Which Film Simulation Recipes, When? — Summer Edition — Part 1: Fujifilm X-Pro3, X100V, X-T4, X-S10, X-E4, X-T30 II

Rural Warehouse – Litchfield Park, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4 – Fujicolor 100 Gold Recipe

Original Series

Summer is here! Traveling, camping, visits to the beach, boating on the lake, and stuff like that are common during these months. Perhaps you are looking for some Film Simulation Recipe recommendations for your Fujifilm camera for the summer season. I thought I’d take this opportunity to revisit my Which Film Simulation Recipe, When? series of articles. This post will make a lot more sense if you’ve read the original series—especially the first article—so be sure to take a look at it if you haven’t yet (or if it’s been awhile and you don’t remember).

This Part 1 is for Fujifilm X-Trans IV cameras, except for the X-T3 and X-T30, which will be covered in a different section. If you have an X-Pro3, X100V, X-T4, X-S10, X-E4, or X-T30 II model, I invite you to give these Recipes a try! There are seven suggestions below—one for each C1-C7 Custom Preset—and three alternative ideas for each in case you don’t like the first recommendation. Each Custom Preset slot serves a specific purpose, so you should have a good Recipe option programmed into your camera no matter the subject or lighting. This group of seven isn’t necessarily better or worse than my original recommendations, just a different set chosen specifically for the summer months.

C1 — Fujicolor Natura 1600 — Golden Hour

Golden Lake – Culleoka, TX – Fujifilm X-E4 – Fujicolor Natura 1600 Recipe

Fujicolor Natura 1600 is a Film Simulation Recipe that does well at anytime during daylight hours—and it’s one of my all-time favorites—but I’m going to recommend it specifically for “golden hour” near sunrise and sunset. If you like the aesthetic, this really could be your primary use-all-of-the-time recipe, and that’s why I suggest placing it in C1, but when the sun is low to the horizon, this is one I definitely recommend shooting with. I personally use this recipe frequently.

Alternatives for “golden hour” photography:

Fujicolor 100 Gold
Kodak Portra 400 v2
Kodak Portra 400

C2 — Pacific Blues — Midday

Coastal Blooms – San Simeon, CA – Fujifilm X-E4 – Pacific Blues Recipe

Pacific Blues is another one that could be your go-to everyday-use Recipe, but specifically I want to suggest it for daytime (non-“golden hour”) photography. Obviously it can also be used for when the sun is low to the horizon, too, which it excels at, but I think it is an excellent option for when the sun is not low—from mid-morning to mid-afternoon. It’s especially well suited for a day at the beach.

Alternatives for “midday” photography:

Kodachrome 64
Vintage Color
Superia Summer

C3 — Urban Dreams — Overcast

Cienega Bridge on Old Highway 80 – Vail, AZ – Fujifilm X100V – Urban Dreams Recipe

If it’s thick overcast and rainy, the Urban Dreams Recipe is surprisingly an excellent option. Yes, it’s pretty good in daylight, too (even “golden hour” and at night), but give it a try on drab overcast days—I think you’ll really appreciate just how well it does in that situation.

Alternatives for “overcast” photography:

Elite Chrome 200
Reggie’s Portra
Kodachrome II

C4 — Nostalgic Negative — Natural-Light Indoor

Watch and Jewelry – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V – Nostalgic Negative Recipe

For natural-light indoor photography, a good option is the Nostalgic Negative Recipe. This is another great all-rounder that could be used in pretty much any daytime situation and produce excellent results, but specifically I’m recommending it for natural-light indoor pictures. For artificial-light indoor images, use the Recipe for nighttime photography below.

Alternative for “natural-light indoor” photography:

Kodak Ultramax 400
Color Negative 400
Classic Negative

C5 — Pure Negative — Nighttime

Brad’s – Pismo Beach, CA – Fujifilm X-E4 – Pure Negative Recipe

If it’s after dark, an excellent option for nighttime or artificial light photography is Pure Negative. This is a low-contrast Recipe with a natural rendering, which makes it especially ideal for high contrast scenes, particularly during midday light; however, it also does quite well in the darkness between sunset and sunrise and in indoor artificial light situations.

Alternatives for “nighttime” photography:

Serr’s 500T
Ektachrome 320T
CineStill 800T

C6 — Vibrant Arizona — Bonus

Summer Cliffs – Sedona, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4 – Vibrant Arizona Recipe

The C6 slot is a bonus, and the Vibrant Arizona Recipe is a solid option to fill it with—and it’s one of the most popular Recipes right now. If you didn’t want to use Vibrant Arizona, you could instead select your favorite “alternative” Recipe from C1-C5 above, or use one below.

Alternatives bonus Recipes:

Bright Kodak
Bright Summer
Silver Summer

C7 — Kodak T-Max P3200 — B&W

Closed Umbrella – Phoenix, AZ – Fujifilm X100V – Kodak T-Max P3200 Recipe

The newest black-and-white Film Simulation Recipe is Kodak T-Max P3200, and it has quickly become one of my favorites! If you don’t want to use this one, definitely give Kodak Tri-X 400 a try.

Alternatives for “B&W” photography:

Kodak Tri-X 400
Ilford HP5 Plus 400
Moody Monochrome

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Fujifilm X100V in black:  Amazon   B&H  Moment
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Kodak T-Max P3200 — A Fujifilm Film Simulation Recipe for X-Trans IV & V

A grainy high-contrast B&W Film Simulation Recipe for the Fujifilm X-Pro3, X100V, X-T4, X-S10, X-E4, X-T30 II, X-H2, X-H2s, X-T5, and X-S20.

Courthouse Butte – Sedona, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5 – Kodak T-Max P3200 Recipe

“Stop the presses!”

That was the subject of an email I recently received from Anders Lindborg. Longtime Fuji X Weekly readers will immediately recognize Anders, since he invented the Kodak Tri-X 400Ilford HP5 Plus 400Ilford Pan F Plus 50, and Ilford FP4 Plus 125 (plus co-created Kodak T-Max 400) black-and-white Film Simulation Recipes—he is, in my opinion, the guru on Fujifilm B&W Recipes. Kodak Tri-X 400 is my all-time favorite Recipe, period. Anders also created the Kodak Gold v2 Recipe, seven Fujicolor Pro 160NS Recipesseven Fujicolor Pro 400H Recipes, and made an important D-Range Priority discovery. When Anders Lindborg says to stop the presses, I knew to stop the presses!

The story that I found in that email was absolutely incredible! Whether or not you ever use the Film Simulation Recipe that Anders sent to me, the story itself makes this article a worthwhile read. I was (and still am) just blown away by it! It’s funny how life comes full circle in surprising ways sometimes.

Closed Umbrella – Phoenix, AZ – Fujifilm X100V – Kodak T-Max P3200 Recipe

“Some years back,” Anders Lindborg wrote me, “I found myself being totally photographically stuck. People liked my photos, but I could feel there was something missing from them and I thought they were still too amateurish. By chance, a photography magazine published an article called Learning How to See in which they mentioned a photographer named John Sevigny, an art teacher at a university in Mexico City. The magazine referenced Mr. Sevigny because he often talked with his students—and had also written some papers—about the subject of the article. Anyway, I started searching the internet and found many articles about him and his work. I also found some of his papers on the subject. Afterwards, I noticed that something gradually happened to my photos, and I realized that I could often see a deeper meaning in random ordinary things, people’s expressions and behavior. It really helped me, and I swore to never forget about this guy.”

“Life is funny,” Anders continued, “and I think I’m slowly starting to believe in this karma stuff. As it happens, awhile back I was contacted out of the blue by no other than John Sevigny himself! He had apparently found my stuff published on Fuji X Weekly very interesting and asked very kindly if I could help him out with the final touches on his upcoming book. The project that he had been working on was really heavy stuff, so he was temporarily burned out and needed some technical assistance, which I gladly provided. After the material for the book was finished, we continued chatting and I’m now proud to call him my friend.”

“After weeks of talking about photography, John mentioned that he really missed shooting with Kodak T-Max P3200 that he used to use all of the time while working as a news photographer. So, he said, how about making a recipe for it? I couldn’t resist, so we started developing it immediately. John provided me with all the information about the emulsion that I could possibly need, including a bunch of his own 25-year-old scans, but most important was his experience of shooting it daily for years. According to John, anytime there was a request for something that was going to be an article inside the newspaper, that’s the film they used since the available light would almost always be ranging from bad to worse. It didn’t matter if it was a sports event or a murder, they used Kodak T-Max P3200. After reading up about it (since I never shot it myself, sadly), I understood why: it was optimized to create sharp and (reasonably) detailed photos in generally bad light.”

Now Serving Bacon – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4 – Kodak T-Max P3200 Recipe

“Much care and testing has been put into this recipe by both John and myself,” Anders concluded, “and since John had all this experienced with the film, he had to be the one to officially approve it, which he did. I couldn’t be happier with the results we got from the tests! I actually put his scans in a photo album together with my test shots and the only thing revealing was the lens quality. When using the recipe with a vintage lens, I promise that you’ll have a really hard time telling your photos apart from the real film! Even some of the film’s tell-tale quirks have been replicated.”

Wow! Thank you, Anders Lindborg and John Sevigny, for creating this Kodak T-Max P3200 Film Simulation Recipe and allowing me to share it with the Fujifilm community on Fuji X Weekly—your work is much appreciated! I really love how Fujifilm cameras and Film Simulation Recipes are bringing people together across the world—it’s truly amazing! As great as this Recipe is—and it is great—the story behind it is even better.

Like Anders, I have also (sadly) never shot with Kodak T-Max P3200 black-and-white negative film (I went with Ilford Delta 3200 instead). Originally released in 1988 (the ISO 100 and ISO 400 versions were released two years prior), Kodak discontinued T-Max P3200 in 2012, but reintroduced it (with an “improved” emulsion) in 2018. It’s actually an ISO 800 (some say ISO 1000) film that labs automatically develop with two stops of push-processing, unless you tell them otherwise. But you can shoot it at ISO 800 and not push or ISO 400 and pull one stop (for less contrast) or ISO 1600 and push one stop. Some (brave? crazy? desperate?) photographers even shot it at ISO 6400 and pushed it three stops! Kodak T-Max P3200 can basically be anywhere from an ISO 400 to an ISO 6400 film, and it can go from a fairly flat and fine-grained emulsion to a punchy and gritty film, just depending on how you shot and developed it.

Yucca Flowers – Sedona, AZ – Fujifilm X100V – Kodak T-Max P3200 Recipe

With this Kodak T-Max P3200 Film Simulation Recipe, the higher the ISO you shoot with, the more it will resemble shooting the film at a higher ISO and push-processing, and the lower the ISO it will more resemble shooting at ISO 800 and not pushing in development. In other words, you are going to get somewhat different results at ISO 640 than ISO 6400; I especially appreciate how this Recipe looks from ISO 3200 to ISO 12800. You will need to consider if you want a cleaner or more grainy aesthetic, and choose an ISO that will produce those results.

If you have a Fujifilm X-Trans IV camera (X-Pro3, X100V, X-T4, X-S10, X-E4, X-S10, X-T30 II) or X-Trans V (X-H2, X-H2s, X-T5, X-S20, and any other released after publication), I invite you to give this Kodak T-Max P3200 Film Simulation Recipe a try! It’s not compatible with the X-T3 or X-T30 or X-Trans III, unfortunately; however, if you ignore Toning, Grain size, and Clarity, it should still produce good results, so don’t be afraid to give it a try. This Recipe should also work with GFX cameras, although I haven’t tested it and have no firsthand experience if it will look similar or not.

