave it a couple of small tweaks to make it look better (but less like the X-Trans IV recipe), and that’s how this Kodak Negative recipe came to be.

To my eyes, without digging too deeply into samples (just “memory color”), this recipe is reminiscent of Kodak Ektar 100. Maybe +4 Color isn’t quite high enough to mimic Ektar film, but there are definitely some similarities between this recipe and the film. I didn’t set out to recreate Ektar, so I’m not worried that it’s not an exact match. There’s certainly a vibrant Kodak color negative film vibe to this recipe; if not Ektar, then maybe Royal Gold 100 or Gold 100 or something along those lines.

Looking Through the Stone – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5 – “Kodak Negative”

This Kodak Negative Film Simulation Recipe is only compatible with (as of this writing) the Fujifilm X-T5, X-H2, and X-H2S. I assume that the GFX100S and GFX50S II can also use this recipe, but that it will render slightly different—I don’t have either of those cameras to test it to know for certain. This Kodak Negative recipe is especially well-suited for golden hour photography, but can also be used during most other light situations.

Film Simulation: Nostalgic Neg.
Grain Effect: Weak, Large
Color Chrome Effect: Off
Color Chrome FX Blue: Off
White Balance: Auto, +1 Red & -4 Blue
Dynamic Range: DR400
Highlight: -0.5
Shadow: +2.5
Color: +4
Sharpness: -1

High ISO NR: -4
Clarity: -3
ISO: Auto, up to ISO 6400
Exposure Compensation: +1/3 to +2/3 (typically)

Example photographs, all camera-made JPEGs using this “Kodak Negative” Film Simulation Recipe on my Fujifilm X-T5:

Church Dome – Litchfield Park, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Empty Cage – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Water & Reflection – Litchfield Park, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Lake Lamp – Litchfield Park, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Pond at Last Light – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Disappearing Desert Light – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Approaching Dusk at Pond – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Pond Water – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Palm Tree Moon – Litchfield Park, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Media Center – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Golden Triangle – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Golden Leaves – Litchfield Park, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Tree Top Clouds – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Lakeside Townhomes – Litchfield Park, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Soft Shrub – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Three Oranges – Litchfield Park, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Me Photographing Me – Litchfield Park, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Observing the Lake for Fish – Litchfield Park, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Worn Wood – Litchfield Park, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Pier Leg – Litchfield Park, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Lantana – Litchfield Park, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5

This post contains affiliate links, and if you make a purchase using my links I’ll be compensated a small amount for it.

Fujifilm X-T5 in black:  Amazon  B&H
Fujifilm X-T5 in silver:  Amazon  B&H

Find this Film Simulation Recipe and over 250 more on the Fuji X Weekly — Film Recipes App!

Help Fuji X Weekly

Nobody pays me to write the content found on fujixweekly.com. There’s a real cost to operating and maintaining this site, not to mention all the time that I pour into it. If you appreciated this article, please consider making a one-time gift contribution. Thank you!

$2.00

Five Fujifilm X-T5 AI AWB Workarounds

Yesterday I stated that I don’t like the inconsistent results from the new AI Auto White Balance found on the Fujifilm X-T5 and the other X-Trans V cameras. This isn’t a problem for most people, I don’t think; however, if you are a wedding or event photographer (or someone who needs consistent rendering over a series of pictures), if you use Film Simulation Recipes and rely on the out-of-camera JPEGs, and if you commonly use Auto White Balance, this is an issue you are likely to encounter, and you will surely be frustrated by it.

For those who are looking for a workaround to this problem, I want to offer you five potential solutions that might be helpful. None are perfect, so I hope that Fujifilm addresses this with a firmware update in the near future, but in the meantime perhaps one of these will be at least ok for you.

1. Use a Film Simulation Recipe that doesn’t use AWB yet matches the lighting conditions. For example, if you will be photographing indoors under artificial light, instead of using AWB, try Serr’s 500T (which uses a specific Kelvin temperature) or CineStill 800T (which uses Fluorescent 3). While AWB recipes are easy to like because of their versatility (Jack-of-all-trades), Auto White Balance won’t always deliver the best results. You’ll have to figure which recipe might be most appropriate for whatever it is that you are photographing, and there could only be one or two that will really work well; however, if you can match the recipe with the scene and situation, that’s when you’ll get the best outcome.

2. Use Custom White Balance. Instead of using Auto White Balance, take a custom white balance measurement in each lighting condition that you encounter. Your camera has three Custom White Balance banks, so you can take a measurement in up to three different situations at the beginning, and just switch between the three banks as you move throughout the event. For example, Custom 1 could be for outdoors, Custom 2 could be for the reception, and Custom 3 could be for the dressing room. If the light changes significantly due to (for example) the sun’s position in the sky or cloud coverage, you might have to remeasure at various times. You’ll have to remember to switch to the appropriate Custom White Balance bank as the light situation changes.

3. Use Auto White Balance Lock (AWB-L). This feature allows you to lock onto a specific white balance for as long as you keep it locked. To do this, first, while in the Shooting Mode (not Playback), press and hold the Disp/Back button until the Bluetooth & Function (Fn) Setting Menu appears. Pick an Fn button (whichever one you like, as long as it isn’t a touchscreen gesture) to customize, and set it to AWB-L. Next, open the Wrench Menu subset, click Button/Dial Setting, select AWB-Lock Mode, and set it to AWB On/Off Switch. Now, when you think AWB is producing a good white balance for the situation, simply press the Fn button you chose to enable AWB-L, and the camera will keep that white balance until you press the button again to disable it. Don’t forget to disable AWB-L when you encounter different lighting.

4. Program the same Film Simulation Recipe into several C1-C7 Custom Presets, but (for example) set the white balance to Daylight (for outdoors) on one, maybe Fluorescent 3 (for indoors) on another, and some other white balance (for another light you expect to encounter) on another. Definitely check the results at the very beginning to make sure it all looks good (and adjust if necessary) before photographing the whole event this way. You’ll have to remember to change to the correct C1-C7 preset as the light situation changes.

5. Take your chances with AWB. If you shoot RAW+JPEG, even if you have no intentions of editing the RAW files, you can reprocess the pictures in-camera or with X RAW Studio if, by chance, a crucial exposure has a weird color cast. You can simply adjust the white balance to be closer to the others, or apply a B&W recipe (such as Kodak Tri-X 400) and call it being creative.

