Fujifilm X-T1 Short-Term Project, Update 3

Desert Sunset – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T1 – “Ektachrome 100SW” – Day 14

Part 1 Part 2

This is the third and final installment of this series. As a reminder, I photographed only with my Fujifilm X-T1 from the announcement day of the Fujifilm X-T5 (November 2) until the release date (November 17). Why? First, even though the Fujifilm X-T1 is eight-years-old (and approaching nine), it is still such a great little camera. It took three years for Fujifilm to bring this model to the market because they wanted to get it right, and it was one of their most important cameras ever released. The Fujifilm X-T1 was one of the first, if not the first, Fujifilm cameras that widely appealed to professional photographers. It was Fujifilm’s most successful model at the time—outselling all the previous cameras—and launched the extremely successful X-T line. The X-T5 is the latest iteration. This project was intended to give me a better understanding of how the X-T5 has evolved from the original model. It also allowed me to demonstrate that previous models, including the original X-T1, are still really good.

I wanted to try some things with the X-T1 that I wasn’t able to do in the first 10 days, including wildlife and low-light. I had been sick, which made this a much more difficult project than I had anticipated, so I tried to make the most of the last five days. In the end I didn’t do everything that I wanted, but I was able to do a lot, and I’m happy with how it all came together.

I was really impressed with the Fujifilm X-T1—even in 2022, it is an excellent body that’s quite capable of capturing beautiful photographs. I thoroughly enjoyed shooting with it, more than I thought I would. The only shortcoming that I encountered was in dim light, the autofocus tended to hunt. This didn’t prevent me from getting the pictures, but it did make me work a little harder to do it. Otherwise, the camera performed exceptionally well in a whole host of situations. If you have one, it’s definitely a keeper. If you are in the market for a used Fujifilm model, this is one that I have no problems recommending. Is the X-T5 better? Sure. Is the X-T4 better? Yeah. Is the X-T3 better? Affirmative. Is the X-T2 better? I’m certain that it is. But, the X-T1 is still really good, and the newer iterations aren’t miles ahead—each new model is marginally better than the previous, which means that the latest is only four small steps ahead; ahead indeed, but the ol’ X-T1 holds its own surprisingly well.

I hope that you enjoyed this short-term project as much as I did!

Day 11

Curling Leaves – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T1 – “Classic Kodak Chrome
Leaf Abstract – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T1 – “Color Negative Film
Monochromatic Leaf – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T1 – “Monochrome
Hanging Leaves – Buckeye. AZ – Fujifilm X-T1 – “Classic Kodak Chrome”

Day 12

Ka-Chow – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T1 – “Classic Kodak Chrome”
American 4×4 – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T1 – “Classic Kodak Chrome”
Bougainvillea Bunch – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T1 – “Classic Kodak Chrome”
Bougainvillea Palm – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T1 – “Classic Kodak Chrome”
Work Ahead – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T1 – “Classic Kodak Chrome”
Fallen Flags – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T1 – “Classic Kodak Chrome”
Fallen Signs – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T1 – “Classic Kodak Chrome”
It Better Not Flood – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T1 – “Classic Kodak Chrome”
Big Yellow Cat – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T1 – “Classic Kodak Chrome”
168 – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T1 – “Classic Kodak Chrome”
Golden Saguaro – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T1 – “Classic Kodak Chrome”
Bird Home – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T1 – “Classic Kodak Chrome”

Day 13

Evening Light Saguaro – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T1 – “Classic Kodak Chrome”
Desert Peak – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T1 – “Classic Kodak Chrome”
Bougainvillea Over Wall – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T1 – “Classic Kodak Chrome”
Twin Bulbs Hanging – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T1 – “Classic Kodak Chrome”
Pigeon Tiles – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T1 – “Classic Kodak Chrome”
Bird in a Tree – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T1 – “Kodak Portra 160”
Little Birdie – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T1 – “Kodak Portra 160”
Curious Birdie Hiding – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T1 – “Kodak Portra 160”
Vulture – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T1 – “Kodak Portra 160”

Day 14

Sunset Over a Desert Ridge – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T1 – “Ektachrome 100SW”
Purple Mountains – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T1 – “Classic Kodak Chrome”
Last Light on Desert Mountain – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T1 – “Classic Kodak Chrome”
It’s a Bird, It’s a Plane, It’s a… B2 – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T1 – “Classic Kodak Chrome”
Evening Light on a Desert Hill – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T1 – “Classic Kodak Chrome”
Deflating Rainbow – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T1 – “Classic Kodak Chrome”
Deflating Balloon – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T1 – “Classic Kodak Chrome”
Perched at the Top – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T1 – Buckeye, AZ – “Classic Kodak Chrome”
Waiting to Hum – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T1 – Classic Kodak Chrome”

Day 15

Carts – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T1 – “Monochrome”
Red, White, Blue – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T1 – “Classic Kodak Chrome”
CVS – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T1 – “Classic Kodak Chrome”
Lightning Rod Bird – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T1 – “Classic Kodak Chrome”
November Palm – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T1 – “Classic Kodak Chrome”
Waiting is the Hardest Part – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T1 – “Kodak Portra 160”
Urban Bloom – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T1 – “Kodak Portra 160”
Blossoms in the City – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T1 – “Classic Kodak Chrome”

Day 16

Bolsey – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T1 – “Classic Kodak Chrome”
X100V – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T1 – “Classic Kodak Chrome”
Piano Hands 1 – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T1 – “Monochrome”
Piano Hands 2 – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T1 – “Monochrome”
Singing – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T1 – “Monochrome”

Fujifilm X-T1 Short-Term Project, Update 2

Blossomed Pink Rose – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T1 – “Classic Kodak Chrome” – Day 9

Part 1 Part 3

I had big plans for this project for these days, but life had other plans. Specifically, Covid. I know what you’re thinking: didn’t you just have the flu a few weeks ago? Yes, I did. Now I have Covid. Well, I’m almost recovered now, but I was very sick during the days that I captured these pictures, and I was limited to what I could capture in and around the house. Most of these photographs were taken in the backyard.

If you’re not sure what this short-term project is, the concept is simple: I’m photographing only with my Fujifilm X-T1 from the announcement day of the Fujifilm X-T5 (November 2) until the release date (November 17). Why? First, even though the Fujifilm X-T1 is eight-years-old (and approaching nine), it is still such a great little camera. It took three years for Fujifilm to bring this model to the market because they wanted to get it right, and it was one of their most important cameras ever released. The Fujifilm X-T1 was one of the first, if not the first, Fujifilm cameras that widely appealed to professional photographers. It was Fujifilm’s most successful model at the time—outselling all the previous cameras—and launched the extremely successful X-T line. The X-T5 is the latest iteration. This project will give me a better understanding of how the X-T5 has evolved from the original model. It also allows me to demonstrate that previous models, including the original X-T1, are still really good.