Film Simulation: Acros (or Acros+Y, Acros+R, Acros+G)
Monochromatic Color (Toning): WC -1 & MG -1
Grain Effect: Strong, Large
Color Chrome Effect: Off
Color Chrome FX Blue: Off
White Balance: 5500K, +4 Red & +7 Blue
Dynamic Range: DR400
Highlight: +1
Shadow: +3
Sharpness: +2

High ISO NR: -4
Clarity: +1
ISO: up to ISO 12800
Exposure Compensation: 0 to +2/3 (typically)

Example photographs, all camera-made JPEGs using this Kodak T-Max P3200 Film Simulation Recipe on my Fujifilm X-T5, X-E4 and X100V cameras:

Tall Flower Vine – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4
Tiny White Blooms – Phoenix, AZ – Fujifilm X100V
Garden Bulb – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4
Forest Stream – Sedona, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
38th Way – Phoenix, AZ – Fujifilm X100V
Palm in the Contrail Sky – Phoenix, AZ – Fujifilm X100V
Tall Cactus – Phoenix, AZ – Fujifilm X100V
Highlight & Shadow Leaves – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4
Backyard Barrel – Phoenix, AZ – Fujifilm X100V
Water Wheel – Sedona, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Castle Rock – Sedona, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Jet Above the Rocks – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Cloud Above the Desert – Sedona, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Arizona’s High Desert – Sedona, AZ – Fujifilm X100V
Oak Creek & Cathedral Rock – Sedona, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4
Rocks & Big Sky – Sedona, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4
Busy Parking Lot – Sedona, AZ – Fujifilm X100V
Delilah – Sedona, AZ – Fujifilm X100V
Sunlit Suburban Tree Branch – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X100V
Peaceful Pool – Phoenix, AZ – Fujifilm X100V
Josh by the Pool – Phoenix, AZ – Fujifilm X100V
Closed Umbrella 2 – Phoenix, AZ – Fujifilm X100V
Towel on Chair – Phoenix, AZ – Fujifilm X100V
Empty Bench – Phoenix, AZ – Fujifilm X100V
Please Don’t Litter – Phoenix, AZ – Fujifilom X100V
Basket – Phoenix, AZ – Fujifilm X100V
Hoop & Pine – Phoenix, AZ – Fujifilm X100V
Bus Rider – Sedona, AZ – Fujifilm X100V
Camera Fight 1 – Sedona, AZ – Fujifilm X100V
Camera Fight 2 – Sedona, AZ – Fujifilm X100V
Sisters in the Back of the Bus – Sedona, AZ – Fujifilm X100V
Lady with Paw-Print Earring – Phoenix, AZ – Fujifilm X100V
Joy’s Smile – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X100V
Girl Along a Wall – Phoenix, AZ – Fujifilm X100V
Preparing Hands – Phoenix, AZ – Fujifilm X100V
Sink Full of Dirty Dishes – Phoenix, AZ – Fujifilm X100V
Fake Plant – Phoenix, AZ – Fujifilm X100V
Floor – Phoenix, AZ – Fujifilm X100V
Table Lamp – Phoenix, AZ – Fujifilm X100V
Outdoor Patio Lights – Phoenix, AZ – Fujifilm X100V
Betty Elyse – Phoenix, AZ – Fujifilm X100V

ISO 640 vs ISO 12800:

ISO 640 Crop
ISO 12800 Crop

Find this Film Simulation Recipe and nearly 300 more in the Fuji X Weekly App!

This post contains affiliate links, and if you make a purchase using my links I’ll be compensated a small amount for it.

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Fujifilm X-E4 in silver:  Amazon   B&H  Moment
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Nostalgic Emulsion — Fujifilm X-Trans III (+ X-T3 & X-T30) FXW App Patron Early-Access Film Simulation Recipe

Bougainvillea Blues – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-H1 – Nostalgic Emulsion Recipe

My 15-year-old daughter, Joy, approached me and asked, “Can I make a Film Simulation Recipe?”

“Sure,” I happily replied. I handed her my Fujifilm X-H1, gave her a quick tutorial on the menu and settings (she hadn’t previously used this model), and off she went.

A couple of hours later Joy returned. “I’m not sure this is right. Can you help me?” She showed me her pictures.

“What look are you trying to create?” I asked.

“Well,” she replied, “it’s this aesthetic that’s dark with deep greens.”

“Where did you see it?” Joy then proceeded to show me some music videos, including Daylight by David Kushner. “That’s the aesthetic I want to make,” she told me, while stopping on a forested scene.

Rose of Sharon Backlit – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-H1 – Nostalgic Emulsion Recipe

The camera settings she had chosen weren’t all that far off, so I suggested a few adjustments. After more testing and review, another couple changes were made, and then even more testing was done. I asked, “Are you happy with this look?”

“Yes!” Joy excitedly responded. “This is the aesthetic I wanted.”

After she was done capturing pictures, I shot with her settings for a little while myself. I really like the moody and nostalgic feeling that this Film Simulation Recipe produces. It has a retro negative film look, maybe along the lines of Fujicolor Super HQ or Agfa XRG or something like that. You can expect dark shadows and a cool cast that leans green. It’s not a Film Simulation Recipe that everyone will love, but I bet it will be an instant favorite for some of you. It requires a White Balance setting that I had not previously used for a Recipe; for those trying to avoid adjusting the WB Shift when switching between C1-C7, this is another option for you to try.

Concrete Vine – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-H1 – Nostalgic Emulsion – by Joy Roesch

The Fuji X Weekly App is free, yet becoming a Fuji X Weekly App Patron unlocks the best App experience! One benefit of being a Patron is you get early access to some new Film Simulation Recipes. These Early-Access Recipes will eventually become available free to everyone in time, including this new one. In fact, many Early-Access Recipes have been publicly published on this blog and the App, so now everyone can use them. Patrons help support Fuji X Weekly and, really, without them there would be no App. So I want to give a special “thank you” to all of the Patrons!

This Nostalgic Emulsion Patron Early-Access Recipe is compatible with all Fujifilm X-Trans III cameras, plus the X-T3 & X-T30. For those with newer X-Trans IV cameras, set Color Chrome FX Blue to Off, Clarity to 0, and I’d suggest Grain size Small. Those with “older” GFX cameras can use it, too, although it will render slightly different (but try it anyway!).

If you are a Fuji X Weekly App Patron, the Nostalgic Emulsion Recipe is available to you right now on the App! Don’t have the Fuji X Weekly App? Download for free today! Consider subscribing to unlock the best App experience and to support this website.

Example photographs, all camera-made JPEGs captured using this Nostalgic Emulsion Film Simulation Recipe on my Fujifilm X-H1:

Water Fountain – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-H1 – by Joy Roesch
Concrete Fountain – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-H1 – by Joy Roesch
Little Vine Leaves – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-H1 – by Joy Roesch
Backlit Green Leaves – Buckeye, AZ -Fujifilm X-H1 – by Joy Roesch
Hidden Bougainvillea – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-H1 – by Joy Roesch
Garden – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-H1
Spring Window Reflection – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-H1
Fallen Bougainvillea – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-H1
Bougainvillea Sprouting – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-H1
Bougainvillea Sage – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-H1
Bougainvillea Leaves – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-H1 – by Joy Roesch
Bloom Small – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-H1 – by Joy Roesch
Backyard Trumpet Blossoms – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-H1 – by Joy Roesch
Rose of Sharon – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-H1
Rosebud – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-H1
Bright Green Leaves – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-H1
Bush & Blocks – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-H1 – by Joy Roesch
Pouring Sunlight over Honeysuckles – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-H1
Garden Gate – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-H1 – by Joy Roesch
Pink Oleander Blooms – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-H1 – by Joy Roesch
Dark Blooms – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-H1 – by Joy Roesch
Wall and Leaves – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-H1 – by Joy Roesch
Joyful Josh – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-H1
Peaches – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-H1
Architecture & Jon – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-H1 – by Joy Roesch
Blue Glass – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-H1 – by Joy Roesch
Three Bright Ideas – Buckeye, AZ – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-H1
Dusk Light – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-H1 – by Joy Roesch
Green Leaves at Dusk – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-H1 – by Joy Roesch
Veiled Lightbulb – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-H1 – by Joy Roesch
Blue Hour Light – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-H1 – by Joy Roesch
Disabled Parking – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-H1
Illuminated Plant – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-H1
Night Corridor – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-H1

Find this Film Simulation Recipe and nearly 300 more in the Fuji X Weekly App!

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Fujicolor Pro — Fujifilm X-Trans III (+ X-T3 & X-T30) Film Simulation Recipe

Last Light on Brush – Antelope Island SP, UT – Fujifilm X-H1 – Fujicolor Pro Recipe

This Film Simulation Recipe is intended to produce an analog-like color-negative-film aesthetic with a classic Fujicolor palette. While I didn’t attempt to mimic any specific film, I had Fujicolor Pro 160NS in my mind as I made this. There are already Recipes for that film (here and here), and this one isn’t “better” than those two, but more of an alternative version that you might like. I also had pulled-process Fujicolor Pro 400H on my mind (there’s also already a Recipe for that); again I didn’t necessarily try to mimic that film and process specifically, but instead had the intention of producing a general Fujicolor Pro “memory color” (similar to what I did with my Nostalgic Color Recipe). This Fujicolor Pro Film Simulation Recipe works well in a variety of daylight situations, and produces a fairly distinct look.

The Fujicolor Pro Film Simulation Recipe has been a Patron Early-Access Recipe on the Fuji X Weekly App for over a year—it’s well past due to become available to everyone! And now it is. If you are an App Patron, be sure to look for the Early-Access Recipe that replaced this one.

Parking Garage – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-H1 – “Fujicolor Pro”

This Fujicolor Pro Film Simulation Recipe is compatible with all Fujifilm X-Trans III cameras, plus the X-T3 & X-T30. For those with newer X-Trans IV cameras, set Color Chrome FX Blue to Off, Clarity to 0, and I’d suggest Grain size Small. Those with “older” GFX models can use this Recipe, too, although it will render slightly differently (but try it anyway).

PRO Neg. Std
Dynamic Range: DR400

Grain: Strong
White Balance: 5900K, -2 Red & 0 Blue
Color Chrome Effect: N/A (X-Trans III) or Off (X-T3/X-T30)
Highlight: -2
Shadow: +3
Color: -2
Sharpness: -2
Noise Reduction: -4
ISO: Auto up to ISO 6400
Exposure Compensation: +2/3 to +1 1/3 (typically)

Example photographs, all camera-made JPEGs captured using this Fujicolor Pro Film Simulation Recipe on my Fujifilm X-H1:

Bunch of Honeysuckle Blooms – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-H1
Cage – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-H1
Easter Egg Hunting – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-H1
Jon with Messy Hair – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-H1
Stairs Up – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-H1
Main St. Market – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-H1
Yellow Among Green – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-H1
Frary Peak Sage – Antelope Island SP, UT – Fujifilm X-H1
Great Salt Lake Rocks – Antelope Island SP, UT – Fujifilm X-H1
Lake Between the Rocks – Antelope Island SP, UT – Fujifilm X-H1
Salt Lake From Antelope Island – Antelope Island SP, UT – Fujifilm X-H1
Island Brush – Antelope Island SP, UT – Fujifilm X-H1
Jetty – Antelope Island SP, UT – Fujifilm X-H1
Sunset Over Salt Lake – Antelope Island SP, UT – Fujifilm X-H1

Find this Film Simulation Recipe and nearly 300 more in the Fuji X Weekly App!

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Can AI Make a Fujifilm Recipe? — Kodak Ektachrome E100VS — Two Fujifilm X-T5 (X-Trans V + X-Trans IV) Film Simulation Recipes!!

Rocky Hill in the Desert – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5 – Kodak Ektachrome E100VS v1

I asked OpenAI’s ChatGPT to make a Film Simulation Recipe to mimic the look of Kodachrome X slide film. This wasn’t the first time that I attempted to use ChatGPT to make a Recipe for Fujifilm cameras… you might recall that the Urban Dreams Film Simulation Recipe was made by ChatGPT, and by chance it has some resemblance to Kodachrome 200. I learned a lot about the AI’s ability (or is it inability?) to make Recipes, so I decided to try again just for the fun of it.

Kodak introduced Kodachrome—a color transparency film, and the world’s first commercially successful color film—in 1935. Kodachrome X was in the second era of the emulsion, sold between 1962 and 1973. It was replaced by Kodachrome 64, which was discontinued in 2009. Today you cannot buy Kodachrome, and even if you found some old rolls of the film, you cannot even get it developed. Shooting with a facsimile Film Simulation Recipe on Fujifilm cameras is a great way to experience some of these old emulsions that no longer exist, such as Kodachrome X.

Here’s a YouTube video I made documenting the experience!

I have Film Simulation Recipes already that mimic Kodachrome X slide film. These Recipes are called Kodachrome II, and there’s one for X-Trans I, one for X-Trans II, one for X-Trans III, and two for X-Trans IV cameras. In the video above, I compare ChatGPT’s Kodachrome X Recipe to my Kodachrome II v2 Recipe for X-Trans IV, which I shot on my X-T5; in order to make the Recipe compatible, I set Color Chrome FX Blue to Off since X-Trans V cameras render blue more deeply with some film sims.

My opinion is that ChatGPT’s Recipe is much too vibrant to mimic Kodachrome X. While the film was richly vibrant for its time, no emulsion in the 1960’s was that colorful. Today it would be described more as true-to-life. There are also other issues I take with the settings that the AI chose, so I don’t think it did well at mimicking Kodachrome; however, that doesn’t mean the settings (by chance) don’t look nice.

ChatGPT’s Kodachrome X Recipe
My Kodachrome II v2 Recipe

After examining the ChatGPT Recipe, I decided that it reminds me a lot of Kodak Ektachrome E100VS. There have been over 40 different emulsions that carried the Ektachrome name over the years—each with their own unique look—and E100VS was just one. Kodak introduced this film in 1999 and discontinued it in 2012. Ektachrome E100VS was Kodak’s best attempt at Velvia, and was their most vibrant emulsion. The “VS” in the name meant Vividly Saturated. While it was similar to Velvia, it wasn’t identical—the warmth of the film was the most obvious difference—and many photographers preferred Fujifilm’s Velvia over Kodak’s Ektachrome E100VS. Still, at the pinnacle of the film era, it was a popular choice for landscape photographers wanting a boost in vibrancy.