Why I Don’t Like the New AI AWB on the Fujifilm X-T5

Fujifilm used “deep-learning AI Technology” to improve Auto White Balance on the X-T5 (or, more accurately, on X-Trans V cameras—not just the X-T5). According to the promotional statement, the camera is able to more accurately identify warm tints, and adjust to compensate for that when using Auto White Balance. Sounds impressive, right?

When I first learned about this, I was a little concerned that the new Auto White Balance would affect Film Simulation Recipes that use AWB. So I took a few test shots with the X-T5 and an X-Trans IV model side-by-side to compare, and I didn’t notice any difference between the two regarding white balance. It looked the same to me. But now that I’ve used the X-T5 a little longer, I do, in fact, at times notice something that I initially overlooked.

In the banner above, which comes from Fujifilm’s promo materiel for the X-T5 (even though the X-H2 has this same feature, it wasn’t promoted with that camera), you can see the “conventional model” vs the X-T5 AWB rendering in identical light. I assume that the so-called conventional model wasn’t a Sony or Canon, but an X-T4 (or other X-Trans IV camera). I personally prefer the more golden rendering of the “conventional” AWB to the copper rendering of the AI AWB, but each has their own tastes, so there’s no right or wrong answer. Perhaps you prefer the image on the right over the one on the left. It’s definitely subjective.

Something I have noticed—and I don’t like—is that this new rendering is inconsistent. From one exposure to the next, with identical lighting and identical settings, you can get something more like the “conventional model” rendering or something more like the AI AWB rendering. I’ve noticed it in artificial light, and I’ve noticed it in golden-hour/sunset situations. Two exposures, one right after the other—nothing’s changed—but the camera produces two very different tints when using AWB. Take a look at the two pictures below for an example of this. They were captured under identical light with identical settings, but they clearly aren’t identical. This was in a set of 32 pictures (of my son opening birthday gifts); 19 had the golden-ish cast and 13 had the copper-ish cast (these are frames nine and ten, for those wondering).

Obviously if you are a wedding or event photographer, and you rely on Auto White Balance, this could be a big issue for you, because you want consistent results. You don’t want the white balance to be bouncing back-and-forth between two tints. I don’t even want it for my son’s birthday pictures! If the camera chose one rendering in the situation, and consistently applied that to each image, whether gold or copper or something else entirely, that’s fine—it’s what is expected to happen—but bouncing between renderings is bad and should not happen. If you can’t trust AWB, and if it’s a tool that you commonly use, the X-T5 (or any of the X-Trans V models) might not be the camera for you.

Of course, for many people this might not be an issue whatsoever. Maybe you don’t even use AWB. Perhaps you do but you don’t care if the results are different between exposures. It could be that you’re going to adjust white balance in software later anyway, so what the camera records makes no difference to you. If that’s you, and none of this matters to you, great! But I do want to point it out for those who it might matter for, because they should know. It’s better to find out now before dropping so much money on something that’s just going to frustrate you.

I imagine that this is something Fujifilm could fix fairly easily via a firmware update. A simple tweak to the code could possibly make this behavior happen much less frequently. Fujifilm should address this issue. I hope in a few months from now this will all be a past problem that was fixed and forgotten. Or it could be the expected behavior that all Fujifilm X-Trans V cameras will have, and it will only be fixed by an even more improved AI-AWB on X-Trans VI models. Time will tell.

See also: Five Fujifilm X-T5 AI AWB Workarounds

Kodak Portra 400 v2 — Fujifilm X-T5 (X-Trans V) Film Simulation Recipe

Swath of Red – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5 – “Kodak Portra 400 v2”

This is a simple update to the Kodak Portra 400 v2 Film Simulation Recipe, which was originally made for X-Trans IV cameras. I discovered that a slight tweak is needed for X-Trans V models, because the new sensor renders blues just a little deeper on some film simulations, including Classic Chrome. For this recipe, simply setting Color Chrome FX Blue from Weak to Off makes it compatible with (as of this writing) the Fujifilm X-T5, X-H2, and X-H2S.

Kodak Portra 400 is a popular professional-grade color negative film introduced in 1998. There’s been a number of revisions and improvements to the emulsion over the years, so the Portra that’s available today is slightly different than the original Portra from roughly 25 years ago. As the name suggests, it’s intended for portraitures, but is also a popular option for many other genres of photography. One film can have several different aesthetics depending on many factors, and this particular Film Simulation Recipe is modeled after the Kodak Portra 400 pictures from a specific photographer. It’s one of my absolute favorite recipes for daylight and especially golden hour photography, and it does pretty well in several other light conditions; however, it’s probably not the best option for indoor artificial light, unless you want especially warm pictures.

Succulent Stories – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5 – “Kodak Portra 400 v2”

This Kodak Portra 400 v2 Film Simulation Recipe is intended for Fujifilm X-Trans V models. It’s compatible with newer GFX cameras too, but will likely render slightly different. If you have an X-Pro3X100V, X-T4, X-S10, X-E4, or X-T30 II, try the Kodak Portra 400 v2 recipe for those models (click here). If you have an X-T3 or X-T30, try the version for those cameras (click here). 

Film Simulation: Classic Chrome
Grain Effect: Strong, Small
Color Chrome Effect: Strong
Color Chrome FX Blue: Off
White Balance: 5200K, +1 Red & -6 Blue
Dynamic Range: DR400
Highlight: 0
Shadow: -2
Color: +2
Sharpness: -2

High ISO NR: -4
Clarity: -2
ISO: Auto, up to ISO 6400
Exposure Compensation: +1/3 to +1 (typically)

Example photographs, all camera-made JPEGs using this “Kodak Portra 400 v2” Film Simulation Recipe on my Fujifilm X-T5:

Christmas Angel – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Nativity – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Happy Holidays – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Lemons – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Changing Seasons – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Leaves on the Concrete – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
GCR – Williams, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Lighted Cupola – Williams, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Sisters – Williams, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Brothers – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
December Fog – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Multi-Arm Saguaro – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Saguaro Mist – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Wall Cage – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Super Star – Glendale. AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
I Believe – Avondale, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Standing in the Sun – Avondale, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Untidy Palm – Palo Verde, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Misty Desert Hills – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
It Was All Yellow – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Small Pop of Color – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Clouds & Brown Trees – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Golden Neighborhood – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5

This post contains affiliate links, and if you make a purchase using my links I’ll be compensated a small amount for it.

