Times Have Changed

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Airport Lobby – McKinney, TX – I captured this picture about 20 years ago.

I was thinking about how things have changed significantly in photography over the last 20 years. I have been doing this picture-taking thing for 20 years, beginning when I enrolled in Photography 101 in college. I remember that it started because, in the summer of 1998, I took a trip to New England, and brought along my dad’s Sears 35mm SLR and a bunch of film. I didn’t really know how to use the camera, but how hard could it be? When I returned and had the film developed, the pictures were extraordinarily awful! There were only a few frames that were correctly exposed, and the ones that were exposed alright had other issues, such as improper focus or were poorly composed. My desire to learn photography came out of the frustration of not understanding how to capture a descent picture. That fall I enrolled in college and signed up for a photography class, and soon fell in love with the art of creating pictures.

While it’s easy to say that the biggest change in photography over the last 20 years is technology, I don’t know if that’s completely true. Gear has changed a whole lot. When I started, it was all about film and darkrooms. Now it’s about sensors and software. However, there’s some carryover between the two methods. Technology has made things easier for the most part. I think it’s possible nowadays to throw a camera into auto and get good results, and one-click software has made editing much simpler. The prerequisite knowledge of how stuff works and why is no longer required, although it can still be very useful. I guess what I’m trying to say is that the learning curve for digital isn’t necessarily less–it’s definitely different–but there are technologies that will allow you to appear to know what you’re doing even when you don’t. Because the camera and software will take care of many things for you, you don’t have to know what you’re doing to capture a decent picture. Today’s cellphone cameras are more capable than many DSLRs were 15 years ago, and are one-click wonders. Advancements in photography technology has opened up photographic possibilities that weren’t conceivable before. It’s incredible what the modern camera can do! Another aspect of all this gear change is that cameras have become throw-away. People often “upgrade” their gear every year or two, and many don’t keep a camera more than five years. A ten year old camera is ancient. It used to be, in the old film days, that people kept their gear much, much longer, and typically only replaced their camera if it broke.

Another big change is the number of photos being created. Over a trillion pictures are captured worldwide each year now. When I started out the number was around 85 billion, so that’s a pretty big increase–about 12 times, in fact! Not only are there a ton more pictures being captured, but the ability to share those pictures with an audience worldwide is much, much easier (that’s a gross understatement). Everyday, each of us are bombarded with pictures. It’s become overwhelming! It’s to the point that it is difficult to get noticed among all the noise. You have to be extraordinarily great, do something especially unusual, have great marketing skills, or have amazingly good luck to get noticed. Or cheat. A lot of people buy their way to success nowadays, using questionable or downright unethical methods. Despite the fact that it’s more difficult to get noticed or create an iconic image, the number of great pictures being captured now is significantly higher than it used to be. Since there’s a heck-of-a-lot of quality pictures available, it’s a great time to be a photography consumer.

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Clearing Rainstorm – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 – I captured this yesterday.

While way more photographs are being captured now than ever before, the number of pictures being printed is way down. Most photographs are only seen digitally via a computer monitor or cellphone or tablet. The physical print is significantly less common than 20 years ago. While the number of digital pictures is high, the number of physical pictures is low. However, with print-on-demand services, it’s very easy to obtain a print of almost any subject, if you should ever need a photographic print of something.

I bring this up because, in my opinion, the biggest change in photography over the last twenty years is the photographic market. It’s much harder to make good money as a photographer now than it used to be. Everybody with a camera–and everyone has a camera–is a photographer. It’s incredibly easy to start a photography business nowadays. Buy a camera, which will take decent pictures in full-auto mode, take a few snaps of family and friends, create a (free) website to look professional, then post a portrait or wedding photography business ad on Facebook Marketplace. I have seen a lot of people do this. And they make money, but not a lot. The photographers who are actually talented, which is a minority group, can do well for themselves, but many earn much less than they should for their efforts. The stock photo business is pretty much dead, replaced by micro-stock, which sells images for cheap and gives photographers peanuts at best for their work. They get away with this because a huge number of “photographers” willingly participate, trying to earn something from their pictures. The photojournalist has been replaced by onlookers with cellphones. The travel photographer has been replaced by the “influencer” who probably cheated his or her way to success. A lot of photography jobs that were good jobs have been replaced by things that don’t pay much, if anything at all.