Hopefully, now that I’m not nearly so sick and my quarantine period has ended, I can do some of the photography that I was intending to do. I want to really see what the X-T1 is capable of, and with some luck I’ll be able to do that before this project comes to a close in the coming days. Once my X-T5 arrives in the mail, the X-T1 will be going back on the shelf, at least for a little while. I don’t expect the new camera to be wildly better than the first iteration, but soon enough I’ll know for sure just how much improved it is. And, of course, I’ll write all about it, so stay tuned!

Day 6

Bright Leaves – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T1 – “Fujichrome Slide
Trumpet Now & Trumpet Later – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T1 – “Classic Chrome
Triple Letter – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T1 – “Monochrome

Day 7

Flower Among Leaves – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T1 – “Classic Kodak Chrome
Spiderweb Rose – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T1 – “Classic Kodak Chrome”
Rosebud – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T1 – “Classic Kodak Chrome”

Day 8

Wet Tree Leaves – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T1 – “Classic Kodak Chrome”
Wet Blossom – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T1 – “Classic Kodak Chrome”
Water & Thorns – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T1 – “Classic Kodak Chrome”
Wet Rose – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T1 – “Classic Kodak Chrome”
Sadness – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T1 – “Monochrome”

Day 9

Bougainvillea Sage – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T1 – “Kodak Color Negative
Rays on Leaves – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T1 – “Kodak Color Negative”
Light Bulb Beams – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T1 – “Kodak Color Negative”
Garden Wall – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T1 – “Monochrome”

Day 10

Autumn Sky Blue – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T1 – “Classic Kodak Chrome”
The Colors of Fall – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T1 – “Classic Kodak Chrome”
The Beauty of Once Was – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T1 – “Classic Kodak Chrome”
Sage Bloom – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T1 – “Classic Kodak Chrome”
Warm Light Above a Wall – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T1 – “Classic Kodak Chrome”
Chalk – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T1 – “Classic Kodak Chrome”
Macro Rose – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T1 – “Classic Kodak Chrome”
Bougainvillea Red – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T1 – “Kodak Color Negative”

This post contains affiliate links, and if you make a purchase using my links I’ll be compensated a small amount for it.

Preorder your Fujifilm X-T5 in black:  Amazon  B&H
Preorder your Fujifilm X-T5 in silver:  Amazon  B&H

Fujifilm X-T1 Short-Term Project, Update 1

Tiny Purple Blossoms – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T1 – “Classic Kodak Chrome” – Day 5

In my article, Did I Buy the Fujifilm X-T5? Should You?, I mentioned that I began a new short-term photography project: photographing only with my Fujifilm X-T1 from the announcement of the Fujifilm X-T5, which was November 2, until the release date, which will be November 17. I’m not using any other camera during this 16 day period, only the X-T1.

Why am I doing this? First, even though the Fujifilm X-T1 is eight-years-old (and approaching nine), it is still such a great little camera. It took three years for Fujifilm to bring this model to the market because they wanted to get it right, and it was one of their most important cameras ever released. The Fujifilm X-T1 was one of the first, if not the first, Fujifilm cameras that widely appealed to professional photographers. It was Fujifilm’s most successful model at the time—outselling all the previous cameras—and launched the extremely successful X-T line. The X-T5 is the latest iteration. This project will give me a better understanding of how the X-T5 has evolved from the original model.

More importantly than any of that, the Fujifilm X-T1 was a good camera on the day it was released, and is still a good camera in 2022. There’s no reason that it cannot be used today. The image quality is excellent. The camera is pretty quick overall (look at the sports pictures!). It has one advantage over all other X-T cameras: 16mp. The files are smaller, which means I can capture more pictures on an SD card, it takes less time to transfer the pictures from the camera to my phone, the pictures take up less space on my phone, the pictures upload more quickly to my cloud storage, the pictures use less cloud data, and the pictures download from cloud storage more quickly. Less is more sometimes. I’ve really appreciated this quickness lately. The Fujifilm X-T1 is a camera that I’ve thoroughly enjoyed shooting with over the last week, and I think I’ll be a little sad when I put it back on the shelf after my X-T5 arrives in the mail.

Day 1

Birdcage on a Wall – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T1 – “Classic Kodak Chrome” – Day 1
A Pink Rose in the Garden – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T1 – “Classic Kodak Chrome”
Autumn Colors – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T1 – “Classic Kodak Chrome”

Day 2

Hummingbird Feeder Along a Wall – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T1 – “Classic Kodak Chrome”
Running on Air – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T1 – “Classic Kodak Chrome”
Inflatable Obstacle – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T1 – “Classic Kodak Chrome”
Duck and Run – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T1 – “Classic Kodak Chrome”
Obstacle Athlete – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T1 – “Classic Kodak Chrome”

Day 3

Morning Roofline – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T1 – “Classic Kodak Chrome”
Bougainvillea Bush – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T1 – “Classic Kodak Chrome”
Green Tree Leaves – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T1 – “Classic Kodak Chrome”

Day 4

An Arizona Autumn – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T1 – “Kodak Portra 160
Lots of Pink Blossoms – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T1 – “Kodak Portra 160”
Bent Do Not Enter Sign – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T1 – “Kodak Portra 160”
Tower – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T1 – “Kodak Portra 160”
Backyard QB – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T1 – “Kodak Portra 160”
Football Catcher – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T1 – “Kodak Portra 160”

Day 5

Cranes – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T1 – “Kodak Portra 160”
Monkeys on the Bars – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T1 – “Kodak Portra 160”
Flower Among Flowers – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T1 – “Kodak Portra 160”
Hidden Logs – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T1 – “Kodak Portra 160”
Bones – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T1 – “Kodak Portra 160”
Saguaro Skeleton – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T1 – “Monochrome
Dead Saguaro – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T1 – “Monochrome”

This post contains affiliate links, and if you make a purchase using my links I’ll be compensated a small amount for it.

Preorder your Fujifilm X-T5 in black:  Amazon  B&H
Preorder your Fujifilm X-T5 in silver:  Amazon  B&H

Part 2

New Fujifilm X-Trans II FXW App Patron Early-Access Film Simulation Recipe: Provia Negative

Empty Baseball Field – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T1 – “Provia Negative”

The Fuji X Weekly App is free, yet becoming a Fuji X Weekly Patron unlocks the best App experience! One benefit of being a Patron is you get early access to some new Film Simulation Recipes. These Early-Access Recipes will eventually become available free to everyone in time, including this new one. In fact, many Early-Access Recipes have already been publicly published on this Blog and the App, so now everyone can use them. Patrons help support Fuji X Weekly and, really, without them there would be no App. So I want to give a special “thank you” to all of the Patrons!

I didn’t model this recipe after any film or process. My first thought was this: how can I make a recipe that’s helpful. Let me back this up a minute. Unless your camera is an X-Pro3 or newer, you cannot save a white balance shift with your C1-C7 custom presets; however, your camera will remember one shift per white balance type, so if each C1-C7 recipe uses a different white balance type, you won’t have to remember to change the shift when you change recipes. For X-Trans II, there are recipes that use Auto, Daylight (which Fujifilm calls “Fine” for some reason), Kelvin, and Shade, so I thought it would be helpful to create a recipe that calls for a different white balance type that I haven’t yet used.