Fujifilm X-T5 in black:  Amazon  B&H
Fujifilm X-T5 in silver:  Amazon  B&H

Find this Film Simulation Recipe and over 250 more on the Fuji X Weekly — Film Recipes App!

Help Fuji X Weekly

Nobody pays me to write the content found on fujixweekly.com. There’s a real cost to operating and maintaining this site, not to mention all the time that I pour into it. If you appreciated this article, please consider making a one-time gift contribution. Thank you!

$2.00

5 Ways the Fujifilm X-T4 is Better Than the Fujifilm X-T5

The Fujifilm X-T5 is better—at least slightly—than the X-T4 in a many ways, but not every way. Perhaps you have an X-T4 and are considering upgrading to the latest iteration, or maybe you cannot decide between the X-T4 or X-T5—this article will point out some reasons why you might consider the X-T4 over the new model. Don’t get me wrong, I’m not saying that the X-T4 is better, only that in some ways it is indeed better; however, overall, the X-T5 is, in my opinion, the superior camera, but only by a small margin (I’ll have a full review of the new camera soon, so keep an eye out for that). Below are five ways the Fujifilm X-T4 is actually better than the X-T5.

1. Heat Dispersion

There are a few true workhorses in the Fujifilm lineup. These cameras just go and go and go. They’re eager to work and don’t need a break. The X-H1 is probably the best. The X-T4 is not far behind.

I don’t usually have heat issues with Fujifilm cameras in my day-to-day photography, but when I do the monthly SOOC broadcast, I need a camera that will run 4K video for several hours. My X-H1 will do it. The X-T4 will do it, too. But, I found out that the X-T5 will only last for about 45 minutes before overheating. Interestingly enough, I accidentally forgot to turn off the X-T4, and it kept running for 24 hours straight, no overheating! Before you scoff, the camera was plugged into the wall with a faux battery power cord and it was tethered to my computer, so it is, in fact, possible for the camera to run 4K for hours and hours and hours, just so long as it doesn’t power down due to overheating.

After I discovered the X-T4 had been inadvertently running for a whole day, I powered it off and let it rest for 15 minutes, then I used it for a three-and-a-half hour broadcast. It worked like a champ! The X-T5 overheats much too quickly to even be considered for this use. If you will be video broadcasting or recording long clips, the X-T4 is the clear winner. The almost-five-year-old X-H1 is better than the X-T5 in this regard, too. I’m not surprised, because Fujifilm stuffed a high-resolution sensor and quick processor into a small body, and the consequence of that is heat, and there’s just not enough heat dispersion. For most people, this is no big deal at all, but for those videographers who need to record extended-length clips, the X-T5 should be avoided, and the X-T4 is a much better option.

2. Rear Screen

I like the X-T5’s three-way tilt screen better than the flippy screen on the X-T4, but not everyone agrees with me on that. For some, the X-T4’s screen is superior. You can do a lot more with it, and being able to see yourself while recording video of yourself is big plus for some. Personally, what I like best about the X-T4’s screen is that you can close it backwards, and it is sort of like shooting with an X-Pro3 (kinda, but not really)—no other X-T series camera can do that, only the X-T4. You might actually prefer the X-T4’s rear screen over the X-T5. Different strokes for different folks, right?

3. Vertical Battery Grip

I’ve never used a vertical battery grip on any camera ever, but some do use it, either for the extra battery power, the extra grip, or both. Every single camera in this series—including the X-T1—has had an optional vertical battery grip accessory for those who want one, except for the X-T5. In this way, the X-T5 is more like the X-T00 series, and it cheapens the line (not in cost, but in perceived quality). Most people don’t use the vertical battery grip, so for the majority this is no big deal whatsoever, but for some this is a dealbreaker.

4. Body Size

A lot of people (myself included) have applauded the smaller size of the X-T5, but some prefer the bigger X-T4 body. Those with big hands might prefer the grip on the X-T4, and those who frequently shoot with large, heavy lenses might prefer using them attached to the bulkier frame. For me, just doing some testing in preparation for the upcoming X-T5 review, the larger X-T4 body felt better when using the Fujinon 100-400mm lens than the smaller X-T5, but that was simply my experience and my preference. I would suggest that the shooting experience of the X-T4 might be slightly superior if you do use large lenses a lot, but it is a personal preference.

5. Resolution

More is more, right? 40 is better than 26, right? If you crop deeply, print poster, or enjoy pixel-peeping, the higher resolution sensor of the X-T5 is probably for you. Otherwise, the X-T4 has more resolution than most people typically use or need. The disadvantage of more resolution is that it takes up more digital storage space (on your SD cards, phone, computer, external hard drive, and cloud storage), and it can take longer to process or upload files—an extra second here and there doesn’t seem like much, but if you add it up over ten thousand pictures (the course of a year for me), you’re talking about hours that the higher resolution sensor cost you. Sometimes less is more. Personally, I prefer the 26-megapixel resolution of the X-T4 over the X-T5’s 40-megapixels; some of you might even prefer the X-T1’s 16-megapixels.


But, but, but… the X-T5 has the new super-quick autofocus, that finally brings it up to par with Canikony! That alone makes it worthwhile, right? Outside of dim-light situations, I found the X-T1’s eight-year-old autofocus to be plenty quick for me, including for sports and wildlife photography. The X-T4’s autofocus, which is even better, is more than good enough for almost everyone.

It’s not the gear that’s incapable. People have been capturing amazing photographs for 150+ years, and whether for stills or motion pictures, the focus capability of the gear has never stood in the way. People have done so much more with so much less for so many decades. If you looked at photography forums and such lately, you’d wonder how anyone ever managed to capture an in-focus picture prior to the Sony A7 III. We must have imagined it all, because it’s just not possible without the quickest autofocus—and if you don’t have the quickest, you got nothing. That’s how it seems. The focus inability of camera gear is a very recent phenomena. With that said, if a camera offers a tool that makes photography a little easier for you, that’s a good thing. Certainly autofocus in general, and the gradual improvements in autofocus capabilities over the years, have opened up photography for people who don’t have the skill or experience or desire to get the shot otherwise—that’s not a dig, by the way, as I believe opening up photography to those who the door would otherwise be closed to is important. Film Simulation Recipes do that for those who don’t have the skill, time, desire, or access to computer/software to edit RAW files—for me, that’s time and desire; for you, it might be something else—and it has become an important tool for the visually impaired. So, yeah—bravo to better autofocus! But, if you do find the focus capabilities lacking on whatever gear you are using, know that you do have it within you to overcome that issue, and it doesn’t involve buying new gear.