I’m not saying this because I’m bitter. I’m just pointing out how the photographic industry in many genres has changed a whole bunch, which has made it more difficult for the photographer to make a decent living. There are still plenty of people who are making good money at photography. There are new opportunities that didn’t exist before. If you really want to become a successful photographer, I believe that if you keep trying really hard and are determined to do so, you’ll likely see your dream fulfilled. It won’t be easy and won’t likely happen overnight, but it can certainly happen. If you are doing photography for the love of the art and have no interest in the financial side of picture making, you’re doing it at an extraordinarily great time.

It’s an interesting era in photography. Gear has changed, becoming more impressive with each year. People across the globe are capturing pictures at an unprecedented rate. If you like viewing photographs or creating photographs, there’s never been a better time. If you want to earn money from making pictures, competition is extremely fierce, and you might find it as tough as it’s ever been to be successful. There are opportunities, so it’s far from impossible, but making good money from photography is not an easy task. It never was easy, but it’s more true today. You have to discover your niche and market the heck out of it. Those who don’t need to earn money from photography, but can create simply because they love to, are the lucky ones. They have it good. In fact, they’ve never had it better.

Steak, Sushi & Shutter

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Japanese Lamps – South Ogden, UT – Fujifilm X-T20

I try to carry a camera with me wherever I go because you just never know when a photographic opportunity might present itself. One recent example of this was dinner. Specifically, my family and I ate out at a local Japanese restaurant called Kobe Teppanyaki, which was a fun and delicious place. Because I had a camera with me, I was able to capture a few photographs of the experience, a couple of which turned out decently enough.

The camera I used was a Fujifilm X-T20. I sometimes like to use vintage lenses, and I had an Asahi Auto-Takumar 55mm f/2.2 attached to the front of the camera. This is one of my all-time favorite lenses, as it produces lovely images. The dark environment proved to be challenging. It’s a restaurant, and people move pretty quick to get their work done. The lens is a manual focus lens, and nailing focus with a large aperture is not an easy task. The added challenge is that I had my one-year-old daughter in my lap, so I was one-handed photographer much of the time. Still, I managed to capture a few pictures that I’m happy with.

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Japanese Cook – South Ogden, UT – Fujifilm X-T20

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Sushi Makers – South Ogden, UT – Fujifilm X-T20

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Itamae – South Ogden, UT – Fujifilm X-T20

Weekly Photo Project, Week 29

This week wasn’t quite as productive as the previous week, but it was still overall a decent week of photography for me. I didn’t create any spectacular pictures, and for the most part these images will be quickly forgotten. Five of the seven pictures are of snowy mountains, which are seen from my backyard. That’s a great aspect of living in Utah. There are wonderful views all around, and I feel fortunate that I can frequently photograph the local beauty.

Sunday, February 17, 2019

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Mountain White & Cold – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T20

Monday, February 18, 2019

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Cloud Over The White Mountain – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T20

Tuesday, February 19, 2019

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Wide Load Chairs Out In The Cold – Uintah, UT – Fujifilm X-T20

Wednesday, February 20, 2019

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Snow Falling On The Red Shed – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T20

Thursday, February 21, 2019

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Crested Cloud Over The Peak – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T20

Friday, February 22, 2019

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Monochrome Mountain White – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T20

Saturday, February 23, 2019

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Evening Light On The Frosted Mountain – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T20

Week 28  Week 30

Antelope Island State Park In B&W

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Brush Strokes Over The Great Salt Lake – Antelope Island SP, UT – Fujifilm X-T20

The Great Salt Lake is the largest natural lake west of the Mississippi River, the largest salt water lake in the western hemisphere and the 33rd largest lake in the world. It’s massive! It can seem almost ocean-like, or perhaps more like a large ocean bay, but it is located far from any ocean. One difference between the Great Salt Lake and an ocean is that the lake is much saltier, and brine shrimp are the only thing alive in it. It is one of Utah’s natural wonders!