Indoor Tree – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T1 – “Provia Negative”

After some playing around, I created a Film Simulation Recipe that I was quite happy with. It reminds me a little of Fujichrome Provia 100F slide film, but less vibrant, and a tad less contrasty, too, but still kind of similar; however, I think the tonality is more similar to negative film than reversal film. That’s why I call this recipe Provia Negative. This recipe has a slight cool color cast, with white leaning towards blue. I was able to get good results in several different light situations.

If you are a Fuji X Weekly App Patron, it’s available to you right now on the App! Don’t have the App? Download it for free today! Become a Patron to unlock the best App experience and gain early access to this recipe.

Example photographs, all camera-made JPEGs captured using this “Provia Negative” Film Simulation on my Fujifilm X-T1:

Two Magenta Flowers – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T1
One Bloom Remains – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T1
Pink & Green – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T1
Pop of Warmth – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T1
Pink Flower Blossom – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T1
Pink Flower Blossom 2 – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T1
Bougainvillea Pink – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T1
Backlit Flowers & Leaves – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T1
Basketball in the Grass – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T1
Go Supply – Goodyear, AZ – Fujifilm X-T1
Hobby Lobby – Avondale, AZ – Fujifilm X-T1
Square on Block Wall – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T1

Fujifilm X-T1 (X-Trans II) Film Simulation Recipe: Color Negative Film

Yellow – Layton, UT – Fujifilm X-T1 – “Color Negative Film”

One of my favorite X-Trans I Film Simulation Recipes is Color Negative Film, which has a white balance shift inspired by my Fujicolor 100 Industrial recipe. This recipe, which was a Patron Early-Access Recipe on the Fuji X Weekly App but is now available to everyone, is an adaptation of the X-Trans I recipe for X-Trans II. It doesn’t mimic any specific film, but just has a more generic film aesthetic. It’s not an exact match to the X-Trans I recipe, but it’s pretty close.

This “Color Negative Film” recipe is a great allrounder for daylight situations. My Fujifilm X-T1 was boxed away for over two months as I moved, and when I unboxed it last week this recipe is the one that I programmed and used first. It’s a recipe that I know many of you will love, too. If you have an X-Trans II camera, give this one a try!

No Swimming – Layton, UT – Fujifilm X-T1 – “Color Negative Film”

Provia
Dynamic Range: DR400
Highlight: +2 (Hard)
Shadow: +2 (Hard)
Color: -2 (Low)
Sharpness: -1 (Medium-Soft)
Noise Reduction: -2 (Low)
White Balance: 3200K, +8 Red & -8 Blue
ISO: Auto up to ISO 3200

Exposure Compensation: 0 to +2/3 (typically)

Example photographs, all camera-made JPEGs captured using this “Color Negative Film” film simulation recipe on my Fujifilm X-T1:

Sunlit Leaves – Layton, UT – Fujifilm X-T1
Green Leaves – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T1 – Photo by Jon Roesch
Early Autumn – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T1
Forest Trail – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T1
One Dead Leaf – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T1
Backlit Autumn Leaves – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T1
Autumn Flare – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T1
Changing Leaves in the Woods – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T1
Yellow Shrub – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T1
Trail to the Trees – Layton, UT – Fujifilm X-T1
Water Logged – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T1 – Photo by Jon Roesch
Little Purple Blooms – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T1
Reeds of Summer – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T1
Magenta Blossoms – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T1
Trumpet Flower – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T1
Pride of Barbados – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T1
Jon by a Wall – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T1

Find this Film Simulation Recipe and over 200 more on the Fuji X Weekly App!

Help Fuji X Weekly

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Fujifilm X-T1 (X-Trans II) Film Simulation Recipe: Winter Slide

Winter Neighborhood at Sunset – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T1 – “Winter Slide”

This recipe began with a weather forecast. It had been unusually dry and warm here in Utah, but cold temperatures and plenty of snow was on the way. At this time of year I get asked regularly which film simulation recipes are best for snow—there are plenty that will work well, but not many that are specifically made for it. A camera like the Fujifilm X-T1, which is weather-sealed, is great for these type of conditions, so I thought, with the forecasted wintry weather, I’d create a good-for-snow recipe for X-Trans II cameras that I could use on my X-T1. When the snow finally came, I’d be ready!

The initial inspiration for this recipe was Agfa Precisa CT 100 color slide film, which I read was one of the best film options for winter situations. I wasn’t having good luck recreating the aesthetic of it, but, in the process, I made some settings that I thought might be good for snow. So I failed at mimicking Agfa Precisa CT 100, but I succeeded at what I set out to do, which was a film simulation recipe that works well in snow. Interestingly, when I created the recipe, it wasn’t yet snowy, so I wasn’t completely sure how it would do. Luckily, it did every bit as well as I had hoped it would.

Two Cold Horses – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T1 – “Winter Slide”

The trick to snow photography is to overexpose (based on what the meter says) because the camera sees a lot of white and wants to make it grey. So if you follow the meter, you’ll get a lot of dark pictures. By increasing the exposure compensation, you’ll get brighter pictures—I found myself often using +1 exposure compensation. If you are using this recipe when it’s not wintry white, you won’t have to increase the exposure compensation quite as much, and +1/3 to +2/3 will likely be better. This film simulation recipe is compatible with all X-Trans II cameras.

Provia/STD
Dynamic Range: DR200
Highlight: 0 (Standard)
Shadow: +2 (Hard)
Color: -2 (Low)
Sharpness: -1 (Medium-Soft)
Noise Reduction: -2 (Low)
White Balance: 5000K, -1 Red & -3 Blue
ISO: Auto up to ISO 3200

Exposure Compensation: +1/3 to +1 1/3 (typically)

Example photographs, all camera-made JPEGs captured on my Fujifilm X-T1 using this “Winter Slide” film simulation recipe:

Ice Cold Red – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T1
Winter Red Berries – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T1
Snow on Branch – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T1
Snow on Tree Trunk – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T1
Winter Tree – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T1
Winter Bush with Red Berries – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T1
Snow on a Bush – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T1
Winter Girl – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T1
White House in Snow – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T1
Lamp with Bow – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T1
Winter Blue Home – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T1
One Light in a Tree – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T1

Find this film simulation recipe and many more on the Fuji X Weekly — Film Recipes App!

Help Fuji X Weekly

Nobody pays me to write the content found on fujixweekly.com. There’s a real cost to operating and maintaining this site, not to mention all the time that I pour into it. If you appreciated this article, please consider making a one-time gift contribution. Thank you!