Back to the cameras in question…. In AF-S, I didn’t hardly notice any difference between the X-T4 and the X-T5 (or even the X-T1 and X-T5 in normal light). I think the visual confirmation of focus is a hair quicker, but the actual focus isn’t (I hope that makes sense). The X-T5 recognizes faces a little further away, if that matters. In AF-C, I do think the X-T5 is just a tad better at finding and correctly focusing on the intended subject, but it’s not a night-and-day difference, only a small improvement (but an improvement nonetheless). Where I believe the X-T5 is indeed superior to the X-T4 with regard to autofocus is continuous subject-tracking. The X-T5 can recognize more various subjects to track (not just human face/eye), and does a better job of tracking. So if you do use continuous subject-tracking autofocus, you’ll find the X-T5 to be better than the X-T4; if you don’t, you’ll find the X-T5’s autofocus to be only marginally improved.

This post contains affiliate links, and if you make a purchase using my links I’ll be compensated a small amount for it.

Fujifilm X-T4 in black:  Amazon  B&H
Fujifilm X-T4 in silver:  Amazon  B&H

Fujifilm X-T5 in black:  Amazon  B&H
Fujifilm X-T5 in silver:  Amazon  B&H

Kodak Vericolor Warm — Fujifilm X-T5 (X-Trans V) Film Simulation Recipe

Right Around the Bend – Arlington, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5 – “Kodak Vericolor Warm”

I wasn’t sure if I should publish this Film Simulation Recipe, but then I thought, why not? Initially, the intention was simply to see how the Nostalgic Neg. film simulation looks with Dynamic Range set to DR100, and how the X-T5 images look at ISO 125, which is the base-ISO of X-Trans V cameras. I didn’t model these settings after any specific film aesthetic; instead, I borrowed the GAF 500 Film Simulation Recipe‘s white balance (modified just a little after a couple test shots), and was also inspired by Kodak Portra 400 and Reggie’s Portra recipes. I wasn’t sure what to expect from this, but I ended up really liking it!

So what does this Film Simulation Recipe most closely resemble? Unintentionally, I think it has some similarities to Kodak Vericolor film. What’s Kodak Vericolor? Originally introduced in 1971 as an ISO 100 professional color negative film, Kodak made two version of Vericolor: NPS (also known as S-Type) for short exposures (Daylight balanced) and NPL (also known as L-Type) for long exposures (Tungsten balanced). Just a few years later Kodak improved the emulsions and in 1974 introduced Vericolor II NPS and NPL, which was also ISO 100. In 1983 Kodak improved the emulsion once again and introduced Vericolor III, which was ISO 160 for NPS and ISO 100 for NPL; however, the NPL version was later spun off as Ektacolor Pro Gold 100T and later Portra 100T, while Vericolor III NPS was renamed Vericolor III 160. Later (sometime in the late-1980’s, although I couldn’t pinpoint a specific year), Kodak introduced a new high-ISO version called Vericolor III 400. Vericolor III 160 and 400 were replaced by Portra 160 and 400 in 1998. This recipe by chance shares a resemblance to Vericolor III 160 or perhaps Vericolor II NPS, but I think it is more warm, and perhaps more like if an 81A Color Correction Filter was used in conjunction with the film, a common technique in the film era, and maybe a CPL filter, too.

Hanging Garden Light – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5 – “Kodak Vericolor Warm”

This Kodak Vericolor Warm Film Simulation Recipe is only compatible with (as of this writing) the Fujifilm X-T5, X-H2, and X-H2S. I assume that the GFX100S and GFX50S II can also use this recipe, but that it will render slightly different—I don’t have either of those cameras to test it to know for certain. Unless Fujifilm gives X-Trans IV cameras the Nostalgic Neg. film simulation, which I doubt they will do, this recipe is only for X-Trans V cameras, and maybe the latest GFX, too; however, consider the Kodak Portra 160, Kodak Portra 400, and Reggie’s Portra as alternatives for those with X-Trans IV models. This Kodak Vericolor Warm recipe is especially well-suited for daylight photography, but can also be used during “blue hour” and overcast situations.

Film Simulation: Nostalgic Neg.
Grain Effect: Weak, Small
Color Chrome Effect: Strong
Color Chrome FX Blue: Strong
White Balance: 3000K, +8 Red & -9 Blue
Dynamic Range: DR100
Highlight: -2
Shadow: -1
Color: +2
Sharpness: -2

High ISO NR: -4
Clarity: -2
ISO: Auto, up to ISO 6400
Exposure Compensation: 0 to +2/3 (typically)

Example photographs, all camera-made JPEGs using this “Kodak Vericolor Warm” Film Simulation Recipe on my Fujifilm X-T5:

Blue Sky Bougainvillea Blossom – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Rose in the Garden – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Triple Leaves – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Water Pipe – Arlington, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Trioliet – Arlington, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Tired Old Bus – Arlington, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Four Lights – Arlington, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Tractor Pipe – Arlington, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Cattle Co – Arlington, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Industrial Water – Arlington, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Tree on the Bank – Arlington, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Fujifilm Photographer – Arlington, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Roadside Memorial – Arlington, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Feed Barn – Palo Verde, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Metal Garage – Arlington, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Rust & Lock – Arlington, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Ome – Arlington, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
No Loitering on Bridge – Arlington, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Love the Bridge – Arlington, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Goat Man – Arlington, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5

This post contains affiliate links, and if you make a purchase using my links I’ll be compensated a small amount for it.

Fujifilm X-T5 in black:  Amazon  B&H
Fujifilm X-T5 in silver:  Amazon  B&H

Find this Film Simulation Recipe and over 250 more on the Fuji X Weekly — Film Recipes App!

Help Fuji X Weekly

Nobody pays me to write the content found on fujixweekly.com. There’s a real cost to operating and maintaining this site, not to mention all the time that I pour into it. If you appreciated this article, please consider making a one-time gift contribution. Thank you!