The largest island in the Great Salt Lake is Antelope Island, which is 15 miles long and five miles wide. The highest point, Frary Peak, is 6,594′, and is often snow-capped in the winter. It’s accessible by road via a causeway. Antelope Island is managed by the Utah State Park system.

Kit Carson and John C. Fremont, who visited Antelope Island in 1845, gave it its name after hunting pronghorn antelope on the island. Daddy Stump and Fielding Garr would build homes on Antelope Island over the next few years. This is a place that people have been coming to for a long time. In fact, there is evidence that native people have spent time on the island since at least the time of Christ.

Antelope Island seems like a world away from the Salt Lake City metro area, even though it is located very close to the city. It looks remote, and it must have been very remote before the road was built and the city grew. Interestingly enough, the oldest non-Native American structure in Utah is located on the island: an adobe ranch house built in 1848. The Fielding Garr Ranch was a working ranch from 1848 to 1981, and now the old ranch is open to the public for self-guided tours.

Wildlife abounds on Antelope Island, including buffalo, mule deer, pronghorn antelope, big horn sheep and many other animals. At one time the bison herd on Antelope Island was the largest in America. There are a huge variety of birds that migrate across the area.

The water is often calm and the reflections can be incredible. There are sandy beaches. There are trails that curve across the rugged landscape. There is a unique beauty to Antelope Island that draws me back. It’s one of my favorite places to photograph. But it’s also disgusting! There’s a certain “rotten egg” smell that can be found near the shores. There are tons and tons of bugs, including biting no-see-ums, brine flies (that cover the shore like a thick cloud), mosquitoes, tons of spiders (venomous and non-venomous), among other things. It’s pretty common to see dead birds. There’s plenty to love and hate about this place. I try to look beyond the gross to see the beauty.

Something interesting that I’ve discovered since moving to the Salt Lake City area almost three years ago is that most people who grew up in Utah don’t visit Antelope Island. Maybe they went on a school field trip as a kid, but they haven’t been back since. The majority of people you find on the island are from out-of-town. The locals who do visit are often those that moved to the area from someplace else. It’s too bad for those who don’t make the short trip to the island, because they’re really missing out!

Antelope Island is incredibly beautiful and tranquil. It is indeed odd, and one has to purposefully look beyond the negative aspects of the place to truly appreciate it. I feel like it is a secret treasure that is easily overlooked, and I feel honored to have found it and photographed it.

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Frary Fence – Antelope Island SP, UT – Fujifilm X-T20

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Coming Storm – Antelope Island SP, UT – Fujifilm X-A3

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Island Beach View – Antelope Island SP, UT – Fujifilm X100F

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White Rock Bay Vista – Antelope Island SP, UT – Fujifilm X-A3

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Bush In The Crag – Antelope Island SP, UT – Fujifilm X-A3

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Clouds Over The Great Salt Lake – Antelope Island SP, UT – Fujifilm X100F

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White Rock Bay – Antelope Island SP, UT – Fujifilm X100F

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Land & Lake Layers – Antelope Island SP, UT – Fujifilm X-T20

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Promontory Peninsula – Antelope Island SP, UT – Fujifilm X-T20

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Sunlight Falling On The Salty Water – Antelope Island SP, UT – Fujifilm X-T20

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Light Streaming Over Antelope Island – Antelope Island SP, UT – Fujifilm X-E1

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Wasatch Mountains From The Causeway – Antelope Island SP, UT – Fujifilm X-E1

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Frary Peak Reflected – Antelope Island SP, UT – Fujifilm X-E1

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Deer Statue – Antelope Island SP, UT – Fujifilm X-E1

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Old Salty Stump – Antelope Island SP, UT – Fujifilm X-E1

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Frozen Stump – Antelope Island SP, UT – Fujifilm X-T20

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Ice, Lake & Mountains – Antelope Island SP, UT – Fujifilm X-E1

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Cracked Earth – Antelope Island SP, UT – Fujifilm X100F

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Buffalo Snow – Antelope Island SP, UT – Fujifilm X-T20

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Bison In The Road – Antelope Island SP, UT – Fujifilm X-E1