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Fujifilm X-T1 (X-Trans II) Film Simulation Recipe: Kodacolor 200

Pumpkin – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T1 – “Kodacolor 200”

For this recipe, I was attempting to recreate a Kodak Portra 400 NC aesthetic. A couple of decades ago, Portra (both the ISO 160 and ISO 400 emulsions) came in two versions: NC (“Neutral Color”) and VC (“Vivid Color”). Kodak later revised the film to be something in-between the two, which they simply called Portra 160 and Portra 400. This recipe is, I believe, in the general ballpark of Portra 400 NC, but not exactly right; however, I like the results anyway. So if this recipe is close to Kodak Portra 400 NC, why did I call it Kodacolor 200? Because I think it is actually a little closer to Kodacolor 200, which is a variety of Kodacolor VR, and related to ColorPlus 200. I wouldn’t call it an exact match to Kodacolor 200, but that’s the film this is most likely closest to. If you want a Portra 400 NC or Kodacolor 200 aesthetic, this recipe is relatively similar to both.

There’s a fair amount of contrast produced by this recipe, which looks really good in conditions without harsh light. In bright daylight, the contrast might be a little too much, perhaps more closely resembling push-processed film, or (to a lessor extent) even bleach-bypassed Portra. On bright days, you might consider dropping both Shadow and Highlight to +1 if you find it to be too contrasty. I believe this film simulation recipe produces its best results when the sun is a little obscured, but not heavy overcast; however, it’s possible to get good results in many different circumstances. If your X-Trans II camera has Classic Chrome, I invite you to give this recipe a try—it’s a great high-contrast, low saturation option.

Power Pole Cup – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T1 – “Kodacolor 200”

Classic Chrome
Dynamic Range: DR200
Highlight: +2 (Hard)
Shadow: +2 (Hard)
Color: -2 (Low)
Sharpness: -1 (Medium-Soft)
Noise Reduction: -2 (Low)
White Balance: 3200K, +8 Red & -8 Blue
ISO: Auto up to ISO 3200

Exposure Compensation: 0 to +2/3 (typically)

Example photographs, all camera-made JPEGs captured on my Fujifilm X-T1 using this Kodacolor 200 film simulation recipe:

Phragmites – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T1
Touch of Red – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-T1
Pumpkin Stem – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T1
Autumn Shrub – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T1
Ground Leaves – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T1
Neighborhood Autumn Tree – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T1
Creek Path in Autumn – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T1
Narrow Path – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T1
Old Mile Post – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T1
Delicate Fibers – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T1

Find this film simulation recipe and many more on the Fuji X Weekly — Film Recipes App!

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Fujifilm X-Trans II Film Simulation Recipe: Yosemite Velvia

Photo by Joy Roesch – Yosemite NP, CA – Fujifilm X-T1 -“Yosemite Velvia”

On a recent trip to Yosemite National Park, my daughter, Joy, created a new film simulation recipe for X-Trans II cameras, which I’m calling Yosemite Velvia. Joy has made two X-Trans I recipes, Superia Xtra 400 and Winter Blue, but this is her first for X-Trans II. On this trip I let her use my Fujifilm X-T1 camera, and I told her that she could use whichever settings she wanted—this recipe is what she came up with.

I asked her why she chose these settings. She told me that she wanted the pictures to be colorful but without too much contrast. She decided on the Shade white balance because the forecast was for overcast sky, although it ended up being mostly sunny; however, she liked how it looked, so she stuck with it. Besides photographing in Yosemite, she also used these settings in Reno, Nevada.

Photo by Joy Roesch – Yosemite NP, CA – Fujifilm X-T1 -“Yosemite Velvia”

This film simulation recipe is compatible with all Fujifilm X-Trans II cameras. You can use it on X-Trans I and Bayer sensor cameras, too, but the results will be a little different (feel free to try, though).

Velvia
Dynamic Range: DR200
Highlight: -1
Shadow: -2
Color: +2
Sharpness: -1
Noise Reduction: -2
White Balance: Shade, -2 Red & -2 Blue
ISO: Auto up to ISO 3200

Exposure Compensation: 0 to +2/3 (typically)

Example photographs, all camera-made JPEGs captured by Joy on my Fujifilm X-T1 using this “Yosemite Velvia” film simulation recipe:

Photo by Joy Roesch – Yosemite NP, CA – Fujifilm X-T1
Photo by Joy Roesch – Yosemite NP, CA – Fujifilm X-T1
Photo by Joy Roesch – Yosemite NP, CA – Fujifilm X-T1
Photo by Joy Roesch – Yosemite NP, CA – Fujifilm X-T1
Photo by Joy Roesch – Yosemite NP, CA – Fujifilm X-T1
Photo by Joy Roesch – Reno, NV – Fujifilm X-T1
Photo by Joy Roesch – Reno, NV – Fujifilm X-T1
Photo by Joy Roesch – Reno, NV – Fujifilm X-T1

Find this film simulation recipe on the Fuji X Weekly — Film Recipes App!

Help Fuji X Weekly

Nobody pays me to write the content found on fujixweekly.com. There’s a real cost to operating and maintaining this site, not to mention all the time that I pour into it. If you appreciated this article, please consider making a one-time gift contribution. Thank you!

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Fujifilm X-Trans II Film Simulation Recipe: Kodak Platinum 200

Bicycle 88 – West Valley City, UT – Fujifilm X-T1 – “Kodak Platinum 200”

Fuji X Weekly reader Corey Steib (Instagram here and here) shared with me an X-Trans II recipe that he created called Kodak Platinum 200. Corey named it this because it reminds him of vibrant Kodak film captured with a Panaflex Platinum motion picture camera, and because the best results are found at or near ISO 200. This recipe is nothing like the Eterna film simulation, but it does have a slight cinematic feel to it nonetheless thanks to the Shadow setting. It looks really nice, with vibrant colors and soft shadows, and is a great all-purpose recipe. Thank you, Corey, for creating this and allowing me to share it!

I have the ISO in my camera set to Auto, with the upper limit set to ISO 3200. I’m happy with the results from my X-T1 all the way to ISO 3200, but the intention of this recipe is to keep the ISO lower when you can. In bright light, depending on the contrast in the scene, because of the DR-Auto setting, the camera might select ISO 200 or ISO 400, and the idea is to use this recipe at those ISOs when practical. As the available light decreases, it’s perfectly fine to increase the ISO, and I feel good going as high as ISO 3200 when necessary.

Touch of Red – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-T1 – “Kodak Platinum 200”

This film simulation recipe is compatible with all Fujifilm X-Trans II cameras. You can use it on X-Trans I and Bayer sensor cameras, too, but the results will be a little different (feel free to try, though).

Provia
Dynamic Range: DR-Auto
Highlight: +1 (Medium-High)
Shadow: -2 (Low)
Color: +2 (High)
Sharpness: +1 (Medium-High)
Noise Reduction: -2 (Low)
White Balance: Daylight/Fine, 0 Red & 0 Blue
ISO: Auto up to ISO 3200
(but… the lower the better)
Exposure Compensation: -1/3 to +1/3 (typically)

Example photographs, all camera-made JPEGs captured with my Fujifilm X-T1 using this “Kodak Platinum 200” film simulation recipe:

Snack – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-T1
Yellow Rope – West Valley City, UT – Fujifilm X-T1
Unicorn Jo – West Valley City, UT – Fujifilm X-T1
Curved Trunk – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-T1
Log Bridge & 3 Trees – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-T1
Bridge & Stump – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-T1
Pine Needles – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-T1
Tree Canopy – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-T1
Plastic Plants – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T1

Find this film simulation recipe on the Fuji X Weekly — Film Recipes App!