$2.00

Superia Xtra 400 — Fujifilm X-T5 (X-Trans V) Film Simulation Recipe

Red & Green Bush – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5 – “Superia Xtra 400”

This is a simple update to the Superia Xtra 400 Film Simulation Recipe, which was originally made for X-Trans IV cameras. I discovered that a slight tweak is needed for X-Trans V models, because the new sensor renders blues just a little deeper on some film simulations, including Classic Negative. For this recipe, simply setting Color Chrome FX Blue from Strong to Weak makes it compatible with (as of this writing) the Fujifilm X-T5, X-H2, and X-H2S.

Thomas Schwab created the Superia Xtra 400 recipe by capturing a roll of actual Superia Xtra 400 film while also capturing identical exposures with his Fujifilm cameras, then, using X RAW Studio, he worked on the settings until he found a match. As you can imagine, he put a lot of time and effort into creating it! He shared with me some of his side-by-side pictures—comparing the film with his recipe—and it was tough to figure out which was which—they looked so close! Also, just recently another photographer shot a roll of Superia Xtra 400 film and used the Superia Xtra 400 recipe on his Fujifilm camera, and he shared with me the similar results he got between the two. Amazing! Of course, with film, so much depends on how it’s shot, developed, and scanned or printed, and the aesthetic of one emulsion can vary significantly.

Lemon Bowl – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5 – “Superia Xtra 400”

Fujifilm introduced Superia Xtra 400, a consumer-grade color negative film, in 1998, replacing Super G Plus 400. This film has been updated a couple of times, first in 2003 and again in 2006. It’s been widely used, thanks to its low cost and versatility. I’ve shot several rolls of this film over the years. This recipe is for Fujifilm X-Trans V cameras. Those with newer GFX models can use it, too, although it will likely render slightly differently.

Film Simulation: Classic Negative
Grain Effect: Strong, Small
Color Chrome Effect: Off
Color Chrome FX Blue: Weak
White Balance: Auto, +3 Red & -5 Blue
Dynamic Range: DR400
Highlight: 0
Shadow: -1
Color: +4
Sharpness: -1

High ISO NR: -4
Clarity: -2
ISO: Auto, up to ISO 6400
Exposure Compensation: 0 to +1 (typically)

Example photographs, all camera-made JPEGs using this “Superia Xtra 400” Film Simulation Recipe on my Fujifilm X-T5:

Forwards or Backwards – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Standing Tall – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Hiding Saguaro – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Don’t Touch – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Neighborhood Fog – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Dark Desert – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Misty Desert – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Clearing Clouds & Desert Mountain – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Ground Fall – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Wet Blossom – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Wet Rosebud – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Early Morning Lamp – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Night Blossoms – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Western Boots – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5

See also:
Fujifilm X-Trans V Film Simulation Recipes
Fujifilm X-Trans IV Film Simulation Recipes

This post contains affiliate links, and if you make a purchase using my links I’ll be compensated a small amount for it.

Fujifilm X-T5 in black:  Amazon  B&H
Fujifilm X-T5 in silver:  Amazon  B&H

Find this Film Simulation Recipe and over 250 more on the Fuji X Weekly — Film Recipes App!

Help Fuji X Weekly

Nobody pays me to write the content found on fujixweekly.com. There’s a real cost to operating and maintaining this site, not to mention all the time that I pour into it. If you appreciated this article, please consider making a one-time gift contribution. Thank you!

$2.00

Pacific Blues — Fujifilm X-T5 (X-Trans V) Film Simulation Recipe

Up or Down – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5 – “Pacific Blues”

I published the Pacific Blues Film Simulation Recipe just four months ago, and it has already become one of the most popular on Fuji X Weekly. The aesthetic is intended to emulate Lucy Laucht‘s Spirit of Summer series, particularly the Positano Blues photographs. While it is intended for a summer day at the beach, the recipe works great for many different subjects and situations. Foggy mornings? Yes! Dreary overcast? Yep! Desert landscapes? Sure! Garden flowers? Autumn leaves? Dramatic portraits? Absolutely. And lots, lots more. I’ve even seen some really interesting night photographs with it. Try this recipe for many different light scenarios and different subjects—you’re bound to love it!

Pacific Blues was made for X-Trans IV cameras, and I discovered that a slight tweak is needed for X-Trans V models, because the new sensor renders blues just a little deeper on some film simulations. For X-Trans IV recipes that use Classic Negative, Classic Chrome, Eterna, or Eterna Bleach Bypass and calls for Color Chrome FX Blue Strong, you’ll need to adjust it to Weak on X-Trans V; if it calls for Color Chrome FX Blue Weak, you need to adjust it to Off. If it calls for Color Chrome FX Blue Off, well, you just have to know it will render differently on X-Trans V and there’s nothing you can do about it. For Pacific Blues, setting it to Weak instead of Strong makes it compatible with X-Trans V.

Misty Saguaro – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5 – “Pacific Blues”

If you have an X-Pro3, X100V, X-T4, X-S10, X-E4, or X-T30 II, you’ll want to use the original Pacific Blues Film Simulation Recipe. For those with an X-T3 or X-T30, unfortunately Fujifilm never gave your camera the Classic Negative film simulation, so you cannot use Pacific Blues. For those with GFX, if it’s an older model, I think the X-Trans IV version is likely most compatible, and for newer models, this version is likely most compatible; however, I have not tested either version on any GFX model to know for sure. If you have an X-H2, X-H2S, or X-T5 (or any other X-Trans V camera that is released after publication), this is the Pacific Blues recipe that you want to use.

Film Simulation: Classic Negative
Grain Effect: Strong, Large
Color Chrome Effect: Strong
Color Chrome FX Blue: Weak
White Balance: 5800K, +1 Red & -3 Blue
Dynamic Range: DR400
Highlight: -2
Shadow: +3
Color: +4
Sharpness: -2

High ISO NR: -4
Clarity: -3
ISO: Auto, up to ISO 6400
Exposure Compensation: +2/3 to +1 (typically)

Example photographs, all camera-made JPEGs using this “Pacific Blues” Film Simulation Recipe on my Fujifilm X-T5:

Minolta Garden – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Ground Leaves – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Wet Lightbulb – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Flower in the Rain – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Wet Red Rosebud – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Wet Red Bougainvillea – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Afternoon Bougainvillea – Bcukeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Illuminated Branch – Buckeye, AZ Fujifilm X-T5
Spiderwebs – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Desert Cactus – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Misty Morning Desert – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Foggy Tree – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Neighborhood Fog – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Autumn Walkway – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Lifting Clouds Over Veiled Ridge – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5

See also:
Fujifilm X-Trans V Film Simulation Recipes
Fujifilm X-Trans IV Film Simulation Recipes

This post contains affiliate links, and if you make a purchase using my links I’ll be compensated a small amount for it.