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Area Closed For Bison – Antelope Island SP, UT – Fujifilm X-E1

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One Buffalo – Antelope Island SP, UT – Fujifilm X-A3

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Pulling Hard – Antelope Island SP, UT – Fujifilm X100F

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Park Patrol – Antelope Island SP, UT – Fujifilm X100F

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On The Fence – Antelope Island SP, UT – Fujifilm X100F

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State Park Workday – Antelope Island SP, UT – Fujifilm X100F

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Waiting Game – Antelope Island SP, UT – Fujifilm X100F

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Leather Gloves – Antelope Island SP, UT – Fujifilm X100F

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Circle Hashtag – Antelope Island SP, UT – Fujifilm X-E1

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Fielding Garr Ranch Fence – Antelope Island SP, UT – Fujifilm X-E1

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Empty Marina – Antelope Island SP, UT – Fujifilm X-E1

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Boys Playing In The Great Salt Lake – Antelope Island SP, UT – Fujifilm X-E1

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Pollution – Antelope Island SP, UT – Fujifilm X-T20

Weekly Photo Project, Week 28

Another week in the books! This was a particularly photographically productive week. Not every day was especially productive, obviously, but on several days I created a number of good images. You’ve seen some of them already, and others will be shared in the coming weeks in various articles.

Sunday, February 10, 2019

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Colorful Chalk – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T20

Monday, February 11, 2019

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Evening Mountain Snow – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T20

Tuesday, February 12, 2019

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Coca-Cola Cans – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T20

Wednesday, February 13, 2019

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Morning Egg Bowl – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T20

Thursday, February 14, 2019

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Classic Camera – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T20

Friday, February 15, 2019

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Dramatic Clouds Over The Winter Mountain – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T20

Saturday, February 16, 2019

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Brush Strokes Over The Great Salt Lake – Antelope Island SP, UT – Fujifilm X-T20

Week 27  Week 29

What Separates Great Photographers From Good Photographers?

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Brush Strokes Over The Great Salt Lake – Antelope Island SP, UT – Fujifilm X-T20

The question of what separates great photographers from good photographers is something that I’ve been turning in my mind for several weeks. I don’t know if I found any profound answers, but I did come up with several generalizations that I think give some clarity to the question. I know that these won’t be true all of the time, but there is truth in these statements.

  • Great photographers show fewer photographs. Sometimes perception is reality.
  • Great photographers are better at promoting their work. Branding cannot be understated.
  • Great photographers return to the same location, subject or concept over and over and over again, trying to create a better picture.
  • Great photographers worry about emotion and storytelling, not rules.
  • Great photographers have boat loads of patience to get a particular picture.
  • Great photographers create their own luck by placing themselves in the right places at the right times.
  • Great photographers do a lot of planning. Research is critical, especially if it’s an unfamiliar place or subject.
  • Great photographers constantly work at their craft. Practice, practice, practice. Try new techniques and perfect the old ones. Know their gear intimately.
  • Great photographers have a meaning to their madness. They are very deliberate.

I don’t want to go too deeply into what defines a “great” photographer. I would say that a great photographer is one who creates amazing pictures and is successful, whatever that means. My definition (which, by the way, is not something that I hold strictly onto) and your definition might be completely different. That’s perfectly alright. I think, no matter what the definition is, the generalized thoughts above will still apply, at least in part. If you want to go from being a good photographer to being a great photographer, these are things that you should strongly consider how to apply to yourself and your own photography. I’m trying to figure out how to incorporate those concepts into my own photographic ventures.

Weekly Photo Project, Week 27

After a short intermission, I’m back on track with my photo-a-day challenge, where I’m trying to capture at least one picture each day for a year, taking things one week at a time. I’ve shifted my week slightly, going Sunday through Saturday instead of Monday through Sunday. In 2018, starting out on Monday made sense with the flow of my week, but things have changed slightly this year, and so starting out on Sunday works well with how things are now.