Help Fuji X Weekly

Nobody pays me to write the content found on fujixweekly.com. There’s a real cost to operating and maintaining this site, not to mention all the time that I pour into it. If you appreciated this article, please consider making a one-time gift contribution. Thank you!

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Fujifilm X-Trans II Film Simulation Recipe: Portra v2

Joshua & Joy at a Creek – Layton, UT – Fujifilm X-T1 – “Portra v2” – Photo by Jon Roesch

I’ve been wanting to create a Kodak Portra 400 film simulation recipe for Fujifilm X-Trans II cameras for a long time now. I’ve had a Portra 160 recipe on this website for awhile, but I’ve never created a Portra 400 recipe for this sensor. I’ve actually created five different Portra 400 recipes for X-Trans III and IV cameras, but those don’t work on X-Trans II. I made a guess on my Fujifilm X-T1 on what might be a good Portra 400 recipe, handed the camera to my son, Jon, and let him capture some pictures with it. You might remember that Jon created his own Classic Chrome recipe; this time I made the recipe, but I let him capture the pictures.

You might be wondering why I didn’t call this recipe “Portra 400” but named it “Portra v2” instead. While I believe that this recipe is similar to Portra 400, I do plan to create a more accurate recipe. Actually, that was my intentions with these pictures: reprocess the RAW files in-camera to refine the Portra look; however, as I reviewed the pictures, I liked the aesthetic created by these settings, so I decided to keep this as its own recipe. I will still work on a different Portra 400 recipe for X-Trans II.

Trees – Layton, UT – Fujifilm X-T1 – “Portra v2” – Photo by Jon Roesch

One film can have many different aesthetics, depending on how it’s shot, developed, scanned or printed, and this is especially true with Kodak Portra 400. Portra can have many different looks. This recipe does resemble one of those aesthetics, but it definitely doesn’t resemble all of the aesthetics, or even the most common. If you do like Portra, I’m confident that you’ll appreciate these settings, which is compatible with all X-Trans II cameras that have the Classic Chrome film simulation.

Classic Chrome
Dynamic Range: DR200
Highlight: -1 (Medium-Low)
Shadow: -1 (Medium-Low)
Color: +2 (High)
Sharpness: -1 (Medium-Low)
Noise Reduction: -2 (Low)
White Balance: Daylight/Fine, +4 Red & -4 Blue
ISO: Auto up to ISO 3200

Exposure Compensation: +2/3 to +1 (typically)

Example photographs, all camera-made JPEGs captured by Jon on my Fujifilm X-T1 using this Portra v2 film simulation recipe:

Water – Layton, UT – Fujifilm X-T1 – Photo by Jon Roesch
Fence Tree – Layton, UT – Fujifilm X-T1 – Photo by Jon Roesch
Trees & Lake – Layton, UT – Fujifilm X-T1 – Photo by Jon Roesch
Creek in the Woods – Layton, UT – Fujifilm X-T1 – Photo by Jon Roesch
Trees & Leaves – Layton, UT – Fujifilm X-T1 – Photo by Jon Roesch
Moss on a Log – Layton, UT – Fujifilm X-T1 – Photo by Jon Roesch
Grass – Layton, UT – Fujifilm X-T1 – Photo by Jon Roesch
Bridge – Layton, UT – Fujifilm X-T1 – Photo by Jon Roesch
My Friend – Layton, UT – Fujifilm X-T1 – Photo by Jon Roesch

Find this film simulation recipe on the Fuji X Weekly app!

See also: Fujifilm X-Trans II Film Simulation Recipes

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Help Fuji X Weekly

Nobody pays me to write the content found on fujixweekly.com. There’s a real cost to operating and maintaining this site, not to mention all the time that I pour into it. If you appreciated this article, please consider making a one-time gift contribution. Thank you!

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Fujifilm X-T1 (X-Trans II) Film Simulation Recipe: Jon’s Classic Chrome

Fujifilm X-T1 – Farmington, UT – Photo by Jonathan Roesch – “Jon’s Classic Chrome”

I handed my Fujifilm X-T1 to my 11-year-old son, Jonathan—gave him a brief tutorial on how to use the camera, and let him have at it. My XF10 Classic Chrome film simulation recipe was programmed into the X-T1; to my surprise, Jon made a few small adjustments to it. He increased Dynamic Range to DR400, moved the White Balance Shift to +4 Red, and set Sharpness at 0. I’m not sure why he made those specific changes, but the results are pretty good, and I’m very proud and impressed by the pictures that he captured with the X-T1 using his settings!

My opinion is that this recipe has a ColorPlus feel to it. It could be close to Kodacolor, Portra 400, or Ultramax—it definitely has a Kodak color negative vibe; however, I think Fujicolor C200 might also be in the neighborhood. Whatever film it might be close to, it’s got a great analog-like aesthetic that’s easy to love. Great job, Jon!

Fujifilm X-T1 – Farmington, UT – Photo by Jonathan Roesch – “Jon’s Classic Chrome”

Classic Chrome
Dynamic Range: DR400
Highlight: +1 (Medium-High)
Shadow: +2 (High)
Color: +1 (Medium-High)
Sharpness: 0 (Medium)
Noise Reduction: -2 (Low)
White Balance: Auto, +4 Red & -4 Blue
ISO: Auto up to ISO 3200

Exposure Compensation: +2/3 (typically)

Example photographs, all camera-made JPEGs captured by Jon on my Fujifilm X-T1 using his Classic Chrome film simulation recipe:

Fujifilm X-T1 – Farmington, UT – Photo by Jonathan Roesch
Fujifilm X-T1 – Farmington, UT – Photo by Jonathan Roesch
Fujifilm X-T1 – Farmington, UT – Photo by Jonathan Roesch
Fujifilm X-T1 – Farmington, UT – Photo by Jonathan Roesch
Fujifilm X-T1 – Farmington, UT – Photo by Jonathan Roesch
Fujifilm X-T1 – Farmington, UT – Photo by Jonathan Roesch
Fujifilm X-T1 – Farmington, UT – Photo by Jonathan Roesch
Fujifilm X-T1 – Farmington, UT – Photo by Jonathan Roesch
Fujifilm X-T1 – Farmington, UT – Photo by Jonathan Roesch
Fujifilm X-T1 – Farmington, UT – Photo by Jonathan Roesch

See also: X-Trans II Film Simulation Recipes

Find Jon’s Classic Chrome film simulation recipe on the Fuji X Weekly app!

Fujifilm X-T1 (X-Trans II) Film Simulation Recipe: Porto 200

Hidden House – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T1 – “Porto 200”

I was asked to make a film simulation recipe for Fujifilm X-Trans II cameras that mimics the aesthetic of photographer João Falcão (Instagram). I got pretty close to his look with this recipe, although perhaps not exact. Certainly if you like João’s aesthetic, you’ll appreciate these settings. It produces some really nice results! I call it Porto 200.