Fujifilm X-T5 in black:  Amazon  B&H
Fujifilm X-T5 in silver:  Amazon  B&H

Find this Film Simulation Recipe and over 250 more on the Fuji X Weekly — Film Recipes App!

Help Fuji X Weekly

Nobody pays me to write the content found on fujixweekly.com. There’s a real cost to operating and maintaining this site, not to mention all the time that I pour into it. If you appreciated this article, please consider making a one-time gift contribution. Thank you!

$2.00

Nostalgic Neg. Is Basically Eterna (Sort of…)

One of the two images above is Nostalgic Neg. and the other is Eterna. Can you guess which is which?

The Nostalgic Neg. image is made using the Timeless Negative Film Simulation Recipe. The Eterna image is modified to resemble the Timeless Negative recipe.

Let’s look at another set.

I bet you’ve figured out which is which, but if you haven’t, in the train picture at top the left is Nostalgic Neg. and the right is Eterna. For the set above, the Eterna picture is left and the Nostalgic Neg. is right.

What’s different between the two? There’s quite a bit different between out-of-the-box default Nostalgic Neg. and Eterna, but Eterna can be made to look quite similar to Nostalgic Neg.—this was just a quick experiment, and with some more time and work, I could probably get it even closer. Nostalgic Neg. has a little more contrast, a lot more vibrant colors, and is slightly warmer than Eterna. With some modifications to make the two appear similar, though, it seems that the biggest difference is that Nostalgic Neg. is slightly warmer and more vibrant in the shadows, and yellow is rendered a little more deeply; otherwise, you can almost match them identically.

So what does it take to create faux Nostalgic Neg. with Eterna? I’m still fine-tuning it, but I believe that, using Eterna, reducing Highlight by -1, increasing Shadow by +1.5, reducing Dynamic Range by one or maybe two spots, adjusting White Balance Shift by +2 Red and -1 (or maybe -2) Blue, increasing Color by +6… this obviously means that Color has to be a negative value (at least -2) on Nostalgic Neg. in order to match it. This is all still a work-in-progress, but it does mean that a fairly close faux Nostalgic Neg. recipe for X-Trans IV is possible, and in the process of being created. If you feel as though you’re missing out on Nostalgic Neg.—don’t fret!—if your camera has Eterna, it can, to an extent, mimic it—stay tuned for a Film Simulation Recipe!

Timeless Negative — Fujifilm X-T5 (X-Trans V) Film Simulation Recipe

Soft Rose – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5 – “Timeless Negative”

On February 3, 2021, Fujifilm shared the very first Nostalgic Neg. Film Simulation Recipe. As part of their promotion for the GFX100S, which was the first camera to have the new Nostalgic Neg. film sim, Fujifilm Japan shared a YouTube video, and hidden within was a recipe put together by the creators of Nostalgic Neg. “Nostalgic Negative is tuned for the best allrounder settings, but if you want to tweak it to get that classic American New Color look from the ’70’s, there are some adjustments you should make.” Fujifilm recommended, when using the Nostalgic Neg. film simulation, to set everything to 0, Off, or Auto, except for three things: shift Auto White Balance to +2 Red & -3 Blue, adjust Shadow to -2, and reduce Color to -2. Additional to that, I recommend using -4 High ISO NR.

I’m not a huge fan of Nostalgic Neg. set to factory defaults. It’s not bad, but it’s not what it purports to be, which is a vintage 1970’s aesthetic inspired by Eggleston, Shore, Sternfeld, and Misrach. I think Fujifilm should have had the courage to make their recipe the default, and not worry so much that it wasn’t the “best allrounder” film simulation. Fujifilm’s suggested adjustments do improve Nostalgic Neg. and bring it closer to a ’70’s vibe, but I felt I could improve it just a little more. Of course, that’s all subjective, and you might prefer factory default Nostalgic Neg., or Fujifilm’s recommended recipe, or something different altogether—in other words, when I say that this is “improved” it’s perfectly alright to disagree with that assessment, but hopefully many of you will agree that this is indeed better—at least a little, as my adjustments to Fujifilm’s recipe are pretty subtle. This particular recipe seems to be especially versatile, and can be used for many different genres of photography and in various light conditions—it looks good most anytime of the day or night.

Evening Bougainvillea – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5 – “Timeless Negative”

This Timeless Negative Film Simulation Recipe is only compatible with (as of this writing) the Fujifilm X-T5, X-H2, and X-H2S. I assume that the GFX100S and GFX50S II can also use this recipe, but that it will render slightly different—I don’t have either of those cameras to test it to know for certain. Unless Fujifilm gives X-Trans IV cameras the Nostalgic Neg. film simulation, which I doubt they will do, this recipe is only for X-Trans V cameras, and maybe the latest GFX, too; however, Nostalgic Neg. isn’t too dissimilar from Eterna, so perhaps consider the Arizona Analog, SantaColor, Eterna V2, and Polaroid recipes as potential alternatives for those with X-Trans IV models.

Film Simulation: Nostalgic Neg.
Grain Effect: Weak, Small
Color Chrome Effect: Strong
Color Chrome FX Blue: Off
White Balance: Auto, +2 Red & -3 Blue
Dynamic Range: DR400
Highlight: +2
Shadow: -2
Color: -3
Sharpness: 0

High ISO NR: -4
Clarity: -2
ISO: Auto, up to ISO 6400
Exposure Compensation: -2/3 to +1/3 (typically)

Example photographs, all camera-made JPEGs using this “Timeless Negative” Film Simulation Recipe on my Fujifilm X-T5:

Dark Coffee – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Night Train – Williams, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Color Behind Frosted Glass – Williams, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Hot Hot Hot – Williams, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Sleigh Bell – Williams, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Round Trip Ticket – Williams, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Dusk Train – Williams, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Keep Off – Williams, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Please… Use RitchieCam – Williams, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Barricades – Williams, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
ATSF Caboose – Williams, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Route 66 Gift Shop – Williams, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Car Above, Coke Below – Williams, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
UnAmerican Experience – Williams, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Stop Route 66 – Williams, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Los Angeles, 1978 – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Looney Tune – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Backyard Trumpet Blossoms – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5

Comparison

Factory default Nostalgic Neg., except High ISO NR set to -4.
Nostalgic Neg. with Fujifilm’s suggested adjustments.
This new Timeless Negative Film Simulation Recipe.