I noticed with AI generated Film Simulation Recipes that most of the time it chooses Auto White Balance, Grain Strong, and stays within -2 to +2 on all of the settings; my experience is that it only occasionally strays from that. It also seems to always leave some necessary settings out, and you have to ask it to add those. Of course, no film has Auto White Balance—most are Daylight (around 5500K), and some are Tungsten (around 3200K). While it is amazing that ChatGPT can produce a Recipe for Fujifilm cameras, if it looks good or not—and if it truly produces the aesthetic that you asked for—is more by chance than skill. Also, it doesn’t like to cite its sources, which is just wrong in my opinion.

Yellow Desert Flower – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5 – Kodak Ektachrome E100VS v2

While it tried and failed to resemble 1960’s era Kodachrome, I still liked the look produced by ChatGPT’s Kodachrome X Film Simulation Recipe. Since it has some similarities to Kodak Ektachrome E100VS color transparency film, I renamed it after that emulsion. I also refined the settings to more closely resemble the film, and am including that as a second Recipe, which I call Kodak Ektachrome E100VS v2. So v1 is ChatGPT’s Recipe, and v2 is my modified alternative.

I shot a number of rolls of Ektachrome E100VS back in my film days. Most of these pictures are stored away in little yellow boxes, but a few images have been scanned. Obviously, the scanner—and especially the quality of the scan—has an impact on the photo rendering. The four images below are some real Kodak Ektachrome E100VS frames that I shot many years ago. None of these are high-quality scans, and for that I apologize, and I hope you can overlook that aspect of the pictures. Also, it’s important to state that they all look significantly more impressive when viewed on a light table or especially from a slide projector.

Actual Kodak Ektachrome E100VS film
Actual Kodak Ektachrome E100VS film
Actual Kodak Ektachrome E100VS film
Actual Kodak Ektachrome E100VS film

How the film was shot had a significant impact on the look. For deeper blues and reds, one should underexpose the film slightly. For cyan sky and brighter (and warmer) colors, one should overexpose slightly. Of course, you had to be careful, because the film—like most slide films—had a narrow dynamic range, and there wasn’t much room for error either direction. These two Film Simulation Recipes behave similarly, although I believe v2 a little more so than v1.

Without further ado, here are the two Kodak Ektachrome E100VS Film Simulation Recipes!

Kodak Ektachrome E100VS v1

ChatGPT Recipe for Kodachrome X

Beef Franks – Vulture City, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5 – Ektachrome E100VS v1

This is the Recipe that ChatGPT created to mimic Kodachrome X, but it looks more like Kodak Ektachrome E100VS. It produces vivid colors similar to—but more warm and slightly less vibrant than—Velvia film. For darker blues and deeper reds, use a lower exposure compensation, and for lighter blues and brighter/warmer colors, use a higher exposure compensation. Because it uses Auto White Balance and DR400, you’ll find it to be quite versatile; however, the rendering is clearly “wrong” in some situations.

The Kodak Ektachrome E100VS v1 Film Simulation Recipe is fully compatible with X-Trans V cameras, which (as of this writing) are the X-T5, X-H2, and X-H2s, as well as “newer” X-Trans IV cameras, which include the X-Pro3, X100V, X-T4, X-S10, X-E4, and X-T30 II. You can use this Recipe on newer GFX cameras; however, it will render slightly differently (but try it anyway!). For the X-T3 and X-T30 (plus older GFX), you’ll have to ignore Color Chrome FX Blue, Grain size, and Clarity (since your camera doesn’t have those options), so it will definitely look a little different, but you might like it nonetheless; for X-Trans III, you’ll have to additionally ignore Color Chrome Effect.

Film Simulation: Velvia
Grain Effect: Strong, Small
Color Chrome Effect: Strong
Color Chrome FX Blue: Strong
White Balance: Auto, +2 Red & -2 Blue
Dynamic Range: DR400
Highlight: +1
Shadow: +1
Color: +2
Sharpness: +1

High ISO NR: -2
Clarity: +1
ISO: Auto, up to ISO 6400
Exposure Compensation: +1/3 to +1 (typically)

Example photographs, all camera-made JPEGs using this Kodak Ektachrome E100VS v1 Film Simulation Recipe on my Fujifilm X-T5:

Suburban Arches – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Red, Green & Yellow – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Pink Blossom in Spring – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Boy in a Red Hat – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Saguaro & Abandoned Building – Vulture City, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Agave at the Mine – Vulture City, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Pile of Rocks – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Barrel Cactus & Yellow Flowers – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Colorful Thorns – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Hidden Saguaro – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Sharpness – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
A Cactus in Spring – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Spiderweb Among Thorns – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Yellow Flowers Behind Cactus – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Cactus Vailed by Sunlight – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Little Purple Wildflowers – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Veiled Cactus – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Desert Spring in the Shade – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Shaded Bristlebush Blooms – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5

Kodak Ektachrome E100VS v2

Fuji X Weekly Recipe

Unexpected X – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5 – Kodak Ektachrome E100VS v2

This version of Kodak Ektachrome E100VS is my modification to better mimic the film. It’s not too divergent—only slightly dissimilar—since it’s simply a modification of the AI Recipe, and not made from scratch. Because it uses more of a daylight-balanced Kelvin White Balance and DR200, it’s not quite as versatile as v1, and you have to be a little more careful of the light situation you are shooting in and pay closer attention to the highlights to avoid clipping. Sometimes it’s not completely correct, but I think in the “right” conditions it can be quite convincing—nearly identical to some slides I have.

The Kodak Ektachrome E100VS v2 Film Simulation Recipe is fully compatible with X-Trans V cameras, which (as of this writing) are the X-T5, X-H2, and X-H2s, as well as “newer” X-Trans IV cameras, which include the X-T4, X-S10, X-E4, and X-T30 II. Unfortunately, it is not compatible with the X-T3, X-T30, X-Pro3, or X100V. You can use this Recipe on newer GFX cameras; however, it will render slightly differently (but try it anyway!).

Film Simulation: Velvia
Grain Effect: Weak, Small
Color Chrome Effect: Strong
Color Chrome FX Blue: Strong
White Balance: 5150K, +3 Red & -3 Blue
Dynamic Range: DR200
Highlight: +1.5
Shadow: +0.5
Color: +1
Sharpness: -1

High ISO NR: -4
Clarity: +3
ISO: Auto, up to ISO 6400
Exposure Compensation: -1/3 to +2/3 (typically)

Example photographs, all camera-made JPEGs using this Kodak Ektachrome E100VS v2 Film Simulation Recipe on my Fujifilm X-T5 and X-E4:

Americana Home – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Blue Sky Behind Trees – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4
Boy in a Red Hat 2 – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Abunda la Bougainvillea – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Garden Apex – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Bright Backyard Blossom – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Shaded Oleander Blooms – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Tiny Yellow Evening Blooms – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5 – Kodak Ektachrome E100VS
Reddish Orange Cactus Flower – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
White Paper Flowers – Beckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Desert Hill through Palo Verde – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Little Pops of Purple – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Purple Spring – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Bunch of Yellow Trumpets – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Red Airplane – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Sunset in Suburbia – Surprise, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5

Comparison

In the three examples above, Kodak Ektachrome E100VS v1 is on the left (revealed by moving the slider right), and Kodak Ektachrome E100VS v2 is on the right (revealed by moving the slider left).

This post contains affiliate links, and if you make a purchase using my links I’ll be compensated a small amount for it.

Fujifilm X-T5 in black:  Amazon  B&H  Moment
Fujifilm X-T5 in silver:  Amazon  B&H  Moment

Find these Film Simulation Recipes and nearly 300 more on the Fuji X Weekly — Film Recipes App!

As a bonus, I asked OpenAI’s DALL-E 2 AI image creator to show me what ChatGPT creating Film Simulation Recipes looks like. The results? Awful, but also kind of funny! I tried rewording the request several different ways in hopes of getting a better image, but it never really got any better.

Here are a few:

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Getting a Wes Anderson Look from your Fujifilm Camera + 4 new Film Simulation Recipes!!!!

Yellow Cactus Blooms – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5 – Vibrant Arizona Recipe

Everyone is after a Wes Anderson look right now!

When I first watched the trailer for the upcoming Wes Anderson movie Asteroid City, I thought perhaps it might be possible to mimic the aesthetic on my Fujifilm X-T5; however, I quickly realized that it’s not possible straight-out-of-camera. The movie has an orange and teal look, and I’ve tried unsuccessfully for years to achieve that on Fujifilm. In order to get orange and teal, the White Balance Shift requires plus red for orange and minus red for teal; it’s not possible to do both, so you must decide which one you want: orange or teal? After a few hours of unsuccessfully trying to get the settings right, I gave up.

Then I saw your pictures on Instagram. Specifically, there were photos captured using the Bright Summer, Bright Kodak, Kodak Portra 400 Warm, and Pacific Blues Film Simulation Recipes that had some Wes Anderson vibes to them, which convinced me to try again. I directly compared those four Recipes to Asteroid City screenshots, and decided that Bright Summer and Bright Kodak were the closest; however, none of them were quite right. So I set out to get a little closer—as close as I could—knowing that I wouldn’t be able to achieve a perfect match, but I hoped it would be similar enough that at a cursory glance it would pass for Asteroid City.

Popeyes – Litchfield Park, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4 – Vibrant Arizona Recipe

Knowing that most of you don’t have an X-Trans V camera, I made a version for X-Trans IV models, too, since the majority of those who shoot with Recipes do so on X-Trans IV cameras. Also, I figured that some of you won’t be satisfied with the results, and are after an even closer facsimile of Asteroid City, so I have some advice for that, too, a little further down, but it does require a small amount of post-editing with Capture One.

While attempting to mimic Asteroid City, I was inspired by another Wes Anderson film: The French Dispatch, specifically, the indoor scenes of the newspaper office, so I made Film Simulation Recipes for that, too—one for X-Trans V and another for X-Trans IV. I don’t know what the light situation was exactly in those scenes, so I don’t know if it would render similarly under identical light, but it does produce convincing results in certain artificial and mixed light scenarios.

If you are after a Wes Anderson look, check out the four Film Simulation Recipes below!

Vibrant Arizona (X-Trans V)

Look that Way – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5 – Vibrant Arizona Recipe

The Vibrant Arizona Film Simulation Recipe can be characterized as bright, colorful, and warm, yet still classic-analog-like, with some similarities to overexposed Kodak negative film. While not an exact match, I’m confident that it is as close as you’re going to get to an Asteroid City aesthetic straight-out-of-camera. The movie takes place in a fictional northern-Arizona town (although it was filmed in Spain, apparently), so that is why I’m calling it Vibrant Arizona.

An important note is that this Recipe uses D-Range Priority (a.k.a. DR-P), which takes the place of Dynamic Range and the Tone Curve (Highlight and Shadow). I don’t have a lot of Film Simulation Recipes which utilize D-Range Priority, but there are a few, including Pulled Fujicolor Superia, Scanned Superia, and Portra-Style, the last of which has some similarities to Vibrant Arizona.

This particular Recipe is for X-Trans V cameras, which (as of this writing) are the Fujifilm X-T5, X-H2, and X-H2s. For best results, use in sunny daylight. I shot in both the 3:2 and 16:9 aspect ratios, and preferred the latter for a more cinematic feel.

Film Simulation: Classic Chrome
Grain Effect: Weak, Small
Color Chrome Effect: Off
Color Chrome FX Blue: Weak
White Balance: 4350K, +6 Red & -8 Blue
Dynamic Range: DR-P Strong
Color: +4
Sharpness: -2

High ISO NR: -4
Clarity: -3
ISO: Auto, up to ISO 6400
Exposure Compensation: +2/3 to + 1 1/3 (typically)

Example photographs, all camera-made JPEGs using this Vibrant Arizona Film Simulation Recipe on my Fujifilm X-T5:

Backyard Spring – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Spring or Fall? – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Blue Star – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Ocotillo & Saguaro – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Palo Verde on Rocks – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Rocks & Vista – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Arizona View – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Girl with a Camera – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Contemplation – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Over There – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Please Let Me Get Back to Playing – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Neil’s – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Deere in the Desert – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Apartment Palm – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Sonoran Desert – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
The Yellow Desert – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
A Cactus Blossom – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Main Fountain – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5

Vibrant Arizona (X-Trans IV)

Red Light – Avondale, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4 – Vibrant Arizona Recipe

Because X-Trans V cameras render blue more deeply on some film simulations, the X-Trans IV version of this Recipe calls for Color Chrome FX Blue to be set to Strong instead of Weak, and is otherwise identical. This Vibrant Arizona Film Simulation Recipe is compatible with the Fujifilm X-Pro3, X100V, X-T4, X-S10, X-E4, and X-T30 II cameras. For the X-T3 and X-T30, you can ignore Grain size and Color Chrome FX Blue (since your camera doesn’t have those options), and use a 1/4 Black Pro Mist or 10% CineBloom diffusion filter in lieu of Clarity; however, it will look slightly different. For newer GFX models… I’m not sure if you should use this version or the X-Trans V version, but one of the two should work well on your camera—try them both, and see which you prefer.