Why do I call this film simulation recipe Porto 200? After all, there’s no film called Porto 200. Well, Porto is the city in Portugal where João is from. While Porto means “port” I think it has a nice film-stock-like name, similar to “Portra” for example. So Porto 200 it is!

Moody Lake – Big Arm, MT – Fujifilm X-T1 – “Porto 200”

I really enjoy using this recipe on my X-T1! It has (at least for now) a permanent spot in the Q menu. It produces a look that might be kind of similar to ColorPlus 200. It’s not intended to be similar to that film, but to me it seems a little similar. Feel free to try it with +1 Color and/or Sharpness if you prefer, or -5 Blue if you think it’s too yellow. This recipe is intended for X-Trans II cameras, but it will work on X-Trans I and Bayer cameras, too, but with slightly different results.

PRO Neg. Std
Dynamic Range: DR400
Highlight: 0 (Std)
Shadow: +1 (Medium-Hard)
Color: 0 (Mid)
Sharpness: 0 (Std)
Noise Reduction: -2 (Low)

White Balance: Daylight/Fine, +2 Red & -6 Blue
ISO: Auto, up to ISO 3200
Exposure Compensation: -1/3 to +2/3 (typically)

Example photographs, all camera-made JPEGs using this Porto 200 recipe on my Fujifilm X-T1:

Holiday Rain – Big Arm, MT – Fujifilm X-T1
Forest Ivy – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T1
Fall Wall – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T1
Forest Fence – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T1
Dying Leaves – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T1
Tree Leaves – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T1
Hanging Leaves – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T1
Little Red Berries – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T1
Red Berries in a Tree – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T1
Treescape – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T1

See also: X-Trans II Film Simulation Recipes

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Help Fuji X Weekly

Nobody pays me to write the content found on fujixweekly.com. There’s a real cost to operating and maintaining this site, not to mention all the time that I pour into it. If you appreciated this article, please consider making a one-time gift contribution. Thank you!

2.00 $

Fujifilm X-T1 (X-Trans II) Film Simulation Recipe: “Eterna”

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Lavender – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T1 – “Eterna”

I haven’t forgotten about my Fujifilm X-T1! My last five film simulation recipes have been for my new X100V, but I will continue making recipes for other sensors. Not everyone, probably not most Fujifilm X shooters, have the latest models, so the recipes for those cameras are irrelevant to many Fuji X Weekly readers. There will still be many articles related to the X100V, but I will continue to publish articles about other Fujifilm cameras, too. I’ll try to keep things balanced.

This “Eterna” film simulation recipe is my best facsimile of my X-T30 Eterna recipe. Obviously X-Trans II cameras don’t have the Eterna film simulation, as well as other options that the X-T30 has. It’s impossible to make an exact match, but this one is surprisingly pretty close. It looks nothing like straight-out-of-the-box Eterna, but it resembles pretty closely my Eterna recipe, which requires some big adjustments to various settings.

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Red Blooms – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T1 – “Eterna”

My X-T1 “Eterna” recipe has a strong warm color cast, and it has a fair amount of contrast. It reminds me of Kodak Gold printed on Kodak paper, but I’m sure it’s not an exact match for that, just a general impression. This recipe is not for every situation, but it can look great for certain pictures.

PRO Neg. Std
Dynamic Range: DR100
Highlight: +2 (High)
Shadow: +1 (Medium-High)
Color: +2 (High)
Sharpness: +1 (Medium-High)
Noise Reduction: -2 (Low)
White Balance: Auto, +6 Red & -7 Blue
ISO: Auto, up to ISO 3200
Exposure Compensation: -1/3 to +1/3 (typically)

Example photographs, all camera-made JPEGs using this “Eterna” recipe on my Fujifilm X-T1:

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Yellow Truck with Red Graffiti – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-T1

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Empty Trailers – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-T1

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Evening Thistle – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-T1

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Someone’s Watching – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-T1

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Authorized Persons and Vehicles Only – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-T1

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Bike Lane Ends – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-T1

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Stump by the Water – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-T1

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Pole Reflection – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-T1

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Sunstar Tree – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-T1

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Empty Bench – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-T1

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Ford 250 – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-T1

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SkyWest – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-T1

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Statue Girl on Bench – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T1

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Shadow Stripes – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-T1

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Toes & Couch – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T1

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Josh in the Window Light – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T1

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Kitchen Succulent – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T1

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Tree Branch Blossoms – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T1

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Cloud Above The Mountain Ridge – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T1

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Mountain Tree – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T1

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Tree Top – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T1

See also: Film Simulation Recipes

Help Fuji X Weekly

Nobody pays me to write the content found on fujixweekly.com. There's a real cost to operating and maintaining this site, not to mention all the time that I pour into it. If you appreciated this article, please consider making a one-time gift contribution. Thank you!

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Video: Monument Valley with Fuji X Weekly (500th Post!)

Follow along with me as I photograph Monument Valley! The video above, Monument Valley with Fuji X Weekly, is a behind-the-scenes look at my photographic adventure to the incredible desert formations of southern Utah and northern Arizona on the Navajo Nation. It was a thrill to experience Monument Valley. It really is an amazing place!

This was my last trip before the worldwide pandemic shut down all of my travel plans. So far I’ve had to cancel two trips, and there’s likely one or two more that won’t happen. I hope that this video will bring you some joy. I hope that it reminds you of some recent travels that you’ve done. I hope that it inspires you to dream of where you’ll go and what you’ll photograph when you can once again go places.

My wife, Amanda, and I created this video. Actually, she did the majority of the work. Amanda recorded the clips. She did all of the editing. She coached me through the narration. I have a face for radio and a voice for print, yet somehow she made the video look great! Her vision, her storytelling, and her talents are what made this happen. Thank you, Amanda!

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Evening at Monument Valley – Monument Valley, AZ – Fujifilm X-T30 & Rokinon 12mm

The photographs in the video were captured using a Fujifilm X-T30 and X-T1. I used four different lenses: a Fujinon 100-400mm, Fujinon 90mm f/2, Fujinon 35mm f/2 and Rokinon 12mm f/2. Amanda recorded the video using a Fujifilm X-T20 with a 16-50mm lens and a GoPro Hero 8 Black. The film simulation recipes used on the X-T30 were Velvia, Kodachrome 64, Analog Color, Dramatic Monochrome and Agfa Scala, and Velvia and Monochrome were used on the X-T1. Amanda used PRO Neg. Hi on the X-T20.

This article marks a significant milestone that I wanted to point out to you. This is the 500th post on Fuji X Weekly! Many blogs never make it to 500 posts, either because they publish too infrequently or they simply give up before it’s reached. What it means for you is that there’s a lot of content on this blog! If you haven’t been following Fuji X Weekly since the beginning, there are a ton of articles that you might have missed. There are perhaps many posts that could be helpful to you and your photography that you’ve never seen. I invite you to explore the older articles. The best way to do this is click the four lines on the top-right of this page, and either search a topic or browse the archive. Anyway, thank you for being a part of Fuji X Weekly! Without you, the 500 Posts milestone would not have been reached. You are appreciated!