You might notice that I have two different themes this week: monochrome and location. All of these pictures are black-and-white and they were all captured at or very near my home. You don’t have to go far to find interesting things to photograph. Sometimes you don’t even need to leave your home. Look for what’s right around you, wherever you happen to be. I chose monochrome simply because I had captured a number of black-and-white pictures this week, and decided to keep things consistent. I hope you enjoy!

Sunday, February 3, 2019

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Cold Mountain Monochrome – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T20

Monday, February 4, 2019

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Snow Falling On The Ridge – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T20

Tuesday, February 5, 2019

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Wood Gate – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm XF10

Wednesday, February 6, 2019

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Pentax 35mm Film Camera – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm XF10

Thursday, February 7, 2019

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February Storm Over Wasatch Mountains – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T20

Friday, February 8, 2019

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Illuminated Decor – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm XF10

Saturday, February 9, 2019

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Winter Ridges – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T20

Week 26  Week 28

Photoessay: Cold Winter Daze

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Melting Ice – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T20

When I moved to Utah from California, one thing that I wasn’t prepared for was winter. Before California I lived in Arizona, so having temperatures below freezing and white fluffy stuff on the ground was something that I didn’t have much experience with. This is my third winter in Utah, and while I’m now a little acclimated, winter is not my favorite season whatsoever. In fact, I dread winter.

Even though I’d rather be warm and have long hours of seemingly endless sunshine with green fields and blossoming flowers, there is a certain beauty to the drabness of the cold season. Winter brings clouds, and an approaching or clearing storm can be incredibly dramatic. Those clouds blanket the entire landscape in pure white that sparkles like glitter when the sun finally shows. Winter is a transformation season, and while the days are short and the air is frigid, it’s a worthwhile time to capture pictures. This is the time to keep an especially watchful photographic eye on things, because the opportunities for interesting photographs abound, but they are fleeting, so one must be quick and ready.

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Frozen Lake – Bountiful, UT – Fujifilm XF10

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Winter Pond & Tree Trunk – Bountiful, UT – Fujifilm XF10

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Winter Wasatch Homes – Layton, UT – Fujifilm X-T20

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Snow On Red – Spanish Fork Canyon, UT – Fujifilm X-T20

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Cold Horse Coat – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm XF10

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Equestrian Winter – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T20

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Red Tractor In Snow – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T20

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Snow Removal – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T20

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Too Cold For Basketball – South Weber, Ut – Fujifilm X-T20

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Sled In The Yard – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm XF10

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Cold Picnic – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T20

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White Landscaping – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm XF10

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Winter Mountain Ridge – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T20

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Snow Blowing On The Ridge – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T20

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Cold White Mountain – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T20

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Backyard Snowfall – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T20

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Winter Forest – Layton, UT – Fujifilm X-T20

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Winter Stream – Layton, UT – Fujifilm X-T20

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Cold Hillside – Layton, UT – Fujifilm X-T20

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Buddhist Instagram – Layton, UT – Fujifilm X-T20

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Ice Cold Branches – Layton, UT – Fujifilm X-T20

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Evening Cold – Layton, UT – Fujifilm X-T20

Weekly Photo Project – Intermission

After completing half a year without missing a single day, I purposefully took a break from this photo-a-day project. At first I was a little anxious, because I felt as though I was selling myself short. I mean, I made it halfway, why can’t I just pull up the bootstraps and persevere? However, the break was refreshing, and perhaps necessary, and those initial feelings soon subsided. I was able to reflect back on the 26 weeks that had passed. I now feel ready to tackle the second half. I said this before, if I were to do this again, I would schedule periodic breaks, maybe once a quarter. In a way it goes against the idea of capturing a picture each day, but, at the same time, if one needs a mental refresher, one should take a mental refresher! I definitely needed one, and I’m happy that I took it.

Below you’ll find one photograph that I’ve selected from each week of this project. What I found interesting as I looked back at each post is that for some of the weeks there were several good pictures to choose from, and other weeks there were seven mediocre-at-best pictures posted. Those weeks that had several good photographs in them, I remembered that there were other good images that I could have also included, but I had to pick just one for each day. Good photography doesn’t happen daily, as it takes the right subject at the right time in the right light and with the right vision. Doing a project like this increases the odds, but it’s still not going to happen every time I have a camera in my hands. But when the right conditions occur, it’s usually not just one good frame that I come away with, but several. It’s important to take advantage of those moments when everything comes together, and really squeeze the best pictures possible out of them.