Film Simulation: Classic Chrome
Grain Effect: Weak, Small
Color Chrome Effect: Off
Color Chrome FX Blue: Strong
White Balance: 4350K, +6 Red & -8 Blue
Dynamic Range: DR-P Strong
Color: +4
Sharpness: -2

High ISO NR: -4
Clarity: -3
ISO: Auto, up to ISO 6400
Exposure Compensation: +2/3 to + 1 1/3 (typically)

Example photographs, all camera-made JPEGs using this Vibrant Arizona Film Simulation Recipe on my Fujifilm X-E4:

Bird in a Palm – Avondale, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4
Green Sign – Avondale, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4
Two Palm Building – Avondale, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4
Indicative? – Litchfield Park, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4
Spring or Autumn? – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4
Caged – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4
Bougainvillea Branch Blossom – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4
Pink & Yellow – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4
Bougainvillea Garden – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4
Green Meets Red – Avondale, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4

Asteroid City Edit

Asteroid City Edit

If you aren’t satisfied with how well the Vibrant Arizona Film Simulation Recipe matches Asteroid City, there is a quick and easy Capture One edit that will make your pictures even closer to the aesthetic of the motion picture film. Simply import your straight-out-of-camera JPEGs (not the RAW!) into Capture One, find the Basic Color Editor, and make these adjustments:

Cyan
Hue -30
Lightness -20

Blue
Hue -20
Saturation +50

Those are the adjustments that I made to the picture above plus the five images below. You might have to stray from the above settings and modify the exact parameters, just depending on the photographs, but for these six, I followed them precisely and made no other changes. With this edit, the pictures are pretty convincing, and there’s no doubt that we’re mimicking Wes Anderson’s Asteroid City. Even though this will get you closer to the movie aesthetic, I personally prefer the unedited versions.


Yellow Pillow – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5 – Indoor Angouleme Recipe

There was a moment while creating the above Recipes that I became particularly frustrated with the process, so I took a break, and instead worked on a different Wes Anderson look. I was inspired by the indoor scenes inside the newspaper office in the movie The French Dispatch, so I began working on a Film Simulation Recipe to mimic that aesthetic. The look is warm when shot in warm light, with somewhat muted colors and low contrast. This is a much different aesthetic than Asteroid City, but it is another Wes Anderson film that’s popular right now.

While the movie takes place in a fictional French town, it was filmed in the real town of Angouleme, which apparently (and appropriately) is known as the City of the Image. While these Recipes look quite interesting in outdoor daylight situations, they are intended for artificial and mixed indoor lighting, which is where they really shine. That’s why I’ve named the two Film Simulation Recipes below Indoor Angouleme. Although none of the movie was filmed in the 16:9 aspect ratio, I used it for these Recipes, but feel free to use whichever aspect ratio you prefer.

Indoor Angouleme (X-Trans V)

Red Chair – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5 – Indoor Angouleme Recipe

This version of the Indoor Angouleme Film Simulation Recipe uses the new Nostalgic Neg. film simulation. It also utilizes the Auto Ambience Priority White Balance, which I’ve only used once before (on the Ektachrome 320T Recipe). Indoor Angouleme is compatible with X-Trans V cameras, which (as of this writing) are the Fujifilm X-T5, X-H2, and X-H2s. Those with newer GFX cameras can use it, too; however, it will likely render slightly differently.

Film Simulation: Nostalgic Neg.
Grain Effect: Weak, Small
Color Chrome Effect: Strong
Color Chrome FX Blue: Weak
White Balance: Auto Ambience Priority, -2 Red & -6 Blue
Dynamic Range: DR400
Highlight: -2
Shadow: -2
Color: -1
Sharpness: -2

High ISO NR: -4
Clarity: -3
ISO: Auto, up to ISO 6400
Exposure Compensation: +2/3 to +1 (typically)

Example photographs, all camera-made JPEGs using this Indoor Angouleme Film Simulation Recipe on my Fujifilm X-T5:

Dessert – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Nutmeg – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Iced or Hot? – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Pumps – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Mmmm – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Tea Cup – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Artist at Work – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Making Salad – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Joshua in Front of a Curtain – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Spectacular Suburban Sunset – Surprise, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Pergola Corner – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Roof Ridge – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Sun Peeking Behind Wall – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Big Bloom – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
A Pink Rose – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5

Indoor Angouleme (X-Trans IV)

Water, Fish, and View – Avondale, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4 – Indoor Angouleme Recipe

The Nostalgic Neg. film sim is somewhat similar to Eterna, and can sometimes be closely mimicked with it. Since X-Trans IV models don’t have Nostalgic Neg., I used Eterna instead. While this version isn’t 100% identical to the X-Trans V Recipe, it is pretty close overall, and retains the same feel.

This version of Indoor Angouleme is compatible with the Fujifilm X-Pro3, X100V, X-T4, X-S10, X-E4, and X-T30 II cameras. To use it on the X-T3 and X-T30, ignore Color Chrome FX Blue and Grain size (since your camera doesn’t have those options), select regular AWB (since your camera doesn’t have the Ambience option), and use a 1/4 Black Pro Mist or 10% CineBloom diffusion filter in lieu of Clarity; however, it will look slightly different.

Film Simulation: Eterna
Grain Effect: Weak, Small
Color Chrome Effect: Strong
Color Chrome FX Blue: Strong
White Balance: Auto Ambience Priority, -1 Red & -6 Blue
Dynamic Range: DR200
Highlight: -1
Shadow: -1
Color: +4
Sharpness: -2

High ISO NR: -4
Clarity: -3
ISO: Auto, up to ISO 6400
Exposure Compensation: 0 to +2/3 (typically)

Example photographs, all camera-made JPEGs using this Indoor Angouleme Film Simulation Recipe on my Fujifilm X-E4:

Tabletop Succulent – Litchfield Park, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4
Bookshelf Plant – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4
Sugar & Creamer – Litchfield Park, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4
Roar – Avondale, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4
Alignment – Litchfield Park, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4
1:10 – Litchfield Park, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4
Green Planet – Litchfield, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4
White Rose – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4
Pink Blossomed Rose – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4

Find these Film Simulation Recipes and nearly 300 more on the Fuji X Weekly — Film Recipes App!

This post contains affiliate links, and if you make a purchase using my links I’ll be compensated a small amount for it.

Fujifilm X-T5 in black:  Amazon  B&H  Moment
Fujifilm X-T5 in silver:  Amazon  B&H  Moment
Fujifilm X-E4 in black:  Amazon   B&H  Moment
Fujifilm X-E4 in silver:  Amazon   B&H  Moment

Help Fuji X Weekly

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Fujifilm Recipes for Spring Flower Photography

Vibrant Flowerbed – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 – Velvia Recipe

April showers bring May flowers, as the saying goes. Yes, it’s wildflower season already, and if you are not sure which Film Simulation Recipe to program into your Fujifilm camera to capture the colorful spectacle, this article should help with that. No matter which Fujifilm X-Trans camera you have, there’s a Recipe for you to try today!

This is far from a comprehensive list of Film Simulation Recipes that will work well for photographing spring blossoms. There are nearly 300 Recipes, and most of them could be a good choice, depending on the exact subject, lighting, and your style. This list is simply a selection of the ones that I personally like and can recommend to you. Feel free to try other Recipes not included in the list below. If I didn’t include your favorite Recipes for photographing spring flowers, let me know in the comments because I’d love to hear which ones you use. If you are not sure which Film Simulation Recipe to try, these recommendations should get you started.

X-Trans V

X-T5, X-H2, X-H2s

X-Trans IV — Part 1

X-Pro3, X100V, X-T4, X-S10, X-E4, X-T30 II

X-Trans IV — Part 2

X-T3, X-T30

X-Trans III

X-Pro2, X100F, X-E3, X-T2, X-T20, X-H1

X-Trans II — Part 1

X100T, X-E2, X-E2s, X-T1, X-T10, X30, XQ2, X70

X-Trans II — Part 2

X100S, X20, XQ1

X-Trans I

X-Pro1, X-E1, X-M1

Find these Film Simulation Recipes and nearly 300 more on the Fuji X Weekly — Film Recipes App!

Wait, What?!? Fujifilm to Use X-Trans IV Sensor in new Cameras?

Sentinel & Merced – Yosemite NP, CA – Fujifilm X100V – Vintage Color Recipe
Captured on a 26-megapixel X-Trans IV sensor

According to Fujirumors, who is almost always right, the upcoming X-S20 camera, which will likely be announced in May, will have a 26-megapixel X-Trans IV sensor, the same sensor as the X-S10 and all other X-Trans IV cameras, and not the new 40-megapixel or 26-megapixel-stacked X-Trans V sensor.

Wait, what?!? Why would Fujifilm do this?

This doesn’t make any sense because Fujifilm has historically used the same sensor in all models of a certain generation, with few exceptions. What are the exceptions? The X-M1 had an X-Trans I sensor paired with an X-Trans II processor (yet with options more like a Bayer model). The X20, X30, XQ1, and XQ2 were X-Trans II cameras with small sensors and not APS-C. Otherwise, all of the X-Trans cameras in a generation shared the same sensor. All of the X-Trans III cameras had the 24-megapixel X-Trans III sensor. All of the X-Trans IV cameras had the 26-megapixel X-Trans IV sensor. But X-Trans V is definitely different.

First we have the 26-megapixel-stacked X-Trans V sensor in the X-H2S, which presumably will be found only in that one model and no others. Then there is the 40-megapixel X-Trans V sensor found in the X-H2 and X-T5, which presumably will also be found in the next X-Pro and X-100 models. Now we’ll have the 26-megapixel X-Trans IV sensor (presumably paired with the X-Trans V processor) in the X-S20. Weird.

The advantage of having just one sensor for each Fujifilm era is that no matter your camera within a certain generation, you know you will get identical images out of each body. So you could have an X-T2 as your main camera, an X-T20 as a second body, and an X-E3 as a travel option, and the images will look the same, because they all share the same sensor and processor. Consistency. Or you might have an X-Pro3 and X100V, and—no matter which you used—the picture quality will be identical. Now with X-Trans V there’s a lot less consistency across the range, which in my opinion is a disadvantage.

Using the X-Trans IV sensor in the X-S20 does make sense because the sensor, while a few years old, is still excellent, and pairing it with the new processor will (potentially) get the most out of it. I have both X-Trans IV and X-Trans V cameras; while they’re all great, I actually prefer X-Trans IV. I don’t need 40-megapixels. Some people do—yes—but the vast majority don’t, and it’s overkill that for most people only exacerbates storage issues. So I would rather Fujifilm work to squeeze more—increased dynamic range, improved high-ISO, speed, etc.—out of the 26-megapixel sensor than to push more resolution. I feel like 26MP is a really good spot for APS-C, and Fujifilm shouldn’t be in a hurry to move past it. I’ve made many very nice 2′ x 3′ prints from X-Trans IV JPEGs, and the majority of people don’t print that large, let alone bigger.

One question that this raises is what will be different about the X-S20 compared to its predecessor, since they’ll share the same sensor? Apparently the X-S20 will have the new NP-W235 battery, which is certainly nice. I would be surprised if a slight design change isn’t necessary to accommodate the bigger battery, but I don’t expect any drastic changes to the design overall. I expect some improvements to autofocus, maybe image stabilization, and perhaps some small video spec upgrades (such as better time limits) will be included, but certainly nothing major. Most likely more will be alike than dissimilar; however, the upgraded battery and processor will make the X-S20 better than the X-S10, at least by a little, but probably not much more than a little.

I do think this gives some credibility to my theory that another PASM model is in the works—I don’t have any inside information, this is just my personal thoughts. I think a number of X-S10 users would like to upgrade to a higher-end body, but the X-H2/X-H2S is too big and expensive for them. I also believe that a number of X-H2/X-H2S owners would like a more compact and cheaper second body, but the X-S10 is a little too much of a downgrade for them. These folks aren’t interested in the X-T4 or X-T5 because of the traditional dials. Fujifilm has created a need for an in-between mid-tier PASM model. Don’t be surprised if an X-S2 (or whatever they will call it) is being designed right now, which will be a little larger than the X-S20 (but not as large as the X-H2/X-H2S), have weather-sealing, two SD-Card slots, seven Custom Presets, but no external fan accessory and slightly more limited video specs compared to the X-H2 (more similar to the X-T5), with an MSRP around $1,500-ish. Look for it in 2024. Like I said, this is all just a guess.

Evening Charge – Santa Rosa, NM – Fujifilm X-E4Kodak Portra 400 v2 Recipe

Another question that is raised is whether the X-T40 (or maybe they’ll call in X-T50) will have the X-Trans IV sensor like the X-S20, and I think the answer is yes. Fujifilm will use the “old” sensor to differentiate low-end models from mid and high-end bodies. If there is an X-E5, which is far from guaranteed, it would also have the 26-megapixel X-Trans IV sensor. I don’t personally believe that both the X-T00 and X-E lines will continue, and most likely the one to get axed is the X-E series, which is unfortunate because I really like the X-E line. If there eventually is an X-E5, look for it in 2025 near the very end of X-Trans V. Fujifilm should 100% be making an X80—the long awaited successor to the X70—and if they do it will certainly also have the 26-megapixel X-Trans IV sensor, but I don’t think that such a camera is in the works. I really hope I’m wrong.