This post contains affiliate links, and if you make a purchase using my links I’ll be compensated a small amount for it.

Fujifilm X-T5 in black:  Amazon  B&H
Fujifilm X-T5 in silver:  Amazon  B&H

Find this Film Simulation Recipe and over 250 more on the Fuji X Weekly — Film Recipes App!

Help Fuji X Weekly

Nobody pays me to write the content found on fujixweekly.com. There’s a real cost to operating and maintaining this site, not to mention all the time that I pour into it. If you appreciated this article, please consider making a one-time gift contribution. Thank you!

$2.00

Making the Fujifilm X-T5 Make a Lot of Noise — Testing High-ISO on X-Trans V

Lights from a Frosted Window – Williams, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5 – “Kodachrome 64” – ISO 6400

A lot of people have asked me if the Fujifilm X-T5, with the new 40-megapixel X-Trans V sensor and processor, is better or worse than the 26-megapixel X-Trans IV cameras when it comes to high-ISO noise. Conventional wisdom would suggest that the lower-resolution sensor would be superior. Is it? Or did Fujifilm pull a rabbit out of a magic hat and somehow make X-Trans V better at high-ISO despite more megapixels?

I’ve spent some time pixel-peeping, comparing X-Trans V to X-Trans IV. Right off the bat I can tell you that both are pretty similar to each other. You’ll have a very hard time noticing the differences without pixel-peeping, and with pixel-peeping, they’re still quite similar. Below I’ve included a massive crop from an X-Trans V camera and an X-Trans IV camera. If these crops were sections of the whole pictures printed, I don’t know how large the prints would be, but they would be very large, so keep that in mind. The picture on the left (revealed by moving the bar to the right) is X-Trans IV, and the picture on the right (revealed by moving the bar to the left) is X-Trans V. Take a look at these two images.

You likely notice that the X-Trans V image is a little more detailed with noticeably finer digital noise, while the X-Trans IV picture is a tad fuzzier with chunkier digital noise. This is a result of the higher resolution sensor of the 40mp X-Trans V camera. What might be less obvious is that there seems to be just a bit more color blotchiness in the X-Trans V image. Perhaps even less obvious, I believe the X-Trans V camera is applying a slightly heavier-handed noise reduction to the picture than X-Trans IV, despite both set to -4 High ISO NR. However, please take all of this with a grain of salt, because we’re seriously pixel-peeping here. In real world photography, both cameras are pretty darn good at high-ISO, and neither are significantly better or worse than the other, and there’s no practical variance between the two. Unless you print posters or crop deeply, you’re not going to even notice a difference—even if you did print large or crop massively, the differences are pretty minor, but I guess you can feel confident that ultra-high ISO pictures will look slightly better (for the most part) on X-Trans V than X-Trans IV. That’s the takeaway, I think: high-ISO on X-Trans V cameras are just a hair better than X-Trans IV, but not enough to make a practical difference for most people. What I will add, though, is that it’s pretty amazing that they could do this while also increasing the resolution. I do wonder, though, if Fujifilm could make—say—a 20mp X-Trans camera with significantly increased dynamic range and high-ISO performance—that’s something I would be highly interested in.

Below are a few more high-ISO examples from my Fujifilm X-T5 camera.

Polar – Williams, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5 – “GAF 500” – ISO 12800
Train Wheels – Williams, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5 – “GAF 500” – ISO 12800
Tracks – Williams, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5 – “Kodachrome 64” – ISO 6400
Polar Express Passengers – Williams, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5 – “Kodak Tri-X 400” – ISO 12800
Tree Lights – Williams, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5 – “Kodachrome 64” – ISO 6400

This post contains affiliate links, and if you make a purchase using my links I’ll be compensated a small amount for it.

Fujifilm X-T5 in black:  Amazon  B&H
Fujifilm X-T5 in silver:  Amazon  B&H

Kodachrome 64 — Fujifilm X-T5 (X-Trans V) Film Simulation Recipe

Pilot – Cordes Lakes, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5 – “Kodachrome 64”

This isn’t a new Film Simulation Recipe; it’s simply a slight modification of my Kodachrome 64 recipe for X-Trans IV cameras to make it compatible with X-Trans V models. The adjustments are pretty simple: set Color Chrome FX Blue to Off and Shadow to +0.5. Why the Color Chrome FX Blue adjustment? I discovered that with Classic Chrome (and some other film simulations), X-Trans V cameras render blue deeper. Why the change to Shadow? I stated in the X-Trans IV version, “I would set Shadow to +0.5 if I were using these settings on [a] camera [with that option].” With those two modifications, the Kodachrome 64 recipe is ready for your Fujifilm X-Trans V camera!

Kodachrome was a brand-name of color reversal film made by Kodak between 1935 and 2009. There were three eras of Kodachrome: 1935-1960, 1961-1973, and 1974-2009. Each era produced a slightly different look, and the third era is the one you’re probably most familiar with. This recipe is intended to mimic the aesthetic of the third era of Kodachrome, specifically the ISO 64 emulsion.

Arizona Bougainvillea – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5 – “Kodachrome 64”

This Kodachrome 64 Film Simulation Recipe is intended for Fujifilm X-Trans V models, which (as of this writing) include the X-H2, X-H2S, and X-T5 cameras. It’s compatible with newer GFX models too, but will likely render slightly different on those cameras. Those with an X-Pro3, X100V, X-T4, X-S10, X-E4, or X-T30 II, try the Kodachrome 64 recipe for those models (click here). Those with an X-T3 or X-T30, try the Kodachrome 64 recipe for those cameras (click here). For those with an X-Trans II model, there’s a Kodachrome 64 recipe for you, too (click here).