Be sure to follow Fuji X Weekly, so that you don’t miss anything! I invite you to follow the Fuji X Weekly YouTube channel, as well. If you liked the Monument Valley video, I invite you to give it a thumbs-up, comment and share!

See also: Monument Valley – A Monumental Landscape

Help Fuji X Weekly

Nobody pays me to write the content found on fujixweekly.com. There's a real cost to operating and maintaining this site, not to mention all the time that I pour into it. If you appreciated this article, please consider making a one-time gift contribution. Thank you!

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[Not] My Fujifilm X-T1 (X-Trans II) Kodak Portra 160 Film Simulation Recipe

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Mitchell Mesa – Monument Valley, AZ – Fujifilm X-T1 “Kodak Portra 160”

Kodak introduced Portra film in 1998. As the name implies, this film was designed for portrait photography, as it produces pleasing skin tones. It came in three ISO options: 160, 400 and 800. The ISO 160 and 400 versions came in two varieties: Neutral Color (NC), which was less saturated, and Vivid Color (VC), which was more saturated. In 2011 Kodak did away with the Neutral Color and Vivid Color options, making a new version that was more-or-less in-between the two.

One of the top films that I’ve been asked to create a film simulation recipe for is Portra 160. I’ve tried many times, and I felt that I got close a couple of times, but I was never able to get it quite right. Fuji X Weekly reader Piotr Skrzypek recently created a Portra 160 film simulation recipe for his Fujifilm X-E2, and he gave me permission to share his settings with you! When I first looked at his pictures, I immediately thought that they resembled Portra, and I continued to think so as I used his recipe on my X-T1. Piotr has a lot of experience shooting film, and the main film that he uses is Portra 160. I’ve shot Portra before, but it’s been many years. How the film is shot, developed, and printed or scanned effects the way that it looks, so results can vary, but this recipe is overall an excellent facsimile of actual Portra 160 film. Great job, Piotr Skrzypek!

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Portra – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T1 “Kodak Portra 160”

I did alter Piotr’s recipe a little. I have Color set to +1, but he has Color set to +2, which I think more mimics Portra 160VC. Whether you set Color to +1 or +2, you are still getting a Portra look, and you can try it both ways and decide which you like better for your photographs. You can even try setting color to 0 to get a Portra 160NC look. The other change I made is to white balance, which I set to Daylight, while Piotr uses auto-white-balance. In many outdoor circumstances Daylight and AWB will produce identical results, so for the most part it doesn’t matter which you choose. I like Daylight a little more than AWB, but you can decide which you prefer for yourself. This recipe is intended for X-Trans II cameras, but there will be a Portra 160 recipe for X-Trans III and IV cameras coming soon!

Classic Chrome
Dynamic Range: DR-Auto
Highlight: -2 (Low)
Shadow: -2 (Low)
Color: +1 (Medium-High)
Sharpness: -2 (Low)
Noise Reduction: -2 (Low)
White Balance: Daylight, +3 Red & -4 Blue
ISO: Auto, up to ISO 3200

Example photographs, all camera-made JPEGs using this Kodak Portra 160 recipe on my Fujifilm X-T1:

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Snow on the Roofs – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T1

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Roof Snow – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm  X-T1

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Faux Green – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T1

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Beside the Window – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T1

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Silver & Green – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T1

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Green Stems – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T1

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Bright Blossoms – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T1

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Future Fujifilm Photographer – Monument Valley, AZ – Fujifilm X-T1

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Girl, Horse & Books – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T1

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The Peg Game – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T1

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Girl & Game – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T1

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Wood Ladder – Edge of the Cedars SP, UT – Fujifilm X-T1

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Monumental Crosswalk – Monument Valley, UT – Fujifilm X-T1

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Four Desert Horses – Monument Valley, AZ – Fujifilm X-T1

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Mittens Evening – Monument Valley, AZ – Fujifilm X-T1

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Rural Grass – Farmington Bay, UT – Fujifilm X-T1

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Reeds & Mountain – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T1

See also:
Fujifilm X-T1 Kodacolor Recipe
Fujifilm X-T1 Kodachrome II Recipe
Fujifilm X-T1 Kodachrome 64 Recipe
Fujifilm X-T1 Ektachrome 100SW Recipe
Fujifilm X-T1 Agfa Optima Recipe

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Fujifilm X-T1 Agfa Optima (Provia) Film Simulation Recipe


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Reeds & Mountain – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T1 “Agfa Optima”

The film simulation recipe in this article is my Agfa Optima recipe, which is compatible with X-Trans III & IV cameras, converted for use on my Fujifilm X-T1. While the X-T1 is an X-Trans II camera, you can also use this recipe on X-Trans I and Bayer sensor cameras. Agfa Optima is a color negative film that was around from the mid-1990’s to the mid-2000’s.

Provia
Dynamic Range: DR100
Highlight: -1 (Medium-Low)
Shadow: +1 (Medium-High)
Color: -2 (Low)
Sharpness: 0 (Medium)
Noise Reduction: -2 (Low)
White Balance: Daylight, -3 Red & +1 Blue
ISO: Auto, up to ISO 3200

Example photographs, all camera-made JPEGs using this Agfa Optima recipe on my Fujifilm X-T1:

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Eggs in a Bowl – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T1

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Take a Picture Pronto – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T1

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Fruity Cereal – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T1

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Stealth Mode – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T1

 

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Suburban Alleyway – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T1

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Windows & Shadows – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T1

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Pine Tree & Sky – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T1

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Green & Fence – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T1

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Rural Metal Fence – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T1

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Marshland Sky – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T1

See also: Film Simulation Recipes

Help Fuji X Weekly

Nobody pays me to write the content found on fujixweekly.com. There's a real cost to operating and maintaining this site, not to mention all the time that I pour into it. If you appreciated this article, please consider making a one-time gift contribution. Thank you!

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Fujifilm X-T1 (X-Trans II) Faded Monochrome Film Simulation Recipe


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Partially Illuminated – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T1 “Faded Monochrome”

This is my Faded Monochrome recipe adapted for my Fujifilm X-T1. It will work on all X-Trans I & II and Bayer sensor cameras, just so long as it has a double-exposure mode (I think they all do, but I’m not 100% certain). You have to put the camera into double-exposure mode, capture the scene with the first exposure, and use the second exposure to photograph a medium-grey piece of paper (I used an 8.5″ x 11″ sheet of construction paper). I prefer the second exposure to be out of focus. The first exposure should be slightly overexposed, perhaps by 1/3 to 2/3 stop, because the second exposure will decrease the contrast. The second exposure should be underexposed by at least 1 stop, and as many as 3 stops. How bright or dark the second exposure is will determine just how faded the picture will be. It requires some experimentation, but thankfully you get a real-time display of what the picture will look like and the opportunity for a do-over (simply select “Retry”). The look you get is similar to using a low-contrast filter when making black-and-white prints in the darkroom.