I don’t know if the X-S20 (and future X-T40) will have an output more similar to X-Trans IV or X-Trans V or something unique. My guess is that the processor will be programmed to produce results more like the X-T5, which renders blue a little deeper on some film simulations and does some odd things with AWB (otherwise the differences between X-Trans IV and V are pretty small overall). We’ll have to wait until the camera comes out to find out.

Personally, I feel as though camera makers release new models much too quickly. There’s still quite some demand for X-Trans IV models. The X-E4 and especially the X100V have long backorder lists. A camera store told me that if they received zero new orders for the X100V and they continued to received new bodies at the same rate that Fujifilm has been delivering them, that it would take them six months to fulfill all of the current X100V orders; yet, they continue to receive new orders at a higher rate than bodies are being shipped to them by Fujifilm, so the backorder list is constantly growing. Fujifilm should concentrate their efforts on fulfilling current demand for X-Trans IV before pressing forward with X-Trans V. Unfortunately, camera makers will constantly push slightly improved new models because there is so much GAS and FOMO out there that people will buy them up.

There’s a cycle, which I’ve certainly been caught up in, and it’s not healthy: buy a new camera every year. People often have two camera bodies (sometimes someone has only one, and sometimes someone—like me—has a bunch)—and one of the two is replaced every odd year and the other is replaced every even year. Perhaps in 2021 you replaced your X-T2 with an X-T3 and in 2022 you replaced your X100F with an X100V; maybe in 2023 you will replace your X-T3 with an X-T5, and in 2024 you’ll look to replace your X100V with an X100Z (or whatever they’ll call the next X100). The cycle goes on and on.

My most recent camera purchase was an X-T5, but I did so in order to try the new film sim and make Film Simulation Recipes for X-Trans V; otherwise I didn’t need it—yes, the X-T5 is very nice to have and I’m not complaining whatsoever, but I’d be just as happy without it. I purchased my X-E4 two years ago, and I have no desire to replace it anytime soon—it was my most-used camera in 2022. My X100V was a birthday gift from my wife nearly three years ago, and I’m sure I’ll skip the next X100 series model, unless there’s something really radical about it. A year before that I bought an X-T30, which is a good camera that would still seem fresh if Fujifilm had shown it more Kaizen love, instead of releasing the firmware as a new model. Of those four, the X100V and X-E4 are my two favorites, and I hope to be still using them in 2025 and perhaps well beyond that. If Fujifilm made an X80, monochrome-only X100 or X-Pro, or an IR model, I’d be in line to buy those, but otherwise I’m not personally interested in anything new. I have what I need, but more than that I need to break the cycle of buying a new camera every year.

The fact is that even the older Fujifilm models are good. Yes, the newer models are better in many ways, but that doesn’t mean that their predecessors weren’t good. I used my Fujifilm X-T1 exclusively for a couple of weeks last November, and, not surprising to me but perhaps a surprise to some of you, the X-T1 did exceptionally well in most situations, including sports—the biggest shortcoming was autofocus in dim-light. If your camera still works for you, there’s not likely a good reason to upgrade.

Of course, the X-S20 isn’t intended as an “upgrade” model. Its purpose is to convince those unhappy with their Canikony cameras to consider Fujifilm instead. The X-S line’s main goal is to attract those from other brands who aren’t interested in (or are intimidated by) Fujifilm’s traditional tactile controls, but want Fujifilm’s colors and such. The X-S20 is an entry-level model, so Fujifilm is hoping that those with a Nikon D3500 or Sony A6300 or Canon T7 (or another model along those lines) will take a long look at the X-S20. I’m sure it will sell well, bringing people into the Fujifilm fold who otherwise wouldn’t be.

10 Must Try Film Simulation Recipes for Night Photography

Night Statue – Jackson Hole, WY – Fujifilm X100V – Serr’s 500T Recipe

Which Film Simulation Recipes are good for nighttime photography? With nearly 300 to choose from, it can be difficult to know when to use which Recipe. Almost all film emulsions are either Daylight-balanced or Tungsten-balanced; similarly, most Recipes are intended for daytime photography, and some are intended for nighttime photography. There are also some that, even though made for sunny conditions, still do well after the sun goes down. So let me suggest to you 10 Film Simulation Recipes that do well at night!

Depending on the exact light situation, some Film Simulation Recipes that are intended for daytime use will still look good at night, and other times they will produce a strong warm cast that you might not like. While adjusting the White Balance to better suite the situation is always an acceptable option (“season to taste” the Recipe), picking a Recipe that is intended for the light situation you are in is my preferred method. Like film, it’s better to pick the “right” one that matches the conditions you’ll be shooting in, but there’s no right or wrong way to do photography, so you’ll have to decode what works for you.

Of course, everyone has different tastes. There are some Recipes that you might love, and some that you might not. Your favorite after-dark Recipe might not be in this list, as it’s not comprehensive. There are certainly other Recipes that I have personally used and liked for nighttime photography; however, these are ones that I think are especially well-suited. A couple were tough cuts, and would certainly have been included if it was 15 Recipes and not 10.

If you are not sure which Film Simulation Recipe to use at night, try one of these!

Find these Film Simulation Recipes and nearly 300 more on the Fuji X Weekly — Film Recipes App!

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Which Film Simulation Recipe, When? Part 5 — Fujifilm X-Trans V (X-T5, X-H2, X-H2s)

Way Over That Way – Tucson, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5 – Thommy’s Ektachrome Recipe

Part 1Part 2Part 3Part 4

I get asked all of the time when to use which Film Simulation Recipe. With nearly 300 on the Fuji X Weekly App to choose from, it can be difficult to know when each Recipe should be chosen. Besides, you only have C1-C7 Custom Presets on your Fujifilm camera (most of you, anyway). Which seven Recipes should you have programed? When should you select them?

To understand the idea behind this post, it’s important to go back to Part 1, which explains it all. Definitely review the earlier articles in this series if you never saw them or if it’s been awhile. When I started, the Fujifilm X-T5 wasn’t even announced yet, and I had zero X-Trans V Film Simulation Recipes. By the time I published Part 4, I had a couple of Recipes for the X-T5, but only a couple. This followup had to wait awhile.

I still don’t have a ton of X-Trans V Recipes, but I do have just enough that I could complete this Part 5. I do want this to be an ongoing series, but new posts will likely be few and far between, so don’t expect a Part 6 anytime soon.

Below I will suggest to you seven Film Simulation Recipes (one for each C1-C7 Custom Preset) for you to program into your Fujifilm X-Trans V camera, and state when to use each. If you have a Fujifilm X-T5, X-H2, or X-H2S (or any other X-Trans V camera that is released after this is published), I invite you to try these Recipes for the situations that I recommend.

C1 — Kodak Portra 400 v2 — Golden Hour

Flock of Cranes – Gilbert, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5 – Kodak Portra 400 v2 Recipe

Kodak Portra 400 v2 is a Recipe that does well at anytime during daylight hours, and as the name suggests it is a good option for portrait photography, but I’m going to recommend it specifically for “golden hour” near sunrise and sunset. This really could be your primary use-all-of-the-time Recipe, and that’s why I suggest placing it in C1, but when the sun is low to the horizon, make sure that this is the one you’re shooting with. I personally use this Recipe frequently.

Alternatives for “golden hour” photography:

Nostalgia Negative
Kodak Negative

C2 — 1970’s Summer — Midday

More Than Double Wide – Arlington, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5 – 1970’s Summer Recipe

You might be surprised that Kodachrome 64 didn’t make it to the top-spot on this category. I love that Recipe and think it’s a wonderful choice—don’t be afraid to choose it over this… or even over Kodak Portra 400 v2 for “golden hour” photography. Yet, for midday—which I’m defining as daylight that’s in-between the “golden hour” light of sunrise and sunset—I think 1970’s Summer is tough to beat. It’s not the most versatile Recipe, but if the sun is out, it’s an excellent option.

Alternatives for “midday” photography:

Kodachrome 64
Kodachrome 25

C3 — Kodak Ultramax 400 — Overcast

Rainy Day Window – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5 – Kodak Ultramax 400 Recipe

For dreary overcast, Kodak Ultramax 400 is my favorite option. It is a versatile Recipe, so it’s not just good for rainy days, but many other situations, too, including golden hour, midday, shade, indoor, nighttime and more. This could be your go-to Film Simulation Recipe. Emulsion ’86 and Thommy’s Ektachrome are very good runners up, and could also be alternatives for C2.

Alternatives for “overcast” photography:

Emulsion ’86
Thommy’s Ektachrome

C4 — Timeless Negative — Indoor

Dark Coffee – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5 – Timeless Negative Recipe

For natural light indoor photography, my top choice is the Timeless Negative Recipe (although any of the Recipes listed above this could work well, too). Timeless Negative is an all-rounder that could be used in most situations and produce excellent results, but specifically I’m recommending it for natural light indoor pictures. For artificial-light indoor images, use the recipes for nighttime photography below.

Alternative for “indoor” photography:

Standard Provia
Nostalgic Print

C5 — Superia Xtra 400 — Nighttime

Night Blossoms – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5 – Superia Xtra 400 Recipe

I don’t yet have a “Tungsten” Film Simulation Recipe for X-Trans V, but that doesn’t mean you are out of luck. I’ve gotten good results at night with both Kodak Ultramax 400 and Timeless Negative, but Superia Xtra 400 is my favorite for after-dark photography. Superia Xtra 400 is also good for any of the C1-C4 situations mentioned above, as it’s a versatile Recipe—it’s another that could be your go-to for any situation. The two alternatives mentioned below are great options for golden hour or midday photography—I prefer both for that, and Pacific Blues is one of my absolute favorites—but I have also had decent results with those two Recipes at night, so they are worth your consideration (either in C5, or in C1 or C2).

Alternatives for “nighttime” photography:

Pacific Blues
CineStill 400D v2

C6 — Vintage Bronze — Wildcard

Paperflowers – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5 – Vintage Bronze Recipe

In Parts 1-3, this category was called Alternative Process; however, for Part 4 and Part 5, since there is no Film Simulation Recipe that fits that category, it was renamed Wildcard. My top-option for it is Vintage Bronze, which produces vintage analog-like results in a variety of situations, including daylight and indoors. Alternatively, you could fill C6 with a favorite color Recipe that didn’t make it to C1-C5 above (such as Kodachrome 64 or Pacific Blues). Otherwise, the two options below are also great choices to program here.

Alternative “wildcard” Recipes:

Summer of 1960
CineStill 400D v1

C7 — Ilford FP4 Plus 125 — B&W

Window Shade Pull – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5 – Ilford FP4 Plus 125 Recipe

Technically speaking, Ilford FP4 Plus 125 is the only black-and-white Film Simulation Recipe made specifically for X-Trans V cameras—and it’s a very good Recipe! But, X-Trans IV B&W Recipes are also compatible with X-Trans V cameras, and of those Kodak Tri-X 400 is my all-time favorite. I definitely recommend that one, but Ilford FP4 Plus 125 is excellent, too.

Alternatives for “B&W” photography:

Kodak Tri-X 400
Ilford HP5 Plus 400

This post contains affiliate links, and if you make a purchase using my links I’ll be compensated a small amount for it.

Fujifilm X-T5 in black:  Amazon  B&H  Moment
Fujifilm X-T5 in silver:  Amazon  B&H  Moment

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Thommy’s Ektachrome — Fujifilm X-T5 (X-Trans V) Film Simulation Recipe

Backlit Lupine – Sun City, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5 – Thommy’s Ektachrome

Thommy’s Ektachrome Film Simulation Recipe was created by Thomas Schwab, who has made a number of Recipes published on this website, including Pure NegativeSuperia Xtra 400Fujicolor NPS 160 PulledUrban Vintage ChromeKodachrome IIKodak Portra 800 v2Kodak BrillianceClassic MonochromeB&W Superia, and Monochrome Kodachrome. Thomas has also collaborated on other Recipes, playing an important role in getting them right, including Kodak Portra 800Kodak Ektar 100Kodachrome 1Kodak Portra 400, and Kodak T-Max 400. I’m sure I’ve missed a few, and for that I apologize. When he sent me this one to try, I was especially excited!

Thomas was simply trying to make a Recipe using the Nostalgic Neg. film sim that would be good for portraits. The Recipe he created has a distinctive Ektachrome aesthetic, especially similar to National Geographic photographs prior to Ektachrome’s discontinuation by 2013 (prior to the revival in 2018). That was, of course, by chance and not intentional, but there certainly are some similarities, and why this Recipe is called Thommy’s Ektachrome. It’s not only good for portraits, but also landscapes and I’m sure many genres of photography. This Recipe does particularly well in sunny daylight, but is good for overcast, shade, and natural-light indoors, too.