Film Simulation: Classic Chrome
Grain Effect: Weak, Small
Color Chrome Effect: Strong
Color Chrome FX Blue: Off
White Balance: Daylight, +2 Red & -5 Blue
Dynamic Range: DR200
Highlight: 0
Shadow: +0.5
Color: +2
Sharpness: +1

High ISO NR: -4
Clarity: +3
ISO: Auto, up to ISO 6400
Exposure Compensation: 0 to +2/3 (typically)

Example photographs, all camera-made JPEGs using this “Kodachrome 64” Film Simulation Recipe on my Fujifilm X-T5:

Palm Tree Closeup – Palo Verde, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Abandoned Mobile Home – Arlington, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Store & Bar – Hassayampi, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Narrow Bridge – Arlington, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Concrete Railroad Ties & Steel Bridge – Arlington, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Gillespie Dam – Arlington, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Gila River Reeds – Arlington, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Flag, Bell, Cross – Arlington, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Princess Garden – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Secret Garden – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Blossomed Garden Rose – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Farm Truck – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Wall Shadow & Empty Pot – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Dusk Lamp – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Girl on Swing – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Desert Sunset – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5

This post contains affiliate links, and if you make a purchase using my links I’ll be compensated a small amount for it.

Fujifilm X-T5 in black:  Amazon  B&H
Fujifilm X-T5 in silver:  Amazon  B&H

Find this Film Simulation Recipe and over 250 more on the Fuji X Weekly — Film Recipes App!

Help Fuji X Weekly

Nobody pays me to write the content found on fujixweekly.com. There’s a real cost to operating and maintaining this site, not to mention all the time that I pour into it. If you appreciated this article, please consider making a one-time gift contribution. Thank you!

$2.00

1970’s Summer — Fujifilm X-T5 (X-Trans V) Film Simulation Recipe

Short Train – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5 – “1970’s Summer”

This Film Simulation Recipe is the aesthetic that I hoped to achieve with the new Nostalgic Neg. film simulation. What does it resemble? It very much has a nostalgic Kodak “memory color” (as Fujifilm likes to say) that is reminiscent of old color photographs from the 1970’s. You might notice some similarities to William Eggleston’s Election Eve and 2 1/4 series and some of his other work from the late-1960’s through the mid-1970’s—not every picture, but certainly several. You might spot some similarities between this look and some of Stephen Shore’s photographs from the early-to-mid 1970’s. I think there are some similarities to a few of Joel Sternfeld’s American Prospects pictures. There’s a noticeable likeness to several of Richard Misrach’s desert photographs. In other words, this recipe produces a distinct 1970’s American New Color aesthetic.

It shouldn’t surprise you that the Nostalgic Neg. film simulation produces this look because Fujifilm stated that the American New Color movement was the inspiration. Specifically, they looked at the photographs of Eggleston, Shore, Sternfeld, and Misrach, but out-of-the-box default Nostalgic Neg. doesn’t seem to resemble their work all that closely. After examining many of their photographs, and identifying a few from each with a similar aesthetic, I set out to create a Film Simulation Recipe that better mimics some of their pictures. I feel like a got pretty close, and this recipe produces a distinct 1970’s vibe—especially the warmth of summertime—and so I named it 1970’s Summer. This recipe works best in sunny daylight, and is excellent for midday photography.

Going Out of Business – Prescott, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5 – “1970’s Summer”

This 1970’s Summer Film Simulation Recipe is only compatible with (as of this writing) the Fujifilm X-T5, X-H2, and X-H2S. I assume that the GFX100S and GFX50S II can also use this recipe, but that it will render slightly different—I don’t have either of those cameras to test it to know for certain. Unless Fujifilm gives X-Trans IV cameras the Nostalgic Neg. film simulation, which I doubt they will do, this recipe is only for X-Trans V cameras, and maybe the latest GFX, too; however, if you are looking for something somewhat similar, try my Vintage Color recipe, or even Kodak Portra 400 Warm.

Film Simulation: Nostalgic Neg.
Grain Effect: Strong, Large
Color Chrome Effect: Strong
Color Chrome FX Blue: Strong
White Balance: 6500K, -1 Red & -4 Blue
Dynamic Range: DR400
Highlight: -2
Shadow: -0.5
Color: -2
Sharpness: -2

High ISO NR: -4
Clarity: -3
ISO: Auto, up to ISO 6400
Exposure Compensation: +1/3 to +1 (typically)

Example photographs, all camera-made JPEGs using this “1970’s Summer” Film Simulation Recipe on my Fujifilm X-T5:

Red & Gold – Prescott, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Adventure’s First Stop – Prescott Valley, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Hyundai – Prescott, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Cat Clock – Prescott, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Propane – Hassayampa, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Security Light – Palo Verde, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Hay, Detour – – Arlington, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Gila River Bridge – Arlington, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
13 FT 6 IN – Arlington, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Around the Bend – Arlington, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Gillespie Dam Bridge – Arlington, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Desert Dam – Arlington, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Julio Suarez – Arlington, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Dam Reflection – Arlington, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Broken Dam – Arlington, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Lakeview – Lynx Lake, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Attention Anglers – Lynx Lake, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Can’t See the Forest – Lynx Lake, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Rural Tree – Arlington, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Green Field – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Abandoned Rural Home – Palo Verde, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
More Than Double Wide – Arlington, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Hole in the Wall – Arlington, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
PRA – Arlington, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Abandoned & Leaning – Arlington, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Desert Basketball – Arlington, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Double Cross – Arlington, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Palm Trunk & Blocks – Arlington, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Fake Fall Flowers – Arlington, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Arlington Baptist Church – Arlington, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Gate 8 – Arlington, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Flowing Water & Broken Footbridge – Arlington, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Irrigation Mist – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5

This post contains affiliate links, and if you make a purchase using my links I’ll be compensated a small amount for it.

Fujifilm X-T5 in black:  Amazon  B&H
Fujifilm X-T5 in silver:  Amazon  B&H

Find this Film Simulation Recipe and over 250 more on the Fuji X Weekly — Film Recipes App!

Help Fuji X Weekly

Nobody pays me to write the content found on fujixweekly.com. There’s a real cost to operating and maintaining this site, not to mention all the time that I pour into it. If you appreciated this article, please consider making a one-time gift contribution. Thank you!

$2.00