Week 1

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Truck Stop – Bowie, TX – Fujifilm X100F

Week 2

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Grain Hoppers – Westlake, TX – Fujifilm X100F

Week 3

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Window Seat – Pawhuska, OK – Fujifilm X-Pro2

Week 4

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Halfway Done – Layton, UT – Fujifilm X100F

Week 5

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Beams Over The Mountain – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-Pro2

Week 6

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California Dreamin’ – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-Pro2

Week 7

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Wasatch Ridge Autumn – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-Pro2

Week 8

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Flag On A Pole – Layton, UT – Fujifilm XF10

Week 9

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Cloudy Day Train – Clearfield, UT – Fujifilm XF10

Week 10

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Ghosts of the Past – Ogden, UT – Fujifilm XF10

Week 11

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Clouds Around The Timpanogos – Heber City, UT – Fujifilm X-Pro2

Week 12

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Wasatch Orange – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-Pro2

Week 13

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Capital Lamp – SLC, UT – Fujifilm XF10

Week 14

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Joy Rider – SLC, UT – Fujifilm X100F

Week 15

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Empty Church Seats – Layton, UT – Fujifilm XF10

Week 16

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Peculiar Waters – Antelope Island SP, UT – Fujifilm XF10

Week 17

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Waiting Alone For The Train – SLC, UT – Fujifilm XF10

Week 18

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The Little Engineer – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T20

Week 19

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Amanda & I at the Great Salt Lake – Antelope Island SP, UT – Fujifilm X100F

Week 20

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Fake Flowers In The Window – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm XF10

Week 21

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Ogden Airport – Ogden, UT – Fujifilm XF10

Week 22

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Wasatch Mountain Moon Rise – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T20

Week 23

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Great Salt Lake Evening – Layton, UT – Fujifilm X-T20

Week 24

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Frary Fence – Antelope Island SP, UT – Fujifilm X-T20

Week 25

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Morning Mountain White – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T20

Week 26

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Winter Horse – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm XF10

 

Welcome to Fujixweekly.com!

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On August 21, 2017, I began the Fuji X Weekly blog with the photograph above and several paragraphs explaining why I started this thing and what I envisioned it becoming. Several twists and turns have taken place along the way. What this blog is today isn’t exactly what I originally had in mind. It has evolved in ways that I didn’t anticipate back in late-summer of 2017, as well as some ways that I thought could potentially happen. That’s alright, because it’s much greater than I thought possible! I’m not bragging. It’s because of you all that Fuji X Weekly is what it is. Like you, I’m just going along for the ride, and we’ll find out together where things go over the coming months and years.

I wanted to announce two changes that are big, yet may not be completely obvious at first. These changes are the direct result of you guys and gals out there that have ordered products using my Amazon links. I recently received the first payment, and it was just enough money to accomplish what I hoped to accomplish. Like I promised, the purpose of the links is to improve the Fuji X Weekly experience. It’s thanks to you that these changes happened. Thank you!

The first thing you might notice is that this blog is officially fujixweekly.com. Yea! You don’t have to use “.wordpress” anymore. If you’ve linked to this blog, those links will still work even though “.wordpress” is in the address. However, from here on out, the address is shorter and simpler, and hopefully that makes things easier for you when you wish to visit or share. Also, I’m hoping that it gives this website a little more credibility, as “.wordpress” has an amateur air to it.

The second big change is that the WordPress advertisements should be gone forever. Because I was using their free service, WordPress was plastering advertisements all over this blog. It was annoying! I didn’t benefit from those ads except that I didn’t have to pay WordPress any money for this website. Now that I’m not using the free service, there are no more advertisements. This should make the blog look more clean and less cluttered, and hopefully you won’t feel hounded for money. I will still post Amazon links here and there, but I hope that you find that to be a helpful service and not an annoying ploy.

Anyway, welcome to fujixweekly.com! Expect more positive changes to come, and those changes are all thanks to you!