Way Over That Way – Tucson, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5 – Thommy’s Ektachrome

Because this Thommy’s Ektachrome Film Simulation Recipe uses the new Nostalgic Neg. film simulation, it is only compatible with the Fujifilm X-T5, X-H2, and X-H2S (as well as any other X-Trans V camera released after this article is published). Those with newer GFX cameras can likely use it, too, although it will probably render slightly different (but try it anyway!). 

Film Simulation: Nostalgic Neg.
Grain Effect: Weak, Small
Color Chrome Effect: Weak
Color Chrome FX Blue: Off
White Balance: 5000K, -1 Red & +3 Blue
Dynamic Range: DR100
Highlight: +1.5
Shadow: +1.5
Color: +1
Sharpness: -1

High ISO NR: -4
Clarity: -2
ISO: Auto, up to ISO 6400
Exposure Compensation: +0 to +1/3 (typically)

Example photographs, all camera-made JPEGs using Thommy’s Ektachrome Film Simulation Recipe on my Fujifilm X-T5:

Amanda Using RitchieCam – Sun City, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Caterpillar Blossoms – Sun City, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Wildflower Spring – Sun City, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Lupine – Sun City, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Colors of Spring – Sun City, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Rain on a Green Leaf – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Raindrops on Rose Leaves – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Trumpet Flower in Blossom – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Water Drop on a Lightbulb – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Spring Cage – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Breakfast – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Fallen Tree over Sabino Creek – Summerhaven, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Sabino Creek – Summerhaven, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Waterfall from Snowmelt – Summerhaven, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Waterfall over Stone – Summerhaven, AZ -Fujifilm X-T5
Historic Ranch House – Tucson, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Jon in the Forest – Summerhaven, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Reserved – Tucson, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Two at the Overlook – Tucson, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Old Man at the Vista – Tucson, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Mountains – Summerhaven, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Rock Climbers – Tucson, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Resting on Top – Tucson, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Desert Pine – Tucson, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5

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Summer of 1960 — Fujifilm X-T5 (X-Trans V) Film Simulation Recipe

Ranch House – Tucson, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5 – Summer of 1960 Recipe

I love Arizona Highways magazine! When I was a kid, my grandparents, who lived in Arizona, would give me their old copies of the publication. The pictures were always amazing. I didn’t know it at the time, but that simple act had a profound impact on my life. Eventually I would become a photographer, and I would be significantly influenced by the pictures from that magazine.

For those who don’t know, Arizona Highways is a magazine with an important history. It began in 1925, and in 1946 published the world’s first all-color publication. From the beginning, Arizona Highways has been dedicated to the art of photography. Ansel Adams was a regular contributor. Barry Goldwater, Ray Manley, Chuck Abbott, David and Josef Muench, Ed Ellinger, Esther Henderson, and many other talented photographers were often featured. The publication is full of wonderful images even to this day. While it is not purely a photography magazine, Arizona Highways is a publication that photographers love due to their passion for the medium.

I recently found the December 1960 issue of Arizona Highways in a used bookstore. It has page after page of amazing photography! I really love the look of the pictures in this particular issue—while not every image looks alike, there is definitely a commonality to the photo aesthetic. I suppose that some of it is due to the printing process, which the magazine proudly claims is “Micro-Color Lithography” printed on “Glossette Offset Enamel 70-pound base” paper. I believe that the age of the magazine—now over 62-yeas-old!—has something to do with it, as color photographs and pages have a tendency to fade and discolor over time. What about the film? Well, there’s that, too.

Agaves in 1960 – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5 – Summer of 1960 Recipe
Photo of a page in the December 1960 issue of Arizona Highways magazine.

In the back of the magazine is a page that provides detailed notes on all of the photographs. For example, the picture shown in the magazine above—entitled The Blossoming Agaves—was photographed by Chuck Abbott in July 1960 during midday using a 5×7 Deardorff View camera set to f/18 and 1/10 shutter on Kodachrome, which had an ISO of 10. You might note that this is the “Sunny 16 Rule” except underexposed by 1/3 stop (presumably to protect the highlights). The detailed notes that were provided are a real treasure trove!

The vast majority of the pictures in the December 1960 issue were captured on Ektachrome. Now Ektachrome prior to 1955 used the E1 development process and was ISO 10, from 1955 to 1958 used the E2 development process and was ISO 32, and from 1959 to 1965 used E3 and was ISO 50—this particular issue had a mix of all three of those Ektachromes. A few Ascochrome images were also published, and those have a look that’s noticeably different than the Ektachrome and Kodachrome pictures. One image was captured on Ektacolor negative film, and that’s the only picture in the issue that wasn’t shot on slide film. Many of the photographs printed in the December 1960 issue of Arizona Highways were captured during the spring, summer, or fall of 1960.

Inspired by the aesthetic of the pictures found in the magazine, I set out to mimic the look with my Fujifilm X-T5. After a little fiddling and trial-and-error, I was able to get surprisingly close—almost an exact match to some of the pictures! There are certainly some similarities to both the Ektachrome and Kodachrome photographs published in the December 1960 issue of Arizona Highways, some of which were captured in the summer of 1960, hence the name of this Film Simulation Recipe.

Saguaro Spines – Tucson, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5 – Summer of 1960 Recipe

Because this Summer of 1960 Film Simulation Recipe uses the new Nostalgic Neg. film simulation, it is only compatible with the Fujifilm X-T5, X-H2, and X-H2S (as well as any other X-Trans V camera released after this article is published). Those with newer GFX cameras can likely use it, too, although it will probably render slightly different (but try it anyway!). This Recipe seems especially well suited for sunny daylight photography, and does alright in overcast, shade, and natural-light indoors, too.

Film Simulation: Nostalgic Neg.
Grain Effect: Strong, Small
Color Chrome Effect: Off
Color Chrome FX Blue: Strong
White Balance: 5250K, -3 Red & -5 Blue
Dynamic Range: DR400
Highlight: +4
Shadow: +2
Color: +3
Sharpness: -4

High ISO NR: -4
Clarity: -3
ISO: Auto, up to ISO 6400
Exposure Compensation: +1/3 to +1 (typically)

Example photographs, all camera-made JPEGs using this Summer of 1960 Film Simulation Recipe on my Fujifilm X-T5:

Green Growth Under Dormant Trees – Tucson, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Falling Rain on Bougainvillea – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Bougainvillea on a Sunny Day – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Oleander and Palm Tree – Tucson, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
March Palms – Tucson, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Agua Caliente Pond – Tucson, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Palm and Pond – Tucson, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Manmade Pond – Tucson, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Ham & Cheddar – Tucson, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Jon by a Pond – Tucson, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Ranch House & Palm – Tucson, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Yellow Blossom by Blue Window – Tucson, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Door Lamp – Tucson, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Sunlight Pines – Summerhaven, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Light Pouring Downhill – Summerhaven, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Leftover Forest Snow – Summerhaven, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Small Waterfall – Summerhaven, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Evergreen Forest – Summerhaven, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Icy Mountain Road – Summerhaven, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Blue Sky & Green Pines – Summerhaven, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Evening at an American Mountain – Tucson, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Eastern Mountains at Sunset – Tucson, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Rincon Peak at Sunset – Tucson, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Small Water Fountain at Sunset – Tucson, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5

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Fujifilm X-T5 in black:  Amazon  B&H  Moment
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Using AI to Create Film Simulation Recipes + Urban Dreams X100V (X-Trans IV) Film Simulation Recipe

B is for Bisbee – Bisbee, AZ – Fujifilm X100V – Urban Dreams Recipe

Can you use Artificial Intelligence to create Film Simulation Recipes for Fujifilm cameras? Does AI even know what that is? If so, would those Recipes be any good? Those questions and more have been rattling around inside my head for the last few months.

Back in January I asked Open AI‘s Chat GPT what a Film Simulation Recipe was and it didn’t know—it couldn’t differentiate a Film Simulation Recipe from a Film Simulation, but only went so far as to acknowledge that Film Sims could be customized. It also didn’t know much about Fuji X Weekly. It didn’t take long for things to change.

Last week Open AI announced the new-and-improved GPT-4, and so I put it through the same test. To my surprise, it not only knew what a Film Simulation Recipe is, but could even create one! The AI also provided the reasons why it chose the settings it did, and they seemed logical. However, I noticed that some required parameters were missing, so I asked it to add those settings to the Recipe, and it did. I also asked Chat GPT to give the Recipe a name. The AI created Recipe turned out to be pretty good, and I used it for some photography in southern Arizona, but I’m getting ahead of myself. We’ll get back to this in a moment, but let’s talk about some other things first.

Don’t Park Overnight at Boothill – Tombstone, AZ – Fujifilm X100V – Urban Dreams

I wanted to find out how Chat GPT knew how to create a Film Simulation Recipe. Obviously the software has never used a camera, so where was it getting its information? I asked, and the software deflected, telling me where I could find further information on Fujifilm cameras and Film Simulation Recipes. To my surprise, Fuji X Weekly was listed as a potential resource. I wasn’t satisfied with the answer, so I kept asking, rewording the question, until the software admitted that it gathers information from (among other things) websites, such as Fuji X Weekly, One Camera One Lens, Dan Bailey, and Ted Forbes. I was a little surprised on the last two, especially Ted who I’m pretty certain doesn’t use Recipes or out-of-camera JPEGs. Maybe it just threw out some names associated with Fujifilm gear. My conclusion is that the software searches the web for resources and attempts to make sense of what it finds, and it borrows heavily from the work of others (but, thankfully, doesn’t outright copy).

I had Chat GPT make a total of seven Film Simulation Recipes for the Fujifilm X100V. Not once did it provide me with all the necessary parameters on the first try, and I had to ask it to add the missing fields. It always chose Auto White Balance (once it did not provide a WB, so I had to ask it to do so), and only provided a White Balance Shift once on the first try; for the other six Recipes, when I asked it to provide me with a WB Shift, it never ventured beyond +/- 2 for Red and Blue. In fact, only once did the software suggest that any setting go beyond +/- 2, so I think it takes a conservative approach, perhaps not understanding why anyone would want to go wild with the JPEG options.

On the first try I was provided with Color Chrome Effect and Color Chrome FX Blue settings: Off on both. For the next five attempts Chat GPT didn’t list either option, so I had to ask, and it chose Off each time. With the final Recipe attempt, it listed Color Chrome Effect set to Strong, but didn’t list Color Chrome FX Blue; when I asked it to give me a Color Chrome FX Blue setting, it (surprisingly) stated that Color Chrome FX Blue isn’t an option on the Fujifilm X100V. I think the software struggles to understand what these settings do and why someone would choose them, and also struggles to understand what specific settings are available on each Fujifilm model.

Cienega Bridge on Old Highway 80 – Vail, AZ – Fujifilm X100V – Urban Dreams Recipe

Two settings that the software never provided on the first try are Grain size and Clarity. It would list Grain strength (Off, Weak, or Strong) but never size (Small or Large). When asked about size, it suggested Large four times, Small twice, and Standard once (there is no Standard option). With Clarity, it typically suggested a positive number, and only gave me a negative number once, zero once, and Off (which I suppose is the same as zero) once. As with the other settings, it never ventured beyond +/- 2.

I asked it to mimic the look of a certain film stock, and Chat GPT provided a Film Simulation Recipe that (in my opinion) wasn’t a great match. I then asked it to mimic the look of a different film that just so happens to be the same exact emulsion just sold under a different brand name (to see if it would provide similar or identical settings), and the second Recipe was much different than the first. It’s clear that the AI isn’t analyzing pictures from film to create its Recipes, but instead finds descriptions of the stocks and suggests which Fujifilm settings could logically match the descriptions. “Vibrant” means Velvia and “soft” means PRO Neg. Std, which makes sense to a point; even though one film can produce many different aesthetics based on how it was shot, developed, printed and/or scanned (among other things), I believe you’d be hard pressed to find a single emulsion that could be emulated by both Velvia and PRO Neg. Std, but that’s what the software did.

I also asked Chat GPT to create a Recipe that I already have a Film Simulation Recipe for. I wanted to see if it would just copy my Recipe, but thankfully it didn’t. It was actually significantly different. For now, at least, the software isn’t outright plagiarizing anyone (that I’m aware of), and I hope it stays that way. Finally, using a different account, I asked Chat GPT to create a Recipe with an identical request to one of the seven, just to see if it would give me the same answer, and it didn’t. I repeated this test once more, and it once again provided a different result. While it tries to come across as “intelligence” it appears to be more like a roll of the dice.