Monochrome
Dynamic Range: DR100
Highlight: +2 (High)
Shadow: +2 (High)
Sharpness: 0 (Medium)
Noise Reduction: -2 (Low)
ISO: Auto, up to ISO 3200

Example photographs, all camera-made JPEGs using this Faded Monochrome recipe on my Fujifilm X-T1:

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Thought – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T1

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Girl Shadow – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T1

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Piano Hand – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T1

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Piano Fingers – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T1

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Faded Lily – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T1

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Flowers Fading – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T1

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Bouquet – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T1

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Wheelbarrow Monochrome – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T1

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Gathering – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T1

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Window Blinds – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T1

See also: Film Simulation Recipes

Help Fuji X Weekly

Nobody pays me to write the content found on fujixweekly.com. There's a real cost to operating and maintaining this site, not to mention all the time that I pour into it. If you appreciated this article, please consider making a one-time gift contribution. Thank you!

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Fujifilm X-T1 (X-Trans II) Ektachrome 100SW Film Simulation Recipe


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Windows & Reflections – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-T1 “Ektachrome 100SW”

What I love about my Ektachrome 100SW film simulation recipe is that it reminds me of a film that I used to use. Just like the original Ektachrome 100SW recipe, which is compatible with X-Trans III & IV cameras, this recipe is identical to my Kodachrome II recipe, except that it uses Velvia instead of Classic Chrome. This version of Ektachrome 100SW is compatible with X-Trans I & II cameras, as well as Fujifilm Bayer cameras.

Velvia
Dynamic Range: DR200
Highlight: +2 (High)
Shadow: +1 (Medium-High)
Color: -1 (Medium-Low)
Sharpness: 0 (Medium)
Noise Reduction: -2 (Low)
White Balance: Auto, +1 Red & -2 Blue
ISO: Auto up to ISO 3200

Example photographs, all camera-made JPEGs captured on my Fujifilm X-T1 using this Ektachrome 100SW film simulation recipe:

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Instamatic – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T1

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Throw Pillow – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T1

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Striped Pillow – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T1

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Indoor Decor Near a Window – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T1

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Grass & Concrete – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T1

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Little Steps – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T1

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February Forest – Layton, UT – Fujifilm X-T1

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Lizard – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-T1

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Penguins On A Rock – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-T1

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Swimming Penguins – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-T1

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Coral Fish – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-T1

See also: Film Simulation Recipes

Help Fuji X Weekly

Nobody pays me to write the content found on fujixweekly.com. There's a real cost to operating and maintaining this site, not to mention all the time that I pour into it. If you appreciated this article, please consider making a one-time gift contribution. Thank you!

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Fujifilm X-T1 (X-Trans II) Kodachrome II Film Simulation Recipe


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Rural Grass – Farmington Bay, UT – Fujifilm X-T1

One of my favorite film simulation recipes, and one of the most popular, if not the most popular, on Fuji X Weekly, is my Kodachrome II recipe. This version of that recipe is adapted for Fujifilm X-Trans II cameras, such as my X-T1. It will work on all cameras with an X-Trans II sensor, plus Bayer sensor cameras, such as the XF10, X-T100 and X-A7. Because it requires the Classic Chrome film simulation, it is not compatible with X-Trans I cameras, or the original X100.

Classic Chrome
Dynamic Range: DR200
Highlight: +2 (High)
Shadow: +1 (Medium-High)
Color: -1 (Medium-Low)
Sharpness: 0 (Medium)
Noise Reduction: -2 (Low)
White Balance: Auto, +1 Red & -2 Blue
ISO: Auto up to ISO 3200

Example photographs, all camera-made JPEGs captured on my Fujifilm X-T1 using this Kodachrome II film simulation recipe:

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The Wetlands of Farmington Bay – Farmington Bay, UT – Fujifilm X-T1

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Pallet Dump – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T1

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Old Wood – Farmington Bay, UT – Fujifilm X-T1

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February Thistles – Farmington Bay, UT – Fujifilm X-T1

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Francis Peak in February – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T1

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Succulents – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T1

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Bright Apple – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T1

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Kodak Film Canisters – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T1

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Bolsey on the Camera Shelf – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T1

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Longing For Another World – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T1

See also:
Fujifilm X-T1 Kodachrome 64 Film Simulation Recipe
Fujifilm X-T1 Kodacolor Film Simulation Recipe
Fujifilm X-T1 Ektachrome 100SW Film Simulation Recipe
First Fujifilm X-T1 Film Simulation Recipes

Help Fuji X Weekly

Nobody pays me to write the content found on fujixweekly.com. There's a real cost to operating and maintaining this site, not to mention all the time that I pour into it. If you appreciated this article, please consider making a one-time gift contribution. Thank you!

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My Fujifilm X-T1 (X-Trans II) Kodacolor Film Simulation Recipe


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Man in Red – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T1 – “Kodacolor”

Yesterday I published my Kodachrome 64 recipe for X-Trans II cameras, such as my Fujifilm X-T1, and today I will share with you my Kodacolor recipe for X-Trans II! Because this Kodacolor recipe requires the Classic Chrome film simulation, those with X-Trans I cameras can’t use it, but those with X-Trans II or Bayer sensor cameras can. While I got the overall aesthetic pretty darn close to the original Kodacolor recipe for X-Trans III and IV, the one thing that I wish I could change is the grain. Newer Fujifilm cameras have faux grain options, but older ones don’t. If you want to mimic the grain in-camera, your best option is to use a higher ISO, such as 3200 or 6400, and let the digital noise act as faux grain. Otherwise, I’m quite pleased with how this Kodacolor film simulation recipe turned out.

Classic Chrome
Dynamic Range: DR400
Highlight: +1 (Medium-High)
Shadow: +1 (Medium-High)
Color: -2 (Low)
Sharpness: 0 (Medium)
Noise Reduction: -2 (Low)
White Balance: 6300K, -3 Red & -2 Blue
ISO: Auto, up to ISO 6400

Example photographs, all camera-made JPEGs using this Kodacolor recipe on my Fujifilm X-T1:

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Front Runner – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T1

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Fro – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T1

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Cross at Crosswalks – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T1

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Look Both Ways – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T1

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Pipe – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T1

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Rusty Shadows – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T1

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Stop by the Rack – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T1

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Nord’s Stop – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T1

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Mall Across the Mud – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T1

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Pond Among Reeds – Farmington Bay, UT – Fujifilm X-T1

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Grass on the Water – Farmington Bay, UT – Fujifilm X-T1

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Lake Reflection – Farmington Bay, UT – Fujifilm X-T1

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Antelope Island Beyond Farmington Bay – Farmington Bay, UT – Fujifilm X-T1

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Camera Shelf – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T1

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Green is Good for My Soul – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T1

Help Fuji X Weekly

Nobody pays me to write the content found on fujixweekly.com. There's a real cost to operating and maintaining this site, not to mention all the time that I pour into it. If you appreciated this article, please consider making a one-time gift contribution. Thank you!

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