Red Brick and Good Cakes – Bisbee, AZ – Fujifilm X100V – Urban Dreams Recipe

Based on this test, I believe that AI is about 60% of the way there to being a useful tool for creating Film Simulation Recipes. It struggles to know which parameters to provide. It doesn’t understand the nuances between camera models. It seems to take a rather predictable and conservative approach to creating Recipes. While I think it tries to be logical with its choices, it is basically just taking a guess and giving random settings, which might produce good results sometimes and might not other times. The amazing thing, though, is that just a couple months ago the AI didn’t even know what a Film Simulation Recipe was, so it has made significant strides in a short period. I think eventually—and it might not even be that far out—the software will be able to analyze an image and provide settings for your Fujifilm camera that will be a reasonably close match to that image. For now, though, AI isn’t a particularly good way to get a Recipe.

I promised that I would get back to the first Film Simulation Recipe that I asked Chat GPT to create for me to use on my Fujifilm X100V. I asked the software to create a Recipe that would be good for an urban environment at night. It provided me with everything except for Grain size, White Balance Shift, and Clarity, so I asked it to give me those settings, too. Then I asked it to name the Recipe—it gave me five choices, and I went with the first: Urban Dreams.

I found Urban Dreams to be a pretty decent and versatile Recipe. I didn’t get a chance to use it much in an urban environment at night, but the results were good in the few opportunities that I did have. It seems to do well in sunny daylight, dreary overcast, nighttime, indoors, outdoors, landscapes, street, still-life, portraits, etc., so this could be one’s go-to Recipe for everyday photography. It reminds me a little of Kodachrome 200, a high-ISO slide film introduced by Kodak in the mid-1970’s and discontinued in 2006. It’s not completely “right” for Kodachrome 200, but can be surprisingly close sometimes, and this Recipe is probably the closest to it that I’ve seen.

Dusk on Highway 90 – Benson, AZ – Fujifilm X100V – Urban Dreams Recipe

This Urban Dreams Film Simulation Recipe is compatible with most X-Trans IV cameras: the X-Pro3, X100V, X-T4, X-S10, X-E4, and X-T30 II. For X-Trans V and newer GFX, you can use this Recipe, but it will render slightly different (try it anyway). For the X-T3, X-T30, X-Trans III, and older GFX, simply ignore Clarity and consider Sharpness set to 0; the results will be very similar (only slightly different).

Classic Chrome
Dynamic Range: DR400
Highlight: -1
Shadow: +1
Color: +2
Noise Reduction: -2
Sharpness: -1
Clarity: +2
Grain Effect: Strong, Large
Color Chrome Effect: Off
Color Chrome Effect Blue: Off
White Balance: Auto, 0 Red & +2 Blue
ISO: Auto, up to ISO 6400
Exposure Compensation: +1/3 to +1 (typically)

Example photographs, all camera-made JPEGs using this Urban Dreams Film Simulation Recipe on a Fujifilm X100V:

Oleander Blue – Tucson, AZ – Fujifilm X100V
Colorful Triangle – Bisbee, AZ – Fujifilm X100V
Gunfight at the O.K. Corral – Tombstone, AZ – Fujifilm X100V
Boothill Visitors Leaving – Tombstone, AZ – Fujifilm X100V
H.B. Cook 1882 – Tombstone, AZ – Fujifilm X100V
Tattered Flag – Tombstone, AZ – Fujifilm X100V
Gunslinger – Tombstone, AZ – Fujifilm X100V
Wells Fargo – Tombstone, AZ – Fujifilm X100V
Courthouse – Tombstone, AZ – Fujifilm X100V
Bisbee Afternoon – Bisbee, AZ – Fujifilm X100V
Under the Trestle – Vail, AZ – Fujifilm X100V
Just not Straight Ahead – Bisbee, AZ – Fujifilm X100V
Studebaker – Bisbee, AZ – Fujifilm X100V
Studebaker 2 – Bisbee, AZ – Fujifilm X100V
Blue Truck – Bisbee, AZ – Fujifilm X100V
Uphill to Downtown – Bisbee, AZ – Fujifilm X100V
Object Limited – Bisbee, AZ – Fujifilm X100V
Cafe – Bisbee, AZ – Fujifilm X100V
Outdoor Breakfast – Tucson, AZ – Fujifilm X100V
Coke and Produce – Tucson, AZ – Fujifilm X100V
Lit Lamp – Tucson, AZ – Fujifilm X100V
Saloon & Steaks – Tucson, AZ – Fujifilm X100V

This post contains affiliate links, and if you make a purchase using my links I’ll be compensated a small amount for it.

Fujifilm X100V in black:  Amazon   B&H  Moment
Fujifilm X100V in silver: Amazon   B&H  Moment

Find this Film Simulation Recipe and nearly 300 more on the Fuji X Weekly — Film Recipes App! Consider becoming a Patron subscriber to unlock the best App experience and to support Fuji X Weekly.

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New Fujifilm X-Trans II FXW App Patron Early-Access Film Simulation Recipe: PROvia

O.K. Corral – Tombstone, AZ – Fujifilm X70 – PROvia Recipe

Omar Gonzalez posted a hilarious YouTube video called Do You Suffer from Fujifilm Sim Depression?, which is a parody of pharmaceutical commercials, except that it’s about Fujifilm film simulations and not prescription drugs. It’s incredibly well done and funny! I don’t want to spoil it if you haven’t watched it, but the conclusion is that Omar likes the Provia film simulation. So watch the video if you haven’t yet seen it, and if you are suffering from “Fujifilm Sim Depression” let me offer you are this cure: the PROvia Film Simulation Recipe. Perhaps Omar someday will see it and try it; if so, I hope he likes it!

Provia is one of the film simulations that I personally like least… well above Sepia, but towards the bottom of the list nonetheless. Ouch. As it turns out, I was never meant to like it, yet it is the “Standard” film simulation on all Fujifilm cameras. This PROvia Recipe is my take on a “better” Provia, and is intended to not only look good, but also be versatile so that it could be one’s go-to Film Simulation Recipe (that’s why “PRO” is capitalized in the name). It is compatible with all X-Trans II cameras; those with X-Trans I and Bayer models can use it, too, but it will render slightly different on those models (try it anyway!).

Car Care – Tucson, AZ – Fujifilm X70 – PROvia Recipe

This PROvia Film Simulation Recipe is a Fuji X Weekly App Patron Early-Access recipe, which means if you are an App Patron, you have access to it right now. The Fuji X Weekly App is free, yet becoming a Patron unlocks the best App experience! One benefit of being a Patron is you get early access to some new Film Simulation Recipes, such as this one. These Patron Early-Access Recipes will eventually become available free to everyone in time, including this new one. Patrons help support Fuji X Weekly and, really, without them there would be no App, so I want to give a special “thank you” to all of the Patrons!

If you are a Fuji X Weekly App Patron, I invite you to give the PROvia Film Simulation Recipe a try today! Don’t have the Fuji X Weekly App? Download it for free today! Consider becoming a Patron subscriber to unlock the best App experience, to gain Early-Access to this Recipe, and to support Fuji X Weekly.

Example photographs, all camera-made JPEGs using this PROvia Film Simulation Recipe on my Fujifilm X70:

Sabino Creek – Summerhaven, AZ – Fujifilm X70
Saguaro Behind Palms – Tucson, AZ – Fujifilm X70
Palm Branches – Tucson, AZ – Fujifilm X70
Green Ocotillo – Tucson, AZ – Fujifilm X70
Gunfight Site – Tombstone, AZ – Fujifilm X70
Reach for the Sky – Tombstone, AZ – Fujifilm X70
Bird Cage Theatre – Tombstone, AZ – Fujifilm X70
One Way Alley – Bisbee, AZ – Fujifilm X70
Cloudy Saguaro – Tucson, AZ – Fujifilm X70
Prickly Pear Pads – Tucson, AZ – Fujifilm X70
Sunlight Through the Forest – Summerhaven, AZ – Fujifilm X70
Snowy Hillside – Summerhaven, AZ – Fujifilm X70
Rainy Desert at Dusk – Tucson, AZ – Fujifilm X70
Indoor Fireworks – Tucson, AZ – Fujifilm X70
Used Bookmans – Tucson, AZ – Fujifilm X70
Alignment – Tucson, AZ – Fujifilm X70

Fujifilm X-Trans II Film Simulation Recipe: Provia Negative

Empty Baseball Field – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T1 – Provia Negative Recipe

Unlike most Film Simulation Recipes, I didn’t model this one after any film or process. My first thought was this: how can I make a Recipe that’s helpful. Let me back this up a minute. Unless your camera is an X-Pro3 or newer, you cannot save a white balance shift with your C1-C7 custom presets; however, your camera will remember one shift per white balance type, so if each C1-C7 recipe uses a different white balance type, you won’t have to remember to change the shift when you change Recipes. For X-Trans II, there are recipes that use Auto, Daylight (which Fujifilm calls “Fine” for some reason), Kelvin, and Shade, so I thought it would be helpful to create a recipe that calls for a different white balance type that I haven’t yet used.

After some playing around, I created a Film Simulation Recipe that I was quite happy with. It reminds me a little of Fujichrome Provia 100F slide film, but less vibrant, and a tad less contrasty, too, but still kind of similar; however, I think the tonality is more similar to negative film than reversal film. That’s why I call this recipe Provia Negative. This recipe has a slight cool color cast, with white leaning towards blue. I was able to get good results in several different light situations—including indoors, overcast, and shade—but it is especially well suited for sunny daylight.

Indoor Tree – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T1 – Provia Negative Recipe

This Provia Negative Film Simulation Recipe was a Fuji X Weekly App Patron Early-Access Recipe, so subscribers to the App have been able to use it since July; however, a new Early-Access Recipe has replaced it, so it is now available to everyone. Because it uses the Classic Chrome film simulation, it is only compatible with X-Trans II camera with Classic Chrome, which are the Fujifilm X100T, X-E2, X-E2S, X-T1, X-T10, X30, XQ2, and X70.

Classic Chrome
Dynamic Range: DR400
Highlight: -2 (Soft)
Shadow: +2 (Hard)
Color: +2 (High)
Sharpness: -1 (Medium-Soft)
Noise Reduction: -2 (Low)
White Balance: Fluorescent 3, -2 Red & -2 Blue
ISO: Auto up to ISO 3200

Exposure Compensation: 0 to +2/3 (typically)

Example photographs, all camera-made JPEGs captured using this Provia Negative Film Simulation Recipe on my Fujifilm X-T1 and Fujifilm X70 cameras:

Fake Leaf by Real Window – Tucson, AZ – Fujifilm X70
Cienega Creek Bridge – Vail, AZ – Fujifilm X70
Sharp Agave – Tucson, AZ – Fujifilm X70
Two Magenta Flowers – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T1
One Bloom Remains – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T1
Pink & Green – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T1
Pop of Warmth – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T1
Pink Flower Blossom – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T1
Pink Flower Blossom 2 – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T1
Bougainvillea Pink – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T1
Backlit Flowers & Leaves – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T1
Basketball in the Grass – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T1
Go Supply – Goodyear, AZ – Fujifilm X-T1
Hobby Lobby – Avondale, AZ – Fujifilm X-T1
1:40 Diner – Benson, AZ – Fujifilm X70
Square on Block Wall – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T1

Find this Film Simulation Recipe and nearly 300 more on the Fuji X Weekly App! Consider becoming a Patron subscriber to unlock the best App experience and to support this website.

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7 Film Simulation Recipes for Ultra-High-ISO Photography

Garden Spiderweb – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4 – GAF 500 Recipe – ISO 12800

I remember when ISO 400 used to be consider high ISO. In fact, the “H” in Fujicolor Pro 400H means high ISO. When I shot film, I usually didn’t go higher than ISO 400, although on a rare occasion I did go wild and use an ISO 800, 1600, or (gasp!) 3200 emulsion (those were ultra-high-ISOs back then), when the expected light was dim and a tripod wasn’t practical. When I started shooting digital almost 15 years ago, I remember that ISO 1600 on my first DSLR was barely usable in a pinch, and it was best to stay at or below ISO 800. Nowadays those limitations are long gone.

Thanks to the X-Trans color array, Fujifilm is better able to differentiate color noise from color information (than with a Bayer array), allowing more control over how noise is rendered. Because of this, the APS-C sensor on Fujifilm X cameras does pretty darn well at high-ISO photography. Yes, it can get noisy, but the noise is more organic-looking and less color-splotchy (perhaps even a little film-grain-like) than non-X-Trans cameras typically produce.

Still, a lot of photographers are hesitant to try high-ISO photography. I’ve had someone tell me that they never go beyond ISO 800 on their Fujifilm cameras. Someone else said that they don’t use Film Simulation Recipes with DR400 because it requires an ISO that they’re not comfortable using. Everyone has their own preferred upper ISO limit—mine might be higher than yours, and that’s ok. What I’d like to do, though, is encourage you to step outside of your comfort zone, and try some ISOs that you would not normally—or perhaps ever—use.

You might want to use ultra-high-ISOs—which I consider to be ISO 12800 and higher, but your definition might be different—in dim light situations, such as at night or in a poorly lit room. That’s probably the most common reason. I will sometimes use really high ISOs in daylight when it’s not even necessary just for the aesthetic of it. Crazy, right?! I think sometimes digital can appear too clean, and an ultra-high-ISO can give the picture a grittier look, more similar to some film emulsions.

Of course, using ultra-high-ISOs in daylight can be problematic because the light is strong. My Fujifilm X100V has a built-in ND filter, which makes it more practical. Otherwise, screwing an ND filter onto the end of the lens will help. If you don’t have one, be sure to use your camera’s electronic shutter (instead of the mechanical one) because it is capable of faster shutter speeds. You might also have to use small apertures like f/11 or f/16 to reduce the light entering the camera.

If you want to give it a try, below are seven Film Simulation Recipes that use ultra-high-ISOs. Many of them go “up to” an ultra-high-ISO, so in that case you’d want to purposefully choose a high ISO instead of a low one. Give one or more of these Recipes a try today! Leave a comment to let me know which one (or ones) you like. My personal top favorites are GAF 500 for color and Kodak Tri-X 400 for B&W.

ISO 12800

Up to ISO 12800

Up to ISO 25600

ISO 1600-12800

ISO 12800

ISO 3200-12800

ISO 25600-51200

Find these Film Simulation Recipes and nearly 300 more on the Fuji X Weekly — Film Recipes App!

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Fujifilm X-E4 (X-Trans IV) Film Simulation Recipe: Superia Summer

Fading Flowers in the Desert – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4 & 27mm – “Superia Summer”

I almost always have several experimental Film Simulation Recipes programmed into each of my Fujifilm cameras. Sometimes these developmental settings become Recipes and sometimes they don’t (more don’t than do). Occasionally I forget the story behind an experimental Recipe—why the settings are the way they are, and what I was intending to mimic. It might have been a film photograph I saw, or a film stock someone requested I copy, or a certain photographer’s aesthetic—whatever it was, I just don’t remember. That’s the case with this Recipe: it was programmed into C5 on my Fujifilm X-E4 with the custom name “Exp 9/21” and no further details. I suppose I initially created it back on September 21, but I don’t remember why. The story of it is a complete mystery to me.

Just recently I noticed this Recipe in my camera, and—not remembering what it was—I decided to shoot with it. And I was blown away. The results were stunning! Why didn’t I use it back in September? I don’t know. What I do know is that it produces beautiful analog-like pictures. It reminds me of Fujicolor Superia—maybe 200 or 400—overexposed by about a stop, and shot with a warming filter (such as an 81a or 81b) or maybe with a Takumar lens that has turned yellow due to the thorium coating—perhaps printed on Kodak paper, too, instead of Fujifilm Crystal Archive. It has a strong warm cast, but still retains that distinct Superia palette, so I’m calling it Superia Summer. I cannot overstate just how much I like it!

2nd Story Windows – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4 & 90mm – “Superia Summer”

This Superia Summer Film Simulation Recipe is compatible with the Fujifilm X-T4, X-S10, X-E4, and X-T30 II cameras. Because Blue is rendered more deeply on X-Trans V cameras, set Color Chrome FX Blue to Off in order to use it on the X-T5, X-H2, or X-H2s (or any other X-Trans V camera that is released after this writing). For the X100V and X-Pro3, I recommend using the Fujicolor 100 Gold Recipe or Superia Xtra 400 Recipe instead, which produce similar results, or simply set Highlight to -1 and Shadow to 0. For best results, use the Superia Summer Film Simulation Recipe in sunny daytime light; it does alright in cloudy conditions, too, as long as it’s not thick overcast.

Classic Negative
Dynamic Range: DR400
Highlight: -1.5
Shadow: -0.5
Color: +1
Noise Reduction: -4
Sharpness: -1
Clarity: -4
Grain Effect: Weak, Small
Color Chrome Effect: Off
Color Chrome Effect Blue: Weak
White Balance: 5300K, +3 Red & -6 Blue
ISO: Auto, up to ISO 6400
Exposure Compensation: +1/3 to +1 (typically)

Example photographs, all camera-made JPEGs using this “Superia Summer” Film Simulation Recipe on my Fujifilm X-E4:

Desert Creek – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4 & 27mm
Wildflower Creek – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4 & 27mm
Riverbed – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4 & 27mm
Rocks in the Water – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4 & 27mm
Desert Stump – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4 & 27mm
Hiding Stump – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4 & 90mm
Water & Stone – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4 & 27mm
Young Giant – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4 & 27mm
Cholla in the Flower Field – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4 & 90mm
Red-Tipped Cacti – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4 & 27mm
Saguaro Wren – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4 & 90mm
Saguaro Sky – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4 & 27mm
Palm Tree Three – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4 & 27mm
Roof Vent – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4 & 90mm
Bougainvillea Villa – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4 & 90mm
Vibrant Red – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4 & 90mm
Morning Light – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4 & 90mm
Falling Door – Litchfield Park, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4 & 27mm
Abandoned Building Through Broken Window – Litchfield Park, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4 & 27mm
Blurry Building – Litchfield, Park, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4 & 27mm
Crack of Light – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4 & 27mm
Chairback Window – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4 & 90mm

Comparison:

Superia Summer Recipe
Fujicolor 100 Gold Recipe
Fujicolor Xtra 400 Recipe

This post contains affiliate links, and if you make a purchase using my links I’ll be compensated a small amount for it.

Fujifilm X-E4 in black:  Amazon   B&H  Moment
Fujifilm X-E4 in silver:  Amazon   B&H  Moment
Fujinon 27mm:  Amazon   B&H   Moment
Fujinon 90mm:  Amazon   B&H   Moment

Find this Film Simulation Recipe and nearly 300 more on the Fuji X Weekly — Film Recipes App!

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Nobody pays me to write the content found on fujixweekly.com. There’s a real cost to operating and maintaining this site, not to mention all the time that I pour into it. If you appreciated this article, please consider making a one-time gift contribution. Thank you!

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7 Fujifilm Film Simulation Recipes for Photographing Basketball Hoops

Rusty Hoop – Santa Rosa, NM – Fujifilm X-E4 – Kodak Portra 400 v2 Recipe

I shared with you yesterday that Mango Street posted a YouTube video entitled If Camera Brands Were People, where they (in all humor) suggested that Fujifilm photographers use Film Simulation Recipes to capture images of basketball hoops. Of course that’s true, at least to some extent, because I have photographed a few hoops over the years, and I imagine that some of you have, too. To be fully honest, I’ve been photographing basketball hoops long before I ever picked up my first Fujifilm camera. Also, I should disclose that basketball hoops are rarely in my pictures, only occasionally.

Despite my limited experience in this specific genre, just for fun and to expound on Mango Street’s comedy, I will suggest to you seven Film Simulation Recipes for photographing basketball hoops. These are certainly not the only Recipes that will work well for this, and they might not even be the best, but they are ones that I have personally used, so I am happy to recommend them to you. You’ll find the seven Recipes below.

This is, of course, my least serious article of this type. The other posts where I suggest Recipes for different scenarios are intended to be helpful, and not funny like this one. Even so, I do hope that at least one of these seven is worth your consideration the next time you encounter an interesting basketball hoop somewhere out in the wilds of suburbia. You might want to bookmark this page, just in case.

See also:
Five Film Simulation Recipes Every Social Media Influencer Should Try on Their Fujifilm X100V
Elevating Your Street Photography with Fujifilm Film Simulation Recipes + 5 Recipes to Try Today!
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Kodachrome 25 — Fujifilm X-T5 (X-Trans V) Film Simulation Recipe

Green Hills – Goodyear, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5 – Kodachrome 25 Recipe

This Film Simulation Recipe is intended to mimic Kodachrome 25 color transparency film, which was introduced in 1974, replacing the similar Kodachrome II emulsion. I was fortunate to shoot a few rolls of Kodachrome 25. It was a beautiful film, and probably the sharpest color film ever made, but its low ISO made it difficult to use. Kodachrome 64, which was still a low-ISO film, was significantly faster. The major differences between the two Kodachrome emulsions is that the ISO 25 version was sharper and less grainy, while the ISO 64 version was more contrasty, vibrant and a hair warmer. Both were very similar, though, and it would be hard to spot the differences without a close inspection. Some people preferred the slightly more subtle tones and finer detail of Kodachrome 25, and some preferred the faintly punchier pictures rendered on Kodachrome 64. Kodak discontinued Kodachrome in 2009.

This isn’t a new Film Simulation Recipe, but simply a tweak of the X-Trans IV Kodachrome 25 recipe to make it compatible with X-Trans V cameras. Because blue in Classic Chrome is rendered deeper on X-Trans V than X-Trans IV, Color Chrome FX Blue needs to be set to Weak instead of Strong. Otherwise, this recipe is identical to the X-Trans IV version.

No Lifeguard at 8 – Oceanside, CA – Fujifilm X-T5 – Kodachrome 25 Recipe

This Kodachrome 25 Film Simulation Recipe is intended for Fujifilm X-Trans V models, which (as of this writing) include the X-H2, X-H2S, and X-T5 cameras. It’s compatible with newer GFX models too, but will likely render slightly different on those cameras. Those with an X-T4, X-S10, X-E4, or X-T30 II, try the Kodachrome 25 Recipe for those models (click here). 

Film Simulation: Classic Chrome
Grain Effect: Off
Color Chrome Effect: Strong
Color Chrome FX Blue: Weak
White Balance: Daylight, +2 Red & -4 Blue
Dynamic Range: DR400
Highlight: +0.5
Shadow: -0.5
Color: +1
Sharpness: +3

High ISO NR: -4
Clarity: +3
ISO: Auto, up to ISO 1600
Exposure Compensation: 0 to +2/3 (typically)

Example photographs, all camera-made JPEGs using this “Kodachrome 25” Film Simulation Recipe on my Fujifilm X-T5:

Veteran – Gilbert, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Dormant Trees Reflected – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
White Flowers Faux – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Sunrise Light – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Pink on a Grey Day – Oceanside, CA – Fujifilm X-T5
Backyard Joy – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Wet Haired Boy – Litchfield Park, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Raymond Photographing Flowers – Goodyear, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Cholla Arms – Goodyear, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Rock Ridge – Goodyear, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Flowers in the Dry Desert – Goodyear, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Remnants of a Tree – Goodyear, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Prickles – Goodyear, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Desert Cacti – Gilbert, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Tall Cactus – Goodyear, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5

***Note: When this Kodachrome 25 Film Simulation Recipe was first published, this article mistakenly listed Auto instead of Daylight for White Balance. In the Fuji X Weekly App it has always been correct.***

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Fujifilm X-T5 in silver:  Amazon  B&H  Moment

Find this Film Simulation Recipe and nearly 300 more on the Fuji X Weekly — Film Recipes App!

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Top 10 Film Simulation Recipes of 2022 (& 2023 So Far)

Two Caballeros – Culleoka, TX – Fujifilm X-E4 – Kodachrome 64 Recipe

After yesterday’s Take the Blind Blind Film Simulation Recipe Test article, I’ve been asked a couple of times what were the 10 Film Simulation Recipes that I provided to Andrew Goodcamera. You see, he asked me to give him a list of the Top 10 most popular Film Simulation Recipes of 2022. Now, I have no way of knowing which are the most used; however, I can tell which are the Top 10 most viewed Recipes on the Fuji X Weekly website. Are page-views a good indication of use? Probably, but it’s also quite possible that some Recipes are overrepresented and others are underrepresented. Unfortunately I don’t have a more accurate metric, so this will have to suffice.

Below you will find the Top 10 most popular Film Simulation Recipes of 2022 based on page-views, in order from least to most popular. Seven of them are X-Trans IV Recipes (for the X-Pro3, X100V, X-T4, X-S10, X-E4, & X-T30 II cameras), and three are X-Trans III Recipes (plus compatible with the X-T3 & X-T30). X-Trans V Recipes are pretty new—the oldest published in the third week of November—so it make sense that none made this list, and I suspect that they’ll become increasingly more popular throughout 2023. The Recipes for X-Trans I, II, Bayer, and GFX just aren’t nearly popular enough to crack this list (not likely a Top 20 list, either). The majority of people who shoot using Film Simulation Recipes are doing so on X-Trans III and newer cameras, and the largest group are shooting with X-Trans IV models.

Interestingly, the Classic Chrome Recipe, which is the second one ever published on Fuji X Weekly, ranks pretty high. Black-and-white Recipes aren’t usually as popular as color, so I’m happy to see the Kodak Tri-X 400 Recipe climb the list. I’m not surprised by much else, so let’s get to that list!

Top 10 Film Simulation Recipes of 2022:

Number 10:

Number 9:

Number 8:

Number 7:

Number 6:

Number 5:

Number 4:

Number 3:

Number 2:

Number 1:

Which of these Film Simulation Recipes do you use most? What is your favorite Recipe not found on this list? Let me know in the comments!

I also thought it would be interesting to see if 2023 is trending different so far, or if the Recipes rank the same. While the top half of the list looks nearly identical, there are some notable differences in the bottom half. Pacific Blues is one of my top-favorite recipes, so I’m happy to see it crack the Top 10.

Top 10 Film Simulation Recipes of 2023 (so far…):

Number 10: